Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker Review

Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker Electric Bike Review
Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker
Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker Crystalyte Gearless Motor
Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker Aluminum Battery Box
Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker Led Console Throttle Regen Button
Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker Large Led Headlight Inverted Suspension Option
Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker Single Speed Drivetrain Standard Kickstand
Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker 203 Mm Hydraulic Disc Brake Thru Axle
Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker Classy Leather Saddle Metal Fenders
Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker Speed Plug And Wires
Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker Lightweight Aluminum Frame
Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker Chromoly Steel Dropouts For Strength
Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker Electric Bike Review
Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker
Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker Crystalyte Gearless Motor
Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker Aluminum Battery Box
Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker Led Console Throttle Regen Button
Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker Large Led Headlight Inverted Suspension Option
Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker Single Speed Drivetrain Standard Kickstand
Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker 203 Mm Hydraulic Disc Brake Thru Axle
Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker Classy Leather Saddle Metal Fenders
Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker Speed Plug And Wires
Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker Lightweight Aluminum Frame
Vintage Electric Bikes Tracker Chromoly Steel Dropouts For Strength

Summary

  • A powerful, high speed, heavier electric bike akin to a moped with limiter settings for around town use (750 watt, 20 mph in Street Mode) and optional Race Mode (2800 watt 36 mph)
  • Popular as a pit bike on race courses, used frequently in Indonesia because it stays cooler than internal combustion powered mopeds
  • Single speed drivetrain, available in one size high-step only, large comfortable tires with Kevlar lining, integrated LED lights, optional rear rack and optional pedal assist
  • Custom Aluminum alloy frame with color matched fender and rims, oversized hydraulic disc brakes for great stopping power vs. older versions, solid warranty and good customer support to keep the bike on the road
Warning, in some configurations this electric bike is classified as a moped or motorcycle and may not be ridden on cycling trails or paths. It may require licensing, insurance and lights when used on public roads.

Search EBR

Video Review

Trusted Advertisers

Introduction

Make:

Vintage Electric Bikes

Model:

Tracker

Price:

$4,995 (Up to $6,845 with Accessories and Upgrades)

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2), Moped or Motorcycle (Class 4)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive, 30k Miles

Availability:

United States, Worldwide

Model Year:

2016

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

78.5 lbs (35.6 kg) (74 with Rear Rack)

Battery Weight:

20 lbs (9.07 kg)

Motor Weight:

16 lbs (7.25 kg)

Frame Material:

Hydroformed Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

18 in (45.72 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

18" Seat Tube, 24" Reach, 31" Stand Over Height, 73.5" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Indian Red, Excelsior Blue, Slate Grey, Racing Green, Custom (~$600 Extra) (High Grade Powder Coat)

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid Tig Welded Steel with Hand Crafted Leather Frame Bumpers, CNC Machined High Grade Billet Aluminum Triple Clamp (Optional Inverted 60 mm Suspension Fork $1,145)

Frame Rear Details:

Stainless Steel Dropout Inserts

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses

Gearing Details:

1 (Single Speed)

Cranks:

F. Gimondi, 36 Tooth Chainring

Pedals:

MKS, Aluminum Alloy Platform, Silver

Handlebar:

Stainless Steel, Hand Made, Swept Back

Brake Details:

Shimano Alfine Hydraulic Disc with 203 mm Front Rotor and 180 mm Rear Rotor, Shimano Alfine Levers

Grips:

Leather with Lockers

Saddle:

Brooks, Hand Crafted Leather, Sprung

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

200 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy, Color Matched

Spokes:

36 Spoke, Hand Laced and Tensioned, 14 Gauge Front, 12 Gauge Rear

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Fat Frank, 26" x 2.35"

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)

Tire Details:

Reflective Sidewall Stripe, Available in Black or Creme Colors, Active Line K-Guard Puncture Protection

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Single Side Kickstand on Left, Aluminum Alloy Rear Fender Color Matched, CREE LED Headlight, Optional Rear Carry Rack with Integrated Leather Accents ~$290, Optional Rear Carry Rack with Integrated Leather Accents and Two Saddlebags ~$800, Optional Rear Light Integrated with Brooks Saddle $75 Extra, Optional Brooks Challenge Bag ~$100 Extra

Other:

High Speed 6 Amp Charger, Can Run at 40 Amps Continuous, Spokes and Hubs by Phil Wood (CNC Machined from Aluminum Alloy)

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Crystalyte

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Gearless Direct Drive Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

750 watts

Motor Peak Output:

3000 watts

Motor Torque:

60 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung

Battery Voltage:

52 volts (60 Amp Continuous)

Battery Amp Hours:

13.5 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

702 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

2 hours

Estimated Min Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Estimated Max Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Display Type:

Fixed LED Console

Readouts:

Battery Level (Green, Yellow, Red)

Display Accessories:

Regeneration Button on Left

Drive Mode:

Trigger Throttle, Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist (Pedal Assist is Optional and Costs ~$130, 12 Magnet King Meter)

Top Speed:

36 mph (58 kph) (Default 20 mph Mode, Race Mode Pin ~$150 Extra)

Trusted Advertisers



Written Review

Vintage Electric Bikes designs and assembles high power, high speed ebikes in Northern California. I got to visit their headquarters and meet with the founder, Andrew, to learn about their new Tracker model which is basically a refined version of the E-Tracker which I reviewed in mid 2015. The biggest improvement in my mind is larger more powerful brakes… where the E-Tracker had mechanical 160 mm disc brakes the Tracker has hydraulic 203 mm and 180 mm disc brakes (front and rear respectively). There’s still really only one frame size (about medium with a 31″ stand over height and 18″ seat tube). I was able to ride it comfortably and I’m about 5’9″ weighing in at ~135 lbs. These Tracker bikes have always been heavy and the version I tested was about 78 pounds but had an upgraded suspension fork so the default model could be slightly lighter. Other upgrades include custom paint (they’ve matched cars and even hand bags before), a rear rack and Race Mode which is activated by screwing in a special pin to complete a circuit. Vintage Electric Bikes sells this pin separately because it changes the class of the bike from barely being Class 2 to being an illegal moped. Illegal on most city streets in the US and elsewhere but not as a pit bike on race tracks or off road. The Tracker has become popular in countries like Indonesia where there are fewer regulations and people appreciate the quiet and low temperature operation (when it’s 100+ degrees and super humid outside sitting on an internal combustion engine adds even more heat vs. an EV).

Just to hit the specs real quick, with standard Street Mode the motor puts out 750 watts nominal up to 1800 watts max and in Race Mode with that pin it puts out 2600 watts to 2800 watts and operates at 40+ Amps continuous. My preference for operating the bike is using their basic variable speed trigger throttle that’s mounted near the right grip. It’s smooth and can be used from standstill so you don’t have to push hard on the single speed drivetrain to get yourself moving. Not only is the bike heavy but when you’re limited to a single pedaling speed it’s just not fun to start with… Andrew explained that they actually chose a larger chainring with more teeth (36 to be exact) to make it easier and more comfortable to pedal at higher speeds. The company has been experimenting with a cadense sensor in addition to the trigger throttle but I didn’t like the limited and less responsive six magnet design I tried. While I was told they will probably use a 12 magnet sensor there was still no way to disable assist altogether and unlike the variable speed throttle assist operates more like on/off and made me feel uncomfortable when trying to stop because the brake levers didn’t have a motor inhibitor built in. So there’s no LDC display to adjust assist or turn it off and no inhibitors and the bike is heavy and fast… that’s just dangerous.

To up the safety this bike comes with a beautiful and large headlight, LED tail light mounted in a special saddle bracket (which can also be used with their optional rack) and of course the fender and oversized tires with Kevlar lining to reduce flats and reflective sidewall stripes. The emphasis is on beauty and durability here and Andrew explained that they help customers fix and upgrade older models including electronics and batteries. The battery box was modeled after the engines on vintage board track racer bikes (old fashioned bicycles used to race around circular tracks in the 1920’s) and is not easily removable but appears to protect the battery and controller inside very well against the elements and physical impact. I love that the motor power cable has a quick disconnect option and that it enters the axle from the side vs. the end because this protects it from getting bent or snagged. The cables and wires mostly blend in with the frame but there is a bit of a mess just below the battery box where everything goes in and out (more with the bike I reviewed since it also featured pedal assist).

For the right situation the Tracker can be an amazing and beautiful electric bike. I’d want to have a truck or trailer to move it around given the weight and I’m not sure how much I’d actually pedal given the lower seating position and single speed drivetrain but the acceleration is amazing, even if you leave it at 20 mph for Street Mode it’s a rush and feels very responsive. It is however, very quiet so watch out for traffic and pedestrians. Cruising around Indonesia on one of these things at high speed, the wind in your hair and the beautiful sights and sounds unobstructed would be pretty awesome and I love the enthusiasm and genuine approach that Andrew brings. He got to hang out with Jay Leno a while back to share his creation in the famed garage, check that out here for more fun footage.

Pros:

  • This electric bike feels very solid and comfortable… in large part because it weighs nearly 80 pounds and has oversized balloon tires, the thru-axle on the front fork helps keep it stiff
  • The brakes have been vastly improved from earlier versions, they are now extra large hydraulic disc which feel smooth and powerful (very important given the heavier build and higher possible speeds)
  • The Tracker looks beautiful, from the old-fashioned circular headlight to the leather accents and thick frame, it’s great for zipping around on but less practical for pedaling if the seat is kept low
  • The power regen button is very cool, efficiency is probably only ~10% but it helps to save your brake pads and definitely recoups energy… especially with the greater weight of this electric bicycle
  • I absolutely love the inverted suspension option because it looks great, feels solid and improves the ride at high speed but it costs a lot at ~$1,100
  • The color-matched fender looks awesome, doesn’t rattle and keeps you dry and clean while riding (I also like that it’s bent on the side to accommodate the chain), the rear rack is a great option as well but costs more than an average bicycle rack, the panniers they sell are also very cool and work perfectly with the rack
  • Extremely quiet because there are no gears inside the motor, even in Speed Mode opening the throttle up completely it remains silent so be extra careful because cars and pedestrians might not hear you
  • Uses the EnergyBus charging standard with Rosenburger port that is magnetic (like an Apple laptop charger) and sends both power and data for software upgrades
  • The motor is extremely powerful (limited to 750 nominal for street legal use by default but peaks around 2800 watts with the optional speed pin) you get a 52 volt battery and 40 Amps of continuous current for amazing acceleration from standstill, most ebikes I test send ~20 Amps
  • The rims are colormatched and the spokes are painted black to match the motor… it all looks great together, the rear spokes are 12 gauge which is super strong for the added weight and forces of the bike frame and motor

Cons:

  • The power cables and wires are mostly hidden (zip tied below the downtube) but there is a sort of messy bundle at the base of the battery box that isn’t as nice looking as internally routed designes
  • I didn’t love the default pedal assist setting when using the Tracker in high speed mode because you can’t adjust the power level and it just takes off… also the brake levers don’t have motor inhibitors so you might be fighting the system between the start/stop delays of the pedelec (at least it has 12 magnets for faster response)
  • The battery isn’t designed to be easily removed from the frame for charging separately, you’ll have to bring the bike inside or near an outlet in the garage to charge, avoid extreme cold and heat to prolong life
  • Single speed drivetrain, pedaling isn’t much fun at low speed because the bike is so heavy but they’ve used a larger chainring with more teeth to make it comfortable to pedal past 20 mph if you’re using speed mode
  • Very limited system feedback, no LCD with speed or assist level just three colored LED’s indicating an approximate voltage on the battery
  • Only available in one frame size and one high-step style which might be difficult for shorter riders to mount and stand over, I’m 5’9″ and was able to handle it comfortably

Resources:

Trusted Advertisers

More Vintage Electric Bikes Reviews

Vintage Electric Scrambler Review

  • MSRP: $6,995
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017, 2018

A motorcycle-inspired electric bike with two drive modes, 20 mph stock and optional 36 mph "Race Mode" for use on private property or off-highway vehicle (OHV) trails, one frame size and color. Powerful gearless hub motor is durable and near-silent, pure sine wave controller delivers fluid power…...

Vintage Electric Cafe Review

  • MSRP: $3,995
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

One of the most powerful, fastest accelerating, quietest, and beautifully designed electric bikes I have ever tested, premium drivetrain and custom battery. Surprisingly lightweight and well balanced front to rear considering the large 750 watt hub motor,…...

Vintage Electric Bikes Cruz Review

  • MSRP: $4,995
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A robust, high powered and potentially high-speed cruiser style electric bike styled to resemble the board track racing bikes of the 1920's, optional Race Mode pin for 30+ mph. built on a custom steel frame that dampens vibration but flexes more than the Tracker…...

Vintage Electric Bikes E-Tracker Review

  • MSRP: $4,995
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015

A beautifully styled single speed electric bike that functions like a moped and can reach ~36 mph with the optional "Race Edition" upgrade or function as street legal at the default 20 mph. Good weight distribution and heat dissipation thanks to a custom made aluminum alloy battery box…...


m l
2 years ago

hi there and aloha from Hawaii, thanks for your reviews, I think they are fair and balanced and very informative. I really like the look and the attention to detail that has been given to this bike, I wonder if the gearless but powerful hubmotor is a descent climber without overheating… I am also wondering about reliability and maintenance for this particular setup. I have very little experience with ebikes (tried two middrive models and did not like the sounds from the shifters), but never had a chance to ride a hubmotor. do you think this bike would make a good commuter (20 miles total, in 80 Fahrenheit) and would it last me for a couple of years (battery, charger, motor)

I can bring the bike up to my apartment in an elevator, at work it is covered under a roof. I love riding my surly crosscheck a lot but get to work sweaty even riding at a slower pace (15mph) because my ride is around midday. this might be great to avoid getting too hot and get a tiny workout at the same time. I do not have a car for 8 years already and think this bike might be worth the extra cost since it has been “crafted so nicely”. what are your thoughts? mahalo and best regards

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Aloha! Wow, you get to live in such a beautiful place, I’ve always wanted to visit Hawaii but I’m sure it does get hot ;) I think this bike or their new Cruz model would be great for your intended use and yes, the motor is powerful enough to climb even moderately steep hills in my opinion… even with more weight. Many people who live in Indonesia buy this bike because of its power, speed and ability to stay cool in the heat while traditional motorcycles do not (and are loud). It would definitely help you arrive at work not sweaty but it’s almost more like a moped than bicycle because the seat and pedals aren’t setup perfectly for pedaling and it’s so heavy. The Surly Crosscheck is a more active bicycle and if you like that and still want to pedal and keep the bike lighter weight but also ride fast then check out the Stromer ST2 and Specialized Turbo models. They also have the sturdy gearless hub motor (which is very durable and should last) but these bikes are more fun to actually pedal. I love the Vintage Electric Tracker but it’s more like a vehicle than a bicycle with only one gear. I hope this helps you!

Reply
Huey
1 year ago

Court, is the Tracker’s battery user replaceable or would it be necessary to return the bike to Vintage Electric for replacement? Thanks, I really enjoy your website and YouTube channel.

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

Hi Huey! I can’t say for sure but I did get to peek inside during my visit to their headquarters in the Bay Area. Maybe?! There were several complete bikes that had been sent back for upgrades and improvement so that definitely seems like an option but could get expensive. I’ll ask Andrew to chime in and clarify for us ;)

Reply

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

CoachDennisGreen
2 days ago

Holidays, weekends, international shipping all takes time. 10 days works for me.

For the past week, my FedEx tracker has shown it would be here Monday, October 16. However, my Ultra was loaded on the truck just one city away at 6:05am this morning and the tracker changed to arriving today. But it never showed. I guess they loaded the truck for their Monday deliveries. Dang it!!!

Rambler
6 days ago

I have a drone tracker called, Marco Polo, I plan on sticking it on my bike if I ever have to leave it, in addition to a lock. The down side is that it doesn’t notify you if your bike is moved.

"

I bought it on Amazon https://www.amazon.com/Marco-Rocket-Location-Recovery-System/dp/B01F4DOB5C

Not cheap but worth it!!!

"Marco Polo is the only long range, up to 2 miles line-of-sight, tracking system that works everywhere you fly –"

Um...What happens if they (thieves) go more then 2 miles away from you?

I mean 30 mph is 1/2 a mile a minute of travel distance.

I think part of the issue is that ebikes are so easy just to throw into the back of a pick up trunk or mini van. And even IF we were to invest in a cellular tracking type of service, the expensive parts (motor, battery, controller, wheels, hydraulic disk brakes) can be stripped off in minutes.

I read a while ago that civilian GPS is only good to about 100 feet or so. So that it cannot be used for "military purposes". It made sense to me. Now I'm wondering HOW that would affect trying to find lost property in a neighborhood? Thats a LOT of house's to search.

I don't even carry a lock on my ebike anymore. Just like I don't have one for my Carbon fiber Road bike. Since I don't plan to ever let either one out of my sight.

bob armani
6 days ago

I have a drone tracker called, Marco Polo, I plan on sticking it on my bike if I ever have to leave it, in addition to a lock. The down side is that it doesn’t notify you if your bike is moved.

I bought it on Amazon https://www.amazon.com/Marco-Rocket-Location-Recovery-System/dp/B01F4DOB5C

Not cheap but worth it!!!

Hello Dwight-So you carry the hand-held locator with you in your backpack when you ride?? Looks like you would need an additional shaker alarm or smart phone alert to notify you (if someone is tampering with your bike when left unattended, correct)?

Dwight
6 days ago

I have a drone tracker called, Marco Polo, I plan on sticking it on my bike if I ever have to leave it, in addition to a lock. The down side is that it doesn’t notify you if your bike is moved.

I bought it on Amazon https://www.amazon.com/Marco-Rocket-Location-Recovery-System/dp/B01F4DOB5C

Not cheap but worth it!!!

J.R.
3 weeks ago

I'm wondering what is the best way to affix a Boomerang alarm/GPS-tracker to a Electra since they don't come with built in bottle-holder bosses. Although I live in one of the best towns in California for cycling (Redlands), none of the staff in the local shops (I've visited 3 and spoken to six in all) seems to have any idea how to solve this seemingly trivial problem.
It is trivial. I don't understand why all the brands don't include threaded inserts. Owners of some bikes may be limited in the size of water bottle, but there are so many other uses for those inserts.

The simple solution for the brands or dealers. There are industrial, pneumatic versions of these tools that bike manufactures use. These are similar to ones I own (for other applications), I thought I'd pass the info on...

Right angle drill:

https://m.lowes.com/pd/DEWALT-20-Volt-Max-3-8-in-Cordless-Drill/3977521?cm_mmc=SCE_PLA-_-ToolsAndHardware-_-CordlessDrillsAndComboKits-_-3977521:DEWALT&CAWELAID=&kpid=3977521&CAGPSPN=pla&store_code=2409&k_clickID=b7f15bd0-0fbc-4b65-808d-254f6be3eec7&gclid=Cj0KCQjw9afOBRDWARIsAJW4nvxEZ6TbSYIyh2RMR__1z8YzLYPGB8deLiheGuRMWJjPBWPsB07eyPoaAlFBEALw_wcB

Thread insert tool:

https://m.grainger.com/mobile/product/5JK71?cm_mmc=PPC:+Google+PLA&s_kwcid=AL!2966!3!166589331100!!!!82128166317!&ef_id=WcqY8QAABKRoZtPb:20170926181409:s&kwid=productads-adid^166589331100-device^m-plaid^82128166317-sku^5JK71-adType^PLA

I don't think most bike owners will want to go to the expense or trouble. They shouldn't have to!

Solarbuddy
3 weeks ago

I'm wondering what is the best way to affix a Boomerang alarm/GPS-tracker to a Electra since they don't come with built in bottle-holder bosses. Although I live in one of the best towns in California for cycling (Redlands), none of the staff in the local shops (I've visited 3 and spoken to six in all) seems to have any idea how to solve this seemingly trivial problem.

itsaulgoodman
3 weeks ago

My goodness I've spent a lot of time researching GPS Tracking options to add to my bike.

Spybike - seems like the best option. However, they very rarely ever seem to have stock (Maybe that means its good?). I like the seatpost version (larger battery capacity). I'll probably buy it when it is in stock.
http://www.spybike.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=51

Sherlock Bike. Looks very good. Currently not available in Canada although they say it will be in 2018.
https://www.sherlock.bike/en/

Trojabike. Looks awesome. I love the way it slides into the frame then locks itself in place. Recent kickstarter, doesn't ship until 2018. I'd probably buy if it were available now.
http://www.trojabike.com/

Boomerange Bike. Great if you have water bottle holder mounts available. Unfortunately a lot of ebikes use them for the battery. I do not like the solution to use the Gorilla Bike Clip.. Like seriously, what thief won't just cut the zip ties and toss the thing off to the side before riding away with your bike??
https://boomerangbike.com/

Kiss My Bike. Love the looks of this, but no word on when, where, how it will be sold. Reached out to them to find out - no response.
http://www.kissmy.bike/en/index.php#contact

Trackimo. Great if it could be hidden somewhere. I don't think under the seat is a very good place. It's pretty important in my mind for a GPS tracker to be very well hidden or tamper proof. I've thought about the idea of wiring it up to a light port on my Bosch motor and hiding it under the motor cover or something - but decided against looking into it further (Not sure if this is even possible to do so). Decided to just wait on the Spybike instead.
https://trackimo.com/

DanTracker. Looks pretty good, but sounds like it is very expensive. Non removable / replaceable battery - but apparently lasts about 10 years.
https://www.dantracker.com/en/

Velocate. Looks decent, can hardwire to ebike. A little light on details and no idea where to buy.
https://velocate.com/en/

Cheap Chinese trackers from various places. Don't bother, they are s*it, and the apps are s*it. Some people have even claimed the apps (which request a lot of phone permissions) were used to access peoples phone numbers and lot of expensive calls were placed. Not sure how true that is, but I'm pretty wary if side loading Chinese apps that requested every level of permission possible on my device.. so take that for what it's worth. I tried a GPS305 (Spybike headset knockoff), and it stopped working after a week. When it worked, it didn't work well. Highly unreliable.

sardinas001
3 weeks ago

Hi! Does anyone here have GPS tracker devices or anti theft devices on their bikes? Looking for opinions on the subject. Thanks!
Hello, I do have an anti-theft device called a chain and lock. Jokes aside, I think a tracking device would be appropriate in a theft prone area like unguarded parking lots. Thankfully that's not my case.

Roseville
1 month ago

I like the boomerang bike cyclotrack. In general I think it will work pretty well. Although I fervently hope there will be enormous improvements in the phone app and website as time goes on.
I've started looking at a gps tracker. What are the challenges with the phone app and web site? Thx

Marceltt
1 month ago

Hi.

Can't speak of the Trail Tracker, don't know much about it.

I have a Teo and cannot say enough good things about it. I have a Red S Limited with fenders, rear rack with light. Very nice paint job.

But I have to admit the Rad Rover is also a good buy, it is very similar to the Teo Fat. Rad customer support is getting lots of praises, good warranty and a very vibrant community with lots of riders helping everyone out, here and on Facebook.

But the Teo has hydraulic brakes, bigger 17AH battery, 12 magnet cadence sensor, 9 speed derailleur, quick release on front wheel, among others. Worth the $ in my humble opinion.

The Rad Rover does show Watts used on its LCD display, the Téo does not. It also has nipples for a bottle holder on the frame, the Téo does not.

Both are made from pretty standard components, hence will be relatively easy to maintain over the years.

So yes the Teo is a good call. It ships out of Montreal in Canada, bike made in China, as many are, including Rad.

Good luck.
Thanks for your input. Ok now I'm down to the Rad and Teo. This is a tough one

mrgold35
1 month ago

Wow sounds like you love the Rad. The Trail Tracker is an expensive buy but the Teo &a Rad are half the price. Do you find it easy to work on the Rad. I'm a hands on guy and love to do my own work. With the ridge rider I am limited as you need special tools that only Pedego makes to work on certain areas of this bike.

Pretty much everything about the Radrover has standard parts, nut, bolts, allen sizes as a regular bike. I upgraded to an adjustable 0-60 degree stem, added a Suntour NCX SP-12 400mm suspension seat, transfered my handlebar extender from my other bike for my cell phone holder, upgraded the pedals to MTB type, and added a topeak rack+bag to my Radrover.

Another added bonus with the Radrover is you can adjust the motor cut-off in a few minutes to a little under 25 mph if you need some extra mph. The Radrover is not a perfect bike. It only the front tire has a quick-release, the front suspension with lock-out is just a spring, and the rover has cable brakes. I've had zero issues during an emergency stop with the 60 lbs Rover at +20 mph with the cable brakes (I'm 270lbs+25lbs of gear/accessories).

Marceltt
1 month ago

I've had my two his/her 2016 Radrovers for almost a year with 3200 miles between them. The wife doesn't use her Rover as much and I end up using both for work commuting and trail riding equally (I keep the wear/tear/mileage the same for both). The Radrover does a good job of being a "jack of all trades and master of none" type of bike for $1500.

Sounds like you might want more of hardpacked to single track fat tire bike mostly? The fat tire choices you picked will go anywhere your Pedego Ridge Rider can go offroad with the addition of loose sand being added to the mix with the extra wide tires. The Radrover only has 5 levels of PAS (PAS 0-5) that are designed to provide X amount of watts per PAS level until the 20 mph motor cutoff:
PAS 0: 0 watts,
PAS 1: 75 watts,
PAS 2: 175 watts,
PAS 3: 375 watts,
PAS 4: 550 watts,
PAS 5: 750 watts.

PAS 2-3 works best for me when trail riding. I've never had a need to use PAS 5 trail riding or work commuting because PAS 3-4 can get me at or near max speed of 20-21 mph usually.

I like the Radrover twist throttle because it provide full 750 watts of power in any PAS level (even in PAS 0). Full power throttle comes in handy for short inclines, deep sandy spots, walking the bike up inclines, getting across intersection in a hurry, tight trails when pedaling would hit obstacles, etc...

I went with the Radrover because it is a fat tire bike with ebike components added. I can remove, repair, transfer, or replace ebike hardware if they fail after the warranty period to mod the Rover with more power or just turn it into a regular 4" fat tire bike. At the price point of the Rover, it left me a lot of room for accessories, platform bike rack, lights and gear to travel and trail ride in/out of state day or night. The wife and I had a lot of fun and put over +100 miles on each Radrover in a couple of days at the Grand Canyon and Sedona last November.
Wow sounds like you love the Rad. The Trail Tracker is an expensive buy but the Teo &a Rad are half the price. Do you find it easy to work on the Rad. I'm a hands on guy and love to do my own work. With the ridge rider I am limited as you need special tools that only Pedego makes to work on certain areas of this bike.

Falken
1 month ago

Hi guys , I'm thinking of getting a fat bike and I already own the Pedego Ridge Rider. I have nailed it down to three - Trail tracker , Teo or the Rad. I'm torn between the three. Any input. I have read all the posts but still can't decide
Hi @Marceltt

I also have the Teo and am loving it! I can't speak hands on for either of the other bikes you mentioned but there is a Teo owner who's wife owns the Rad. He might be able to share some thoughts between those two bikes? His name is @Dan Edwards .
I can't see anyone regretting buying a Teo. It's been a great bike so far. From what I've read the Rad is a great bike as well. Good luck on your purchase!:)

Denis Shelston
1 month ago

Hi.

Can't speak of the Trail Tracker, don't know much about it.

I have a Teo and cannot say enough good things about it. I have a Red S Limited with fenders, rear rack with light. Very nice paint job.

But I have to admit the Rad Rover is also a good buy, it is very similar to the Teo Fat. Rad customer support is getting lots of praises, good warranty and a very vibrant community with lots of riders helping everyone out, here and on Facebook.

But the Teo has hydraulic brakes, bigger 17AH battery, 12 magnet cadence sensor, 9 speed derailleur, quick release on front wheel, among others. Worth the $ in my humble opinion.

The Rad Rover does show Watts used on its LCD display, the Téo does not. It also has nipples for a bottle holder on the frame, the Téo does not.

Both are made from pretty standard components, hence will be relatively easy to maintain over the years.

So yes the Teo is a good call. It ships out of Montreal in Canada, bike made in China, as many are, including Rad.

Good luck.

Marceltt
1 month ago

Hi guys , I'm thinking of getting a fat bike and I already own the Pedego Ridge Rider. I have nailed it down to three - Trail tracker , Teo or the Rad. I'm torn between the three. Any input. I have read all the posts but still can't decide

Dewey
2 months ago

So, we expand bikeways and MUPS.

A recent analysis noted cyclist injury patterns and severity were similar on roads and bike paths alike. Another analysis of cyclist injury data mentioned problems at intersections include turning vehicles, the presence of bus stops, and length of crossing whereas a median helps. A new report from the Governors Highway Safety Association touched on ebike safety on page 47 mentioning a 2016 German study which reported ebike riders are twice as likely as pedal cyclists to come into conflict with motorists at intersections. The GHSA report points to a need to change the built environment in US cities to be more accommodating for higher speed ebike cyclists, pedal cyclists, and pedestrians alike. Suggested accident prevention measures include protected bike lanes, redesigning intersections along busy bicycle commuting roads with marked bicycle box waiting areas at intersections and separate bicycle signals timed in advance of traffic to give cyclists a fighting chance to get ahead of turning vehicles, redesigning corners to add more sidewalk width and adding medians to shorten intersection crosswalks. I would add widening MUPs so as to be able to separate the bicycle and pedestrian paths, also require/monitor haulage companies to add side protection bars to prevent cyclists being pulled under truck wheels. Future gazing we might anticipate more sophisticated automated collision avoidance systems in cars and trucks perhaps built into autonomous vehicle software, although this article mentions the difficulties software has in identifying cyclists in real-world conditions driving on the street. To enable MUP/bike path access for distance ebike commuters who might prefer the faster Class 3 speed pedelecs but need to slow down when using bicycle infrastructure closer in maybe something phone/gps based using trail geofencing using Google maps, gps tracker chips in bike frames, and bluetooth controllers could be implemented by ebike manufacturers to automatically limit speed of ebikes on MUPs - this type of relatively simple application would support the case for ebike trail access.

Mr. Coffee
2 months ago

Disclainer: I own a Pedego (Interceptor).

The premium you pay on a Pedego bike is paying for the large dealer network and the fairly generous warranty. If you plan on riding the bike hard and depending on it those things are valuable to you. If you aren't doing those things the value of said premium is more questionable.

In general all Pedego bikes I've tried have an "overbuilt" feel to them compared to other ebikes I have tried. The downside of "overbuilt" is that it makes the bikes heavy monsters to haul around and the upside is they can take quite a bit of abuse (and use).

One question: you are focused on the 24" trail tracker here. Is that because that bike is more likely to fit you? I agree that there are very few options for a fat-tire ebike in that particular wheel size.

Brooklyn Tony
2 months ago

Thanks. I just wanted this bike but it wasn't meant to be I guess.

Fret not! Here's a couple of other fat tire options from low to high pricepoints:
Sondors Original, X, Fold, and Fold X,
Voltbike Yukon, and Mariner,
RadPower Rad Rover and Rad mini,
Pedego trail tracker
Luna cycles homebrewed stuff
iZip E3 Sumo
Emotion Big Bud
Bulls Monster

bob armani
2 months ago

Unfortunately, two days ago, my 2017 Rad Rover eBike was stolen while parked and locked at my local public library. The cable lock I used was no match for the cutters that were used to remove the lock and as witnesses reported, it did take long for the thief to free my RadRover and ride off in plain sight of others...

This incident got me thinking of ways to protect my next bike. Other than a stronger lock and paying attention to where you leave your bike, I'm thinking that incorporating a hidden GPS tracking device into the bike would provide an additional level of security and might provide owners and law enforcement a way to locate and recover the bike. I don't think it would be too expensive to add the hardware and would be a desirable feature.

It could be powered from the bike's battery pack, or have its own battery and be integrated into the controller or display unit. An alternative to a built-in tracker might be an add-on accessory which could be installed somewhere inconspicuous. I don't know if such an accessory is currently available?
What are others doing to prevent the theft of their ebikes which are very attractive to thieves ?

Sincerely,

Marc

Marc-Sorry to hear about your ebike being stolen. Back in the day, I have had many taken from my own backyard. I depended on the bikes to do my paper route deliveries. But now having an ebike stolen has to hurt even more. I do like the suggestion below for some kind of alarm system that signals your smartphone
ie: 'LINKAauto lock with Tamper alerts for added security' sounds like an economical way to start. https://www.linkalock.com/
GPS with monthly fees sounds a bit pricey IMHO. I always keep my ebike in plain sight at all times. Being I have had so many stolen, I am a bit paranoid of loosing another and another. Not to mention, my insurance rates could skyrocket if I keep claiming 'stolen bikes' on my policy.
I have also seen a few bike alarms with remote, but not sure how efficient they really are. Good Luck with your next purchase!

bob armani
2 months ago

The one thing that always sticks in my mind is that locks only keep honest people honest.

I find it funny here in Portland that people leave motorcycles and Vespa type scooters out by the curb all the time and nobody messes with them. But leaving a bicycle locked up like Pee Wee's, even on your property, there are no guarantees that it won't disappear.

I am fortunate that I don't have to leave my bikes anywhere very often that is unsecured and so a stout cable that can get the wheels and frame to a solid object and a padlock work for me.

When someone comes up with a motion sensing 180db alarm and gps tracker combo that notifies your phone I would be interested. Have seen the current crop and none yet that I would put money on.

In the city I live, there is an above ground/underground 'Public Bike Center' parking garage where the CPD frequent as well with a bike attendant on duty. There is also a bike repair shop attached to the garage if quick repairs are needed in a flash. I also have heard talk about individual bike pods to park at to also weatherproof and secure your bike during inclement weather as well. Sounds like a great business for heavy bike traffic areas. Here is the link: http://bikeandpark.com/bike-centers

JRA
2 months ago

The one thing that always sticks in my mind is that locks only keep honest people honest.

I find it funny here in Portland that people leave motorcycles and Vespa type scooters out by the curb all the time and nobody messes with them. But leaving a bicycle locked up like Pee Wee's, even on your property, there are no guarantees that it won't disappear.

I am fortunate that I don't have to leave my bikes anywhere very often that is unsecured and so a stout cable that can get the wheels and frame to a solid object and a padlock work for me.

When someone comes up with a motion sensing 180db alarm and gps tracker combo that notifies your phone I would be interested. Have seen the current crop and none yet that I would put money on.

mrgold35
2 months ago

The new tile has 3x the range (so they claim). My friend had an actual GPS tracker on his Haibike. It was stolen 3 months ago with that and 2 heavy duty locks on it. To this day, he still has not located it.

It might be worth going with a layer approach to bike security and you can add/subtract as needed depending on the threat level. I see most bike only secured with a single point of failure. I always use two locks+Boomerang around town while still keeping my bike in line-of-sight if I can. I've used up to 5 locks+chains+2 Boomerangs when I travel out of town when secured on my bike rack (I put a bike cover on if I have to park outside overnight at a hotel).

You can't stop; but, maybe you can slow them down to give you time to respond or even discourage a thief to move to an easier target (all depends on your budget, area, length of time being unattended, and overnight storage):
- GPS tracker like Boomerang with alarm, tracking, and email/smartphone notification
- bluetooth tracker like Tile
- +16mm chain(s)
- +16mm U-bolt(s), 2X the U-bolts will 2X the grind time, pick U-bolts that secure at both ends and you have to cut twice to remove
- using 2 or more pad locks from multiple brands, 2X the cut/break time
- using something like LINKA auto lock for added security
- secured with bike cover you can lock, helps keep the weather off and out of sight-out of mind
- removing components like suspension seat post, lights, battery, front wheel to make the bike look less appealing (those things a 1/2 my bike's value)
- picking more secured areas to park, line of sight if possible, park next to more expensive bikes, pay a little for securing in an attended parking garage/lot
- travel in packs and secure all bikes together with multiple locks/chains, I do this when I ride with groups.
- have your insurance up-to-date
- sign your bike up for bike registration with local police, National Bike Registry, Bike Index, and/or Project529 (I'm sure there are others)

Lastly; be willing to let the bike go, learn from the experience, and apply the knowledge to the next purchase.

jazz
2 months ago

I use Tile for my car keys and wife's wallet. The Tile bluetooth seems to have a very limited range of under 30 feet from my experience with consistent connection. Might get up to 100 feet with line of sight with no obstacles. The fine print also state the battery needs to changed around once a year and only can be done by the Tile folks. I keep my keys in the same spot at home a few feet from my iphone and sometimes the Tile might not check-in their location for several hours on my phone.

The Boomerang GPS tracker that uses the Verizon network has much longer range and reports in real-time your bike's location; but, way more expensive at $200 per unit+$50 per year cell plan (cheaper than a bike or insurance deductible).

The new tile has 3x the range (so they claim). My friend had an actual GPS tracker on his Haibike. It was stolen 3 months ago with that and 2 heavy duty locks on it. To this day, he still has not located it.

jazz
2 months ago

The only thing you can do for 100% security is never let it out of your sight which is exactly what I do. I never leave any of my ebikes unattended. If I have to go somewhere, I bring it into the business itself. Most businesses in my area know bike theft is rampant and usually allow it no questions asked. I usually ask first as a courtesy and have yet to be told no.

If you have to leave it unattended know just understand there is a strong possibility it will be stolen regardless of what lock or fancy tracker you have on it. If you can accept that (and possibility of not having an ebike any more), then go for it. It's harsh but reality.

A $25 angle grinder from Harbor Freight can cut thru any lock in 60 seconds or less.

Gene Coppola
2 months ago

Unsightly wiring for the money

knifesketch101
3 months ago

Court, would you recommend not getting the pedal assist with this bike?

Resul Teker
3 months ago

I M TURK

fromkentucky
3 months ago

How are they getting 2800 Watts if it's only pulling 50 Amps max?
50A x 52V = 2600W.

Hazzard0
4 months ago

Form over function. What a stupid bike!

Matt Walls
5 months ago

Indian red? racist!!!!!

Dianne Rosales
5 months ago

love it if only i could afford one I would get one in a heartbeat >.<

Viktoria
5 months ago

Every video of yours I watch, I see you always put your hand on their shoulder blade

Michigan Mister
6 months ago

do you provide lights like this "vintage" that have LED's, and I can incorporate (hardwired) into my e-bike? been searching all over without success. thank you!

Ed E.J.Shonka@cox.net
6 months ago

I love that bike I wish I could afford it

One Punch Man
8 months ago

What type of model is this?

Chemtrail Dreams
8 months ago

Anyone know where I can buy a headlight like that to wire into my bike?

Akbary Septianto
8 months ago

Indonesiaaaaaaaaa

Ван Ваныч
10 months ago

Красивейшая вещь. Просто восторг Молодцы ребята.

El Capitan
10 months ago

all e bikes are overpriced. buy a kit and DIY. buy an aftermarket front fork. don't be a sucker

adam damstr
11 months ago

available in uk??

Parachinar TURI
12 months ago

Hello how much this saycel

Ivan Zhong
1 year ago

5000 dollars really man just a motocyle

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

I don't make these, just create videos to help people understand and make a good decision. If you want to ride without a license and insurance, prefer a lighter weight bike, appreciate quiet and want to go on paths and places motorcycles aren't allowed then this is a good option. If you like unlimited distance and want off-road then a dual sport would be great, they make electric motorcycles now that are pretty cool too: http://amzn.to/2e0iFLN

Kiefer Shanks
1 year ago

I definitely will be considering one of these as my next city runabout. Amazing design and performance in a practical, sexy package. Will have to finance it though probably haha

Sean McAleavy
1 year ago

This guy is the most informed reviewer I have ever seen. Very well done. This kind of review should be the standard. Unfortunately, it seems to be an anomaly. Pity.