Zeitgeist City Review

Zeitgeist City Electric Bike Review
Zeitgeist City 8fun 500 Watt Geared Hub Motor
Zeitgeist City Integrated Downtube Battery Protanium Samsung
Zeitgeist City Removable Magnetic Cycle Computer
Zeitgeist City 180 Mm Disc Brakes Qr Front Wheel
Zeitgeist City Carbon Fiber Seat Post 31 6
Zeitgeist City Front View Carbon Fork
Zeitgeist City Kickstand Hydraulic Disc Brakes
Zeitgeist City Custom Carbon Stem Integrated Display Lcd
Zeitgeist City Removable 48 Volt Battery
Zeitgeist City Torque Cadence Sensing Bottom Bracket
Zeitgeist City Tubro Ergonomic Grips Bar Ends
Zeitgeist City Electric Bike Review
Zeitgeist City 8fun 500 Watt Geared Hub Motor
Zeitgeist City Integrated Downtube Battery Protanium Samsung
Zeitgeist City Removable Magnetic Cycle Computer
Zeitgeist City 180 Mm Disc Brakes Qr Front Wheel
Zeitgeist City Carbon Fiber Seat Post 31 6
Zeitgeist City Front View Carbon Fork
Zeitgeist City Kickstand Hydraulic Disc Brakes
Zeitgeist City Custom Carbon Stem Integrated Display Lcd
Zeitgeist City Removable 48 Volt Battery
Zeitgeist City Torque Cadence Sensing Bottom Bracket
Zeitgeist City Tubro Ergonomic Grips Bar Ends

Summary

  • A Class 3 speed pedelec made entirely from Carbon fiber including the frame, fork, seat post, stem and handle bars
  • Powerful 500 watt planetary geared motor, 48 volt Lithium-ion downtube mounted battery (removable) with premium Samsung cells
  • Custom integrated LCD display panel that's removable paired with a wireless control pad, oversized hydraulic disc brakes with ebike specific levers to cut power and premium tires with Kevlar lining for durability
  • One of the more expensive electric bikes I've tested at nearly $8k, only available in one size, color and frame style, quality Shimano Deore XT ten speed drivetrain for a comfortable range of pedaling and nine levels of assist to match

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Zeitgeist

Model:

City

Price:

$7,999

Body Position:

Forward Aggressive

Suggested Use:

Road, Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedalec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States, Worldwide

Model Year:

2016

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

43.5 lbs (19.73 kg)

Battery Weight:

5 lbs (2.26 kg)

Frame Material:

Carbon Fiber Nano Tubes (Kevlar Inner Lining)

Frame Sizes:

18.9 in (48 cm)

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

White with Matte Black Accents

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid, Carbon Fiber

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses

Gearing Details:

10 Speed 1x10 Shimano Deore XT

Shifter Details:

Shimano Deore XT Triggers on Right

Cranks:

Lasco FR 660, Aluminum Alloy Bash Guard

Pedals:

VP-882 Plastic Platform, Black

Headset:

FPD

Stem:

Custom Carbon Fiber

Handlebar:

Flat, Carbon Fiber

Brake Details:

Tektro Auriga Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Rotors, Tektro Dorado Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Grips:

Tubro TS420 Ergonomic, Locking with Bar Ends

Saddle:

Selle Royal, Vented Gel Active

Seat Post:

Carbon Fiber

Seat Post Length:

250 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

31.6 mm

Rims:

Brass Nipples

Spokes:

14 Gauge, Black

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Energizer Plus, 28" x 1.75"

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

GreenGuard Puncture Protection, Reflective Sidewall Stripe

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Adjustable Length Kickstand, Front and Rear Racks from Thule, Thule Pannier Bags, Thule Front Basket, Optional LED Headlight, Aluminum Alloy Bash Guard

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, Quanta Quick Release Front Skewer

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bafang

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Battery Brand:

Samsung, Protanium

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

8.7 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

417.6 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

6 hours

Estimated Min Range:

20 miles (32 km)

Estimated Max Range:

35 miles (56 km)

Display Type:

Integrated LCD (Removable Magnetic)

Readouts:

Pedal Assist (0-9), Battery Level, Speed, Odometer, Trip Distance

Display Accessories:

Wireless Remote Button Pad, LED Indicator on Battery

Drive Mode:

Torque Sensing Pedal Assist (Rides Like Cadence Sensing Assist)

Top Speed:

28 mph (45 kph)

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Written Review

The Zeitgeist City is a premium, all-Carbon fiber speed pedelec. It’s an electric bike that can high 28 mph and only weighs ~43 lbs which is impressive given the 500 watt hub motor and 48 volt battery pack. At one point, I believe this model was being called the Zeitgeist by Karma Bikes but the company may have adjusted due to confusion with the Fisker Karma electric car… My experience testing this ebike was great because I could tell they put a lot of thought into the design (which is comfortable and well balanced). I especially liked the removable magnetic LCD display and optional wireless button pad because the bike still operates without it if you want to go for a minimal look and reduced weight but using it makes navigating the nine levels of assist possible without taking your left hand off the grip. The grips are also a highlight for me with a locking ergonomic design and unique Aluminum bar ends for changing hand position. The Zeitgeist City is a cross between a city and road bike from my point of view, the addition of rear rack bosses is great for those who plan to commute and want to add a set of panniers or trunk bag.

When you look at this thing from the side it almost looks like a normal bicycle, in large part due to the two-tone paint job, the battery disappears and the white glossy highlights create a safe visual footprint. It’s definitely an active geometry and there’s no suspension but to me Carbon fiber rides nicely and absorbs more road vibration than Aluminum and is lighter than steel. It comes with large hydraulic disc brakes and e-bike specific levers that cut power to the motor… my only complaint is the higher price point. I’m not sure I’ve seen anything out there with similar specs, high speed, low weight and cool appearance so the price is founded but a bit excessive. The other limitation is that it only comes in one sort of medium frame size with a relatively straight top tube that can make mounting and standing over difficult for shorter riders. This thing would be a blast to own for road cycling with friends in hilly or mountainous regions and could make an excellent commuter, rather than going with thin narrow tires they upgraded to ebike specific Schwalbe Energizer Plus that are puncture resistant and a bit more forgiving due to larger 1.75″ radius which makes a lot of sense to me.

Pros:

  • One of the only electric bikes I’ve tested that is almost completely made from carbon fiber! That includes the seat post, stem, handlebar and of course the fork
  • Considering the large 48 volt battery pack and 500 watt motor this bike is pretty light weight and handles very well because that weight is kept low and relatively centered across the frame
  • I really like the custom stem with integrated LCD display panel… that’s removable! I’m seeing more custom panels these days but very few let you take them out (to prevent tampering and exposure to the weather), well thought out design
  • Pedal assist is very responsive, I was told it’s torque based but it responded almost like a cadence sensor for me (not requiring as much force when pedaling) maybe it’s just dialed in to be very sensitive
  • Class 3 speed pedelec capable of hitting 28 mph fairly easily due to the light weight efficient design and larger 700c wheelset, it’s satisfying to accelerate or cruise at top speed
  • Quality tires with reflective sidewalls for safety and integrated puncture protection, the quick release front wheel makes changing flats or moving the bike in vehicles easier
  • Large, powerful hydraulic disc brakes with ebike specific extended levers that cut power to the motor instantly when activated, they worked well and felt sturdy at high speed
  • Zeitgeist offers optional Thule rack accessories but the City frame also features threaded eyelets on the seat stays for adding a more traditional rack that could work with a trunk bag and panniers for commuting, I like that the bike also comes with a kickstand (which is removable if you want)
  • Almost all of the wires are run directly through the frame on this bike and it looks great, they are exposed at the bottom bracket but this might make tuneups and maintenance easier, there’s a convenient disconnect point near the motor for rear wheel maintenance
  • Quality drivetrain (shifters and derailleurs), Shimano Deore XT components are light weight, designed to stay tuned and offer high performance

Cons:

  • Currently the Zeitgeist City is only available in one frame size with high-step design so this might not be a fit for super tall or petite riders
  • Extremely expensive at nearly $8k but it does perform well, look great and is likely a very exclusive ebike, there are regular pedal powered bikes that cost this much which are also custom carbon fiber frames so I get it
  • No drop bar option for those who prefer an even more aggressive body position but it did ride more like a road bike, I like the ergonomic locking grips and bar ends for changing hand position
  • No integrated lights on this bike, considering the frame is custom designed it would have been cool to see an LED based lighting system running off the main battery vs. having to add your own
  • The wireless button pad is easy to reach (to adjust assist level or cycle through display modes) but requires its own batteries vs. being run off the main pack with one tiny extra wire, I was told the battery should last two years and is easy to change, you can completely remove the buttons if you want and use a single button below the stem as a backup which is cool
  • The included pedals are very basic, not as wide or rigid as some of the magnesium platforms I’ve seen from Wellgo but this choice might have been made because many people have their own or use clip in options at higher speed

Resources:

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Cameron Newland
2 years ago

No rating for this bike?

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Hi Cameron, I’ve been testing the site without ratings because I feel that a single number/stars isn’t deep enough to communicate the variety and year differences between bikes. I’m focusing on deeper videos with more pros/cons instead :)

Reply
Stu Berman
2 years ago

Hi Court, the more that I look at all the e-bikes out there, the more interested I am in the Zeitgeist, but the one size fits all approach does concern me. I’m 5’8″ and I think you said elsewhere that you’re 5’9″. How well do you think the Zeitgeist fit you, especially as compared to other e-bikes?

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Hi Stu! It’s difficult to remember exactly as the review was done quite a while back and I test so many bikes. As average sized people I feel like both of us would fit this bike just fine, there are little adjustments you can make with the seat post height and handlebar but if you start replacing stuff it could interfere with the electronics or weight (the included Carbon fiber stem and bars are much lighter). If you like the bike I think you could make it work… it’s designed to fit the highest number of people, the peak of the bell curve and I feel like you’re right there.

Reply
Fencible
1 year ago

Hi Court, Thanks for a great site and awesome reviews. Did you notice if it looked possible to fit fenders to the Zeitgeist?

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

Hi Fencible! I bet it’s possible but may require some custom work… and even then, finding parts that match and can be attached without too much rattling while still being solid (especially important at high speeds) could be difficult and expensive. I looked closely at some of the pictures and didn’t see support arm bosses or the standard holes often used for bolts and mounting tabs (perhaps I was missing them). Hope this helps guide you, I think the short answer is no, it’s not really optimized for adding fenders but you could use a seat post mounted rear fender like this or a carry rack to keep water off your back since it does appear to have seat stay bosses.

Reply
Robert Crivelli
1 year ago

Where can I purchase a zeitgeist city electric bike? Any information is gladly appreciated

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

Hey Robert! I’m not sure which shops have it but you could reach out to one of the team leads at the company. His name is Kartik and his email is kartik@zeitgeist.bike hope this helps!

Reply

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indianajo
3 hours ago

I can go 4.5 hours into a 25 mph wind pedalling myself, at 6 mph. I have an old fashioned cushioned wide seat, not one of those splinters the bike shops stock exclusively. I buy seats at Salvation Army. Fighting that much wind wears me out, but I gotta go to/from my summer camp when city services and appointments allow me.
So electrically driven, at 15 mph, I could easily make 72 miles. I bought a 15 AH 48 v battery, because I have a couple of fall parties and concerts I'd like to attend that are 35-40 miles away. I'm not counting on finding a charger at the destination; I'm sure one is not available at the one I attended in October (by rental car).
As an added bonus, electrical drive could fight the wind for me, getting me there on my normal commute in a normal 3.5 hr. I don't intend to use it on nice days. 3.5 hour exercise twice a week has been good for my cardiovascular system. I'm age 67.
So far my endurance greatly exceeds that of the motor/controller I bought, which lasted about 80 miles. I pedalled it to destination from two failures

Dewey
13 hours ago

Corratec Lifebike

Blix Komfort Prima

Evelo Galaxy ST

Gazelle Arroyo C8 (personal favorite)

Kalkhoff Agattu

EasyMotion Evo City Wave Pro

Riese & Muller Homage Nuvinci HS (the only full suspension step through ebike)

hurricane56
1 day ago

Hey all, so quick check in after commuting home with this beast of a bike. I just finished a 17 mile ride with the HF and the power available is borderline insane. The one thing I noted is the power assist levels even in the ECO mode are good enough to keep me going around 24-26 mph at a decent cadence, maybe 80rpms with not too much effort. My point of comparison is with my other bike, 2016 Haibike Trekking S. I don't think this bike is going to replace the Haibike, but it'll give me another platform to use if I'm tired or just want something different. I'd compare the personalities of the HF to a high performance v8 pickup truck, vs the Haibike which is much more like buttery smooth straight six.

Battery life with the 21ah is incredible. I rode a total of 17 miles this evening and used about 5ah of capacity. My route is mostly flat with about 200 ft elevation gain.

There are a couple of subtle characteristics that set apart each bike. Obviously, the fit/finish and geometry of the Haibike is something to be admired. I feel that many people that bash "expensive factory bikes" tend overlook this. The Bosch mid-drive is seamless and very organic. The HF has it's strengths as well, and that is raw power at speed. There were a few times where I wanted to go slow in city traffic, and you can start to feel the bike wanting to really get up and go. Since I was riding with other ebike buddies most of the way back, I left the bike in ECO most of the time.

Overall, I'm happy with the performance thus far and hope that this bike will be a reliable platform for 2000+ miles of riding each year. The bike will need some additional tuning and add-ons to make this a daily commute beast:

1. Installation of rear rack - I ran a backpack today, but panniers are so much better for a longer ride.
2. Installation of bar end mirror.
3. Tuning of the suspension fork - The threads on the schrader valve are either not fully to spec or somewhat coarse. I needed to use a wrench to tighten my shock pump to the valve.
4. Installation of tire tube sealant - Once again this bike has no service disconnect near the motor assembly. There is enough slack on the cable after cutting the zip ties to remove the wheel, but doing a tube change in the field would be cumbersome with one person.

Oh yeah, top speed today was easily 35mph. I think I could sustain that for maybe 3-4 miles at most. Some might argue that having such a fast bike is dangerous. It is in the wrong hands, but now that I know I can go that speed, I feel it makes me safer when I can keep up with traffic taking a lane or on streets without protected bike lanes.

Dewey
14 hours ago

Grace Urbanic (unsure if this model is available in the US)

eVox City

Dewey
1 day ago

For folks seeking a step-through donor pedal bicycle frame to convert to an ebike with a DIY motor kit, the Reddit City Bikes spreadsheet has a column indicating where a step-through frame is available together with price, type of drivetrain, and web link:
https://www.reddit.com/r/citybike/comments/45zbr3/the_rcitybike_spreadsheet_updated_for_spring_2016/

Common features of ebikes used in urban bikeshare systems such as the Smoovengo E-Bike (Paris), Social Bicycles JUMP (Washington, DC), Bewegen Pedelec (Baltimore), and BCycle Dash+ (designed by Trek, coming in 2018), are a step-through frame, 26" wheels, 3 or 7 speed IGH, Class 1 pedelec, 250w front hub or 350w mid-drive motor, and rollerbrakes. Dock based systems recharge off the bikeshare dock vs dockless systems like JUMP incorporate a GPS locator chip and require you lock up the ebike with a provided U-lock and a maintenance guy either swaps out the battery or recharges it at a hub collection point every 2-3 days.

JayVee
2 days ago

Not sure if it's available in the US, but it's one of my favorite step thrus: Riese und Muller Swing City.

1/1
e-boy
2 days ago

Aloha E-Bikes on Dillingham in City Square Center is a Bulls dealer .
http://www.alohaebike.com

Mark Peralta
34 mins ago

I came across the internet about "ebike efficiency" from endless sphere
https://endless-sphere.com/w/index.php/EBike_Efficiency
and I thought it is worth sharing. The beauty of ebikes is there is a second source of motive power and that is your pedal power. It talks about the very basic principle about ebike motors. Here , it relates to a hub motor but the principle is still the same for the smaller mid drives. The road speed on the chart is just changed to cadence on mid drives. First, the power (watts) that comes out from the battery does not completely translates to actual watts to the wheels. There is a certain speed at which the conversion to mechanical power (motor efficiency) is highest.

In this example, the motor efficiency is highest at speeds somewhere between 25-31 mph. The lower the speed, the less efficient is the motor.

Those watt meters on some ebike displays do not always represent the watts to the wheels but these are the wattage that came out from the battery. And if you are on the wrong speed, most of those watts are wasted as heat. Or if you are in the wrong cadence in the case of mid drives. Basing on the efficiency curve of the hub motor above, it appears that it is ideal for high speed commuting.

To minimize energy waste at lower speed, a controller is used to limit the max current.

In the old days, simple resistors were used to control the current but these are very inefficient and obsolete and are now replaced by pulse width modulation controllers (PWM) with the use of metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET). The electrical current is then controlled to different levels. Example of this simple controller with different current settings at different assist levels is from a chart from Bafang mid drive (cadence is used at the x axis instead of road speed). The orange curve represents 100% (current decay is another user adjustable parameter in the Bafang controller)

https://electricbike-blog.com/2015/06/26/a-hackers-guide-to-programming-the-bbs02/

However, it is also important to know the power demand of an ebike at different speeds brought about by many factors and most especially the air resistance (aerodynamic drag), in order to further minimize power wastage when it is not needed and only apply power to when it is really needed.

You don't really need a lot of power at low speed but a simple controller's output is opposite (Cheap Chinese controllers). No wonder the cheap ebikes and ebike kits cannot reliably provide good battery mileage since you thought you are saving battery by going slower but you actually wasted a lot of power there. Most of the time, I notice that simple controllers feel "punchy" and tend to lurch ahead from a dead stop (great for showing off to friends) but once the ebike is already moving and you needed more assist, sometimes the power isn't there anymore, when you needed it the most.

Enter the Smart Controllers from the big players where more brain capacity is added to the controller's program in order to determine and match power requirement with the power output of the motor. And added measures are incorporated to cut the assist if the motor speed is at the inefficient range. This is made possible with the use of torque sensors and sophisticated program algorithms. An example of this is the "dynamic assist" from Juicedbikes.

http://juicedbikes.com.au/bikes/2017-crosscurrent/

I cannot find the controller charts of other big players but that is understandable (trade secret). It only goes to show that it's not only the motor efficiency that is important but how sophisticated the controllers are made. Not all controllers are created equal.

On mid drives, the gear reduction ratio is also set up so that the motor is most efficient at a cadence rate preferred by most cyclists (normal cadence range) .

https://www.electricbike.com/bosch-cannondale/

This principle in actual application made it possible for a small motor (mid drive) to achieve a very very impressive efficiency of 100 miles in 1 charge of the 500wh battery or 5 wh/mile!
https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/range-100-miles-giant-road-e.14617/#post-121767

This highest mileage potential is demonstrated by the small mid drive, but at a slower average speed (~15mph). The mid drives also has an advantage for the ability to climb very steep hills, as long as the gear ratio in the drive train is appropriate, but at the expense of even much slower, snail paced, speed (sometimes it feels like being pulled up by a winch!).

However, hub drives are not far behind in efficiency. Especially with increasing sophistication of the controllers and more efficient motor designs like the Maxon.
http://partir-en-vtt.com/fsb2/index.php?p=search&mode=author&id=52

https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/hub-vs-mid-drive-how-can-i-compare.14635/page-5

Hub drives are also more appropriate for high speed commuting, such as riding regularly at higher average speeds (above 23 mph) since the bicycle drive train at that higher crank output will wear out prematurely in less than a couple thousand miles. Or for transporting heavy loads such as the delivery ebikes.

There is still a bright future for efficient hub drives since, aside from the above mentioned strengths, hub drives are also very user friendly, easy gear shifting, durability, and is superior on stop and go city streets.

1/1
PowerOnBikes
2 days ago

PowerOn Electric Bikes has come out with an awesome new City Commuting eBike..The City Slicker. It has a powerful 48V 500 Watt Bafang motor & a 13.6ah Samsung battery.

The City Slicker is Sleek & Stylish and has enough power to get you where you need to go!
Available in Orange/Gray or Gloss Black

Get free shipping & $100 Off any of our ebikes now until 12/15! Use Code: SAVE100

PowerOn Electric Bikes

Ann M.
3 days ago

Named after the historic Junto Club started by Benjamin Franklin a couple of hundred years ago, the Junto Gen1 electric bike is an incredibly well thought out design at a very reasonable price, $2,200. Designed for all around city riding, the bottom bracket, headset & hub bearings are all sealed, so you're not going to get road grit & water out of the bearings. Junto chose a very high torque 350 watt geared Bafang motor and a larger 48V 11ah lithium pack for better range & overall lighter weight. With the weight balanced a little to the front, you have more positive steering and quicker reaction, much like a better made mountain bike and offsetting the weight of the rear hub motor. Note too the reinforced eyelets on these wheels; a much stronger build. And with Junto's focus on just one model right now, the bike is built to be upgraded without a lot of problems. I'm looking forward to an opportunity to test one of these bikes soon! Check out Court's review for all the details.

https://electricbikereview.com/junto/... The Junto Gen 1 is a sporty, responsive, urban style electric bike with 29er wheels and higher volume tires that create stability and add comfort, available in three frame sizes and two color options. All-aluminum frame is purpose built for ebike applications with a suspension-corrected geometry so you can add a 100 mm suspension fork aftermarket, tapered head tube and 15 mm thru axle. Excellent 11-speed Shimano SLX drivetrain with Shadow Plus clutch, wider 25 mm rims with reinforcement eyelets and thicker 13 gauge spokes in the rear to support the 350 watt geared motor. Simple display only shows battery level and 1-5 assist, the blue LED's can be annoyingly bright in dark ride conditions, nice locking ergonomic grips, gel saddle, and alloy platform pedals, hydraulic 180 mm disc brakes with motor inhibitors.

Mark Peralta
5 days ago

I recently test rode some hub drives .
I ride for transport on paved roads , and can see their advantage .
But the ones I rode were surgey and laggy .
One was an 8fun on an e-Joe , the other was an Easy Motion City Pro .
I tried some Stromer in the past and no hub issue for me there .
So , what are some other top brands , or major brands to try ?
-Ohm
-Bulls Outlaw
-Smartmotion
-The new generation Easy Motion hub drives
-Juicebikes CCS - Torah names his power assist as "dynamic assist", no jerky on-off propulsion.
-Radcity
-Magnum- some riders report jerky on-off feel at low speeds.

e-boy
5 days ago

I recently test rode some hub drives .
I ride for transport on paved roads , and can see their advantage .
But the ones I rode were surgey and laggy .
One was an 8fun on an e-Joe , the other was an Easy Motion City Pro .
I tried some Stromer in the past and no hub issue for me there .
So , what are some other top brands , or major brands to try ?

feifonwong
5 days ago

I bought this... car interior LED light kit. I power it with a little usb phone battery charger thingy.

here is a pic of my bike with those lights and here. I was thinking about the money lights but I don't like the look of the extra wires and one more thing to charge. I am going to upgrade next season to a tire that has reflective sidewalls.... that plus what I have going on.... i feel like if people don't see me at night they are blind.

;)

Andy

Those are actually a better option! Do they project the to red lines on the road like that? This will be perfect for the busy street I have to ride down. The city closed the bridge that connects to Old Sacramento from the river, so I'll be a sitting duck by either riding on the actual freeway or taking the street form the trail.

e-boy
5 days ago

OHM City Comfortable Commuter
https://ohmcycles.com/e-bikes/city/

trebor
6 days ago

I normally ride a Giant Trance 29er, and I am 5'8, 145 lbs. My past e-bike experience was a demo on a Stromer ST2, and I built a hub-motor MTB. I sold off the hub motor system as it was not trail capable - too much weight and the battery was 1000 ah and too heavy and high center of mass. It was a good electric moped in the end, but not what I have come to want.

First I rode the Easy Motion Lynx 4.8 Pro. The Brose motor was very quiet, and it had what I would consider enough power. At around 20 mph when it cuts out, it did so in a fairly soft way. Still, 20 is too slow for road use. I think 28 mph/45 kph is needed for street use. This is especially true because when the motor cuts out, it leaves you in too tall a gear to crank - so in that way, it is actually harder to ride an e-bike over 20 mph than if the motor were just totally shut off as then you would be in the correct gear at 20.

The forks and suspension seemed ok. The wheels and tires were crap - 2.35" $14 tires on a $4000 bike. It even had Schrader valves as if it were a Walmart bike. Maybe they figure everyone will throw the factory tires away anyway so they just use cheap ones? Personally I would not want to take this on any kind of technical trail. I left the demo knowing that I would never buy this bike, for what I want. But, it was a nice bike for riding around a city or any other non-technical use. They make a Lynx 6 27.5+ Pro with 160mm suspension travel and plus tires, so that one may be good.

Then I tried the Turbo Levo Comp. It was a size large, and I normally take a medium. It seemed surprisingly small. I measured the reach compared to my 18" medium Giant, and it was only about an inch more. The size didn't bother me when riding it. Just lifting the Levo seemed a lot heavier than the Lynx. I weighed it with SPD pedals at 52 lbs. I did not have a chance to weigh the Lynx, but the specs say it is also 52 lbs - felt lighter though. I also like how it has no display, and you can use an app to set the three default power levels.

But seeing the Levo got me excited, as it looked much better and more serious to me in person. The wheels/tires were appropriate to what I was expecting. On the street, it was not as good as the Lynx though - the 650B+ tires were loud. The Levo did seem good on a trail though, but not used to the weight yet as for lifting front over obstacles.

The Brose motors on each felt about the same. They sensed torque to some degree - but not sure it was proportional. I got the feeling they just sensed the presence of torque and then went by RPM. Some more work needs to be done to make the feel more natural.

So... Lynx 4.8 good for street use/city/commuting, and would need to try an AtomX 6 27.5+ if used for trails. The Levo seemed good for trails, and it was an interesting product, but I would want to try a BULLS E-CORE AM with E8000 STEPS before making a purchase decision.

Izk
1 week ago

2014 Dash user with 7000 miles now. Battery became useless at 5500 miles and I did the Luna Shark replacement Gadgetguy suggested which gets me 2X the original range now with no cold sensitivity. I did have a a few to many times of not noticing the flashing red charge light when getting home from a ride and missing the charge and changed behavior to not allow this to happen before going to bed.

I gave up on the original Shimano cable discs after 4 months since they ate the resin pads like candy. The speed and weight really makes pad life short if they are resin and especially on cable calipers since they really only actuate one side and wear out only one pad prematurely. I upgraded to Shimano SLX hydraulics 6000 miles ago and they have been totally bomber. I also upped the rotor size to the 203mm (8") which helps with heat and wear. Being an avid mountain biker with a good amount of downhill riding in the rain and mud and lots of bent rims, I have been totally committed to hydraulics since 2003 with my old Hayes. I also upped the rotor size to the 203mm (8") which helps with heat and wear.

Shimano had a few issues with their lower end hydraulics like the M394 and M395 and these lower versions only support resin pads. You need to go up to a SLX to support metallic pads or get some aftermarkets for the lower ends. Metallics last much longer and work better in the wet. They may be a bit more squeaky but it is worth it for pad life and feel. If you watch out you can pick up some of the last few year models of M666 or M675 for about $55 new on ebay. I grabbed mine from Jensen USA on closeout for $59. I have six sets of these SLX one three bikes and they are by far the best stopping, least cost, best reliability solution of anything out there. Plus no DOT fluid.

I have replaced the junk Suntour shock fork with the Rockshox Paragon Gold which is a true air shock with much more plushness and control. New quality Schwalbe Marathon Plus tires have cut down the constant flats after a year of riding on tons of glass/rocks/staples/metal.

I have had my bike for 2.8 years and put a lot of very rough miles through terrible Seattle streets with 9 months of rain per year. The bike replaces the cost of a car and parking which would be at least $500/month in this city. For these reasons I have been ok with throwing in some maintenance/replacement money since it is saving me so much on commuting and is so fun to be able to ride home in blowing downpours with hell traffic and not be impacted at all.

Overall, been happy with the midrange bike that gets me what I need and did want some upgrades once I got hooked.

Paul Cavasino
1 week ago

Today I went to the local Pedego shop and rode the City Commuter and the Interceptor. I wanted to ride the Platinum Interceptor as well, but they said that they didn't carry that, though they could order it for me. That was kinda disappointing because I wanted to try an ebike with hydraulic brakes and compare them to the normal disc ones.

Maybe because it was my first time on an ebike but I was rather nervous at first due to the speed but also neither bike felt like it had stopping power. I was struggling to stay still on a hill and wound up falling by accident (at walking speeds). At the end of the hour period I did feel alot better but just disappointed about the brakes. Or maybe it was totally normal.

This could be due to a few reasons:

Haven't ridden a bike in a while (though this was on the second bike at around 40 minutes into riding)
I test rode the bikes that they use for rental so they were a little beat up.

TL;DR

I couldn't try a bike with hydraulic breaks and i wanted to see if anyone felt that it was worth it. If it is then I will probably wind up buying the Juiced CrossCurrent S since that has the hydraulic breaks and it has a torque sensor (which i couldn't test out) although i'm taking a risk since the forums seem to have mixed feelings about the quality and service of the CCS. If normal brakes are fine then I will just by the Pedego City Commuter since I can take it to the local shop for maintenance and issues.

Thanks!
Yes,...We own 2 Pedegos, his & hers,...( City Commuter & Step thru-Interceptor),...& Have Immensely Enjoyed Our Biking Adventures for 2 Years Now !! GO PEDEGO,...they're rated one of the most reliable EBIKES out there !!

JohnT
1 week ago

Big news! I’m at our Pedego dealer meeting this week, and we were introduced to a few interesting new models! I’m not going to get into details, but I thought people would be interested in a quick overview. I’m going from my notes and from memory, so don’t be surprised if I get something wrong.

“Elevate” - A full suspension eMTB with Shimano Steps mid-drive, and plus size knobby tires. Class 1, pedal assist only, no throttle.

“Conveyer” - A solid street ride with a Brose mid-drive, Gates carbon belt drive (Conveyer belt, get it?), Shimano Nexus 8 IGH, and plus size street tires. No chain and no derailleur! Class 1, PA only, no throttle.

City Commuter Mid-Drive - Basically what I said, it’s a City Commuter with a mid-drive. The interesting thing is that it has a throttle, but it only activates while the pedals are moving. Like all City Commuters, it has PA. I’m not sure whether this makes it Class 1 or 2.

City Commuter Black Edition - This upgrades the regular City Commuter similarly to how the Platinum Edition upgrades the Interceptor. This means front suspension, torque sensing pedal assist, hydraulic disc brakes, and Shimano SLX for smooth shifting. The trim is blacked out.

Dual Motor Stretch - The Stretch is our cargo bike. In this version, a unique controller splits power variably between a torque wound rear motor and a speed wound front motor, resulting in both more torque and better efficiency while keeping the total power under 750w!

Another exciting development is that we’re going to be integrating some “smart” technology into our bikes. I’m not sure which are are going to be available when, so I won’t discuss them today, but at least one model will have built in GPS for anti-theft and navigation!

Most of this is available now, and some will be available soon. I can’t wait to see Court review the new bikes!

hurricane56
1 week ago

1. The drive has a tendency to resist your efforts above a certain RPM level, and the cadence window in which it provides power is pretty limited. This is perceptible in Standard mode, and painfully perceptible in ECO and ECO+ modes.

This has several consequences:

- If you want to tour around in a hilly area, you need to be really fit with the Yamaha. I use ECO mode only when absolutely needed. The Bosch and Shimano ECO modes are infinitely easier on the knees.

- If you want to climb a hill, the lowest gears might not necessarily be the best gears. If you're spinning away in 1st gear you will quickly hit a cadence where power drops off. This means you'll need to shift up a gear or two to get power. But it also means that climbing will be more difficult on the knees (once again). I climb a 7% grade incline every day and the bike is in 8th or 9th gear (meaning, 2-3 gears away from 11 teeth). I hand't noticed this until someone remarked that I was climbing in a really high gear. Might explain why my knees ache sometimes...

- Because the cadence is limited, the bike requires an inordinate number of gear shifts in traffic. Think of a scenario where you have several consecutive red lights. After the first red light goes green, I need to shift up 6 times to reach cruising speed. But as soon as I reach cruising speed, I have to shift down several times as well. And start over at each red light. Other drives, like the Bosch or the Shimano have a more intelligent way of dealing with this. Start in 1st gear and shift into second or third gear, then increase the number of RPMs instead of shifting through all the gears. You'll get just as much power and won't constantly be changing gears.

2. The engineering on some of the parts isn't up to Yamaha standards.

- The remote is fastened by screws which “bite” into the plastic casing. The result is that it’s impossible to tighten them so that the remote doesn’t swivel around the handlebars. This means that it’s nearly impossible to walk the bike up a hill using RUN mode. Press on the RUN button and the remote simply swivels out of your hand.

-The bike’s remote is designed in such a manner that you have to take your right hand off the handlebars in order to switch to another level of assist. But the remote often slips away...

- The button to power on the bike is starting to fail. Sometimes it works, sometimes not.

- The diagnostic button on the battery sometimes doesn't work.

3. Although not directly Yamaha's fault, the lighting on many Trekking Sduros is not sufficient for riding in the countryside at night. I have a Trekking Sduro S 6.0 which has a 60 lux light. When riding in the forest at night I can't see the contours of the road ahead. This is because the projected beam is too narrow and the lights not powerful enough.

So, if I had to do it again, I wouldn't buy a Yamaha powered bike. This is particularly true of the older PW drive system, which still equips most SDUROs.
That's really good insight on the Yamaha system. Also completely agree on the stock lighting. The 60 lux unit is barely adequate for 20mph city riding. The first thing about night commuting is that you live and die by your lighting setup.

scott jewell
1 week ago

I am looking to build my own battery but know little about LIFEPO4 cells.

I do see that they sell a lot of cells for a reasonable price. I had three 22 Ah SLAs but were VERY heavy and weighed the bike down.

I also found out that people like to run the cells in series and use a BMS. I do not want any BMS and running cells in series the pack is only as good as the weakest cell. NOT what I want.

For one thing I almost got run over by a city bus when I started across a busy intersection the light was green and then turned red. My pedal chain was broke and the light turned red and the 36 volt controller had an LVC
or low voltage cut off which happened in the center of traffic. I came within inches of dying that day.

I changed controllers but heard that a BMS has the same feature. Therefore I want to run ten packs of ten in parallel. I was told that these batteries are only 1/3 what they are rated for. That is false advertising which should be considered a crime or a scam.

However I do not wish to order LiPo as a fire hazard. My cousin almost burned his house down with one of those self balancing skateboards. Therefore LIFEPO4 cells are my last hope as do not have $500 or more for a factory 20Ah LIFEPO4 pack.

Please someone let me know if the following diagrams will work and reccomend a charger for that please.

1/2
Paul Cavasino
2 weeks ago

My 2015 PEDEGO City Commuter is The Most fun on 2 Wheels !!

1/4
Paul Cavasino
2 weeks ago

My City commuter & Her step thru Interceptor have had the Plastic Battery sleeves crack @ Various points along the Mid-seam & the Screw nodules in the casing actually breaking apart. The problem was initially noticed while riding along & Hearing a "Slapping" Noise coming from the back Of the bike. Upon closer examination I Stooped down & jiggled the Battery in an up & down motion when I noticed that the seam in the casing actually separated. That was causing the "Plastic Slapping Noise". My remedy was to Connect 2 Medium length ZIP TIES together, loop them around the Back of the casing & Draw it tight !! In Her case I additionally cut & taped along the seams on both sides of the casing with "Gaffers Tape". So far, so good until I decide to call Pedego Tech. Dept & see if they can send us another Battery Casing for each Bike.

John from Connecticut
2 weeks ago

I just wanted to chime in, I asked which Bike advice on the forum and for all sorts of gibberish advice telling me I had to spend thousands of dollars on an to get anything decent to ride around town as a commuter. I've come to find out that total rubbish. I bought a used 2017 Magnum MI5 with 200 miles on it for $625. Original MSRP on the bike is $1,700. I've ridden this bike around rides great does everything I needed to do. I recently ran across a guy who has a 2017 Ancheer that is basically the exact same specs as my bike MSRP under $800.

If you're not doing some heavy-duty off-road racing these name brand bikes are total waste of money.

My bike the Juiced bike all made at the same Factory in the same city in China as the Ancheer.

I hear all the bikes knobs talk about who's going to put your bike together or where you going to get a replacement battery half these outfits can't get parts from the quote unquote manufacturers as they all seem to be waiting for the shipment to come in the container from China.

Then I hear about the warranty my bike has 200 miles on it over the course of a year not a single problem I took it in for a tune-up batteries is in fine shape.

Then I looked at the battery and it's made by a battery supplier who you can buy the battery from on Alibaba.

Seems like all the guys on this form like to hang out in there locally-owned bike shop to shoot the stuff.

I would have been pissed had I paid full price for the bike I bought knowing I could have bought direct from China for half the cost.

Don't fall for all the bull malarkey on the site save yourself a ton of money and buy it online.

Hello Fred,
I believe your initial post was a request for info from the members of this forum on the selection of an e-bike. To that end members respectfully
responded with thoughts, opinions and their personal e-bike experiences.

After reading your reply it became very apparent that your position differs significantly from the members that took the to time to
pass along what they've experienced and where they stand....I completely agree with your right to have an 'opposing view' from what was presented.

While I support that right to reject the opinions presented, I completely and strongly oppose that no member ever should
be allowed to rant in the manor as seen in the following quotes.....

"I hear all the bikes knobs talk about who's going to put your bike together..."

"Seems like all the guys on this form like to hang out in there locally-owned bike shop to shoot the stuff."

"I would have been pissed had I paid full price for the bike I bought knowing I could have bought direct from China for half the cost."

"Don't fall for all the bull malarkey on the site save yourself a ton of money and buy it online. "

I take offense to anyone telling me how to send my money.... It's my money, I earned. I know what is important to me and
and I know best how to spend my money. I know what brings me great joy in my cycling endeavor. I found that joy in a 15 minute test ride
on a Trek XM700+ at my local bike shop. I bought the XM700+ on the spot....It's tough to test ride over the Internet.

As for spending my money, do I think the $3,500 I spent on the Trek XM700+ was worth it...every penny and would I do it again
if I could ? Yes and I did....I bought a Trek Powerfly 7 . See I told you I knew how best to spend my money : )

I've always maintained that cycling, if done with genuine interest, drive and enthusiasm is a very personal endeavor.
It gets down to the rider and the bike.

I hope this was helpful,
John from CT

bob armani
2 weeks ago

I just wanted to chime in, I asked which Bike advice on the forum and for all sorts of gibberish advice telling me I had to spend thousands of dollars on an to get anything decent to ride around town as a commuter. I've come to find out that total rubbish. I bought a used 2017 Magnum MI5 with 200 miles on it for $625. Original MSRP on the bike is $1,700. I've ridden this bike around rides great does everything I needed to do. I recently ran across a guy who has a 2017 Ancheer that is basically the exact same specs as my bike MSRP under $800.

If you're not doing some heavy-duty off-road racing these name brand bikes are total waste of money.

My bike the Juiced bike all made at the same Factory in the same city in China as the Ancheer.

I hear all the bikes knobs talk about who's going to put your bike together or where you going to get a replacement battery half these outfits can't get parts from the quote unquote manufacturers as they all seem to be waiting for the shipment to come in the container from China.

Then I hear about the warranty my bike has 200 miles on it over the course of a year not a single problem I took it in for a tune-up batteries is in fine shape.

Then I looked at the battery and it's made by a battery supplier who you can buy the battery from on Alibaba.

Seems like all the guys on this form like to hang out in there locally-owned bike shop to shoot the stuff.

I would have been pissed had I paid full price for the bike I bought knowing I could have bought direct from China for half the cost.

Don't fall for all the bull malarkey on the site save yourself a ton of money and buy it online.

Fred-Do not listen to anyone-go with your own instincts and research and find out what bike best suits your needs and spend within your budget. There are plenty of great ebikes out there for under $1000 dollars that will work just fine as long as you do not abuse it and beat on it. I purchased a brand new ebike for $450.00 (entry level) but it works fantastic as a second commuter ebike. Its all about your personal needs and preferences IMHO! Ride safe!

Richard Day
4 months ago

Too rich for my blood

Lysle Basinger
4 months ago

Others bikes offer more for less.

MarvFIT
5 months ago

for 8000 i much rather get a stromer

enzo
12 months ago

Can you pop a wheelie on these bikes?

Amit fortus
2 years ago

is this bike actually available or is it just a concept?

Mike Vincent
2 years ago

It's actually on sale right now at touch of modern: https://www.touchofmodern.com/sales/zeitgeist/zeitgeist-city

Question: Is the display readable in the dark? Does it illuminate?

Dmc ScotinCali
2 years ago

where r u? looks amazing

William Lam
2 years ago

Great review. Nice looking bike ... But I really don't see how this thing is priced at $8K. They will sell a ton at $4K, but at $8K, it's only gonna be a store display.

odetoazam
2 years ago

+William Lam It's not gonna be the final price. Its better to price higher and test price points. 4k is too low though.

Rob Schmitt
2 years ago

7999$. This is more expensive than a car. I would ride an electric bike with 45 km/h limit. But these bikes are starting at 4500€.

Christopher Moltisanti
2 years ago

+Rob Schmitt China will clone these soon enough,I predict we'll see versions of this style next year for under $2000.

BIKESTER INC.
2 years ago

+Rob Schmitt you're spot on. Our average street price in the US will settle at $5k-$6.5k for the limited edition selling on ToMo. I think the there are two electric bike markets in the US- the value and the designer. This might fit the latter.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Rob Schmitt Yeah, it's one of the pricier options I've seen... I've reviewed a few other speed pedelecs (with a few being cheaper) back at the site: http://electricbikereview.com/tag/speed/ the new 2016 Turbo is ~$3k and goes ~26 mph (~42km/h)

Jappe Kapanen
2 years ago

ok thank you for the answer

Stephen Cho
2 years ago

The cross current from juiced riders has similar specs with the same battery for $1500. You could buy 5 of them plus a spare battery for 8K. The owner of this company certainly ain't thinking about the masses.

odetoazam
2 years ago

+Stephen Cho I dont think advertisers are thinking about the masses either. #thinkniche

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Stephen Cho Yeah, I'm excited to test the Cross Current very soon :D

William Wonder
2 years ago

I'm surprised the electric firms aren't making more recumbents. Logic would dictate this is the real market, older riders who need assistance to ride like a young man and they are going recumbent. Ya, I know about Bionx and it appears to be a good system.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+William Wonder Hi William, here's one amazing recumbent with full suspension and regeneration! Very cool in my opinion: http://electricbikereview.com/hp-velotechnik/scorpion-fs-26-s-pedelec/ maybe we'll see others like it in the future made with Carbon fiber like the Zeitgeist City :D

дмитрий трофимов
2 years ago

Im   sorry! what about price? 7 hundred bhu bhu bhu bhu dollars. HOW MUCH PLZ???

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+дмитрий трофимов The price is $7,999 which I mention in the video and list back on the website: http://electricbikereview.com/zeitgeist/city/ hope this helps :)

Flo Mo
2 years ago

Fascinating! The future of e-bikes? Again a great video. I'll start saving money. :)

Kartik Ram
2 years ago

+Elya Cornovier Get this bike at a limited sale on #Touchofmodern
https://www.touchofmodern.com/sales/zeitgeist/zeitgeist-city

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Elya Cornovier Yeah, neat to see a completely custom frame like this and the attention to detail with the display unit :)

Gardener Rob
2 years ago

Very impressive looking bike,  looks like it would be very light and agile.

Kartik Ram
2 years ago

+Gardener Rob Get this bike at a limited sale on #Touchofmodern
https://www.touchofmodern.com/sales/zeitgeist/zeitgeist-city

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Gardener Rob Yeah, it rode great... very fast and responsive when pedaling.

JeMasLT
2 years ago

Good work dude.
Make some video with Tips How to care electric bikes. When to clean what to change and so on :)

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+JeMasLT Good tip, I'll work on something like this but here's one I shot a while back with a shop owner: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFLIGRj2bxU

David Macdonald
2 years ago

it's nice , but just to much cash , make a bike for the masses , out of quality parts , that would do more for E bikes, community.

David Macdonald
2 years ago

Thanks all have a look .

Kartik Ram
2 years ago

+David Macdonald Get this bike at a limited sale on #Touchofmodern
https://www.touchofmodern.com/sales/zeitgeist/zeitgeist-city

David Macdonald
2 years ago

Thanks .

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+David Macdonald I've been trying to list more of the affordable models at the site to make them easier to find, check it out: http://electricbikereview.com/tag/affordable/

Jappe Kapanen
2 years ago

Is that bike able to add some kind of front suspension??
Maybe less than 120mm???

Jappe Kapanen
2 years ago

+Kartik Ram Ok Want to see that when it's finished

BIKESTER INC.
2 years ago

+Jappe Kapanen We are considering putting a SRAM RS-1 front fork with 100mm of travel as it can get pretty bumpy out there.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Kartik Ram Kartik, if you're going to comment on videos please answer the question that the user is asking (in this case about suspension) vs. spamming the flash sale

Kartik Ram
2 years ago

+Jappe Kapanen Get this bike at a limited sale on #Touchofmodern
https://www.touchofmodern.com/sales/zeitgeist/zeitgeist-city

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Jappe Kapanen I would think so, SR Suntour makes a few minimal suspension forks like this... they aren't as light as a carbon fork but they are still slim and you get 100 mm or so. I'm reviewing one other Zeitgeist ebike and it does have a suspension fork (but the frame is Aluminum vs Carbon).

benjamin Ofuasia
2 years ago

RIP wallet

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+benjamin Ofuasia There's room for improvement to get there, especially with similarly priced bikes like the Specialized Turbo S and Stromer ST2 with competing specs and perhaps better performance but not quite as light weight.

benjamin Ofuasia
2 years ago

i see it, but all i can think of it trying to fit in with are bikes like the S-Works Demo 8 or the Santa Cruz V10c

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+benjamin Ofuasia Ha! Yeah... but there are still normal bicycles for this price so I can see how it's trying to fit into the market. Maybe just above what I can afford ;)

benjamin Ofuasia
2 years ago

8 grand

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+benjamin Ofuasia Yep O_O