Zeitgeist City Review

Zeitgeist City Electric Bike Review
Zeitgeist City 8fun 500 Watt Geared Hub Motor
Zeitgeist City Integrated Downtube Battery Protanium Samsung
Zeitgeist City Removable Magnetic Cycle Computer
Zeitgeist City 180 Mm Disc Brakes Qr Front Wheel
Zeitgeist City Carbon Fiber Seat Post 31 6
Zeitgeist City Front View Carbon Fork
Zeitgeist City Kickstand Hydraulic Disc Brakes
Zeitgeist City Custom Carbon Stem Integrated Display Lcd
Zeitgeist City Removable 48 Volt Battery
Zeitgeist City Torque Cadence Sensing Bottom Bracket
Zeitgeist City Tubro Ergonomic Grips Bar Ends
Zeitgeist City Electric Bike Review
Zeitgeist City 8fun 500 Watt Geared Hub Motor
Zeitgeist City Integrated Downtube Battery Protanium Samsung
Zeitgeist City Removable Magnetic Cycle Computer
Zeitgeist City 180 Mm Disc Brakes Qr Front Wheel
Zeitgeist City Carbon Fiber Seat Post 31 6
Zeitgeist City Front View Carbon Fork
Zeitgeist City Kickstand Hydraulic Disc Brakes
Zeitgeist City Custom Carbon Stem Integrated Display Lcd
Zeitgeist City Removable 48 Volt Battery
Zeitgeist City Torque Cadence Sensing Bottom Bracket
Zeitgeist City Tubro Ergonomic Grips Bar Ends

Summary

  • A Class 3 speed pedelec made entirely from Carbon fiber including the frame, fork, seat post, stem and handle bars
  • Powerful 500 watt planetary geared motor, 48 volt Lithium-ion downtube mounted battery (removable) with premium Samsung cells
  • Custom integrated LCD display panel that's removable paired with a wireless control pad, oversized hydraulic disc brakes with ebike specific levers to cut power and premium tires with Kevlar lining for durability
  • One of the more expensive electric bikes I've tested at nearly $8k, only available in one size, color and frame style, quality Shimano Deore XT ten speed drivetrain for a comfortable range of pedaling and nine levels of assist to match

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Zeitgeist

Model:

City

Price:

$7,999

Body Position:

Forward Aggressive

Suggested Use:

Road, Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedalec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States, Worldwide

Model Year:

2016

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

43.5 lbs (19.73 kg)

Battery Weight:

5 lbs (2.26 kg)

Frame Material:

Carbon Fiber Nano Tubes (Kevlar Inner Lining)

Frame Sizes:

18.9 in (48 cm)

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

White with Matte Black Accents

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid, Carbon Fiber

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses

Gearing Details:

10 Speed 1x10 Shimano Deore XT

Shifter Details:

Shimano Deore XT Triggers on Right

Cranks:

Lasco FR 660, Aluminum Alloy Bash Guard

Pedals:

VP-882 Plastic Platform, Black

Headset:

FPD

Stem:

Custom Carbon Fiber

Handlebar:

Flat, Carbon Fiber

Brake Details:

Tektro Auriga Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Rotors, Tektro Dorado Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Grips:

Tubro TS420 Ergonomic, Locking with Bar Ends

Saddle:

Selle Royal, Vented Gel Active

Seat Post:

Carbon Fiber

Seat Post Length:

250 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

31.6 mm

Rims:

Brass Nipples

Spokes:

14 Gauge, Black

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Energizer Plus, 28" x 1.75"

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

GreenGuard Puncture Protection, Reflective Sidewall Stripe

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Adjustable Length Kickstand, Front and Rear Racks from Thule, Thule Pannier Bags, Thule Front Basket, Optional LED Headlight, Aluminum Alloy Bash Guard

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, Quanta Quick Release Front Skewer

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bafang

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Battery Brand:

Samsung, Protanium

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

8.7 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

417.6 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

6 hours

Estimated Min Range:

20 miles (32 km)

Estimated Max Range:

35 miles (56 km)

Display Type:

Integrated LCD (Removable Magnetic)

Readouts:

Pedal Assist (0-9), Battery Level, Speed, Odometer, Trip Distance

Display Accessories:

Wireless Remote Button Pad, LED Indicator on Battery

Drive Mode:

Torque Sensing Pedal Assist (Rides Like Cadence Sensing Assist)

Top Speed:

28 mph (45 kph)

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Written Review

The Zeitgeist City is a premium, all-Carbon fiber speed pedelec. It’s an electric bike that can high 28 mph and only weighs ~43 lbs which is impressive given the 500 watt hub motor and 48 volt battery pack. At one point, I believe this model was being called the Zeitgeist by Karma Bikes but the company may have adjusted due to confusion with the Fisker Karma electric car… My experience testing this ebike was great because I could tell they put a lot of thought into the design (which is comfortable and well balanced). I especially liked the removable magnetic LCD display and optional wireless button pad because the bike still operates without it if you want to go for a minimal look and reduced weight but using it makes navigating the nine levels of assist possible without taking your left hand off the grip. The grips are also a highlight for me with a locking ergonomic design and unique Aluminum bar ends for changing hand position. The Zeitgeist City is a cross between a city and road bike from my point of view, the addition of rear rack bosses is great for those who plan to commute and want to add a set of panniers or trunk bag.

When you look at this thing from the side it almost looks like a normal bicycle, in large part due to the two-tone paint job, the battery disappears and the white glossy highlights create a safe visual footprint. It’s definitely an active geometry and there’s no suspension but to me Carbon fiber rides nicely and absorbs more road vibration than Aluminum and is lighter than steel. It comes with large hydraulic disc brakes and e-bike specific levers that cut power to the motor… my only complaint is the higher price point. I’m not sure I’ve seen anything out there with similar specs, high speed, low weight and cool appearance so the price is founded but a bit excessive. The other limitation is that it only comes in one sort of medium frame size with a relatively straight top tube that can make mounting and standing over difficult for shorter riders. This thing would be a blast to own for road cycling with friends in hilly or mountainous regions and could make an excellent commuter, rather than going with thin narrow tires they upgraded to ebike specific Schwalbe Energizer Plus that are puncture resistant and a bit more forgiving due to larger 1.75″ radius which makes a lot of sense to me.

Pros:

  • One of the only electric bikes I’ve tested that is almost completely made from carbon fiber! That includes the seat post, stem, handlebar and of course the fork
  • Considering the large 48 volt battery pack and 500 watt motor this bike is pretty light weight and handles very well because that weight is kept low and relatively centered across the frame
  • I really like the custom stem with integrated LCD display panel… that’s removable! I’m seeing more custom panels these days but very few let you take them out (to prevent tampering and exposure to the weather), well thought out design
  • Pedal assist is very responsive, I was told it’s torque based but it responded almost like a cadence sensor for me (not requiring as much force when pedaling) maybe it’s just dialed in to be very sensitive
  • Class 3 speed pedelec capable of hitting 28 mph fairly easily due to the light weight efficient design and larger 700c wheelset, it’s satisfying to accelerate or cruise at top speed
  • Quality tires with reflective sidewalls for safety and integrated puncture protection, the quick release front wheel makes changing flats or moving the bike in vehicles easier
  • Large, powerful hydraulic disc brakes with ebike specific extended levers that cut power to the motor instantly when activated, they worked well and felt sturdy at high speed
  • Zeitgeist offers optional Thule rack accessories but the City frame also features threaded eyelets on the seat stays for adding a more traditional rack that could work with a trunk bag and panniers for commuting, I like that the bike also comes with a kickstand (which is removable if you want)
  • Almost all of the wires are run directly through the frame on this bike and it looks great, they are exposed at the bottom bracket but this might make tuneups and maintenance easier, there’s a convenient disconnect point near the motor for rear wheel maintenance
  • Quality drivetrain (shifters and derailleurs), Shimano Deore XT components are light weight, designed to stay tuned and offer high performance

Cons:

  • Currently the Zeitgeist City is only available in one frame size with high-step design so this might not be a fit for super tall or petite riders
  • Extremely expensive at nearly $8k but it does perform well, look great and is likely a very exclusive ebike, there are regular pedal powered bikes that cost this much which are also custom carbon fiber frames so I get it
  • No drop bar option for those who prefer an even more aggressive body position but it did ride more like a road bike, I like the ergonomic locking grips and bar ends for changing hand position
  • No integrated lights on this bike, considering the frame is custom designed it would have been cool to see an LED based lighting system running off the main battery vs. having to add your own
  • The wireless button pad is easy to reach (to adjust assist level or cycle through display modes) but requires its own batteries vs. being run off the main pack with one tiny extra wire, I was told the battery should last two years and is easy to change, you can completely remove the buttons if you want and use a single button below the stem as a backup which is cool
  • The included pedals are very basic, not as wide or rigid as some of the magnesium platforms I’ve seen from Wellgo but this choice might have been made because many people have their own or use clip in options at higher speed

Resources:

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Cameron Newland
1 year ago

No rating for this bike?

Court Rye
1 year ago

Hi Cameron, I’ve been testing the site without ratings because I feel that a single number/stars isn’t deep enough to communicate the variety and year differences between bikes. I’m focusing on deeper videos with more pros/cons instead :)

Stu Berman
1 year ago

Hi Court, the more that I look at all the e-bikes out there, the more interested I am in the Zeitgeist, but the one size fits all approach does concern me. I’m 5’8″ and I think you said elsewhere that you’re 5’9″. How well do you think the Zeitgeist fit you, especially as compared to other e-bikes?

Court Rye
1 year ago

Hi Stu! It’s difficult to remember exactly as the review was done quite a while back and I test so many bikes. As average sized people I feel like both of us would fit this bike just fine, there are little adjustments you can make with the seat post height and handlebar but if you start replacing stuff it could interfere with the electronics or weight (the included Carbon fiber stem and bars are much lighter). If you like the bike I think you could make it work… it’s designed to fit the highest number of people, the peak of the bell curve and I feel like you’re right there.

Fencible
7 months ago

Hi Court, Thanks for a great site and awesome reviews. Did you notice if it looked possible to fit fenders to the Zeitgeist?

Court Rye
7 months ago

Hi Fencible! I bet it’s possible but may require some custom work… and even then, finding parts that match and can be attached without too much rattling while still being solid (especially important at high speeds) could be difficult and expensive. I looked closely at some of the pictures and didn’t see support arm bosses or the standard holes often used for bolts and mounting tabs (perhaps I was missing them). Hope this helps guide you, I think the short answer is no, it’s not really optimized for adding fenders but you could use a seat post mounted rear fender like this or a carry rack to keep water off your back since it does appear to have seat stay bosses.

Robert Crivelli
5 months ago

Where can I purchase a zeitgeist city electric bike? Any information is gladly appreciated

Court Rye
5 months ago

Hey Robert! I’m not sure which shops have it but you could reach out to one of the team leads at the company. His name is Kartik and his email is kartik@zeitgeist.bike hope this helps!

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tinynja98
24 hours ago

Hello,

I'm thinking about making my own electric bicycle, which would be able to go around 50+ kph. I have it almost all planned out, I want to make a homemade electric bike, not just buy a ready to install kit. Looking at the cost of such a project, its right around 1000+$...

I was wondering what you guys use your electric bikes for? Do you only go out with an electric bike to have fun or do you actually use it as a mean of transportation replacing, for example, a car? More specifically, it's all great when you're on the road with an electric bike, but what do you actually do with your electric bicycle once you arrive at your destination? Do you simply leave it there, attached to a pole, knowing that you could lose (get stolen) 1000$ of equipment in a single day? This got me questionning my decision of building an expensive electric bicycle.

EDIT: I think it should be taken in consideration that I will probably not be able to secure the electric components to the bicycle as good as a company would do it to prevent theft...

My idea was to build an electric bicycle instead of buying a car, because it would cost way too much for me, knowing that I don't actually NEED a car, since I'm currently using public transport (Bus, Subway) and it's going somewhat great. So, of course this would make a very fun toy to play with, but would you use it often as a mean of transportation?

For what it's worth, I live close to Montreal, if anyone has experience with biking in this city?

Thanks in advance for your feedback!

mrgold35
1 day ago

I just saw they changed the dates of the Salt Lake City eBike Expo to the following week (now on May 19th to 21st). I won't be able to make the Expo. :(

Over50
2 days ago

I am in the Detroit area and I bought my ebike from Propel in Brooklyn. I really wanted to stay local but there just isn't much selection in my area. I was close to choosing the Trek XM700+ but the bike didn't fit me well. I have a local Focus/Kalkhoff dealer and I really liked the Integrale 11 speed. But that particular dealer didn't seem too concerned with getting my business inclusive of not returning a couple of phone calls. Also, I visited one local ebike shop that didn't seem very interested in helping me find the bike I wanted but rather only seemed interested in selling me on what they had on the floor. That dealer also let his bias against pedal assist bikes come out loud and clear when I mentioned a few makes/models I had researched. Finally, I visited a local traditional bike shop that sells some brands that also have ebikes like Scott or Felt (if I recall correctly). I inquired about the possibility of them ordering an ebike in one of those brands even though they only retailed traditional bikes. They steered the conversation to kit bikes and only seemed interested in building a kit bike for me (promising I could do 40mph on one of their kit bikes). So in summary, I had a really bad local experience on the shopping end (and conversely I found that Propel was eager to get me all the info I needed and respond to all of my silly inquiries). And I can report that now that I have had the bike for a few months, I've had it in to 2 different shops for brake adjustments. One is the Trek dealer where I almost opted for an XM700+. I have to say both places were very good about helping me out with service which was a pleasant surprise. It makes me optimistic that I can find someone to work on the bike should it become necessary.

I had a similar experience with one of my regular bikes. I did my research and kind of knew what I wanted but I couldn't find anything locally. I opted for a Spot Brand Champa because I was shopping for a steel frame city commuter with a belt drive. There were no Spot dealers near me so I purchased from a dealer in Chicago. The local Trek shop did the bike build for me, ordered and installed the fenders and now, over a year later, are building a front wheel/dynamo hub for me. So I have been pleasantly surprised that I've been able to get pretty good service from 2 different shops even though I didn't buy their bikes. Hopefully a good businessman sees those as opportunities to win customers if/when that customer decides to make another purchase.

Drumulac
2 days ago

Hey, you can post your full review within this thread if you want, but if you want to start your own I understand:) Your story was very funny, I would have been so upset to see a pannier missing! I lock the panniers onto my rack with a small Abus chain. I am glad you found yours! I recently lost a full set of keys for my bike, the whole key ring gone! Lost the battery and abus lock keys, as well as the 2 keys to my car roof rack for the Yakima and Rockymounts.... Thank god I had a spare of everything, but I have no idea where they went! I usually leave my keys in my Abus Granit city chain which I then bungee onto the rack using the bungees that came with it. They key stays in the locking core well, if you turn it so that it can't be pulled out out, you really have almost no chance of losing it. If you've had that chain youll know what I mean, it really stays in there well. I have no idea where it went!

I had a similar situation with a slow leak where I had to stop and pump every mile, it sucked! One thing you can always count on are fellow cyclists to help out, I've had some guys go wayyyy above and beyond in helping me once or twice on the side of the road. Of course you had to ride your whole route just to find your bag a block away, but at least you found it!! I would be so upset if I lost a great product I couldnt replace. I use the huge Ortleib panniers.

By shorter for the Delite rack, do you mean from saddle to tail? Or from the top of the rack to the bottom by the dropouts? I have never had any other bike with a rack, but I do notice that my Ortleibs have a hard time attaching the bottom swing bolt to clamp onto the rack from the bottom. It seems like the rack arms are in the worst place for attaching that bottom support piece. I kind of forced one on there which eventually led to it flying off my pannier. I keep a lot of tools in those bags and used to keep my 10lb abus chain in there but it would cause the panniers to bump the tire and spokes in rough riding. Now I just roll the chain up and use the bungees to hold it onto the rack which works fine, I have nothing on top of the rack anyway. For my girlfriends bike, we bought the 60L Ortleib Duffle RG. She wanted something she could wheel around so I guess we will just bungee the hell out of it to her Charger rack lol

I'll definitely post my review of the Rohloff GX in this forum Matt as soon as I get some time to do so (Grrrrr. . .). Regarding the rack dimensions vis-à-vis the panniers - the R&M rack is shorter from top to bottom (vertically). I, too, find the bottom support piece of the rack to be oddly setup. I'm sure there is a reason for it being that way and there must be some standard they are following, but it is definitely not compatible with panniers I've owned. But, I'm doing a workaround that will take care of the issue.

One more humorous "lost pannier" story: My wife and I were doing a three week self contained trip in Alaska back in 1995. We had just started out, having flown into Anchorage. First day, we ride to Whittier to catch the ferry to Valdez. I forget the name of the state park we camped in, but right after setting up the tent and getting settled in, a ranger comes by to warn us that there was high Grizzly activity in the area and told us to be sure to clean up well, hang a bag with our food & utensils away from the site, etc. We used to keep our portable kitchen kit and cook stove in one of my wife's front panniers. When camping,we would use a length of zip cord, attach it to a tall overhanging limb, and then hoist up the food pannier 10 feet or so above the ground to keep it from the wild critters. Having celebrated the beginning of our trip with maybe a bit too much JD, I got lazy before turning in and didn't do a great job of hanging the pannier, though it was a considerable distance from our site. Upon waking in the morning, the pannier was missing . . . directly underneath it were very fresh Grizzly tracks! We looked around (very carefully), but never found the pannier. My wife spent the rest of the trip with a sleeping back bungeed to the front rack where the pannier should have been. Visions of mama, papa & baby bear sitting around the den using the spices and utensils to dine on their latest victim. When we got back home, I contacted my LBS who had sold us the panniers to order a new set. Turns out that the folks at Cannondale were so amused by the bear story that they sent on a new pair at no cost.

Chris Nolte
3 days ago

I don't use the throttle much on my Emotion Evo City. If I were 20 years younger, I wouldn't even consider a throttle (or ebike) since I was doing century rides on my road bike. 10 years ago, I had to give up my road and mountain bikes, but got a new lease on riding with a recumbent. I still use the recumbent but realize its time for the next bike phase, ebiking. I still have a competitive spirit and like those long rides, but sometimes get to the point where I feel I've earned the right to use the throttle and rest my weary legs for those last few miles home. I use a throttle only as a safety measure for those rare instances outlined in this thread but can see where some riders feel it is unnecessary just as some feel ebikes are the devil. I hope to be posting many years from now about my experiences on a throttled tricycle!
Have you ridden a bike with a Bosch motor? I ask because the pedal assist is quite a bit more refined and predictable. I wonder if you would feel the same on a bike with that system. I know with the Easy Motion bikes you often have to feather the brake to stop the bike from taking off on you. Easy Motion bikes require a brake cut off switch, whereas the Bosch system does not. The motors sensors are advanced enough that it's not necessary. I don't mean to criticize. I'm really interested in understanding this perspective since it comes up often.

romagjack
3 days ago

I don't use the throttle much on my Emotion Evo City. If I were 20 years younger, I wouldn't even consider a throttle (or ebike) since I was doing century rides on my road bike. 10 years ago, I had to give up my road and mountain bikes, but got a new lease on riding with a recumbent. I still use the recumbent but realize its time for the next bike phase, ebiking. I still have a competitive spirit and like those long rides, but sometimes get to the point where I feel I've earned the right to use the throttle and rest my weary legs for those last few miles home. I use a throttle only as a safety measure for those rare instances outlined in this thread but can see where some riders feel it is unnecessary just as some feel ebikes are the devil. I hope to be posting many years from now about my experiences on a throttled tricycle!

Ann M.
3 days ago

Sea Otter Classic is an interesting event; however, it only happens once a year. With the Ebike Expos, a traveling event, more people have an opportunity over a year's time to visit the show. An ebike show is about everything ebike with loads of test rides on bikes that you don't get to experience in every city or bike shop. The more chances that people have to physically check out an electric bike, the better. Dispels myths and hopefully, some negative judgements about what ebikes are.

So, @mrgold35, go to that Expo! @Nutty Girl, there are lots of places to experience the side dressings of cycling but only small local events and shows like the EBike Expo to really learn about electric bikes :).

Jimtowner
3 days ago

I'm happy to share my new Easy Motion City because of where I can go with it. Having lived in Bouldet County CO for 22 years I just discoveref the City of Boulder's Multi-Use Path. What a gem. At age 74 I can enjoy longish, safe rides and even bump into old friends (not literally).

1/1
Matt A
4 days ago

Yes Matt, got the bike two weeks ago. Chris Nolte was kind enough to have someone personally deliver it on a Sunday. Can't say enough about Chris . . . great guy, knowledgeable, responsive, caring.

Like you, my delayed response to your last post is due to the email notifications mysteriously going missing, but no biggie - I've also been super busy, so haven't even looked at the forum since getting the Delite.

I'll give a full narrative of my first impressions in a separate posting, hopefully within the next day or so. For now, suffice it to say that it is pretty much all as advertised: exceptional quality/engineering, lots of fun. Due to inclement weather and commitments that required my truck, I didn't get to ride it more than 10 miles the first week, but have been making up for it with 140 miles over last week commuting to work + doing a lot of "dead head" miles over this past weekend.

Quick "feel good" story for now: I took it out early yesterday (Easter Sunday) for a 35 mile ride on some of my favorite local roads. On the way back & approximately 6 miles from home, I have a flat in the rear. Not a big deal, since I always carry pump, toolkit, and spare tube. Since I am still setting up the bike and haven't found a good on-frame mounting point for the pump, plus the tool kit isn't mounted on the seat yet due to my still fooling around with seat position settings, I have been keeping all that emergency repair stuff in my right pannier. So, I go to get the pump, etc., out of the pannier and . . . the pannier is missing! Since my wife isn't driving yet (recovering from neurosurgery) and I didn't want to bother friends/family on an Easter Sunday morning, I figured I'd just bite the bullet and started to push the bike the rest of the way home (glad Chris told me how to operate the push assist function - some pretty substantial hills on the route). Anyway, I go maybe one mile and a couple on a tandem stops and offers to pump up the tire. I figured "what the heck, let's see what happens" and the tire did take the air - slow leak. I jump back on the bike, go maybe 1/2 mile and it is flat again. Push another 2.5 miles and woman on another bike stops and offers her pump. This time I really crank the pressure up, thank her profusely, and ride as fast as possible to put more miles on before the tire flattened. Actually got most of the way home. I get home, hop in my truck, and retrace the entire 35 miles in hopes of finding my lost pannier + contents. Didn't see it the whole route until . . . I get one block away from my house and there it is, propped up against a hydrant. Contents untouched. Actually, the pannier is an Arkel Expedition, one of the originals custom made when they were just getting into biz and not cheap, so it would have been sorely missed. Anyway, through pure luck and a string of good Samaritans, all turned out well! The "trail angels" were definitely looking out for me.

The Delite rack is shorter (top to bottom) than the standard after market bolt-on racks I've had in the past, so even though I had done some adjustments, I guess the panniers were still not quite tight enough; also, the thicker diameter of the rack top tube negated the use of the pannier lock mechanism. Will have to figure that out since buying new panniers is not an option right now. Will also be sure to frame mount the pump and make sure the toolkit is mounted on the seat rails, not thrown in the pannier.

As mentioned, I'll post my initial impressions soon.
Hey, you can post your full review within this thread if you want, but if you want to start your own I understand:) Your story was very funny, I would have been so upset to see a pannier missing! I lock the panniers onto my rack with a small Abus chain. I am glad you found yours! I recently lost a full set of keys for my bike, the whole key ring gone! Lost the battery and abus lock keys, as well as the 2 keys to my car roof rack for the Yakima and Rockymounts.... Thank god I had a spare of everything, but I have no idea where they went! I usually leave my keys in my Abus Granit city chain which I then bungee onto the rack using the bungees that came with it. They key stays in the locking core well, if you turn it so that it can't be pulled out out, you really have almost no chance of losing it. If you've had that chain youll know what I mean, it really stays in there well. I have no idea where it went!

I had a similar situation with a slow leak where I had to stop and pump every mile, it sucked! One thing you can always count on are fellow cyclists to help out, I've had some guys go wayyyy above and beyond in helping me once or twice on the side of the road. Of course you had to ride your whole route just to find your bag a block away, but at least you found it!! I would be so upset if I lost a great product I couldnt replace. I use the huge Ortleib panniers.

By shorter for the Delite rack, do you mean from saddle to tail? Or from the top of the rack to the bottom by the dropouts? I have never had any other bike with a rack, but I do notice that my Ortleibs have a hard time attaching the bottom swing bolt to clamp onto the rack from the bottom. It seems like the rack arms are in the worst place for attaching that bottom support piece. I kind of forced one on there which eventually led to it flying off my pannier. I keep a lot of tools in those bags and used to keep my 10lb abus chain in there but it would cause the panniers to bump the tire and spokes in rough riding. Now I just roll the chain up and use the bungees to hold it onto the rack which works fine, I have nothing on top of the rack anyway. For my girlfriends bike, we bought the 60L Ortleib Duffle RG. She wanted something she could wheel around so I guess we will just bungee the hell out of it to her Charger rack lol

Matt A
4 days ago

Wow this is intriguing. When you say the shop fixed it was that Propel? Or did you take it somewhere else? Did they give you a full explanation? I'm very curious as to what the problem was, what caused it to occur and how it was fixed. Any more info you have would be greatly appreciated. I haven't had any trouble with my Nuvinci yet but I'm only at 500 miles. I asked my LBS if they had ever worked on them. The mechanic told me he had successfully repaired the mechanical Nuvinci without too much trouble but had an electronic/automatic Nuvinci that was a major pain in the rear. And with that he said the Fallbrook Technologies was really hard to work with. Just one mechanic's feedback.

Regarding the speed: I'm still glad I got the 28mph version but I have learned that I could have lived with the 20mph bike for commuting. My commute has so much start/stop that I rarely find myself over 20mph. The other day I hit 27mph but it was for only a very short stretch. When I do have open road, I find myself usually cruising right around 20mph in Tour mode. I find myself wondering whether the higher torque but lower speed Bosch motor would have been a better choice for my commuter bike just in terms of efficiency and battery range. The HS Charger is a blast to ride so no regrets at all so I was just referring to what the most "efficient" choice would have been. Over my last few commutes, I've averaged about 2 hours and 10 to 20 minutes for the 35-36 miles or about 15+mph. I'd say I have a few sections where I can get the speed up and cruise but for the most part it is start/stop commuting.
I will certainly get some more information on what went wrong with the NuVinci. I had it fixed at Propel and spent the day in Brooklyn with family so when I picked up the bike I was very tired. I asked about what was wrong and everything but I will ask again in a way that will allow me to explain it to you. Initially I went to Firth & Wilson in Philly and he re-aligned the gear range rings of the Nuvinci which were out of alignment. For some reason, this actually made it worse and instead of spinning like a clown at 24mph i was doing it at 20mph. That guy told me the Nuvinci had to be reset internally but he didnt have time to do it. I had propel fix it so I will ask when I go there in a week or so to pick up my girlfriends bike, she got the same as you I believe. Charger GT Nuvinci HS in matte black, but she got dual battery as well. Can never have too much lithium!

It works great now at least! I am almost at 1000 miles now, but I ride the bike really really hard sometimes. Since my Nuvinci was messed up I was discouraged from working since speed helps me make more money, so I took it up and down some rough terrain and in the city at night was jumping off all of the driveway curbs like I did when I was a kid, only this time I was going 20+ mph. It was so much fun, the bike really can take a beating but I am not sure why this Nuvinci thing happened to me. I was thinking about the electronic Harmony Nuvinci one day, but Kyle at propel told me it isnt smooth and feels glitchy. My only motivation for it was the fact that my cables were frayed multiple times for seemingly no reason. The 2nd time it happened it was from over tightening the cable into the metal piece at the end.

I drive through Center City Philadelphia constantly, but I ride quickly and pedal hard/fast so I end up hitting over 20mph even if I am stopping and starting 1 block at a time. I just like the ability to travel at a speed that cars behind me really cant complain when there is only one lane or the million other situations that require riding in the car lane. Honestly, I mostly travel in the middle of the car lane because I jump red lights, only yield at stop signs, and don't want to get doored. Cars never complain, it usually only takes a couple seconds off the line to hit 15-20mph, I can be at 25+ by half a block when actually putting in real effort.

I don't think efficiency is changed much between motors, just depends more on how you ride I guess. Really I think the dual battery gives more than double the range of a single battery. I took a test ride one night in all Turbo to see how far I could go. Mind you, I was riding in all Turbo, with about a 225lb load on the bike between me and all my tools, water, supplies, and my 10lb Abus chain. I went 52 miles before the range said 1 mile left, I didnt run it to dead but stopped when the range said 1 mile. Also, I have the Supernova M99 Pro, and used it on high beam for most of the ride but pointed down because my tail light only turns on right now if I turn the high beam on the light. Remedying that with the M99 tail light. Anyway, with all that weight, electronic usage (including phone charging), and I frequently travel 25+, and also this was all in busy city stop/start riding, I amazingly went over 50 miles!

With regards to your speed, it sounds like you go faster than you think! At 2 hours and 20 minutes for 36 miles, thats an average of about 15mph if you never stop and just do 15 the entire time. With all the stopping and starting you are doing you must be going faster :)

I ordered a Nyon a while back and it took 4 weeks for German Customs to just cancel it and send it back. I tried again using Ebay this time for an extra $100 compared to the bike-discount.de price, and in just 4 days since shipment its already just a couple towns away! The guy shipped it the day after I ordered, and it went through the exact same German facility. With the Nyon I will have a ton more stats to help decipher where the wattage really goes! After I get that, my final 'upgrade' will be the Sherlock bike tracker when it ships in a few weeks. I am very excited to have the Nyon though, I feel like for a $7000 bike, it should have more than the Intuvia. The Intuvia is great, but minimalist. The Nyon is feature rich, but most likely still has some glitches. I just feel like it really completed the whole feel of having spent car money on a bike if the bike has a serious headlight, and a serious smart computer with GPS. Other than that everything has been great on the bike, the only thing I ever get jealous of is the suspension setup and fenders on the Moustache Starckbike, even though the bike as a whole is something I'd never choose.

P.S. The day after I did that 52 miles all turbo test, I had charged the bike fully and it showed a crazy 154 mile range in Eco.

Oh I forgot one thing to mention but then I remembered you have only 1 battery. Charging on the bike is weird, no matter how much I charge it, my Range in Turbo will only go up to like 38-40. When I charge the batteries separately off the bike using 2 chargers, it will then show me a 5-54 mile range estimate. However, when I begin a ride 'fully' charged but only showing 38 miles of range, I can go 20 miles and the range will still say 30. Really weird, can't figure out why! At first I thought the batteries were only charging to 80% on the bike, but now I'm see the range is just inaccurate, can't imagine why....

BVC
4 days ago

Brakes need lots of adjustments to maintain tightness. This is most likely due to 20+ mph and city street braking of a 60 lb bike + rider/gear (So trying to stop around 225-300 lbs?)

I found using a softer brake pad on the rear cuts down on excessive heavy braking thus leaving a more desired tread wear (less micro-skidding).

Headlight sucks. Buy one from 1859 NW. Plug an play with factory light.

Tilt brake levers down a tad to put less strain on the wrists by not having to twist your wrist down/fingers up just to clear the brake levers to get access. Both rovers had brake levers tilted too high up.

Few days after rain or beach - inspect all bolts and overall bike for rust. One rover had minimal rust. The other had rust on non-treated bolts (especially the controller bolts. What a pain).

Every month or so, depending on how often your ride, inspect the bottom of your kick stand. Mine tends to show wear on the bottom end. I placed a few screw bolts on the bottom foot to help ease wear on the plastic.

Conor
5 days ago

Overheating was my thought as well, especially when it comes after a hill, but I've had mile-long climbs at 4-5% grade where it worked great but would cut out on city streets a mile later. Right now, however, it won't really go at all. I feel bad delivering a "review" now because E-Glide and David are trying to help. I've talked to him and their tech guy a couple of times, and they're sending new electronics. Hoping that helps, but it really sounds like it's the motor (in my uninformed opinion).

RoadWrinkle
5 hours ago

When deciding to buy a BULLS E-stream FS 3 29er it was clear, with no BULLS dealer in my state, I was going to have to buy the bike online. Without the benefit of a test ride or inspection of the exact bike, your in a position where you need to trust the dealer to do a number of things AFTER you send them thousands. I think I chose the right bike, but unfortunately the wrong dealer...live and learn.

After searching a dozen or so sources, found out most BULLS dealers do not stock most bikes on their website, but order them from the manufacturer after the consumer orders online (same with some other brands) . The dealer removes the bike from the box, does a partial assembly, inspection and tune before re-boxing for shipping to you. The whole process takes around three weeks from order to delivery if your bike is not in stock.

Motostrano in Redwood City, Ca. has a large selection of BULLS models advertised with 1-3 day shipping after your order (if it is in stock). Called them and spoke with 'Joe' to confirm they had the bike in stock and was told "it's here, but we need a few days to get it ready for shipping." My order came to $4189.00. After two weeks go by with nothing shipped contacted them again and was told "we just received the bike from BULLS and need to get it ready for shipping". I finally got the bike a few days ago. It arrived with two punctured tubes, a seat frame bent and twisted beyond use, derailleurs and brakes out of alignment, a shipping box with Styrofoam padding taped to the outside of the box where part of the box was missing, most of the manufacturers protective padding was not on the bike, but on the bottom of the box, like it was not re-boxed properly. Joe sent a pic of the bike on their stand "ready for shipping" that clearly shows a completely flat rear tire, with the shrink wrap actually folding the tire on the rim, but they shipped it like that regardless (see pic). While waiting for a new seat to arrive I had plenty of time to change out the tubes, re-tune the derailleurs and brakes on a brand new bike. Thanks Motostrano for an interesting buying experience.

Upside is, after swapping in an old seat, took it for a little 5 mile test ride on paved streets with hills. I can report it climbs easily and rewards peddling power with motor power very smoothly. The brose drive system feels like riding a non-electric bike, you will feel the assist, but this system requires a decent amount of pedaling effort so be prepared. The brose motor is smooth, you know you are getting assist but it feels more like YOU are doing it as opposed to feeling propelled. The entire ebike philosophy at BULLS is to produce "rider bikes", and not throttled EV's. For the size of the battery, this is one of the more stealthy drive systems you can buy today.

1/4
Thomas Jaszewski
6 days ago

Mastercard. And a folding Topeak Mini 9. With the mid drives a chain tool and some chain. But im not an adventure rider. The city is under 2 miles wide and 6 miles long.

Qtr on
6 days ago

My walk assist works. My bike is actually from Germany. There are no Bosch dealers or techs in my city.

justforfun
6 days ago

The city stealing bikes is crazy.

GingerBeardMan
1 week ago

BTW, ours came with Kenda tires. One of the boxes was beat up but other than a small scratch on the left front fork dropout all seems to be good.

Yes mine came with Kenda tires as well. Is this any different than the ones that were having issues earlier in this thread? Would be great if I didn't have to worry about getting Mr Tuffy or other tires all together however will likely get flat city slicks for city commute during summer.

Thomas Jaszewski
1 week ago

OK last bit of input. I don't think a decent bike can be had for less than $600. Under that and the components get cheap. Brakes and wheels are downgraded. I like stopping efficiently. And then the motor and battery. A decent kit is easily $500 and a battery $500-600. That's a low ball battery from one of the famous discount sellers. A good longer range battery more like $650-700. The cheaper bikes are just that. Cheaper and lesser quality. I found the most comfortable frame. $500, a motor, $650, 20Ah battery $600 and from there added better seat, seat post with suspension, mirrors, fenders, bell, rack, misc tools and before long, $3000.

Your idea isn't a bad one. Do the existing bike and get a new bike down the line. My bike weighs 65lbs with the smaller battery. The nice part of building from a kit is that it can be somewhat incremental. Unlike many here I don't care for the discount battery resellers. I paid more for my batteries but here in the 4th season I'm glad I did.

Take a real look at where these hills are. I helped a guy out last week, and when pushed he realized he'd never be out riding on those hilly roads and in that traffic. Realistically most of his riding with the Missus would be on recreational bike paths and city streets. We dd a geared hub drive and battery kit from EM3ev. $1300 with all the good stuff and a 20Ah 36V battery. 20MPH and will do 14% grades even a bit more. Add $100 for a middle BBSHD and a 52V 20Ah battery to do some seriously steep grades..

Cheaper is out there, but again, lesser quality batteries. I've worked with dozens and dozens of builders and watched scores more. Pay now or pay later. Those 30-90day battery warrantees stink.

Mike Radenbaugh
1 week ago

Hi @LimboJim

Here are a few follow ups to your post to help better inform customers and thank and credit you for your input:

- We recently added a sizing chart to the RadMini tech specs page and also changed the disk brake sizing for the front and rear disks to 180mm to reflect the correct production spec, as you are right the rear was still listed as 160mm on the site, but we had changed this earlier last year. https://www.radpowerbikes.com/pages/radmini-technical-specs

- Both the 500 watt and 750 watt stamped Bafang motors we have used from the start have both been mechanically equivalent, the only difference being the stamping/label on the side of the motors. After some negotiations and additional lab testing we were able to get Bafang to agree to change the stamping on the motor to reflect our 750 watt use case, until this time, they had only rated the motors to 500 watts from the factory, but we had been successfully implementing the motors at higher wattages in high volumes without issues. All Rad Power Bikes have been full 750 watts since the early days, the motor controllers power output to the motor is the true measurement, not the sticker/label on the motor.

- All battery packs use Panasonic cells. We had been using an equivalent Samsung cell in the first quarters of production but made Panasonic cells standard for supply reasons. The original weight of the packs was a little over 7 pounds and the current pack weight is 7.4 lbs (rover, city, and wagon) and 7.7 lbs (mini) mainly due to slightly heavier cells and more supporting materials used in the internal pack construction.

- Your comment about the tier of the Shimano components used on our bikes not being specified is because we have to change the specific model used in production almost on a yearly basis, since Shimano makes frequent changes to their product lines. The Shimano Acera and similar tier derailleurs and drivetrain components we use are trouble free on all the Rad bikes we run through the ringer here, and they are one of the lowest volume service/warranty parts we send to customers.

- The Front forks switched to Top Gun on all RadRovers in late 2015 if I remember correctly, will go look that date up in our BOM's.

- Wheel size on the RadMini is 20’’x 4’’ we will be on the lookout for any text that says otherwise.

- Seatpost length did get extended on all bikes. The current website specs are accurate.

- Apologies the mini was listed as a step-through, which was an error, it is more in the “mid-step” category with a 26.6’’ standover.

- The metal gears/oil bath in the original Hengtai motors were a nice improvement, but we had been testing the new Bafang fat bike hub motors in a parallel path of testing, and Bafang’s a more consistent supplier and the motors performance and durability were superb. Sorry if you did not get what you expected, but I hope that you have been happy with the Bafang motor. Most electric fat bike manufacturers followed our lead and have started adopting the same motor late last year and now in 2017 they are on a lot of bikes.

- The discrepancy in motor weight I believe was the weight of a rear wheel versus the weight of a motor.

- The spokes on all of our bikes are 12 guage.

Thanks for your comments, it helps us continue to improve and evolve, happy ebiking

Mr. Coffee
1 week ago

How well does the Spot Trace perform when you are in an adverse situation? E.g. will it still track your bike if it is indoors? In a vehicle? Or someplace where you have a limited view of the sky (e.g. in a big city or a narrow canyon)?

My own experiences with Iridium and Globalstar is that it can be difficult getting them to work unless you have a lot of sky visible from your location. I love 'em both and they both have quite literally saved my life but they do have their limitations.

Robert W Green
1 week ago

Okay guys... I'm asking this because I think a lot of traditional cyclists look at ebikes and think "that's for weaklings" but in my experience, the adrenaline and help with hills and winds actually gets me amped and I tend to pedal more frequently to go even faster (maybe not pedaling as hard... but that saves my knees, and I still get cardio). The other thing about my electric bike is that I ride it more often because I don't dread hills, sweat or getting tired. So yeah... what do you think, can you get more exercise riding an electric bike than a regular bike?

More, because I commute to work 7.5 miles and get there without breaking a sweat. Without pedal assist for cruising and throttle for intersection crossing, riding in the city would be too dangerous for me. Remmber, life isn't a test, so its ok to cheat.

Stromer Bomber
1 week ago

I own a 2013 ST1 Platinum that still rides like new. One way to tell if it's a Platinum is if it has 27 speeds - an Elite only has 9 speeds and no front derailleur. The Platiunum can reach 28 mph, and the Elite is listed as 20 mph - the extra speed is really nice.

My buddy just bought a new 2014 ST1 Partinum for around $3,100 and he loves it. They are warranting the entire bike and the two year warranty on the battery just started - so that's one less thing to be worried about. My buddy's bike also came with the city kit, which is nice if you're going to use it for commuting.

Let me know if you have any other questions.

Krishna
1 week ago

Today I got the battery but the plug is totally different. This 48 VDC 10.5Ah 504wh battery is from the 2017 EVO City.

I am trying to figure out what to do..

1/1
ROCebike
1 week ago

Im looking for an Ebike for riding around town. I want something that looks fairly like a regular bike but after a top speed of at least 28mph. It would be nice to take it off-road also but my main priority is city commuter riding

Ive got a budget of about 5k US.

If anyone can suggest the best bike for me it would be greatly appreciated! Thanks :)
I have a Pedego Ridge Rider and upgrading it with a Body Float and new saddle. This is an amazing bike for versatility, the torque sensor is very smooth engaging, and 20 gears of mountain biking provides lots of options. I love the throttle override for pushing off at intersections and a quick hit as needed. It's not a speed pededelec, but I can peddle over 22mph still with motor. Good battery (now using Panasonic) and stealthy MTB appearance. I might change the tires to Marathons next as I'm really 80/20 road and packed trails. Other than speed, this is a great bike for your specs and under budget.

Options I considered were the Riese and Meuller Charger Series. Great machines, not as stealthy with Bosch mid drives, but I really like the concept of belt drive and Rohlhoff geared hub. These bikes are built to order in Germany and I didn't want to wait. It's more expensive than your budget but I'll probably buy one in the future for a touring bike. Propel Bikes would be a great dealer for you.

Other option I considered was the Bulls Outlaw. It's got both speed and high torque, a rare combo since its usually a trade off between the two. Not at all stealthy with the battery case frame mounted, but it can meet your specs.

Lastly, a fabulous deal is available from Amego in Toronto. Virginia has been in the ebike business for over seven years and she really know her stuff. They got a deal on prior model Stomers which are still better than most competitors new best models. A great deal in CDN $ can be had with online order shipped to your home. Amego has just launched their own branded bike. The Infinity is really well spec'd and a great price. Available in May.

BTW, I'm 6'2" and now 220 lbs.. Down 5 lbs since owning the Ridge Rider. The benefit of riding a 60 lb bike with and without the motor. I m very satisfied. It does everything well and kitted out for $4k. I haven't needed service but I know Pedego is best in class for support. With your budget of $5k, don't underweight dealer Support in your list of requirements. It's a lot of money to potentially sit unused while waiting for a part delivery.

enzo
4 months ago

Can you pop a wheelie on these bikes?

Amit fortus
11 months ago

is this bike actually available or is it just a concept?

Mike Vincent
1 year ago

It's actually on sale right now at touch of modern: https://www.touchofmodern.com/sales/zeitgeist/zeitgeist-city

Question: Is the display readable in the dark? Does it illuminate?

Dmc InLA
1 year ago

where r u? looks amazing

William Lam
1 year ago

Great review. Nice looking bike ... But I really don't see how this thing is priced at $8K. They will sell a ton at $4K, but at $8K, it's only gonna be a store display.

odetoazam
1 year ago

+William Lam It's not gonna be the final price. Its better to price higher and test price points. 4k is too low though.

Rob Schmitt
1 year ago

7999$. This is more expensive than a car. I would ride an electric bike with 45 km/h limit. But these bikes are starting at 4500€.

Christopher Moltisanti
1 year ago

+Rob Schmitt China will clone these soon enough,I predict we'll see versions of this style next year for under $2000.

BIKESTER INC.
1 year ago

+Rob Schmitt you're spot on. Our average street price in the US will settle at $5k-$6.5k for the limited edition selling on ToMo. I think the there are two electric bike markets in the US- the value and the designer. This might fit the latter.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+Rob Schmitt Yeah, it's one of the pricier options I've seen... I've reviewed a few other speed pedelecs (with a few being cheaper) back at the site: http://electricbikereview.com/tag/speed/ the new 2016 Turbo is ~$3k and goes ~26 mph (~42km/h)

Jappe Kapanen
1 year ago

ok thank you for the answer

Stephen Cho
1 year ago

The cross current from juiced riders has similar specs with the same battery for $1500. You could buy 5 of them plus a spare battery for 8K. The owner of this company certainly ain't thinking about the masses.

odetoazam
1 year ago

+Stephen Cho I dont think advertisers are thinking about the masses either. #thinkniche

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+Stephen Cho Yeah, I'm excited to test the Cross Current very soon :D

William Wonder
1 year ago

I'm surprised the electric firms aren't making more recumbents. Logic would dictate this is the real market, older riders who need assistance to ride like a young man and they are going recumbent. Ya, I know about Bionx and it appears to be a good system.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+William Wonder Hi William, here's one amazing recumbent with full suspension and regeneration! Very cool in my opinion: http://electricbikereview.com/hp-velotechnik/scorpion-fs-26-s-pedelec/ maybe we'll see others like it in the future made with Carbon fiber like the Zeitgeist City :D

дмитрий трофимов
1 year ago

Im   sorry! what about price? 7 hundred bhu bhu bhu bhu dollars. HOW MUCH PLZ???

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+дмитрий трофимов The price is $7,999 which I mention in the video and list back on the website: http://electricbikereview.com/zeitgeist/city/ hope this helps :)

Flo Mo
1 year ago

Fascinating! The future of e-bikes? Again a great video. I'll start saving money. :)

Kartik Ram
1 year ago

+Elya Cornovier Get this bike at a limited sale on #Touchofmodern
https://www.touchofmodern.com/sales/zeitgeist/zeitgeist-city

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+Elya Cornovier Yeah, neat to see a completely custom frame like this and the attention to detail with the display unit :)

Gardener Rob
1 year ago

Very impressive looking bike,  looks like it would be very light and agile.

Kartik Ram
1 year ago

+Gardener Rob Get this bike at a limited sale on #Touchofmodern
https://www.touchofmodern.com/sales/zeitgeist/zeitgeist-city

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+Gardener Rob Yeah, it rode great... very fast and responsive when pedaling.

JeMasLT
1 year ago

Good work dude.
Make some video with Tips How to care electric bikes. When to clean what to change and so on :)

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+JeMasLT Good tip, I'll work on something like this but here's one I shot a while back with a shop owner: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFLIGRj2bxU

David Macdonald
1 year ago

it's nice , but just to much cash , make a bike for the masses , out of quality parts , that would do more for E bikes, community.

David Macdonald
1 year ago

Thanks all have a look .

Kartik Ram
1 year ago

+David Macdonald Get this bike at a limited sale on #Touchofmodern
https://www.touchofmodern.com/sales/zeitgeist/zeitgeist-city

David Macdonald
1 year ago

Thanks .

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+David Macdonald I've been trying to list more of the affordable models at the site to make them easier to find, check it out: http://electricbikereview.com/tag/affordable/

Jappe Kapanen
1 year ago

Is that bike able to add some kind of front suspension??
Maybe less than 120mm???

Jappe Kapanen
1 year ago

+Kartik Ram Ok Want to see that when it's finished

BIKESTER INC.
1 year ago

+Jappe Kapanen We are considering putting a SRAM RS-1 front fork with 100mm of travel as it can get pretty bumpy out there.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+Kartik Ram Kartik, if you're going to comment on videos please answer the question that the user is asking (in this case about suspension) vs. spamming the flash sale

Kartik Ram
1 year ago

+Jappe Kapanen Get this bike at a limited sale on #Touchofmodern
https://www.touchofmodern.com/sales/zeitgeist/zeitgeist-city

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+Jappe Kapanen I would think so, SR Suntour makes a few minimal suspension forks like this... they aren't as light as a carbon fork but they are still slim and you get 100 mm or so. I'm reviewing one other Zeitgeist ebike and it does have a suspension fork (but the frame is Aluminum vs Carbon).

benjamin Ofuasia
1 year ago

RIP wallet

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+benjamin Ofuasia There's room for improvement to get there, especially with similarly priced bikes like the Specialized Turbo S and Stromer ST2 with competing specs and perhaps better performance but not quite as light weight.

benjamin Ofuasia
1 year ago

i see it, but all i can think of it trying to fit in with are bikes like the S-Works Demo 8 or the Santa Cruz V10c

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+benjamin Ofuasia Ha! Yeah... but there are still normal bicycles for this price so I can see how it's trying to fit into the market. Maybe just above what I can afford ;)

benjamin Ofuasia
1 year ago

8 grand

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+benjamin Ofuasia Yep O_O

nerdexproject
1 year ago

I like how the battery is integrated but that does not justify the price. We gotta teach those companies that we wont just pay any amount of money. If anybody's interested in a similar bike like this, just look around, there are lower priced options available.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+nerdexproject Good points, I agree :)

nerdexproject
1 year ago

Yeah that might be true but unlike BMW, Zeitgeist isn't a coveted brand. And if they want to get there, being expensive isn't the only answer. They must offer desirable features and first and foremost they need at least lights imo. At least they're doing the design right.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+nerdexproject I think they realize that it's expensive but that's part of the appeal... just like a Coach handbag or a BMW. There are many other affordable ebikes out there, having something different like this just signals mass appeal to me and the desire for some consumers to go for style and quality at a higher price. It costs a lot to create a custom frame like this with electronics and display to match.

CarbLoaders
1 year ago

One of the best looking e-bikes out there. I really like the integrated flush computer in the stem. It's just too bad the price point is way out there in Neverland. Great review as always!

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+CarbLoaders Thanks, yeah I really loved the display :)

Juan Nieve
1 year ago

Great bike, but you have to make a lot, a ton of money to justify something that price, mortals can only watch your video, good one as usual, thanks.

Paideia
1 year ago

If you use it everyday it isn't expensive in the end. I bought my bike 20 years ago. I've changed the brakes, gears and saddle only once, that's all the repair needed. I've never paid gas or taxes and parking is cheaper or free. The only problem is that winter commute is hard or sometimes impossible, but on the plus side my body is aparently in very good shape and never been in a gym