Zeitgeist City Review

Zeitgeist City Electric Bike Review
Zeitgeist City 8fun 500 Watt Geared Hub Motor
Zeitgeist City Integrated Downtube Battery Protanium Samsung
Zeitgeist City Removable Magnetic Cycle Computer
Zeitgeist City 180 Mm Disc Brakes Qr Front Wheel
Zeitgeist City Carbon Fiber Seat Post 31 6
Zeitgeist City Front View Carbon Fork
Zeitgeist City Kickstand Hydraulic Disc Brakes
Zeitgeist City Custom Carbon Stem Integrated Display Lcd
Zeitgeist City Removable 48 Volt Battery
Zeitgeist City Torque Cadence Sensing Bottom Bracket
Zeitgeist City Tubro Ergonomic Grips Bar Ends
Zeitgeist City Electric Bike Review
Zeitgeist City 8fun 500 Watt Geared Hub Motor
Zeitgeist City Integrated Downtube Battery Protanium Samsung
Zeitgeist City Removable Magnetic Cycle Computer
Zeitgeist City 180 Mm Disc Brakes Qr Front Wheel
Zeitgeist City Carbon Fiber Seat Post 31 6
Zeitgeist City Front View Carbon Fork
Zeitgeist City Kickstand Hydraulic Disc Brakes
Zeitgeist City Custom Carbon Stem Integrated Display Lcd
Zeitgeist City Removable 48 Volt Battery
Zeitgeist City Torque Cadence Sensing Bottom Bracket
Zeitgeist City Tubro Ergonomic Grips Bar Ends

Summary

  • A Class 3 speed pedelec made entirely from Carbon fiber including the frame, fork, seat post, stem and handle bars
  • Powerful 500 watt planetary geared motor, 48 volt Lithium-ion downtube mounted battery (removable) with premium Samsung cells
  • Custom integrated LCD display panel that's removable paired with a wireless control pad, oversized hydraulic disc brakes with ebike specific levers to cut power and premium tires with Kevlar lining for durability
  • One of the more expensive electric bikes I've tested at nearly $8k, only available in one size, color and frame style, quality Shimano Deore XT ten speed drivetrain for a comfortable range of pedaling and nine levels of assist to match

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Zeitgeist

Model:

City

Price:

$7,999

Body Position:

Forward Aggressive

Suggested Use:

Road, Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedalec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States, Worldwide

Model Year:

2016

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

43.5 lbs (19.73 kg)

Battery Weight:

5 lbs (2.26 kg)

Frame Material:

Carbon Fiber Nano Tubes (Kevlar Inner Lining)

Frame Sizes:

18.9 in (48 cm)

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

White with Matte Black Accents

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid, Carbon Fiber

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses

Gearing Details:

10 Speed 1x10 Shimano Deore XT

Shifter Details:

Shimano Deore XT Triggers on Right

Cranks:

Lasco FR 660, Aluminum Alloy Bash Guard

Pedals:

VP-882 Plastic Platform, Black

Headset:

FPD

Stem:

Custom Carbon Fiber

Handlebar:

Flat, Carbon Fiber

Brake Details:

Tektro Auriga Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Rotors, Tektro Dorado Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Grips:

Tubro TS420 Ergonomic, Locking with Bar Ends

Saddle:

Selle Royal, Vented Gel Active

Seat Post:

Carbon Fiber

Seat Post Length:

250 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

31.6 mm

Rims:

Brass Nipples

Spokes:

14 Gauge, Black

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Energizer Plus, 28" x 1.75"

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

GreenGuard Puncture Protection, Reflective Sidewall Stripe

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Adjustable Length Kickstand, Front and Rear Racks from Thule, Thule Pannier Bags, Thule Front Basket, Optional LED Headlight, Aluminum Alloy Bash Guard

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, Quanta Quick Release Front Skewer

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bafang

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Battery Brand:

Samsung, Protanium

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

8.7 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

417.6 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

6 hours

Estimated Min Range:

20 miles (32 km)

Estimated Max Range:

35 miles (56 km)

Display Type:

Integrated LCD (Removable Magnetic)

Readouts:

Pedal Assist (0-9), Battery Level, Speed, Odometer, Trip Distance

Display Accessories:

Wireless Remote Button Pad, LED Indicator on Battery

Drive Mode:

Torque Sensing Pedal Assist (Rides Like Cadence Sensing Assist)

Top Speed:

28 mph (45 kph)

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Written Review

The Zeitgeist City is a premium, all-Carbon fiber speed pedelec. It’s an electric bike that can high 28 mph and only weighs ~43 lbs which is impressive given the 500 watt hub motor and 48 volt battery pack. At one point, I believe this model was being called the Zeitgeist by Karma Bikes but the company may have adjusted due to confusion with the Fisker Karma electric car… My experience testing this ebike was great because I could tell they put a lot of thought into the design (which is comfortable and well balanced). I especially liked the removable magnetic LCD display and optional wireless button pad because the bike still operates without it if you want to go for a minimal look and reduced weight but using it makes navigating the nine levels of assist possible without taking your left hand off the grip. The grips are also a highlight for me with a locking ergonomic design and unique Aluminum bar ends for changing hand position. The Zeitgeist City is a cross between a city and road bike from my point of view, the addition of rear rack bosses is great for those who plan to commute and want to add a set of panniers or trunk bag.

When you look at this thing from the side it almost looks like a normal bicycle, in large part due to the two-tone paint job, the battery disappears and the white glossy highlights create a safe visual footprint. It’s definitely an active geometry and there’s no suspension but to me Carbon fiber rides nicely and absorbs more road vibration than Aluminum and is lighter than steel. It comes with large hydraulic disc brakes and e-bike specific levers that cut power to the motor… my only complaint is the higher price point. I’m not sure I’ve seen anything out there with similar specs, high speed, low weight and cool appearance so the price is founded but a bit excessive. The other limitation is that it only comes in one sort of medium frame size with a relatively straight top tube that can make mounting and standing over difficult for shorter riders. This thing would be a blast to own for road cycling with friends in hilly or mountainous regions and could make an excellent commuter, rather than going with thin narrow tires they upgraded to ebike specific Schwalbe Energizer Plus that are puncture resistant and a bit more forgiving due to larger 1.75″ radius which makes a lot of sense to me.

Pros:

  • One of the only electric bikes I’ve tested that is almost completely made from carbon fiber! That includes the seat post, stem, handlebar and of course the fork
  • Considering the large 48 volt battery pack and 500 watt motor this bike is pretty light weight and handles very well because that weight is kept low and relatively centered across the frame
  • I really like the custom stem with integrated LCD display panel… that’s removable! I’m seeing more custom panels these days but very few let you take them out (to prevent tampering and exposure to the weather), well thought out design
  • Pedal assist is very responsive, I was told it’s torque based but it responded almost like a cadence sensor for me (not requiring as much force when pedaling) maybe it’s just dialed in to be very sensitive
  • Class 3 speed pedelec capable of hitting 28 mph fairly easily due to the light weight efficient design and larger 700c wheelset, it’s satisfying to accelerate or cruise at top speed
  • Quality tires with reflective sidewalls for safety and integrated puncture protection, the quick release front wheel makes changing flats or moving the bike in vehicles easier
  • Large, powerful hydraulic disc brakes with ebike specific extended levers that cut power to the motor instantly when activated, they worked well and felt sturdy at high speed
  • Zeitgeist offers optional Thule rack accessories but the City frame also features threaded eyelets on the seat stays for adding a more traditional rack that could work with a trunk bag and panniers for commuting, I like that the bike also comes with a kickstand (which is removable if you want)
  • Almost all of the wires are run directly through the frame on this bike and it looks great, they are exposed at the bottom bracket but this might make tuneups and maintenance easier, there’s a convenient disconnect point near the motor for rear wheel maintenance
  • Quality drivetrain (shifters and derailleurs), Shimano Deore XT components are light weight, designed to stay tuned and offer high performance

Cons:

  • Currently the Zeitgeist City is only available in one frame size with high-step design so this might not be a fit for super tall or petite riders
  • Extremely expensive at nearly $8k but it does perform well, look great and is likely a very exclusive ebike, there are regular pedal powered bikes that cost this much which are also custom carbon fiber frames so I get it
  • No drop bar option for those who prefer an even more aggressive body position but it did ride more like a road bike, I like the ergonomic locking grips and bar ends for changing hand position
  • No integrated lights on this bike, considering the frame is custom designed it would have been cool to see an LED based lighting system running off the main battery vs. having to add your own
  • The wireless button pad is easy to reach (to adjust assist level or cycle through display modes) but requires its own batteries vs. being run off the main pack with one tiny extra wire, I was told the battery should last two years and is easy to change, you can completely remove the buttons if you want and use a single button below the stem as a backup which is cool
  • The included pedals are very basic, not as wide or rigid as some of the magnesium platforms I’ve seen from Wellgo but this choice might have been made because many people have their own or use clip in options at higher speed

Resources:

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More Zeitgeist Reviews

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Cameron Newland
1 year ago

No rating for this bike?

Court Rye
1 year ago

Hi Cameron, I’ve been testing the site without ratings because I feel that a single number/stars isn’t deep enough to communicate the variety and year differences between bikes. I’m focusing on deeper videos with more pros/cons instead :)

Stu Berman
1 year ago

Hi Court, the more that I look at all the e-bikes out there, the more interested I am in the Zeitgeist, but the one size fits all approach does concern me. I’m 5’8″ and I think you said elsewhere that you’re 5’9″. How well do you think the Zeitgeist fit you, especially as compared to other e-bikes?

Court Rye
1 year ago

Hi Stu! It’s difficult to remember exactly as the review was done quite a while back and I test so many bikes. As average sized people I feel like both of us would fit this bike just fine, there are little adjustments you can make with the seat post height and handlebar but if you start replacing stuff it could interfere with the electronics or weight (the included Carbon fiber stem and bars are much lighter). If you like the bike I think you could make it work… it’s designed to fit the highest number of people, the peak of the bell curve and I feel like you’re right there.

Fencible
10 months ago

Hi Court, Thanks for a great site and awesome reviews. Did you notice if it looked possible to fit fenders to the Zeitgeist?

Court Rye
10 months ago

Hi Fencible! I bet it’s possible but may require some custom work… and even then, finding parts that match and can be attached without too much rattling while still being solid (especially important at high speeds) could be difficult and expensive. I looked closely at some of the pictures and didn’t see support arm bosses or the standard holes often used for bolts and mounting tabs (perhaps I was missing them). Hope this helps guide you, I think the short answer is no, it’s not really optimized for adding fenders but you could use a seat post mounted rear fender like this or a carry rack to keep water off your back since it does appear to have seat stay bosses.

Robert Crivelli
7 months ago

Where can I purchase a zeitgeist city electric bike? Any information is gladly appreciated

Court Rye
7 months ago

Hey Robert! I’m not sure which shops have it but you could reach out to one of the team leads at the company. His name is Kartik and his email is kartik@zeitgeist.bike hope this helps!

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zap016VOLTAGE
33 mins ago

Hi Zap,
I just found this forum and very useful.
Is there any update to the battery? I called Volt Bike and asked for any plan to upgrade ah. Their reply was no plan because it will be too expensive, and most customers are happy with the current battery. I usually ride from Manhattan to Jamaica Bay area (sometimes extended to Rockaway Beach), so I need 30+ miles battery life. I could line up and take a ferry back to downtown, but I know the queue is way too long. I wish we could have more battery capacity option.

Oh, we might run into each other in this small city ;)

Ciao.

Hola @Moooo :cool:
Thirty Mile commute WoW:eek:!
There are a few Voltbike Mariners in NYC.
Should create a Mariner owners meet up group.

@Voltbike has recently increased the Ah for some of their offerings including the Mariner.
For the Mariner, its battery Ah grew from 10.6 Ah to 11.6 Ah, a small amount.

Electric bikes encourage their users to travel greater distances because of the ease that they can be ridden.
However, I wonder if some vendors failed to understand this?
Just a few vendors, such as Storm Sondors of Sondors and @Tora Harris of Juiced Bikes, make available larger capacity batteries for their ebikes.

While I don't need a larger battery, nonetheless I would purchase one intended for the Mariner.
I've found not all Silverfish batteries are created equal.
At this time, I've sourced E-Bike Marketplace to rebuild my bike's battery (ground freight ship my battery to them as ebike batteries are considered hazardous material) .
E-Bike Marketplace also sells a 48V 16 Ah Silverfish style battery.

Share your experiences please.;)

Thanks:D

Moooo
9 hours ago

Hi Zap,
I just found this forum and very useful.
Is there any update to the battery? I called Volt Bike and asked for any plan to upgrade ah. Their reply was no plan because it will be too expensive, and most customers are happy with the current battery. I usually ride from Manhattan to Jamaica Bay area (sometimes extended to Rockaway Beach), so I need 30+ miles battery life. I could line up and take a ferry back to downtown, but I know the queue is way too long. I wish we could have more battery capacity option.

Oh, we might run into each other in this small city ;)

Ciao.

Alex M
1 day ago

Can a hammer replace a screwdriver?
It should be asked - Can a hammer replace a set of tools (or a multi-tool) :)

As a transportation tool, ebike has more limitations than a car - in most places.
There exist no-car zones in some cities, or high taxes charged in a toll booth at the city gate. This makes a car "less" practical in these particular places. Doesn't necessarily mean that ebike would be the best tool there, as these places are typically either a small area that can be walked, or a city transit there is well developed.

Over50
2 days ago

Thanks, Over50. I did see some of the locking threads and there do seem to be some good options out there. I was mostly curious if there were those who are taking the risk of leaving their beautiful ebike out there and exposed for the day...and what methods (locks, motion sensors, etc) they use to deter. What has your experience been? I must have a little PTSD in this area as I had my beautiful mountain/road hybrid bike that I loved dearly stolen at a bus station years ago - it's painful to think about 20 years later. :)

That is a bit of a different situation (having to leave all day sight unseen). I am parking in front of two different office buildings. Both are high traffic and have security teams. Which isn't to say that I have a lot of confidence they are monitoring the bike racks. The one in front of my office is a hangout for the office smokers so from 8am to 5pm there is generally someone standing close by. And me being paranoid I check on it about 10 times per day. The other office building I use about 50% of the time because the racks are covered- but it is 3 blocks from my office. So I can only check on the bike a couple of times per day. I had the Boomerang GPS but the unit failed and I haven't worked out a replacement yet. Your situation is why I wasn't commuting by bike prior to getting the ebike. I did have the option of riding my regular bike to a bus stop about 5 miles from my house and taking the bus to work. But I didn't feel there was a safe place to lock the bike for the entire day. The ebike gave me the ability to ride all the way to work and back. I would have a tough time leaving either my ebike or my human powered city commuter locked up for the entire day in any of the areas around my office or even my home if I couldn't check on it from time to time. I probably have too much separation anxiety for that...

Saratoga Dave
2 days ago

<<quite hilly with stop signs in the middle of the hills>>

Hub drive with a throttle. Far easier to get going and across a street quickly, then ride as usual with the pedal assist helping as you desire. I'd say a Pedego City Commuter, but they're heavy (and top heavy as well, since the battery is on the rear rack)... very strong throttle. That Cross Current mentioned above with a throttle might be a good idea. A lot lighter than the Pedego.

You can certainly get going on an XM700 - I own and love one - by making sure you are in a low gear and kicking up the assist to Sport, but the throttle jobs are really simple and great for that purpose.

opimax
3 days ago

Hi, I am in Falls Church, I look forward to getting Metris to haul my bikes inside, Get some rack mounted the floor and remove the seats or some of them as needed. I ride to Lake Kneedwood all the time then along the intercounty connector to New Hampshire or Ga ave and back south through the city to the W&OD to home, I am Stromer guy for a few years now...we need a DMV get together this summer which I hope to accomplish at some point...

america94
3 days ago

american94-

My 2 cents- I have a Sport Rack fitted on a 1 1/4 inch receiver for my ebike with the same weight ratings as you have mentioned. My rack has hoop holders for the tires. I did not want to keep lifting the bike on and off, so I jimmy rigged a ramp system using a plastic gutter Down Spout Splash and attached some metal conduit hooks on the end of it. I then hook it on the end of the tire hoop and it allows me to roll the bike on and off of the bike rack. So far, a very efficient system. The rack looks very stable and very well built, so I do not have any concerns st this point. I do not drive on the highway or very far distances, just to city local trails. Hope this may help!
thanks Bob for the info. Genious hack! Is your rack old? do you know which model it is? and how much does your bike weigh?

bob armani
4 days ago

Hi everyone,

I really don't want to spend money on a bike rack solution if i can help it to carry my single e-bike.

Here is my current situation:

- Class I hitch 1 1/4 in. mounted on a Corolla (max 200 tongue weight for the hitch)
- Bike that weighs 63 pounds all in, with the battery.
- I already own a 2 bike ball mounted bike rack, very similar to this one:
https://www.amazon.com/Swagman-64095-2-Bike-Ball-Mount/dp/B0009NZL2K/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8
- I can't find the max weight for my rack, but most like it are usually either 2X35lb bikes or up to max 90lb depending on the manufacturer
- I used to carry 2 regular inexpensive bikes on there, so I assume about 50ish pounds.

Can I safely assume that it will not be an issue at all to carry my 1X50ish pounds e-bike on that rack (battery removed)?

The real question I wonder about actually is this: if you have let's say a 4 bike rack, stated at max 35lb per bike (= 140lbs), can you actually consider carrying 2 x 70lb bikes?

To make matters worse, I am in Canada! so as always, we have a lot less selection than the US, and pretty much nothing under an insane price.

thanks in advance for your help!

american94-

My 2 cents- I have a Sport Rack fitted on a 1 1/4 inch receiver for my ebike with the same weight ratings as you have mentioned. My rack has hoop holders for the tires. I did not want to keep lifting the bike on and off, so I jimmy rigged a ramp system using a plastic gutter Down Spout Splash and attached some metal conduit hooks on the end of it. I then hook it on the end of the tire hoop and it allows me to roll the bike on and off of the bike rack. So far, a very efficient system. The rack looks very stable and very well built, so I do not have any concerns st this point. I do not drive on the highway or very far distances, just to city local trails. Hope this may help!

Nutella
4 days ago

Keeping people off of bikes in the city seems like a counterintuitive way to fight traffic congestion

Saratoga Dave
4 days ago

Well, in New York we're getting shafted yet again after a very big push this year to try and get a law. Today's Albany Times Union:

<<Also expected to be back next year is legislation to allow the use of electric bicycles. Permitting the powered bikes was halted amid worries about traffic congestion in New York City.>>

Once again that stinking city interferes with the entire rest of the state

mrgold35
4 days ago

I did take a 22 mile all paved bike ride loop around the city starting at 2:30pm just to see how hot is too hot on an ebike. It showed 101 degrees on the internet; but, it was probably 100-107 depending on the part of the city (started heading east from work near downtown, headed to north side of ABQ, cut down towards the west to the north/south river trail, and back home on west side). The Radrover rode like a champ the entire way. Never felt under powered, zero issues with braking, or it had any issues maintaining PAS 3 at 17-21 mph. I did up the PAS to 4 for longer inclines to maintain my speed and used the throttle at full 750w on short but steep inclines.

SPEED is your friend! It really helped keeping my speed +17 mph because it aided in the cooling. I never felt overheated during the ride (commuter Osprey backpack, vented bike helmet, sunglasses, half finger glove, long sleeve bike shirt, extra long baggy bike shorts with spandex under, and regular running shoes). I like the long sleeve shirts to keep from getting sun burned when riding.

I ran into a few other bikers and they could only travel 1/2 to 3/4 of my speed on the same paved trails. A few were walking their bikes or taking breaks in the shady spots along the river. I did the same loop on my old pedal bike last year during the summer and that left me tired into the next day.

Over50
5 days ago

Its my 1,000 mile anniversary! My bike has about 1,050 miles on the odometer and I claim about 1,015 of those. And probably about 750 of the miles are work commuting. My "anniversary" work commute today was definitely eventful but the weather was superb and for the first time I had tailwind going both ways. The eventful parts of the commute involved a loud, scary pop from the motor/crank area (described in another thread) and a young man in a tough neighborhood who jumped up from a bus bench to start screaming obscenities at me as I sat at a red light. The latter was just one more odd thing I've seen commuting through the city of Detroit. At this point I'm really glad I started bike commuting. It's a long tough commute but I always feel better for having done it. And when I leave in the morning and the air is fresh and crisp (56F when I left this morning) with stars in the sky it feels great. In the 1,000+ miles on the e-bike I've also logged about 250 miles on my regular bikes. I'm coming up on a stress test/heart exam in a couple of weeks and I hope to receive good results thanks in part to the miles on the bikes.

ace20ri
6 days ago

@Bsbs I decided to not exhaust any more energy on removing the speed limit on my Yukon and went with an overhaul of the power electronics all together.

I have not posted in a while and have been pretty busy DIYing. Here is my new setup:

Phaserunner by Grin Technologies (Dimensions 99mm x 40mm x 34mm)

The voltage range is from 30v-90v and can handle up 50A from the battery. The cables are long for a diverse setup but I checked and it can fit in the nook where the shipping controller is located. I decided not to do this since the controller is programmable and must get "tuned" to the motor. There are lots of settings and I am still tweaking them so hiding the controller would be a pain. Really awesome controller that allows the motor to start using the hall sensors and then run in sensorless mode after initial feedback from the hall sensors. Of course there are speed settings and many other fun settings like injecting field weakening current that can pull increase the motor's RPM without a lot of additional current. (Speed boost!).

I also added a Cycle Analyst (CA3-DP)

This display has too many features to list. I recommend installing the new firmware to get the benefit of using a potentiometer and digital input to control power or amp levels along with adding PAS level functionality.

Here are few pics of my latest setup:

Hard to see but I swapped the rear freewheel to a DNP Epoch 11-30 Freewheel to stay in cadence at the higher speeds I am able to achieve now (33mph!)

View of the cycle analyst V3 along with the potentiometer (assigned to control overall power level), digital aux 2 button input (I have it assigned to control PAS levels) and my Lifeproof Bike Handlebar Mount for my iPhone 7+

Close up of the phaserunner:

Cockpit view with new longer 720mm OUTDAD handlebar, Ergon GP5 grips and EM3EV Power Switch with horn button:

Close up of my 48V Uxcel horn This thing is so loud and sounds like a car horn! Must have if riding in city traffic. I wired it up to the switch with a 20A in-line fuse just in case. Only supposed to use 200mA but you never know.

I'm waiting for my YITAMOTOR 36W LED spotlight, I mean headlight to arrive so that I can mount it to my handlebar. Got tired of barely seeing the road and cars seeing me leaving late from the office.

If anyone decides to take on such an upgrade, definitely invest in a JST kit like this. I had to swap quite a few connectors for fitment and wire routing. I also purchased the Bikehand Pro bike stand along with Feedback Handlebar holder.

Lots of information so my apologies but hopefully if anyone is looking to overhaul their Yukon this may help. I will post pictures of the stock Yukon controller connector map soon for anyone interested. I also noticed that the on the stock controller PCBA there are plated through holes which resemble programming pads so I may try and see if I can adapt a harness to see if I can figure out overriding any board level programming now it's just collection dust. I will obviously share my results.

Depending how the second half of the year looks, I may take the battery apart and replace the cells with higher energy density cells. Unfortunately the cells will be proprietary to the company I work for but may be able to recommend some "equivalents" that are off the shelf. Not sure how much air is inside the battery housing but hoping to fit 2170 cells to really get improved capacity.

1/10
Themis1988
6 days ago

Because I want to buy from a local dealer, I went to Ichi Bike in Des Moines' East Village today. They were out of Pedego models so I test rode the Izip E3 Vibe+ on a medium frame and the E3 Path Plus commuter on a large frame. I definitely need the large frame. Not being an aggressive rider, the frames felt very sturdy. It was my first time on an e-bike and was thrilling, a bit scary, and reassuring all at once. I loved that I could start from a stop quickly and get up the steep local hill without any difficulty. Wow, those can fly downhill! :D I really liked the cush of the Vibe with fatter tires and had no problem on the hill with it, even at low to mid-throttle. Maybe I didn't shift correctly on the Path, but without throttle, the pedal assist was not quite as helpful on the hill. This was probably my error but I love the option of either or both pedal assist & throttle on the Vibe. I wouldn't have any problem with either of these bikes and felt very comfortable with the upright position, but would go with the Vibe over the Path because of the softer ride over pavement bumps and the throttle assist. Either would need a suspension post and softer seat. ;) I ordered a Pedego 28" step-thru City Commuter to try without purchase obligation. When it arrives I will test them against each other. I am HOOKED! :p

McApple
6 days ago

DW's Evo City Wave is having controller problems. We are in Bar Harbor on vacation, this is her 4th time out with the bike.

On power up, everything looks good for an instant, then it shows a 28 error code, flashes low battery and then gives a 13 error code and a triangle with an exclamation mark in it.

It started doing this yesterday, it would run for perhaps 1/2 mile on the lowest assist level then die. While rebooting one time I pushed the button for the lights and the display came up fully and showed full charge. For the rest of the day, turning on the power and turning on the lights would work.

Today, nothing would work, cycling the power off/on gives about 1/2 mile of assist, then assist dies.

Does anyone know of any way to reboot the controller, or some troubleshooting that I could try. FWIW, the battery shows 5 green lights when you push the button on the battery.

Thanks,

Macky

mrgold35
6 days ago

We usually don't get above 100 degrees in June in Albuquerque. We are +10 degree hotter than our usual 80s-90s for May and June. Even our morning lows are 10-15 degrees warmer than the avg of 50s-60s (low/mid 70s around the city when I hit the road at 5:30 am).

I haven't noticed anything out the ordinary with my Radrover in this extreme heat so far during my the 13 mile round trip work commute. I have a Luna Cycle triangle bag and I'm debating about using my heat or freeze gel packs I only use with my winter riding Bar Mitts handlebar covers and putting the cold packs in the triangle bag to keep everything cool for my mid-afternoon ride home (we have small fridge with freezer in break room).

I had to change how I ride a little bit because of the heat like:
- sidewalks are starting to buckle and they make cool ramps to jump off
- freshly paved roads and road tar are getting a little gooey and I try to avoid getting tar on me
- no more after work rides on the trails. I now leave to work around 5am to hit the trails when it is cool (I've seen about +10 riders, joggers and walkers at 5:30am when I usually see none).
- I'm up from two to three 22 oz camelbak water jugs in a day

Any thoughts on how hot is too hot for ebike commuting and any extra thing you are doing to fight the heat?

Themis1988
7 days ago

What a great site and forums! I've asked Court to review the Electra Loft Go! with step-through frame. Wanting to get into some semblance of shape again after too many years at a desk job, I would like to find an electric bicycle to be gentle on my knees when needed on starts and hills. Otherwise I plan to pedal with minimal assist. I am female, age 57, 5'10" large-frame and 260# so need a sturdy ride to run errands, exercise and for general cruising. From searching specs and forums so far, I need a 500 w motor and 48 v 15 amp battery. My budget is in the $2500 - $3500ish range. I also plan to retire and buy a van-sized RV in the next year or two, and will take my e-bike along on a rear-mount track rack (?) for supplemental transportation within parks and shorter-range sight-seeing. I'm concerned cruiser handlebars may be too wide for this rack style. This site has enabled me to do lots of homework and I have narrowed choices to Pedego Step-Thru Interceptor, City Commuter or Comfort Cruiser, or Electra Loft Go! or Townie Go! I'm not confident about the weight capacity of some of the other brands (Raleigh and Izip) with local dealers in Iowa. Appreciating your insight and advice,
Themis

Pablohoney
1 week ago

Hey all, I'm moving next week from Seattle to Denver and I'm pretty sure I'm going to buy my first ebike and use it as my main mode of transport. So I have come to ask at what city I should buy in, Seattle or Denver? I'm asking because maybe I can have something on my bike in Seattle that a shop in Denver might not be able to for legal reasons or otherwise. I'm not even sure about the ethics of that and how others might feel so I'm hoping you all can help. Thanks for reading and hope to here from you soon. bye

mwisch
1 week ago

I don't think you can get past question #1. Unless you are driving back and forth to Mexico and can bring the battery back and forth in order to maintain it's charge. Lithium-ion batteries need to be stored at approximately 60% charge, in a space not too warm or too cold. You could possibly set a timer to charge, but that could be dangerous charging unattended.

An ebike doesn't seem practical for your needs. A 49cc gas powered moped would be far more practical and probably less expensive.
Thanks. The information on the battery was exactly what I needed, even if it makes me sad. the size of the speed bumps, called "topes" in Spanish, might allow a moped if the wheels were at least 17", though I would prefer the 26" mountain bike standard. I cannot get a 49cc, though - they are not sold. The bigger ones, like the 90 to 110 cc motorbikes available and not expensive, supposedly require a motorcycle license. Sounds like the 80cc gas motors available for bicycle mounting in Mexico City may be my best bet.

mwisch
1 week ago

As someone who has travelled extensively in Mexico, I can appreciate your problem. I drove the entire length of Mexico from Guatemala to San Diego. On another occasion I took the bus from Tijuana to Guatemala City. There have been many other trips as well... So, it seems your biggest problem is getting the right kind of ebike to the mountain village. Are you south of Mexico City or north?

It is also clear that your requirements include a throttle due to your foot issue.

One solution you allude to is a DYI bike conversion. Buy the electrical components, take them with you to the mountain village, buy a mountain bike nearby and convert the bike. If you have the mechanical and electrical skills, that is certainly one solution. But such a solution may not yield a great riding bike due to either the electrical conversion kit or the quality of bikes available near your mountain village (or both). But you will learn a lot.

In any case, you will need to acquire mechanical and electrical skills just to maintain your bike. Who else is going to do it for you?

Personally, I prefer bikes designed and manufactured to be ebikes and I avoid conversions. I had a bad experience with a LEED conversion kit. Maybe other people on this forum will chime in with an ebike conversion kit recommendation.

One complete bike that would meet your requirements is the Juiced HyperFat with the MAC motor and throttle options, fork suspension (standard), seatpost suspension (third party), and rack (being offered by Juiced sometime in the future). You can buy one in Chula Vista, California (their headquarters), only a few miles from the Mexican border. Then the problem is how to transport it to your mountain village, and I don't have a ready answer. My sense is that you would need to negotiate transport with one of the bus companies... but if you go this route be prepared to overcome many hurdles along the way.

As for keeping the battery in shape, get a GRIN Satiator, which Juiced also sells, and follow their recommendations.
Thanks for the ideas. A friend is an electrician, welder and general handyman in the village, which is 10 hours by bus South of Mexico City, so I don't think maintenance would be a problem. J.R.'s comments about the maintenance of the battery sounds like the death knoll of the electric bike idea, though.

Bicyclista
1 week ago

As someone who has travelled extensively in Mexico, I can appreciate your problem. I drove the entire length of Mexico from Guatemala to San Diego. On another occasion I took the bus from Tijuana to Guatemala City. There have been many other trips as well... So, it seems your biggest problem is getting the right kind of ebike to the mountain village. Are you south of Mexico City or north?

It is also clear that your requirements include a throttle due to your foot issue.

One solution you allude to is a DYI bike conversion. Buy the electrical components, take them with you to the mountain village, buy a mountain bike nearby and convert the bike. If you have the mechanical and electrical skills, that is certainly one solution. But such a solution may not yield a great riding bike due to either the electrical conversion kit or the quality of bikes available near your mountain village (or both). But you will learn a lot.

In any case, you will need to acquire mechanical and electrical skills just to maintain your bike. Who else is going to do it for you?

Personally, I prefer bikes designed and manufactured to be ebikes and I avoid conversions. I had a bad experience with a LEED conversion kit. Maybe other people on this forum will chime in with an ebike conversion kit recommendation.

One complete bike that would meet your requirements is the Juiced HyperFat with the MAC motor and throttle options, fork suspension (standard), seatpost suspension (third party), and rack (being offered by Juiced sometime in the future). You can buy one in Chula Vista, California (their headquarters), only a few miles from the Mexican border. Then the problem is how to transport it to your mountain village, and I don't have a ready answer. My sense is that you would need to negotiate transport with one of the bus companies... but if you go this route be prepared to overcome many hurdles along the way.

As for keeping the battery in shape, get a GRIN Satiator, which Juiced also sells, and follow their recommendations.

mwisch
1 week ago

Sorry, but the requirements are a little complicated. (1) The bike would be used only 4 months a year (will that ruin batteries?); (2) the roads are concrete, asphalt and dirt; (3) there are LOTS of speed bumps, some of which have cut-outs in the middle where a bike tire would fit (don't want small wheels); (4) I had a big toe and metatarsal removed at Christmas and cannot mash the pedal on that side (can pedal on the flats, but they are rare); (5) don't need range over about 5 miles but the hills are ferocious, so I must have torque; (6) I'm 5'10", 71 years old and 182 pounds. 120 V AC is readily available. I normally walk everywhere when I am there but Doc says I must get some form of transport when I go this year. There are a couple of E-bike shops in Mexico City and hub kits are available as well. It would be impossible for me to get a bike from the US to where I live (and would not be easy to get a whole bike from Mexico City to where I live). A hub motor and battery from Mexico City and buying a mountain bike near where I live would not be hard. Necessity may drive me to a little gas motor for a bike, also available; I don't have or want a motorcycle license, and the smaller 90-110 cc motorbikes available have smaller diameter wheels than I want given speed bumps that are 6" high and about 10" long. I don't care how slowly it goes so long as I can get up the darned hills, and I will use it exclusively for transport in the small village. Any suggestions?

Over50
1 week ago

...If I missed something that I should, please let me know. What do you guys think? Pick your favorites please! Just reply back with the name of your pick and let's see which one wins :D

I like the offerings from Kali Protectives. I have the City (or Urban). I think they have a helmet for road racers that is a couple of hundred bucks and very highly rated. But as well a lot of full face offerings for enduro riders:

https://kaliprotectives.com/

jazz
1 week ago

A motorcycle with 2 people on it got pinned under an SUV in my city yesterday. They were both trapped for about 30 minutes and rescued alive, The firefighters said it was because they were both wearing helmets.

enzo
6 months ago

Can you pop a wheelie on these bikes?

Amit fortus
1 year ago

is this bike actually available or is it just a concept?

Mike Vincent
1 year ago

It's actually on sale right now at touch of modern: https://www.touchofmodern.com/sales/zeitgeist/zeitgeist-city

Question: Is the display readable in the dark? Does it illuminate?

Dmc InLA
1 year ago

where r u? looks amazing

William Lam
1 year ago

Great review. Nice looking bike ... But I really don't see how this thing is priced at $8K. They will sell a ton at $4K, but at $8K, it's only gonna be a store display.

odetoazam
1 year ago

+William Lam It's not gonna be the final price. Its better to price higher and test price points. 4k is too low though.

Rob Schmitt
1 year ago

7999$. This is more expensive than a car. I would ride an electric bike with 45 km/h limit. But these bikes are starting at 4500€.

Christopher Moltisanti
1 year ago

+Rob Schmitt China will clone these soon enough,I predict we'll see versions of this style next year for under $2000.

BIKESTER INC.
1 year ago

+Rob Schmitt you're spot on. Our average street price in the US will settle at $5k-$6.5k for the limited edition selling on ToMo. I think the there are two electric bike markets in the US- the value and the designer. This might fit the latter.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+Rob Schmitt Yeah, it's one of the pricier options I've seen... I've reviewed a few other speed pedelecs (with a few being cheaper) back at the site: http://electricbikereview.com/tag/speed/ the new 2016 Turbo is ~$3k and goes ~26 mph (~42km/h)

Jappe Kapanen
1 year ago

ok thank you for the answer

Stephen Cho
1 year ago

The cross current from juiced riders has similar specs with the same battery for $1500. You could buy 5 of them plus a spare battery for 8K. The owner of this company certainly ain't thinking about the masses.

odetoazam
1 year ago

+Stephen Cho I dont think advertisers are thinking about the masses either. #thinkniche

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+Stephen Cho Yeah, I'm excited to test the Cross Current very soon :D

William Wonder
1 year ago

I'm surprised the electric firms aren't making more recumbents. Logic would dictate this is the real market, older riders who need assistance to ride like a young man and they are going recumbent. Ya, I know about Bionx and it appears to be a good system.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+William Wonder Hi William, here's one amazing recumbent with full suspension and regeneration! Very cool in my opinion: http://electricbikereview.com/hp-velotechnik/scorpion-fs-26-s-pedelec/ maybe we'll see others like it in the future made with Carbon fiber like the Zeitgeist City :D

дмитрий трофимов
1 year ago

Im   sorry! what about price? 7 hundred bhu bhu bhu bhu dollars. HOW MUCH PLZ???

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+дмитрий трофимов The price is $7,999 which I mention in the video and list back on the website: http://electricbikereview.com/zeitgeist/city/ hope this helps :)

Flo Mo
1 year ago

Fascinating! The future of e-bikes? Again a great video. I'll start saving money. :)

Kartik Ram
1 year ago

+Elya Cornovier Get this bike at a limited sale on #Touchofmodern
https://www.touchofmodern.com/sales/zeitgeist/zeitgeist-city

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+Elya Cornovier Yeah, neat to see a completely custom frame like this and the attention to detail with the display unit :)

Gardener Rob
1 year ago

Very impressive looking bike,  looks like it would be very light and agile.

Kartik Ram
1 year ago

+Gardener Rob Get this bike at a limited sale on #Touchofmodern
https://www.touchofmodern.com/sales/zeitgeist/zeitgeist-city

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+Gardener Rob Yeah, it rode great... very fast and responsive when pedaling.

JeMasLT
1 year ago

Good work dude.
Make some video with Tips How to care electric bikes. When to clean what to change and so on :)

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+JeMasLT Good tip, I'll work on something like this but here's one I shot a while back with a shop owner: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFLIGRj2bxU

David Macdonald
1 year ago

it's nice , but just to much cash , make a bike for the masses , out of quality parts , that would do more for E bikes, community.

David Macdonald
1 year ago

Thanks all have a look .

Kartik Ram
1 year ago

+David Macdonald Get this bike at a limited sale on #Touchofmodern
https://www.touchofmodern.com/sales/zeitgeist/zeitgeist-city

David Macdonald
1 year ago

Thanks .

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+David Macdonald I've been trying to list more of the affordable models at the site to make them easier to find, check it out: http://electricbikereview.com/tag/affordable/

Jappe Kapanen
1 year ago

Is that bike able to add some kind of front suspension??
Maybe less than 120mm???

Jappe Kapanen
1 year ago

+Kartik Ram Ok Want to see that when it's finished

BIKESTER INC.
1 year ago

+Jappe Kapanen We are considering putting a SRAM RS-1 front fork with 100mm of travel as it can get pretty bumpy out there.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+Kartik Ram Kartik, if you're going to comment on videos please answer the question that the user is asking (in this case about suspension) vs. spamming the flash sale

Kartik Ram
1 year ago

+Jappe Kapanen Get this bike at a limited sale on #Touchofmodern
https://www.touchofmodern.com/sales/zeitgeist/zeitgeist-city

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+Jappe Kapanen I would think so, SR Suntour makes a few minimal suspension forks like this... they aren't as light as a carbon fork but they are still slim and you get 100 mm or so. I'm reviewing one other Zeitgeist ebike and it does have a suspension fork (but the frame is Aluminum vs Carbon).

benjamin Ofuasia
1 year ago

RIP wallet

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+benjamin Ofuasia There's room for improvement to get there, especially with similarly priced bikes like the Specialized Turbo S and Stromer ST2 with competing specs and perhaps better performance but not quite as light weight.

benjamin Ofuasia
1 year ago

i see it, but all i can think of it trying to fit in with are bikes like the S-Works Demo 8 or the Santa Cruz V10c

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+benjamin Ofuasia Ha! Yeah... but there are still normal bicycles for this price so I can see how it's trying to fit into the market. Maybe just above what I can afford ;)

benjamin Ofuasia
1 year ago

8 grand

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+benjamin Ofuasia Yep O_O

nerdexproject
1 year ago

I like how the battery is integrated but that does not justify the price. We gotta teach those companies that we wont just pay any amount of money. If anybody's interested in a similar bike like this, just look around, there are lower priced options available.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+nerdexproject Good points, I agree :)

nerdexproject
1 year ago

Yeah that might be true but unlike BMW, Zeitgeist isn't a coveted brand. And if they want to get there, being expensive isn't the only answer. They must offer desirable features and first and foremost they need at least lights imo. At least they're doing the design right.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+nerdexproject I think they realize that it's expensive but that's part of the appeal... just like a Coach handbag or a BMW. There are many other affordable ebikes out there, having something different like this just signals mass appeal to me and the desire for some consumers to go for style and quality at a higher price. It costs a lot to create a custom frame like this with electronics and display to match.

CarbLoaders
1 year ago

One of the best looking e-bikes out there. I really like the integrated flush computer in the stem. It's just too bad the price point is way out there in Neverland. Great review as always!

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+CarbLoaders Thanks, yeah I really loved the display :)

Jone Gomez
1 year ago

Great bike, but you have to make a lot, a ton of money to justify something that price, mortals can only watch your video, good one as usual, thanks.

Paideia
1 year ago

If you use it everyday it isn't expensive in the end. I bought my bike 20 years ago. I've changed the brakes, gears and saddle only once, that's all the repair needed. I've never paid gas or taxes and parking is cheaper or free. The only problem is that winter commute is hard or sometimes impossible, but on the plus side my body is aparently in very good shape and never been in a gym