Zeitgeist City Review

Zeitgeist City Electric Bike Review
Zeitgeist City 8fun 500 Watt Geared Hub Motor
Zeitgeist City Integrated Downtube Battery Protanium Samsung
Zeitgeist City Removable Magnetic Cycle Computer
Zeitgeist City 180 Mm Disc Brakes Qr Front Wheel
Zeitgeist City Carbon Fiber Seat Post 31 6
Zeitgeist City Front View Carbon Fork
Zeitgeist City Kickstand Hydraulic Disc Brakes
Zeitgeist City Custom Carbon Stem Integrated Display Lcd
Zeitgeist City Removable 48 Volt Battery
Zeitgeist City Torque Cadence Sensing Bottom Bracket
Zeitgeist City Tubro Ergonomic Grips Bar Ends
Zeitgeist City Electric Bike Review
Zeitgeist City 8fun 500 Watt Geared Hub Motor
Zeitgeist City Integrated Downtube Battery Protanium Samsung
Zeitgeist City Removable Magnetic Cycle Computer
Zeitgeist City 180 Mm Disc Brakes Qr Front Wheel
Zeitgeist City Carbon Fiber Seat Post 31 6
Zeitgeist City Front View Carbon Fork
Zeitgeist City Kickstand Hydraulic Disc Brakes
Zeitgeist City Custom Carbon Stem Integrated Display Lcd
Zeitgeist City Removable 48 Volt Battery
Zeitgeist City Torque Cadence Sensing Bottom Bracket
Zeitgeist City Tubro Ergonomic Grips Bar Ends

Summary

  • A Class 3 speed pedelec made entirely from Carbon fiber including the frame, fork, seat post, stem and handle bars
  • Powerful 500 watt planetary geared motor, 48 volt Lithium-ion downtube mounted battery (removable) with premium Samsung cells
  • Custom integrated LCD display panel that's removable paired with a wireless control pad, oversized hydraulic disc brakes with ebike specific levers to cut power and premium tires with Kevlar lining for durability
  • One of the more expensive electric bikes I've tested at nearly $8k, only available in one size, color and frame style, quality Shimano Deore XT ten speed drivetrain for a comfortable range of pedaling and nine levels of assist to match

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Zeitgeist

Model:

City

Price:

$7,999

Body Position:

Forward Aggressive

Suggested Use:

Road, Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedalec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States, Worldwide

Model Year:

2016

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

43.5 lbs (19.73 kg)

Battery Weight:

5 lbs (2.26 kg)

Frame Material:

Carbon Fiber Nano Tubes (Kevlar Inner Lining)

Frame Sizes:

18.9 in (48 cm)

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

White with Matte Black Accents

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid, Carbon Fiber

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses

Gearing Details:

10 Speed 1x10 Shimano Deore XT

Shifter Details:

Shimano Deore XT Triggers on Right

Cranks:

Lasco FR 660, Aluminum Alloy Bash Guard

Pedals:

VP-882 Plastic Platform, Black

Headset:

FPD

Stem:

Custom Carbon Fiber

Handlebar:

Flat, Carbon Fiber

Brake Details:

Tektro Auriga Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Rotors, Tektro Dorado Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Grips:

Tubro TS420 Ergonomic, Locking with Bar Ends

Saddle:

Selle Royal, Vented Gel Active

Seat Post:

Carbon Fiber

Seat Post Length:

250 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

31.6 mm

Rims:

Brass Nipples

Spokes:

14 Gauge, Black

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Energizer Plus, 28" x 1.75"

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

GreenGuard Puncture Protection, Reflective Sidewall Stripe

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Adjustable Length Kickstand, Front and Rear Racks from Thule, Thule Pannier Bags, Thule Front Basket, Optional LED Headlight, Aluminum Alloy Bash Guard

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, Quanta Quick Release Front Skewer

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bafang

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Battery Brand:

Samsung, Protanium

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

8.7 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

417.6 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

6 hours

Estimated Min Range:

20 miles (32 km)

Estimated Max Range:

35 miles (56 km)

Display Type:

Integrated LCD (Removable Magnetic)

Readouts:

Pedal Assist (0-9), Battery Level, Speed, Odometer, Trip Distance

Display Accessories:

Wireless Remote Button Pad, LED Indicator on Battery

Drive Mode:

Torque Sensing Pedal Assist (Rides Like Cadence Sensing Assist)

Top Speed:

28 mph (45 kph)

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Written Review

The Zeitgeist City is a premium, all-Carbon fiber speed pedelec. It’s an electric bike that can high 28 mph and only weighs ~43 lbs which is impressive given the 500 watt hub motor and 48 volt battery pack. At one point, I believe this model was being called the Zeitgeist by Karma Bikes but the company may have adjusted due to confusion with the Fisker Karma electric car… My experience testing this ebike was great because I could tell they put a lot of thought into the design (which is comfortable and well balanced). I especially liked the removable magnetic LCD display and optional wireless button pad because the bike still operates without it if you want to go for a minimal look and reduced weight but using it makes navigating the nine levels of assist possible without taking your left hand off the grip. The grips are also a highlight for me with a locking ergonomic design and unique Aluminum bar ends for changing hand position. The Zeitgeist City is a cross between a city and road bike from my point of view, the addition of rear rack bosses is great for those who plan to commute and want to add a set of panniers or trunk bag.

When you look at this thing from the side it almost looks like a normal bicycle, in large part due to the two-tone paint job, the battery disappears and the white glossy highlights create a safe visual footprint. It’s definitely an active geometry and there’s no suspension but to me Carbon fiber rides nicely and absorbs more road vibration than Aluminum and is lighter than steel. It comes with large hydraulic disc brakes and e-bike specific levers that cut power to the motor… my only complaint is the higher price point. I’m not sure I’ve seen anything out there with similar specs, high speed, low weight and cool appearance so the price is founded but a bit excessive. The other limitation is that it only comes in one sort of medium frame size with a relatively straight top tube that can make mounting and standing over difficult for shorter riders. This thing would be a blast to own for road cycling with friends in hilly or mountainous regions and could make an excellent commuter, rather than going with thin narrow tires they upgraded to ebike specific Schwalbe Energizer Plus that are puncture resistant and a bit more forgiving due to larger 1.75″ radius which makes a lot of sense to me.

Pros:

  • One of the only electric bikes I’ve tested that is almost completely made from carbon fiber! That includes the seat post, stem, handlebar and of course the fork
  • Considering the large 48 volt battery pack and 500 watt motor this bike is pretty light weight and handles very well because that weight is kept low and relatively centered across the frame
  • I really like the custom stem with integrated LCD display panel… that’s removable! I’m seeing more custom panels these days but very few let you take them out (to prevent tampering and exposure to the weather), well thought out design
  • Pedal assist is very responsive, I was told it’s torque based but it responded almost like a cadence sensor for me (not requiring as much force when pedaling) maybe it’s just dialed in to be very sensitive
  • Class 3 speed pedelec capable of hitting 28 mph fairly easily due to the light weight efficient design and larger 700c wheelset, it’s satisfying to accelerate or cruise at top speed
  • Quality tires with reflective sidewalls for safety and integrated puncture protection, the quick release front wheel makes changing flats or moving the bike in vehicles easier
  • Large, powerful hydraulic disc brakes with ebike specific extended levers that cut power to the motor instantly when activated, they worked well and felt sturdy at high speed
  • Zeitgeist offers optional Thule rack accessories but the City frame also features threaded eyelets on the seat stays for adding a more traditional rack that could work with a trunk bag and panniers for commuting, I like that the bike also comes with a kickstand (which is removable if you want)
  • Almost all of the wires are run directly through the frame on this bike and it looks great, they are exposed at the bottom bracket but this might make tuneups and maintenance easier, there’s a convenient disconnect point near the motor for rear wheel maintenance
  • Quality drivetrain (shifters and derailleurs), Shimano Deore XT components are light weight, designed to stay tuned and offer high performance

Cons:

  • Currently the Zeitgeist City is only available in one frame size with high-step design so this might not be a fit for super tall or petite riders
  • Extremely expensive at nearly $8k but it does perform well, look great and is likely a very exclusive ebike, there are regular pedal powered bikes that cost this much which are also custom carbon fiber frames so I get it
  • No drop bar option for those who prefer an even more aggressive body position but it did ride more like a road bike, I like the ergonomic locking grips and bar ends for changing hand position
  • No integrated lights on this bike, considering the frame is custom designed it would have been cool to see an LED based lighting system running off the main battery vs. having to add your own
  • The wireless button pad is easy to reach (to adjust assist level or cycle through display modes) but requires its own batteries vs. being run off the main pack with one tiny extra wire, I was told the battery should last two years and is easy to change, you can completely remove the buttons if you want and use a single button below the stem as a backup which is cool
  • The included pedals are very basic, not as wide or rigid as some of the magnesium platforms I’ve seen from Wellgo but this choice might have been made because many people have their own or use clip in options at higher speed

Resources:

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More Zeitgeist Reviews

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Cameron Newland
2 years ago

No rating for this bike?

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Hi Cameron, I’ve been testing the site without ratings because I feel that a single number/stars isn’t deep enough to communicate the variety and year differences between bikes. I’m focusing on deeper videos with more pros/cons instead :)

Reply
Stu Berman
1 year ago

Hi Court, the more that I look at all the e-bikes out there, the more interested I am in the Zeitgeist, but the one size fits all approach does concern me. I’m 5’8″ and I think you said elsewhere that you’re 5’9″. How well do you think the Zeitgeist fit you, especially as compared to other e-bikes?

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

Hi Stu! It’s difficult to remember exactly as the review was done quite a while back and I test so many bikes. As average sized people I feel like both of us would fit this bike just fine, there are little adjustments you can make with the seat post height and handlebar but if you start replacing stuff it could interfere with the electronics or weight (the included Carbon fiber stem and bars are much lighter). If you like the bike I think you could make it work… it’s designed to fit the highest number of people, the peak of the bell curve and I feel like you’re right there.

Reply
Fencible
11 months ago

Hi Court, Thanks for a great site and awesome reviews. Did you notice if it looked possible to fit fenders to the Zeitgeist?

Reply
Court Rye
11 months ago

Hi Fencible! I bet it’s possible but may require some custom work… and even then, finding parts that match and can be attached without too much rattling while still being solid (especially important at high speeds) could be difficult and expensive. I looked closely at some of the pictures and didn’t see support arm bosses or the standard holes often used for bolts and mounting tabs (perhaps I was missing them). Hope this helps guide you, I think the short answer is no, it’s not really optimized for adding fenders but you could use a seat post mounted rear fender like this or a carry rack to keep water off your back since it does appear to have seat stay bosses.

Reply
Robert Crivelli
9 months ago

Where can I purchase a zeitgeist city electric bike? Any information is gladly appreciated

Reply
Court Rye
9 months ago

Hey Robert! I’m not sure which shops have it but you could reach out to one of the team leads at the company. His name is Kartik and his email is kartik@zeitgeist.bike hope this helps!

Reply

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Ravi Kempaiah
10 hours ago

Ebike love or our conflicted love/hate relationships with them? I love Ebike commuting but Ebikes are ruining my finances. I bought a second bike because I liked the experience so much. I just had to buy several pairs of new jeans because my waist size has dropped an inch as I'm hitting 1300 commuting miles for the year. It just goes on and on: better bike bags, commuting clothes, lights etc.

Sounds like a good marketing idea and particularly for the industry events like the expos. Open up people's minds to the various applications for ebikes (commercial, cargo, commuting, exercise etc) and get them to make connections and open up their minds to possibilities not previously realized.

I like your "day in the life of a commuter" idea: it can really get bizarre to the point the stories sound like fiction. The other day on one commute I encountered two deer feeding at the side of the road, a block later I had to avoid a skunk crossing the road, and about a mile after that, deeper into the city, I passed three dudes with baseball bats walking down the street at 6am. On the ride home I almost crashed into a policeman who was crossing the street but changed his mind and reversed direction suddenly. Every commute something odd seems to occur.

E-bike commute is the best kind of commute. The freedom is unparalleled.
Re: Jeans, that's a good I suppose. You know the amount of money we spent on hospital treatment for my dad when he had stroke = 100's E-bikes. So, if investing in E-bikes helps someone stay healthy, avoid cardiovascular degeneration or keep their bones, knees and hips in great shape, then its a no-brainer.

I am glad you're having awesome fun on these bikes.

Pete B
12 hours ago

Through a local store in order to get a rebate from the city. I'm a bit bummed out because the Juiced website said last week they were going to begin shipping backorders right away but as of yesterday they haven't even shipped yet.

jharlow77
1 day ago

Out of curiosity, did you order through your LBS or from juiced directly?
Through a local store in order to get a rebate from the city. I'm a bit bummed out because the Juiced website said last week they were going to begin shipping backorders right away but as of yesterday they haven't even shipped yet.

Over50
1 day ago

Ebike love or our conflicted love/hate relationships with them? I love Ebike commuting but Ebikes are ruining my finances. I bought a second bike because I liked the experience so much. I just had to buy several pairs of new jeans because my waist size has dropped an inch as I'm hitting 1300 commuting miles for the year. It just goes on and on: better bike bags, commuting clothes, lights etc.

Sounds like a good marketing idea and particularly for the industry events like the expos. Open up people's minds to the various applications for ebikes (commercial, cargo, commuting, exercise etc) and get them to make connections and open up their minds to possibilities not previously realized.

I like your "day in the life of a commuter" idea: it can really get bizarre to the point the stories sound like fiction. The other day on one commute I encountered two deer feeding at the side of the road, a block later I had to avoid a skunk crossing the road, and about a mile after that, deeper into the city, I passed three dudes with baseball bats walking down the street at 6am. On the ride home I almost crashed into a policeman who was crossing the street but changed his mind and reversed direction suddenly. Every commute something odd seems to occur.

Mike Nemeth
1 day ago

Hi. I'm new to e-bikes and highly value many posted replies on various subjects. I think the EBR reviews have turned me on. I'm 75 years old but still very active. Weigh 175 lbs at 5'9". I test rode my first ebike today and came away very excited. It was the Pedego city commuter, which suits me as most, if not all of my riding will be on the many bike paths here in northern CA. The Pedego is around 3k but I came across the E-Glide with similar equipment at $1700 plus shipping. After doing a specs comparison, I'm trying to figure why such a price difference. Does anyone care to comment?

Hi, I just saw your comment. When I was looking for my first E-bike I also noticed the huge difference in prices. There are a few E-bike stores in my city and most of the bikes also started at 2700.00. I think E-Glide keeps their price down by offering only two models and also you are buying it straight from the manufacturer with no middleman. The ST had the features I wanted and you want a nice size 500 watt motor if your going to do any hills. I have not had a single problem since purchasing it and I usually ride 18-25 miles every morning before it gets two hot. It's an amazing feeling riding along at 22 mph! Most of the time I keep the speed at level 3 and ride at about 16 mph. EBR has a video on the bike and also another on Dave and his shop in Santa Monica. Good luck. I hope you find the bike you'll be happy with.

Ann M.
3 days ago

@Katman4532, please don't jump overboard on this discussion. I totally agree that foxes, skunks and potentially coyotes can carry rabies. HOWEVER, There are county wide vaccination programs that have been in place for years in Central Texas. In the rural area where I live that means the health officials are dropping rabies vaccine throughout the area. Please do not spread fear with a few limited observations.

Yes, I have also seen different animal patterns; including deer where there hadn't been any until 5 years ago; adult coyote traveling in broad daylight, and this summer, a new one; the coyote youngsters dashing to and from nearby water holes in daylight. Also, before we moved from S. Lamar, the neighborhood around Barton Springs & Lamar had several reports with pics to back it up of Coyotes roaming in this city area, sometimes in the day. Definitely protect your pet cats. It is the responsibility of everyone in the neighborhood to remove any potential food source for coyotes; and I know that is a real challenge.

Katman4532
3 days ago

That's pretty extreme and unrealistic; @Katman. Whatever you want to call "prodromal" is not a realistic statement. How do you know that the coyote you encountered was rabid. That is serious and in our area of Central Texas it's no joke! Your suggestion of guns does nothing but create fear and we Texans don't buy into fear. You don't encounter coyotes all that often. I KNOW, I live where there are a lot of coyotes and You are creating an incorrect image of how they act.

Coyotes DO NOT chase or attack or do anything against HUMANS. They run away from us.

BTW I've lived in a very rural eastern area of Travis County in Central Texas with a lot coyotes in the space with us for about 30 years. Both Travis and Bastrop counties have continued to do their rabies prevention via air drops for a long time. No Need For Fear!
Actually, I do have a fair knowledge of
The Lyssavirus (causative agent of Rabies). I'm a licensed Medical Technologist with 39 years experience
(20 years in Microbiology). The behavior of this coyote was confirmed by Animal control as strongly suggestive of early stage (prodromal)
Rabies. The animal was shot by APD in
the next door neighbors front yard. The head was sent off to the State lab for
confirmation and if memory serves
me right, it was confirmed as being rabid. Since then we've had 3 confirmed
Rabies cases inside city limits in the past year in skunks. Look, I know coyotes don't normally come anywhere
near humans, but behavior changes when they're rabid. Baiting with vaccine impregnated bait is a great way
to control rabies, but it's not 100%. No
vaccination program is. Coyotes in our
area are not as fearful of humans as they once were. My wife and I have seen them on more than one occasion in our neighborhood. Look, if you think I'm being an "alarmist", then feel
free to cancel my account. I'm done.

Thomas Jaszewski
4 days ago

I guess the entire city of Amsterdam, one of the biggest bike cities in the world, is filled with helmet less idiots. Explain?

"The only country I've seen the majority of people wearing helmets is the US, and they have to, mainly due to how dangerous it is to bike there. It's dangerous because American cyclists are an inferior caste of citizen. In the US, it's OK to be aggressive and it's socially acceptable to behave dangerously toward a cyclist. I know, because I live there. And therefore I feel safer with a helmet, even if it's not going to do anything when 3 ton SUV rolls over my body.

A Dutch person now living in Chicago added:

I agree that it is socially acceptable in the US to be aggressive to bicycles. I grew up in the Netherlands and have been in the US for eight years now.

In the Netherlands it has been socially unacceptable to use a mobile phone when driving for over a decade. In the US you even see police officers texting on their phone whilst driving. If I have a close call with a car it is almost always caused by the driver being on their phone."

Mark23
5 days ago

Thanks for your reply, we're in Atlanta, GA, and haven't found a bike locally that suits us. Only the stores that specialize in e-bikes actually have them on the floor. Looking at the gallery photos for the CF1, it doesn't appear to have the swept-back handlebars, but in some of the rotating pics, it does look like it has them. The E-City looks like a good bike too. Thanks for your suggestions, Mark.

Where are you located. We strongly recommend buying from a local dealer who will support during and after the sale. We sell two bikes that may meet your needs. The CF1 from BESV and the e-City from Smart Motion. Both of these bikes are under $2K and are very easy to mount and ride. What we strongly recommend is that you never buy a bike unless your can test ride it first. Geometry and the way it fits and feels to you is of utmost importance. A bike that has the wrong geometry will not be comfortable and hence ridden little.. test ride as often as you can to develop a frame of reference.

Piero
5 days ago

We own 2 City Commuters, and find them wonderful bikes overall to use, but quite costly on maintenance, especially at dealership. The main weakness of Pedego bikes is the exposed and easily damaged wiring, which is expensive to replace. The electrical wires (I know of 6 different ones, because they broke at some point) cost between $40 and $60 apiece, and because they are exposed, they are easily damaged, especially at the connection level. Add dealership labor--according to them they are hard to replace, and Scooteretti asks for $73/hour labour, and replacement fees run in the $100 range per damaged wire, parts and labor. Figures in are in Can$

Computers are a bit unreliable too. over 8000 km, I am at my third computer on my bike.

86 and still kicking
6 days ago

Where are you located. We strongly recommend buying from a local dealer who will support during and after the sale. We sell two bikes that may meet your needs. The CF1 from BESV and the e-City from Smart Motion. Both of these bikes are under $2K and are very easy to mount and ride. What we strongly recommend is that you never buy a bike unless your can test ride it first. Geometry and the way it fits and feels to you is of utmost importance. A bike that has the wrong geometry will not be comfortable and hence ridden little.. test ride as often as you can to develop a frame of reference.

Denis Shelston
1 week ago

If you live in a city, especially a big one, theft happens. So you likely want to insure your new ride.

After days of back and forth with my insurance broker this is what I found out. Of course, I'm not an expert so you should have this conversation with your own insurance company. I wonder if things are different in the U.S. Or other provinces? Anyway here is what I have to report, let me know what you think and if you have other info to add

Most (maybe all in Ontario, Canada) insurance companies will not insure an e-bike as a scheduled item. E-bikes are covered under most home policies up to $1000 for peril (fire, water damage, earthquake, etc). However, theft is not a peril so the e-bike would be covered for the full amount if stolen. This means my bike is covered already under my home policy; however, it would be subject to my deductible. Vandalism (which is not related to theft) is a peril so capped at $1000. Vandalism which is a result of theft or attempted theft is covered for full amount.

Thanks for this, I will inquire with my broker. I too was curious.

Jim Dove
1 week ago

Thought I'd close the loop on this. Visited Sleek Ebikes in Tarrytown, NY to try out the Bulls line-up. Rode the Evo8 and various other Bulls bikes. My wife rode several as well. She went with what seemed to me a cheaper version of the Pedego from Ariel Rider. I think it's kind of goofy but she loves it. I ended up with the Bulls Estream Evo 45 FS. In the end, I came to like the full suspension on the Bulls. And, as a MTB, it offered some additional flexibility beyond their city commuter bikes. Appreciate all of the feedback from everyone and the great reviews to help guide the decision here. Great site...

emco5
1 week ago

> THE FIRST THING you need to know about ebikes is that it’s impossible to look cool riding one.

The only one concerned about you looking cool is YOU. As people age they tend not to care what other people ‘might’ think.

> When you ride one, people look at you with disdain.

People stopping me on my rides with interest and questions has become so frequent that I now keep printed info leaflets in the pannier. Some of the roadie crowd, though, do seem to feel threatened or annoyed because I’m not as uncomfortable or sweating as much as they are.

> They shout things like, “you’re the problem!” and “get off the sidewalk!” (Seriously.)

eBikes really aren’t the problem, they are a solution. If you ride any type of bicycle or mechanical device on occupied sidewalks, yield to pedestrians and ride slowly. If a densely populated city sidewalk, get off your bike and walk it until there is a clearing. That courtesy is just common sense because if you hit someone the odds are high that you will be sued.

Nutella
1 week ago

There have been plenty of conflicts elsewhere in the world with ebike riders going too fast or riding like idiots, which I agree is a behavior issue more than an ebike issue. As far as enforcement goes, it all comes down to money, if the city has it, it's a good way to keep bad behavior from happening, if not, there won't be any. I have a friend who worked at a shop in Breckinridge where they rented ebikes and he told me it was common that tourists would come back all road rashed because they underestimated how fast they could go on an ebike and would dump it in a corner. That might have something to do with why they don't allow them on that bike path.

mrgold35
1 week ago

I have the same restrictions to yield to horses and hikers/walker/joggers in the areas I like to ride around the Rio Grande river in ABQ. I always slow down around walking to jogging pace if I'm passing someone on a narrow dirt trails. I try to acknowledge them with a head nod, wave, or saying "Hi". I usually keep up with bike traffic on the paved bike trails. I've only received two negative comments in 10 months and 3000 miles and only on my work commute (get out of the F***in' road, and someone tossed a Sonic cup full of ice at me and hit the frame). I think I've had +20 positive comments and countless conversation starters riding my ebike (mostly because of the 4" fat tires). I'll say 95%-99% of drivers are respectful of pedestrians and bikers on main roads (moving over to pass them, yielding at stops to let you proceed, not pulling out in front of you on a side street, or they don't cut you off to make a right hand turn, etc...).

Albuquerque is trying to become more bike friendly and they are in the process of building a 50 mile bike loop around the city. They always put marked bike lanes with new road construction or put an extra wide bike/walk/jog paved path that parallels the higher mph main roads and interstate. I live in a new-ish housing area on the far side of town with no public trans within 2 miles. Drive or ebike are my only options to get to work. I was lucky to adjust my work schedule to leave early to/from work to avoid heavy rush hour traffic.

I'm starting to see a lot of familiar bike commuters in the morning and weekend rides around the Rio Grande river paved/dirt paths is really starting to look like weekday rush hour traffic at mid morning. Albuquerque is starting to become more bike friendly every year. I see more vehicles with bike racks on them compared to a few years ago. Unfortunately, I have yet to see another ebike during my rides in Albuquerque and Santa Fe in the last few years. I've only seen one other ebike at the Grand Canyon last November when the wife and I took our Radrovers for a little vacation.

I don't think local or state laws know what to do about ebikes yet? As far as I can find out; I have the same restrictions/rights with my Class II ebike as any road bike or MTB would have on paved/dirt paths and regular roads. I figure I will just "act like a biker", "ride like bike" and "quack like a bike" and fly under the radar until I see otherwise.

No issues riding on sidewalks because:
- hardly no-one is on the sidewalks because it can be too hot outside
- too far to walk anyplace other than the mailbox on the corner
- not a lot of bike only lanes and a very small shoulder if I rode in the streets (I would have to ride in the concrete gutter). I would get rear ended at +50 mph if I did ride in the streets in certain spots if I wasn't on the sidewalk.

Dewey
1 week ago

I'm hoping to find dealers to test ride these suggestions.

Trek have recently expanded their shop network and can order bikes from other stores for you to test ride. Kalkhoff is harder to find, I know of dealers in CA, NY, and DC but the motor can be serviced by a Bosch certified technician of any brand using their motors. The Gazelle Arroyo is similar to the Kalkhoff Agattu and Gazelle have dealers in Chicago and across the US. The Daymak EC1 is lightweight for an ebike at 38lb but the diamond frame forward leaning design is not a townie/city upright style, the dealers are in Canada, and the 24v hub motor on their base model is modest. I first tried a 24v hub motor before I switched to a 36v mid-drive motor because I found the smaller motor could not pull me up hills unloaded whereas I can now go grocery shopping and tow a child trailer.

Dewey
1 week ago

The Trek Lift+ low-step weighs 45lb including battery and has a small size frame option for riders over 5' with 26" wheels, it has drop out eyelets for attaching a rack and fenders, here's Court's review of the diamond frame version. The Kalkhoff Agattu B7 weighs 53lb and has a suspension fork and suspension seatpost for a comfortable ride, and already comes with a rack, fenders, lights, and a bell, of the available frame sizes the small frame is a good choice for shorter riders because it has 26" wheels, here's Court's review. Both ebikes offer pedal assist, no throttle. Apart from the accessories the main difference is with the Trek the battery is mounted on the down tube which puts the weight of the battery in the center of the bike, versus the Kalkhoff that has the battery mounted on the rear rack which means you get a lower step over height which is great for hopping on and off the bike but the trade off is the battery weight is towards the rear and that can feel a little tippy if you add the weight of grocery bags in panniers on the rear rack. With both ebikes you could remove the battery before lifting it onto the van rack to lessen the weight, also probably a good idea to get some sort of tarp/cover you can tie around the bike when it's on the van rack for when it rains.

JayVee
2 weeks ago

Being the (temporary) user of a Bosch Peformance (350W, 45km/h version) with a Nuvinci 380, I have to say that the manual version of the N380 was something of a disappointment. On paper the system really appeals to me, but after trying it out I've found that it doesn't suit my needs or riding style. Not to be negative here, but I don't think the Nuvinci is for everyone. Particularly the manual iteration that I'm currently using.

You have to have really strong hands to use the Nuvinci system. After 15 minutes of riding around, I already had blisters on my fingers. But what bothers me the most with the loaner bike I have is how difficult it is to ride around in a city environment. When the Bosch and N380 are combined, they seem to enhance each other's weaknesses. Bosch drives are fairly difficult to get going from a standstill and the N380 makes it equally difficult to gain speed and momentum rapidly. When you stop at a traffic light you're going to have to put the N380 in a 'steep hill' configuration in order to get going again. But once you get going, in order to acquire some speed you''ll need to twist the lever several times to achieve a 'flatter configuration'. And by several times, I mean about 3 strong full twists. To me this is like rolling a computer mouse entirely across the table 3 times just to get the pointer to the top of your screen. There's simply got to be an easier way to do this.. I suppose I'm influenced by the fact that I've been riding a Yamaha drive around for six months and it has a feature called Zero Cadence, which gives you a little boost when starting off. It's a feature that operates in a rather subtle manner and to be honest I barely noticed it up to now. It's more of a little nudge than a big push, but if you have to deal with 7 consecutive red lights, some of which are on hills, the benefits are clearly there even if you're not consciously aware of them.

I enjoyed Shimano's electronic Di2 Nexus hub a lot. It only takes a click of a thumb to switch gears and everything falls nicely under your fingertips (Di2 gears on the right, and assist levels on the left). I tried the Nexus Di2 in automatic mode, but it takes quite a bit of trial and error to optimise it for your cadence and so I ended up using it in manual mode exclusively over the course of an entire summer. With Shimano's system everything falls under your fingers, and so you can combine assist level shifting and gear shifting for some very neat effects which can dramatically increase your range in traffic. Switch into full assist to get started and then slip back into ECO once you reach cruising speed. Shimano's system is one of the most pleasant systems I've ever used in traffic because it allows you to fully focus on the surrounding environment. After a couple of kilometers, shifting gears and assist levels becomes second nature.

Zach Kadletz
2 weeks ago

Taipei, Taiwan, August 2nd 2017 – Urban transportation specialist Tern Bicycles unveiled the GSD — an ebike that defines a new category: ‘compact utility’. The GSD is designed to carry two kids, a week’s worth of groceries, or 180 kg of cargo, but it’s only 180 cm long—shorter than a Dutch city bike. With Tern’s best-in-class folding technology, it packs down small enough to fit in a VW Touran or an urban apartment. It adjusts to fit riders from 150 – 195 cm—so mom, dad and the kids can all use it. A Bosch Performance motor, with up to two batteries, powers the GSD for up to 250km. It comes fully equipped with integrated lighting, rack, mudguards, double kickstand, two XL panniers, and even retractable passenger foot pegs – everything needed to shift to a bike-centric lifestyle.

“Most of the ebikes on the market today basically look like standard bicycles with motors and batteries grafted on,” said Josh Hon, Tern Team Captain. "That means that all of the valid compromises that were made in designing a muscle-powered vehicle are carried over to the ebike, where they don’t make as much sense. The Tern GSD is the result a fundamental insight: when you design a bicycle around an electric drivetrain, you don’t need to compromise key functionalities like comfort and cargo capacity to optimize for speed. With a Bosch drivetrain, 20” wheel bikes ride just as fast as 700c bikes but thanks to smaller wheels, deliver punchier acceleration. The smaller wheels also allow us to maximize cargo capacity. And with top speed removed from the optimization equation, we were free to design the GSD with a comfortable Dutch-bike riding position. Best of all, we were able to fit all this goodness into a package that’s only the size of a standard city bike.”

“One of our guiding insights was that cargo bikes are most useful in city centers, but they’re correspondingly difficult to manage and store,” according to Galen Crout, Communications Manager at Tern. “Dense urban centers bring cargo bikes to life—where groceries, schools and work are all within a bikeable distance—but they’re also where houses are small, and where bike theft is a persistent problem. We’re creating the compact utility ebike category to let people in cities enjoy the benefits of cargo bikes without the limitations.”

Fits the Family
The GSD is an ebike that everybody in the family can ride. Tern’s patented adjustable stem, special cockpit geometry, and super low step frame make the bike easy to handle and ride, even for very small riders. Taller riders will appreciate the expanding cockpit and handlebars that can be adjusted for height and reach. Heavier riders will appreciate the massively buttressed frame and fork, and components that are designed to handle loads of up to 180kg.

Super Stable
Just as a scooter is easier to ride than a motorcycle, the GSD rides and handles better than many ebikes on the market today. The GSD’s smaller wheels, low frame, and centrally mounted motor and batteries give the bike an extremely low center of gravity. Coupled with an extended wheelbase, the GSD is remarkably stable and easy to handle. This extra stability is critically important and appreciated when the GSD is fully loaded with cargo, especially with the wriggling child variety. And since ebikes are typically ridden at higher average speeds, this extra stability adds to safety.

Capacious Capacity
The GSD is built to carry stuff, lots of it. The frame, fork, and components have been tested to exceed 180kg of total weight for the rider and cargo. The GSD comes standard with an 80cm integrated rear rack and side panniers with a total capacity of 62L. The GSD fits two children in Thule Maxi child seats or one adult passenger. Additional carrying capacity can be added with lower deck supports, a rear tray, and a front tray. Tern will open source the frame attachment point dimensions so riders with an interest can also design and build their own custom cargo accessories.

Portabilty, Storability
Despite its extra large cargo capacity, the GSD packs small to fit into tight urban environments. Since the GSD is no longer than a standard bike, it will work with standard bike racks on cars and buses. But even better, patented Tern folding technology lets the GSD pack even smaller – three seconds is all it takes to reduce its height by 1/3rd and its width by 40% so the GSD can fit INSIDE mid-sized cars like a VW Touran. With two GSD’s packed in the back of the car, family bike adventures will never be the same again. The GSD is even designed to fit into small elevators with a specially designed rack that allows it to stand vertically.

Component Quality
Whereas many cargo-oriented bicycles use mostly standard bicycle parts, the GSD goes a step further with some of the most robust parts available. Examples include Magura 4 piston disc brakes, custom 2.4" Schwalbe Super Moto-X tires, Boost thru-axle hubs, and custom 36mm width double-joined rims.

The GSD, designed as the ultimate car replacement or small business utility vehicle, launches together with a collection of accessories, including Eurocrate-standardized front and rear racks, a passenger kit with KLICKfix adapters, and optional foot supports. The rear rack, sized for up to four Ortliebs, is designed for optimal compatibility with up to two Thule Yepp Maxi Seats. The base price of 3,999 EUR (3,999 USD) includes a pair of 62 L Cargo Hold panniers, a Bosch Performance mid-drive, and a 400 watt hour Bosch battery.

“It’s a bike that fits a family, but it’s also a bike that the whole family can share” said Hon. “When you’re investing $4,000 in a new electric bike, fundamental versatility makes a world of difference. Fit any riders, passengers, or cargo, and fit anywhere.”

Tern will debut the GSD at the Fall trade shows, starting with Eurobike 2017. Dealers and consumers can stop by the Tern booth at B4-405, or the Tern demo booth at DA-417 to test ride the GSD.

Paul Marin
2 weeks ago

Sure. That's true. If you live in a major city your odds might be pretty good. Less so for less densely populated areas. I know plenty of people who have them to track keys, wallet etc. so they would likely still have the app open from when they were looking for something last. I think Bluetooth is about 150 feet in range

Jim Dove
2 weeks ago

First, thanks for the feedback on the husband and wife thread I started. More research has me comparing these two bikes for my wife. I thought a new thread would elicit more response, so apologies for the noise.

Is The Bulls materially superior to the Pedego. The latter has the advantage of my wife loving the color choices and the local dealer.

For me, I am deciding between a Stromer ST2 versus a Bulls Lacuba EVO45 and leaning toward the Bulls. Any advice there welcome too. Again -- spectacular forum and information on the site. This has been very helpful.

Many thanks,
Jim

Stan Wilson
2 weeks ago

I've got a 16" Rad City Commuter and I love it....except, I'm too darned short (27.5" inseam) I'm 69 and hiking my leg over the seat and rack is also getting to be a problem. The step thru models (not just the women's models) seem to be a nice option. Liv has just announced the 2018 model Sedona and it's now got disc brakes. The Sedona is sold as a Giant men's model also and about 3 years ago the "step thru" Sedona was sold as a "'step thru" Giant. They've changed it to a "Liv" women's model. Most of my riding is on concrete/pavement, but I also do some mild trail riding at the area lakes. The Sedona has a 2.25" tire with "semi-mountain bike" tires which would be better for my off road riding.

I'll opt for the Luna (Bafang) 750 Watt motor.

Any help would be appreciated
Stan Wilson
Dodge City, Kansas

mrgold35
2 weeks ago

I've been ebike work commuting around 13-14 miles round-trip since Sept of 2016. I only have about 1/4 mile of bike lanes and under a mile of a walk/job/bike only path that parallels the hwy over the Rio Grande river. I have to share the road with vehicles the rest of the time. I feel safer in the morning at 5:30 am on regular streets because my light are extremely bright and reflective clothing. Our city is trying to build a 50 mile bike only loop around the city. Still a few years away from that and the older neighborhoods can be barely car friendly because of the narrow streets and sidewalks.

Coming home after work is a different story because of rush hour traffic and the lack of bike lanes. I only ride in the street if there is enough space to park a car. I see a lot of folks driving 10-25 mph over the posted speed limits and their side mirrors would hit me in the back because they hug the lanes so close if I didn't have a car width space as a buffer. I ride a lot slower and I actually see more bikes on the sidewalks than people. It takes me longer to get home; but, I feel safer on the sidewalks. Pretty much all the sidewalks are double wide and connect to asphalt bike paths in the newer neighborhoods for two way walk/jog/bike/stroller folks. I always slow down and usually acknowledge folks on sidewalks with a wave or head nod.

Lysle Basinger
1 week ago

Others bikes offer more for less.

MarvFIT
1 month ago

for 8000 i much rather get a stromer

enzo
8 months ago

Can you pop a wheelie on these bikes?

Amit fortus
1 year ago

is this bike actually available or is it just a concept?

Mike Vincent
1 year ago

It's actually on sale right now at touch of modern: https://www.touchofmodern.com/sales/zeitgeist/zeitgeist-city

Question: Is the display readable in the dark? Does it illuminate?

Dmc InLA
1 year ago

where r u? looks amazing

William Lam
2 years ago

Great review. Nice looking bike ... But I really don't see how this thing is priced at $8K. They will sell a ton at $4K, but at $8K, it's only gonna be a store display.

odetoazam
2 years ago

+William Lam It's not gonna be the final price. Its better to price higher and test price points. 4k is too low though.

Rob Schmitt
2 years ago

7999$. This is more expensive than a car. I would ride an electric bike with 45 km/h limit. But these bikes are starting at 4500€.

Christopher Moltisanti
1 year ago

+Rob Schmitt China will clone these soon enough,I predict we'll see versions of this style next year for under $2000.

BIKESTER INC.
2 years ago

+Rob Schmitt you're spot on. Our average street price in the US will settle at $5k-$6.5k for the limited edition selling on ToMo. I think the there are two electric bike markets in the US- the value and the designer. This might fit the latter.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Rob Schmitt Yeah, it's one of the pricier options I've seen... I've reviewed a few other speed pedelecs (with a few being cheaper) back at the site: http://electricbikereview.com/tag/speed/ the new 2016 Turbo is ~$3k and goes ~26 mph (~42km/h)

Jappe Kapanen
2 years ago

ok thank you for the answer

Stephen Cho
2 years ago

The cross current from juiced riders has similar specs with the same battery for $1500. You could buy 5 of them plus a spare battery for 8K. The owner of this company certainly ain't thinking about the masses.

odetoazam
2 years ago

+Stephen Cho I dont think advertisers are thinking about the masses either. #thinkniche

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Stephen Cho Yeah, I'm excited to test the Cross Current very soon :D

William Wonder
2 years ago

I'm surprised the electric firms aren't making more recumbents. Logic would dictate this is the real market, older riders who need assistance to ride like a young man and they are going recumbent. Ya, I know about Bionx and it appears to be a good system.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+William Wonder Hi William, here's one amazing recumbent with full suspension and regeneration! Very cool in my opinion: http://electricbikereview.com/hp-velotechnik/scorpion-fs-26-s-pedelec/ maybe we'll see others like it in the future made with Carbon fiber like the Zeitgeist City :D

дмитрий трофимов
2 years ago

Im   sorry! what about price? 7 hundred bhu bhu bhu bhu dollars. HOW MUCH PLZ???

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+дмитрий трофимов The price is $7,999 which I mention in the video and list back on the website: http://electricbikereview.com/zeitgeist/city/ hope this helps :)

Flo Mo
2 years ago

Fascinating! The future of e-bikes? Again a great video. I'll start saving money. :)

Kartik Ram
2 years ago

+Elya Cornovier Get this bike at a limited sale on #Touchofmodern
https://www.touchofmodern.com/sales/zeitgeist/zeitgeist-city

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Elya Cornovier Yeah, neat to see a completely custom frame like this and the attention to detail with the display unit :)

Gardener Rob
2 years ago

Very impressive looking bike,  looks like it would be very light and agile.

Kartik Ram
2 years ago

+Gardener Rob Get this bike at a limited sale on #Touchofmodern
https://www.touchofmodern.com/sales/zeitgeist/zeitgeist-city

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Gardener Rob Yeah, it rode great... very fast and responsive when pedaling.

JeMasLT
2 years ago

Good work dude.
Make some video with Tips How to care electric bikes. When to clean what to change and so on :)

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+JeMasLT Good tip, I'll work on something like this but here's one I shot a while back with a shop owner: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFLIGRj2bxU

David Macdonald
2 years ago

it's nice , but just to much cash , make a bike for the masses , out of quality parts , that would do more for E bikes, community.

David Macdonald
2 years ago

Thanks all have a look .

Kartik Ram
2 years ago

+David Macdonald Get this bike at a limited sale on #Touchofmodern
https://www.touchofmodern.com/sales/zeitgeist/zeitgeist-city

David Macdonald
2 years ago

Thanks .

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+David Macdonald I've been trying to list more of the affordable models at the site to make them easier to find, check it out: http://electricbikereview.com/tag/affordable/

Jappe Kapanen
2 years ago

Is that bike able to add some kind of front suspension??
Maybe less than 120mm???

Jappe Kapanen
2 years ago

+Kartik Ram Ok Want to see that when it's finished

BIKESTER INC.
2 years ago

+Jappe Kapanen We are considering putting a SRAM RS-1 front fork with 100mm of travel as it can get pretty bumpy out there.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Kartik Ram Kartik, if you're going to comment on videos please answer the question that the user is asking (in this case about suspension) vs. spamming the flash sale

Kartik Ram
2 years ago

+Jappe Kapanen Get this bike at a limited sale on #Touchofmodern
https://www.touchofmodern.com/sales/zeitgeist/zeitgeist-city

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Jappe Kapanen I would think so, SR Suntour makes a few minimal suspension forks like this... they aren't as light as a carbon fork but they are still slim and you get 100 mm or so. I'm reviewing one other Zeitgeist ebike and it does have a suspension fork (but the frame is Aluminum vs Carbon).

benjamin Ofuasia
2 years ago

RIP wallet

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+benjamin Ofuasia There's room for improvement to get there, especially with similarly priced bikes like the Specialized Turbo S and Stromer ST2 with competing specs and perhaps better performance but not quite as light weight.

benjamin Ofuasia
2 years ago

i see it, but all i can think of it trying to fit in with are bikes like the S-Works Demo 8 or the Santa Cruz V10c

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+benjamin Ofuasia Ha! Yeah... but there are still normal bicycles for this price so I can see how it's trying to fit into the market. Maybe just above what I can afford ;)

benjamin Ofuasia
2 years ago

8 grand

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+benjamin Ofuasia Yep O_O

nerdexproject
2 years ago

I like how the battery is integrated but that does not justify the price. We gotta teach those companies that we wont just pay any amount of money. If anybody's interested in a similar bike like this, just look around, there are lower priced options available.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+nerdexproject Good points, I agree :)

nerdexproject
2 years ago

Yeah that might be true but unlike BMW, Zeitgeist isn't a coveted brand. And if they want to get there, being expensive isn't the only answer. They must offer desirable features and first and foremost they need at least lights imo. At least they're doing the design right.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+nerdexproject I think they realize that it's expensive but that's part of the appeal... just like a Coach handbag or a BMW. There are many other affordable ebikes out there, having something different like this just signals mass appeal to me and the desire for some consumers to go for style and quality at a higher price. It costs a lot to create a custom frame like this with electronics and display to match.