Aventon Level Review

Aventon Level Electric Bike Review
Aventon Level
Aventon Level Suntour Suspension Fork Alloy Front Fender
Aventon Level 46t Steel Chainring Alloy Guide 170mm Cranks
Aventon Level Shimano Acera Derailleur 1x8 12 To 32 Tooth
Aventon Level Shengyi 500 Watt Rear Hub Motor
Aventon Level Rear Rack Standard Gauge Tubing 25kg Weight Limit
Aventon Level Aventon By Velo Saddle 27.2mm Seatpost
Aventon Level Rear Mounted Adjustable Length Kickstand
Aventon Level Downtube Integrated 48v 14ah Battery Pack
Aventon Level Bengal Aries 3 180mm Rotor Hydraulic Dual Piston Caliper
Aventon Level Kenda Quik Drumlin Ebike Specific Tires Hybrid Tread Pattern
Aventon Level Cockpit View Center Mounted Display
Aventon Level Grayscale Lcd Display Three Button Control Pad
Aventon Level Bengal Aries 3 Brake Levers With Motor Inhibitors
Aventon Level Thumb Throttle Rubber Locking Grips
Aventon Level 1.8lb 3amp Charger
Aventon Level Stock High Step Earth Grey
Aventon Level Electric Bike Review
Aventon Level
Aventon Level Suntour Suspension Fork Alloy Front Fender
Aventon Level 46t Steel Chainring Alloy Guide 170mm Cranks
Aventon Level Shimano Acera Derailleur 1x8 12 To 32 Tooth
Aventon Level Shengyi 500 Watt Rear Hub Motor
Aventon Level Rear Rack Standard Gauge Tubing 25kg Weight Limit
Aventon Level Aventon By Velo Saddle 27.2mm Seatpost
Aventon Level Rear Mounted Adjustable Length Kickstand
Aventon Level Downtube Integrated 48v 14ah Battery Pack
Aventon Level Bengal Aries 3 180mm Rotor Hydraulic Dual Piston Caliper
Aventon Level Kenda Quik Drumlin Ebike Specific Tires Hybrid Tread Pattern
Aventon Level Cockpit View Center Mounted Display
Aventon Level Grayscale Lcd Display Three Button Control Pad
Aventon Level Bengal Aries 3 Brake Levers With Motor Inhibitors
Aventon Level Thumb Throttle Rubber Locking Grips
Aventon Level 1.8lb 3amp Charger
Aventon Level Stock High Step Earth Grey

Summary

  • The Aventon Level is a powerful and feature-rich Class 3 commuting electric bike, a new model from Aventon that is competitively priced with impressive quality components throughout
  • The Shimano Acera drivetrain feels smooth with a good gear range across eight speeds, Quik Drumlin tires from Kenda are Ebike-specific with hybrid tread and puncture protection, alloy fenders and rack are durable and well built
  • Shengyi's 500 watt rear hub motor is reliable and powerful, easily accelerating the Level up to 28mph Class 3 speeds when using pedal-assist, the Level has a hybrid setup that also allows throttle activation up to 20mph
  • The SR Suntour suspension fork performs great but is coil which adds some weight, lights are not included so you'll have to add your own if riding at night, the center-mounted display has excellent visibility and good readouts but is not removable

Video Review

Introduction

Make:

Aventon

Model:

Level

Price:

$1,599

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Urban, Commuting

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedelec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive, Lifetime Frame

Availability:

United States, Canada

Model Year:

2020

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

58.6 lbs (26.58 kg)

Battery Weight:

7.9 lbs (3.58 kg)

Motor Weight:

9 lbs (4.08 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Double-Butted Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

15 in (38.1 cm)17.5 in (44.45 cm)20 in (50.8 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Large 51cm Measurements: 20" Seat Tube Length, 27" Stand Over Height, 34" Minimum Saddle Height, 27" Width, 72" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Earth Grey

Frame Fork Details:

SR Suntour MOBIE A32 Coil Suspension, 75mm Travel, 32mm Steel Stanchions, Compression Adjust with Lockout, Preload Adjust, 100mm Hub Spacing, 9mm Thru-Axle with Nuts

Frame Rear Details:

135mm Hub Spacing, 9mm Axle with Nuts

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Mount, Fender Mounts

Gearing Details:

8 Speed 1x8 Shimano Hyperglide CS-HG200-8 12-32 Tooth Cassette, Shimano Acera Derailleur

Shifter Details:

Shimano Acera Triggers on Right (Two-Way High, Three-Shift Low)

Cranks:

Aluminum Alloy, 170mm Length, 46 Tooth Steel Chainring, Double-Sided Aluminum Alloy Guard

Pedals:

Wellgo Aluminum Alloy, Wide with Pins

Headset:

Semi-Integrated, Sealed Cartridge Bearings, Straight 1-1/8"

Stem:

Aluminum Alloy, Threadless, 7 Degree Rise, Three 10mm Spacers, 95mm Length, 31.8mm Clamp Diameter

Handlebar:

Aluminum Alloy, Low-Rise, 690mm Width, 31.8mm Bore

Brake Details:

Bengal Aries 3 Hydraulic Disc with 180mm Rotors, Dual-Piston Calipers, Bengal Aries 3 Three-Finger Levers with Adjustable Reach and Motor Inhibitors

Grips:

Velo Comfort, Lock-On, Rubber, Dark Grey

Saddle:

Aventon by Velo, Foam

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

310 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy, Double Wall, 32mm Outer Width, 36 Hole

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 13 Gauge, Black with Silver Nipples

Tire Brand:

Kenda Quik Drumlin, 27.5" x 2.2" (56-584)

Wheel Sizes:

27.5 in (69.85cm)

Tire Details:

50 to 80 PSI, 3.4 to 5.5 BAR, Ebike-Specific, KS+ Puncture Protection, Hybrid Tread Pattern, Reflective Sidewall Striping

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Aluminum Alloy Fenders (Black), Rear-Mount Adjustable Length Kickstand, Aluminum Alloy Rear Rack with 25kg/52lb Weight Limit (Black)

Other:

Locking Removable Downtube-Integrated Battery Pack, 1.8lb 3 Amp Charger

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Shengyi

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Motor Peak Output:

750 watts

Motor Torque:

60 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung, 18650 Cells

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

14 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

672 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-Ion

Charge Time:

4.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Estimated Max Range:

57 miles (92 km)

Display Type:

LCD-M5, Grayscale, Backlit, Fixed, Adjustable Angle

Readouts:

Energy Bar (10 Bars), Current Speed, Assist Level (0-5), Odometer, Trip A, Trip B, Voltage, Timer

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad on Left, Buttons: Up, Down, M, (Backlight: Hold Up, Cycle Readouts: Press M, Walk Mode: Hold Down, Settings Menu: Hold Up and Down)

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle

Top Speed:

28 mph (45 kph)


Written Review

To run the forums, host the website, and travel, I charge a universal service fee for my reviews. This in-depth review was sponsored by Aventon. My goal is to be transparent and unbiased with you, this video and writeup are not meant to be an endorsement of Aventon products. I welcome your corrections, additions, and feedback in the comments below and the Aventon electric bike forums.

Observations:

  • The Level is a hybrid that straddles the line between Class 2 and Class 3, with a throttle that provides power up to 20mph while pedal-assist can push you further up to 28mph. This is a rare configuration and a nice setup for those who want the Class 3 speeds while also making use of a throttle from time to time
  • Aventon started in 2013 making fixed-gear bicycles, and over the years they have steadily grown in size and turned to focus more and more on the Ebike space. The Pace 350 and 500 are some of their most popular Ebike models from previous years, and this year is the first year they have produced a Class 3 commuter like the Level

Pros:

  • Comes with a solid warranty that offers one year of comprehensive coverage and an impressive lifetime of coverage for the frame, widely available thanks to Aventon’s hybrid model of selling directly to consumers with online ordering in the United States (with free shipping!) and also partnering with dealers across the US and in Canada. Dealer support is great not just for support but also for test rides and fitting as you also have three frame sizes to choose from
  • Having those three frame size options means the Level will be a great fit for a wide range of riders, and the curved top bar also helps with approachability, blending the line between high-step and mid-step
  • I found the Level to be a very comfortable ride, you have a mid-range SR Suntour coil suspension fork up front combined with nice wide Kenda tires, and my favorite feature is the wide handlebars which felt great for me as a tall rider with long arms, as well as providing nice stability at higher speeds
  • Included accessories are excellent in terms of quality and performance, you get a rear rack with standard gauge tubing and weight limit (25kg/52lb) and plentiful attachment points for bungees or panniers, as well as sturdy full-coverage aluminum alloy fenders, alloy construction means they will rattle less than plastic while being a bit more resilient than steel
  • The drivetrain, in particular, stands out to me as an above-average component for this price range, the Level is equipped with a Shimano Acera derailleur and rapid-fire trigger shifters, this is a one-by-eight setup with a cassette range of 12 to 32 teeth – a pretty decent range that will do great for starting out or tackling hills, as well as being able to handle Class 3 speeds on the top end. Shifting up and down the gears is smooth as expected from the Acera and I enjoy the satisfying tactile feedback of the trigger shifters
  • Excellent tires from Kenda, these are the Ebike-specific Quik Drumlin series featuring an efficient hybrid tread pattern, reflective sidewall striping for safety, and puncture protection – the perfect tire for a high-speed commuter like the Level. At 2.2 inches wide they are just a bit bigger than the usual commuter tire, which I think is excellent because the extra air provides some more cushion while the efficient center of the tread pattern minimizes drag
  • The 500 watt motor from Shengyi is the same tried-and-true motor from the Aventon 500, it can peak at up to 750 watts and is more than capable of pushing the Level up to Class 3 speeds of 28mph. I was able to reach the top speed with only moderate exertion on the pedals, and my understanding is that the Level can actually be unlocked to handle up to 32mph of speed… but only when riding on private property as that much power is illegal in most cities. I think Aventon has done a good job with their tuning here as the Level felt as powerful as some other 750-watt Ebikes I have ridden recently
  • When riding below 20mph the variable throttle is responsive and satisfying, and I appreciate the tuning from Aventon that allows full-throttle power in any assist level, useful if you are riding in a low level of assist and need to suddenly accelerate to avoid a collision or conquer a particularly steep hill. As with most electric bikes, you can engage the throttle while pedaling or simply use it by itself
  • The cadence sensor is a sealed 12-magnet sensor located on the left side of the bottom bracket, this is a great setup that is high resolution and the sealed nature keeps it immune to damage
  • Hydraulic brakes do a great job for stopping power, these are the Bengal Aries 3 disc brakes with 180mm rotors in the front and rear, I found the levers easy to actuate and did some hard stops from full speed in the review video to demonstrate their effectiveness. These brakes include motor inhibitors which will cut power to the motor instantly when you pull on either lever, always a welcome safety feature!
  • I’m a big fan of Aventon’s displays as they are large with great informational readouts, grayscale LCD technology is extremely easy to see in any light setting, and the battery readout is a full 10 bars – nice and precise compared to many Ebikes that only show a four or five bar readout
  • Seating position is forward which feels good for commuting while still being more relaxed than the forward-aggressive stance on a mountain or road bike, rubber grips are locking and won’t rotate if you bear down on them while riding at higher speeds, and the Level feels incredibly stable even at top speed. The wide handlebars help with this, as does the rock-solid frame with the thick downtube
  • Speaking of the downtube, Aventon has integrated the battery into the underside of the downtube, this combined with excellent integrated cable management lends a beautiful and sleek appearance, most people will not even realize this is an Ebike until they hear the motor (which is fairly loud). I’m a fan of this smooth integration as it helps the Level to have a lower theft risk than some electric bikes with more obvious and exposed electronic components
  • The battery is high capacity at 48 volts and 14 amp-hours, constructed of high-quality Samsung 18650 cells, and features a charging port for off-bike charging as well as an LED indicator for checking the charge level. The battery fits snugly into the frame with a two-step removal process that helps keep it secured, and the on-bike charging port is high up on the right side of the downtube, great positioning compared to some Ebikes that place the charge port down near the bottom bracket and cranks where it’s at risk for damage if the bike is moved or knocked over while charging
  • The kickstand is sturdy with a wide base, adjustable for length, and rear-mounted which means no risk of locking it up with the left crank arm. This rear position is even more important on the Level since we have the motor in the rear, as well as the rear rack, which means the bike will be nice and stable on the kickstand even when carrying cargo
  • Aventon has assembly and tutorial videos, as well as manuals, for the Level (and all of their electric bike models) available on their website, and I was particularly impressed by the manuals. You can easily download them in PDF format, they’re extremely well written and easy to read, a welcome surprise as most Ebike manuals are too generic and vague to be of much help
  • The standard charger provides 3 amps of power, better than the typical 2 amp chargers that come with most electric bikes, so you get a little bit faster charging time with the tradeoff of more weight. This charger weighs in at 1.8 pounds, so it’s still light enough to transport in a backpack… or pannier bag! This is handy if you have an exceptionally long commute and need to charge while at the office, although for most commuters the Level should have more than enough range to get you there and back, especially if you pedal regularly to help out the motor

Cons:

  • The standard configuration of Aventon Ebikes means that you cannot use the throttle from a dead stop, you have to start pedaling first and once you get moving you can switch over to the throttle. This may be a confusing setup if you’re used to electric bikes, and a bit frustrating if you are a rider who likes to get started with the throttle and then switch over to pedaling. Fortunately, thanks to the good gear range on the Level it’s pretty easy to start pedaling on human power alone, and I’ve heard that some riders will simply use the “Walk Mode” to get started and then engage the throttle. Aventon limits this functionality as a safety feature to prevent unexpected or unintentional acceleration when stationary, a common cause for accident and injury among riders who are new to electric bikes, or new to cycling in general
  • Only one color option… so hopefully you like “Earth Grey”! I do love the color scheme and find it sleek and sporty looking, although I would like to see a white or similar light color option as many people prefer it for the safety offered by higher visibility
  • The level does not include any lights, this is a bit surprising for a commuter that has so many other great features, so you’ll have to add lights of your own if you need them. I do understand Aventon’s choice here, the idea is that riders who want lights will often have specific lights they prefer, while other riders don’t need or want lights and would be paying extra for an unused feature… so skipping the lights saves costs for everyone and riders who want lights can pick the perfect setup. That’s a fair deal, with the biggest downside being that lights added won’t be integrated into the electrical system for ease of use. Just make sure you pick up lights if you ride at night! I noticed that Aventon has a large selection of lights and other accessories available on their website, and they seem to be very competitively priced
  • The display is not removable so there is some risk of damage or tampering when parked outside, fortunately, these are durable displays so that should be a minor concern. There are no USB charging ports either so you won’t be able to charge your phone while you ride, which isn’t a big deal although the Level is a great candidate for mounting your phone on the handlebars thanks to the extra real estate there
  • As mentioned above the motor is fairly loud when you get up to higher speeds, this is normal for a hub motor setup but you may get tired of the sound if you ride for long periods at high speed
  • I think Aventon picked a great suspension fork in the SR Suntour MOBIE A32, but I do want to call out that since it is a coil suspension fork it is a bit heavier and not quite as high-performing as an air fork, however, this is a minor complaint as the SR Suntour fork performs great and helps to keep costs low
  • All sensing systems have their trade-offs and the trade-off for cadence-sensing pedal-assist is that it’s just not very responsive compared to a torque-sensing system, cadence-sensing also means a sensor delay when starting and stopping pedaling. Fortunately, these are easy to work around thanks to the wide gear range and motor inhibitors on the brakes, and cadence sensors are actually preferred by many riders as they can be easier on the knees and other joints. For reference, torque sensors require more force on the crank arms to get more power from the motor, whereas cadence sensors (like on the Level) simply require you to cycle the cranks with light pressure in order to get full power
  • There are no bottle cage bosses, although that’s understandable since the curved nature of the top bar limits the space for mounting bottle cages, it would still be nice to see them especially for mounting other smaller accessories
  • The wheels do not have quick-release skewers which means that if you do have to change a flat it’s going to require more tools and effort. On the Level, I don’t see an issue with this since these Quik Drumlin tires have excellent puncture protection, and lack of quick-release does also help to minimize theft risk

Useful Resources:

More Aventon Reviews

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Aventon Pace 500 Review

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Comments (78) YouTube Comments

David
1 year ago

Awesome review, I am currently looking into purchasing an e-bike for commuting in the city. If you were to pick between the Aventon Sinch and the Level, what would your choice be?

Thank you in advance.

  Reply
Tyson Roehrkasse
1 year ago

Hi David, thanks for the question! The Level is my personal favorite, but I think they’re both great bikes and it really comes down to how you’ll be using it. For commuting, I would prefer the Level, you get better range and higher speeds, the rack and fenders are great, and it also performs better for just “riding like a bike” without any electric assist. I think where the Sinch shines is all-terrain capability with those fat tires, as well as being more portable and easier to store thanks to the folding.

The Sinch also only has one frame size, so you’ll probably be able to find a better fit on the Level since there are three frame sizes to work with.

  Reply
Ben G
1 year ago

I am in the market for my first ebike. I’m looking at the Level, and the ride 1 up 700. Of the two, which would you choose? Love the site and I appreciate the help.

  Reply
Court
1 year ago

Hi Ben! Man… these are both sweet ebikes. I think it might come down to geometry of the frame. Look at the step-thru of the 700 series and the swept-back handlebars vs. the more aggressive forward flat bar and stiffer high-step frame on the Level. I’m a more comfort oriented rider who uses a rack, so I’d probably aim for the step-thru for myself… but Tyson said that he loved the Level, and he’s a taller heavier rider. I think you’ll be happy with either, but those are my thoughts and reasoning. You can see all of the stat’s for both bikes at this link that I setup for you, so you can really scrutinize the details. One final thought, the Ride1Up 700 Series is less expensive, has a bottle cage mount, and also has lights. To me, that shows that they really thought it out and scrutinized the details. However, Aventon is a bigger company and might have more resources and staying power in the industry. I have however, heard that their ebikes are more difficult to assemble if you’re ordering online direct (at least for the older models that I covered and talked with shops about).

  Reply
Wendy B.
1 year ago

My husband and I are looking to purchase our first Ebikes, through a local bicycle shop .We live in a rural area, so we will be on roads and dirt trails. We are older. We aren’t sure if we should get the Pace 500, or the Level . Will the extra weight of the Level not work out so good for dirt trails? We are so new to this, any info or suggestions would be helpful.

  Reply
Court
1 year ago

Hi Wendy! Either of these two ebikes should work well for you… and it might come down to what’s available without a wait time! I’ve heard that some brands are low on stock… The Level really impressed Tyson when he performed this review, so I might nod towards that one between the two :)

  Reply
Tyson Roehrkasse
1 year ago

Hey Wendy, I’ll echo what Court said that I personally would prefer the Level over the Pace 500 because the Level is more rigid and sturdy, yes it does weigh more but I think that will help it to feel even more stable on trails. I think an important thing to consider is the frame style, the Level is a more forward seating position, while on the Pace 500 you would be more upright and relaxed. That part really comes down to preference, though, and honestly, I think both bikes will do just fine on your trails as long as you aren’t talking about intense mountain biking trails. I recommend test riding both at your local shop if you can!

  Reply
Ana
1 year ago

Hey there! Thanks so much for your reviews and all your work. I’m trying to decide between the Pace 500 and the Level. I appreciate the accessories that come with the level, but when I do a side by side idea comparison of the two on their website, the Pace 500 says “great for hills” which isn’t mentioned for the level. It looks like the Level has everything the pace does and more, but I’m just concerned about the hills. I live in Providence, which is pretty hilly, and I’d be going up and down hills every day on my commute. Any insight here as to which would be better?

Thanks!

  Reply
Tyson Roehrkasse
1 year ago

Hi Ana, great question! The Level should perform equally on hills as both bikes are using similar electronics including the same rear hub motor.

  Reply
Court
1 year ago

Great question, Ana! I’d say that these two ebikes are going to perform very similarly. Perhaps you just got some marketing speak there… because they both have 500 watt planetary geared motors from what I can tell, and they both seem to have 48 volt batteries. Now, the Level has a higher capacity battery… so it could probably climb for longer distances. I personally prefer how it looks, and appreciate the added fenders and rear rack. If you want the step-thru, don’t mind a slightly smaller battery pack, and are looking to save $200… then the Aventon Pace 500 should be very comparable, based on the stats I’m seeing, and my experience reviewing ebikes :)

  Reply
Scott Chadwick
1 year ago

I enjoy riding road bikes and my wife would like to join me, but her speed is an average of 11 mph and mine is closer to 19-22 mph. I thought about getting her an ebike so that she could join me for a 30-40 mile ride every now and then. My budget is $1400-$1800, does the Aventon Level make sense for what I am trying to do?

  Reply
Court
1 year ago

Hi Scott! The Level is an awesome bike for the money… but you might be just fine getting your wife the cheaper, more approachable Pace 350 from Aventon. That ebike doesn’t have the fenders or rack, but it does have disc brakes and reflective tires. If you decide on this one, you’ll be getting less power, but if she is already close to your speed and used to a traditional bicycle, it will probably still be enough to keep up ;)

The big downside that I’ve heard about for the Pace 350 is that it might require more assembly than average ebikes. If possible, try to buy it from a local dealer, or pay a shop to build it for you (cost of $150+). Here are some other affordable ebikes worth considering, they’re all made with cheaper parts, but they should accomplish your goal of having her keep up. One of my personal favorites for direct-order is the RadCity Step-Thru 3 because the company offers great support.

  Reply
Don
1 year ago

Hi, thanks for the review. I thought it was very thorough and enjoyed the read. Me and my wife are looking at E bikes and we’ve recently tested the Como from Specialized. How would you rate the Aveton Level in comparison to the Como? There’s obviously a huge price difference and I’m thinking the Como may be more than I want to spend but I would like something comparable in the $1,500-$1,800 price range. My wife likes to be upright on her bike as she has some back issues so leaning forward for long periods is difficult. Look forward to hearing your thoughts.

Thanks,
Don

  Reply
Court
1 year ago

Hi Don! The Level has a more forward body position and that’s probably not ideal for your wife. You could swap the stem and get some swept back handlebars… but the bike is more sporty than it sounds like she might prefer. The Como from Specialized is excellent, but yea… costs more. It’s a much more upright cruiser type of ebike, and it’s sold in multiple sizes through dealers who can help dial in the body position and fit. If you’re looking for some alternative products for the both of you, consider the RadCity models, which come in high-step (larger frame) and step-thru (smaller frame and much more approachable). It hits your price range, but is only sold online (or delivered with a van in some big cities). There are many others to consider here, just look at the best ebike guides I’ve made to explore best cruiser and best city ebikes ;)

  Reply
GEORGE LEWIS
1 year ago

I am considering the aventon level and am about 5’10 and 1/2. I have a 32-33 inch inseam. The company recommends the medium. Any reason to buy the large instead?

  Reply
Court
1 year ago

Yeah! Hey George. You and I seem very similar. I’m 5’9″ and have a 32-inch inseam (long legs), so people at bike shops usually say that I’m in between medium and large. For road bikes, I almost always go medium because they are slightly lighter and let me sit more upright vs. tucked forward. I feel like I have more control of the bike and it’s a part of me vs. me riding on top of something big, long, and heavy. Frankly, there isn’t that much difference between most sizes, just a bit more reach and possibly higher standover by like half an inch. I wouldn’t sweat it too much… but look at the longer stem here, that makes you lean forward a bit but also gives your legs and knees space. I actually think that you’d be a great candidate for a large if you have longer arms (most guys do compared to girls), but sticking with a Medium is the safest bet and probably more comfortable, it’s what I would get :)

  Reply
Max
1 year ago

Hmm comparing to all other ebikes here, including Rad I feel like this one is the best in terms of price/quality/power. Amazing battery, powerful high torque motor, quick charge, pretty lightweight, hydraulic brakes. I might be wrong, but this bike looks like an ultimate win!

  Reply
Court
1 year ago

Hi Max! I agree with you, Aventon is doing an excellent job with their bikes. I wish I had gotten to test ride it vs. Tyson, but he did a great job. I like that some shops carry this brand, but have heard that they require a bit more assembly time. It’s so nice to see multiple affordably priced fully-specced ebikes hitting the market now! Do you think you’re going to go for it? Please share your thoughts if so, once you’ve ridden and dug in a bit ;)

  Reply
Tom Meyers
12 months ago

Fantastic review! Concise, objective, and comprehensive. I wish every internet review could be this good!

  Reply
Court
12 months ago

Wow, thanks Tom! That means a lot. We are doing our best here to be thorough, critical, but also constructive. I’m glad this one helped you out :)

  Reply
Derek Eder
12 months ago

Great and good looking review!

  Reply
Court
12 months ago

Thanks Derek! I’m glad you enjoyed it or found it useful :)

  Reply
John
12 months ago

Truly appreciate your thorough and well written reviews. I purchased my first e-bike (Aventon Pace 500) based partially on your review. I purchased it before the Level came out (in 2009). Overall I was incredibly happy with the purchase. Unfortunately my garage got broken into and it was stolen. Thankfully insurance should cover it and I was thinking about purchasing the Level. In your view would you recommend the Level over the Pace 500 (there’s only a slight price delta – so that doesn’t matter in this case)?

Thanks!

  Reply
Court
12 months ago

Oh man! I’m so sorry to hear about the break in, that’s a bummer. Yeah, maybe this is a blessing in disguise?! Aside from the lost time, you may get an upgrade to the Level now. Yes, I would choose the Level if I was given an option between the two. I love how it looks and appreciate the fenders, rear rack, and suspension. Hands down, worth the extra money for me! At some point if you go that route, I’d love to hear how the two compare to you since you will have ridden them for longer times and might have some insights to share :D

  Reply
John
12 months ago

Will do and thank you again!

Stacey Codlin
12 months ago

Hi! Thanks for all the reviews you do – they are really helpful. I’m looking for my first e-bike and I want something that I can ride on gravel and dirt paths, including some easy mountain biking trails (nothing hard core). I’ll be on paved roads quite a bit, too. Would the Level bike be good off road? It’s described as a commuter bike so that throws me off. Thanks!

  Reply
Court
12 months ago

Hi Stacey, great question… I categorize all ebikes that come stock with fenders, rack, and lights as being “commuter ready” but this is also light-trail capable because of the suspension fork and wider hybrid puncture protected tires. The travel for the fork is something like 75mm, which isn’t a lot, but that will definitely smooth out the gravel paths and you shouldn’t be slipping around too much. Aventon makes the Pace 500 and 350 if you don’t care about the fenders, rack, and lights but want to save some money. There are many ebikes out there that can handle trails, and then there are actual “cross country ebikes” which are rated with 100mm+ travel and occasionally even offer full suspension. Those tend to cost more but are really designed with trail riding in mind… which is a step up from packed dirt or gravel roads. I hope this helps ;)

  Reply
Stacey Codlin
12 months ago

Hi Court – thanks so much for your quick response. I plan to be on some wooded trails – so roots and rocks would be common obstacles. with that in mind sounds like I should be looking at the cross country ebikes or a mountain bike. I’d still like something that would be comfortable to ride on paved surfaces (so not a fat bike) and it’d be nice if I could add a rack. Can I do that on those sort of bikes? Also, I definitely want something that I could ride throttle only. Can you recommend a good entry level bike ($2,000 or less) that would fit those wants or am I asking too much :) ? Also – is it worth the extra cost for hydraulic disc brakes over mechanical disc?

Kevin
12 months ago

Love the reviews! Thank You! Can you recommend other bikes from different manufacturers that have throttles as well as pedal assist, such as the Level, for comparison? It is a feature that I really like. Have it on my current e-bike which I’m looking to replace.

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Court
12 months ago

Hi Kevin! Sorry for the very slow reply here. Yes! I like Magnum, Rad Power Bikes, DOST, and I think Blix as well as Biktrix, and a few others that are online direct, RIZE too. Those are each brands that I’ve covered which have pedal assist and throttle. I hope this helps you, and you can also ask around in the EBR forums for feedback too :)

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Gary
11 months ago

Great review. Thanks. I live in a very hilly town with steep long hills and need something that will get me to the top. I currently have one of the original Sondors Thin single speeds and it just doesn’t cut it on the hills, but I otherwise love it. I have been looking at some of the more powerful bikes like the Sondors MXS, the Dost Kope and the Ride1Up Limt’d, but I’m wondering if the Aventon Level will be enough. I’m 190 lbs., and I ride mostly paved roads with some light trails. What do you think? Will the Level cut it, or should I step up to something with even more power? Thanks.

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Court
11 months ago

Hi Gary! Congrats on getting your second ebike. I hope you’ve enjoyed the Sondors Thin… that was a special bike, one of the first super affordable and simple ones. It looks like other companies are going that route now too, cough, Rad, cough. Anyway, I think the Level would work very well for what you’re talking about. The power should be higher, and the gears would help for climbing if you decide to pedal a bit on really steep sections. The Sondors MXS is awesome, but doesn’t offers as much utility as the Level (no rack or fenders). I think it’s a great choice for mostly off-road riding. If you can spare the change and wait for shipping (because they’re backordered) the DOST Kope and Drop are an awesome combination of utility and power with good off-road capability. Their mid-drive motor is super powerful, but done really well with shift detection. I hope these different considerations help you, I’d love to hear what you choose and how you like it someday :D

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Gary
11 months ago

Hey Court thanks for the quick reply. I really appreciate it. One more question — between the Aventon Level and the Ride1up 700 which do you prefer?

El Kati
11 months ago

Thanks! I love your reviews. Could you help me understand the cadence sensors? It seems each successive power assist level will assist you to a higher speed with little or no pressure on the pedals. Do you get any exercise? If using PAS level 1, does the power assistance stop at say 12 mph or does it still help as you pedal faster? It seems that a cadence sensing PAS is either doing all the work or none of the work.

I test rode an Aventon Level today. It’s a beautiful machine but it didn’t feel like pedaling a bike. I also tried a Vado 4.0 with torque sensing (which I’m afraid I can’t afford). It felt more natural – like pedaling a regular bike, but easier. Maybe I’ll buy the Level and learn to love it. Thanks again.

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Court
11 months ago

Hi El Kati! Great description of both PAS and the advanced multi-sensing assist. You’re comparing one of the most affordable and simplistic drive systems to one of the fanciest, newest, and most advanced. The Vado, and most of the new Specialized models, are some of my favorite. That said, when you could afford two or more of one bike for the same price as just one of another, I can see how it becomes difficult to justify. Yes, the pedal assist is more of an all or none, but you can utilize the lower 1, 2, and 3 levels to limit motor power and top speed, then pedal along blending your physical effort with the motor. It’s less dynamic, satisfying, and responsive (or too responsive for some PAS systems which go blasting off), but it is less expensive. I hope this helps :)

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El Kati
11 months ago

Court, based on your comment, I’ve decided the multi-sensing assist including torque is what I want. And your advanced search tab shows me the ones in my price range.

Without your site and reviews, I doubt I would have become interested in ebikes and confident enough to make a decision. I suspect this is true of others as well. I bought a RideKick electric trailer 5 yr ago based on your review and my experience with it is exactly what your review said it would be. I still love it and will continue to use it for groceries.

Thank you so much!
Bye.

Bill Hobson
10 months ago

I love my Aventon Level EXCEPT for ONE thing. There is ZERO variability to the PAS setup.This may be due to the cadence sensor employed, but is there any way to change its behavior so that the boost doesn’t come out full force all at once. If it were to ramp up, even if it ramped up too much at 11mph, it would be MUCH safer. Has anybody come up with a mod for this?

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Court
10 months ago

Hi Bill! I’ve noticed this feeling with certain ebikes, and I think it has more to do with the controller setup than the cadence sensor itself. Some companies, like Rad Power Bikes, have adjusted their controllers in recent years so the bikes ramp up more smoothly and there’s more variation between the levels. It has been a while since I covered an Aventon myself, so perhaps someone else will chime in with some feedback and help for you. It would be great if there was a software update or some settings that you could adjust in the display. Consider asking around in the Aventon forums too.

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Bill Hobson
10 months ago

Thanks Court. Do you know what controller Aventon uses for the Level? Also, would you happen to know if the handlebars on the Level can be adjusted up and down. I see a hidden hex nut below a rubber cover but I imagine that only allows the handlebars to be adjusted side-to-side and I see no mention of any such adjustment in the Owner’s Manual. Thanks.

Bill Hobson
10 months ago

Thanks Court. Aventon was kind enough to verify that the handlebars cannot be adjusted up and down but also suggested a $20 item from Amazon called a Fomtor Adjustable Stem that looks like it will do what I need done. Basically I would like to raise the handlebars and move them a bit closer to the seat. I’ve been trying to ID the display used on the Level and it may be the King-meter Nokee-U. Aventon has “locked” some of the settable parameters of the Level and it seems to me one way to “fix” this would be to just replace the display with a plug-compatible unit. My local dealer appears to be clueless on this matter.

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Court
10 months ago

Hi Bill! I like both ideas, the stem upgrade and display swap. I don’t know where to get a King Meter Nokee-U but perhaps someone in the forums would be able to help. I hope things work out, and I’d love to hear the result someday if you go for it ;)

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william Hobson
10 months ago

Thanks Court. The more I ride the bike the more I am coming to accept that 11mph for PAS 1 is not really so bad. If one just keeps light pressure on the rear brake lever the over-boost can be controlled when necessary. The bike is quite heavy and most of my concerns come from a difficulty in getting going from a dead stop. I have about 50 miles on the bike so far and it looks like 40 miles on a single charge is what I can expect for my local riding conditions (fairly flat paved terrain). I’ve replaced the seat twice now and just can’t find one that I can sit on for more than about 3 minutes without having to stand and reposition my skinny butt. My latest is called a Giddy-Up. Keep up the great work!

Baz
10 months ago

Hi Court. I’ve never owned an ebike. I’ve been researching for over a year. I had finally settled on the Aventon Level (large frame as I am 6’5” tall and 210 lbs). I went to a dealer near me that carries this model, test drove it, and was impressed. I love the price/quality. I have since seen a review of the Ride 1Up 700 series hi-step. It looks great. Many similarities to the Aventon Level. I suspect that it would probably be a toss up. Can you give any insight as to which you think is the better choice based on quality and value? Thanks.

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Court
10 months ago

Yeah, I see a lot of similarities between the Level and 700 Series too. Honestly, I think they are the same hardware like 90%+ but you may prefer the look, support, or availability of one over the other. I tend to like buying from a dealer when it’s possible, because they help to set the bike up nicely and provide ongoing support. Consider the accessories, the price, which one you really want and then whether you want that dealer relationship :)

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Baz
9 months ago

The 700 Series having integrated front and rear lights is the most notable difference. Does either bike have a handlebar stem adjustment? I would like the ability to make my ride more upright.

Mark Jackson
10 months ago

Hi there, love your reviews! After reading 20 to 30 reviews my head was spinning! Finally decided for what we needed the Aventon Level would serve us well. The wife and I (in our early 60s) just bought the Aventon Level a week ago and we love them! We bought the Level at a local shop who had them in stock and we were able to test ride them. That sold me! Most other comparable bikes were DTC internet purchase only, buying 2 bikes and spending over $3K I wanted to see and test what we were buying.

The one little issue is, we both seem to feel like we want to be more upright. The wife has a S/M step thru frame and I got the Large stepover. I was looking at getting adjustable stems, they look like an easy conversion, then we can experiment with angles for riding. Aventon has one for the Pace, but not the Level. There are a lot of different ones on Amazon, I assume they will work!

Thanks for all your hard work on the reviews! Mark

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Court
10 months ago

Hi Mark! Someone else was commenting about this same topic. They thought this one was good because it adds height and has options for a longer stem portion 90mm to 110mm.

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Paul
9 months ago

Hi there. I have come down to a choice between the Level and the Envo D35 2020. The Envo is significantly lighter but I prefer the look of the Level. Is the weight a big issue? Both seem to get good reviews and are similarly priced but I’d be interested in your thoughts. Thanks

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Court
9 months ago

Hi Paul! Well, I definitely prefer lightweight ebikes… but I’m a skinny guy with small muscles. I only weigh 135lbs and have some back and shoulder injuries from sports. I usually ride a non-electric bike, so I prefer my ebikes to be as light as possible. It makes them easier to lift and transport on car racks! Of course, that usually raises the price and lowers the battery range and motor power. You can usually remove ebike batteries to temporarily reduce weight for transport. Since these ebikes are both top picks for you, I’d say to go with your gut or your heart (which one looks cooler or really appeals to you?) the a few extra pounds usually isn’t noticeable once you’re riding. Imagine riding a bike without a 10lb backpack, or with it, the bike probably feels the same in many ways. Hope this helps ;)

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Paul
9 months ago

Thanks Court, I finally went with the Amego Infinite. Decent specs and locally made for service etc.

Steve
9 months ago

I went to a bike shop today in Santa Barbara to test ride an Aventon Level. They had a medium in stock – I’m 5’10 and 175Lbs (inseam 32). I liked the bike a lot. On the test ride I tried adjusting the seat higher so that my legs extended more during pedaling. The downside was that I was leaning forward and down more which felt uncomfortable. If I were to get this bike, I feel that I would need a seat or seat post with some suspension/shock absorption and handle bars that were somewhat swept back so that I would sit more upright.

After that, I test rode a large Aventon Pace 500 which was a better fit and allowed me to sit more upright. I think that the Level has a lot of upgrades that make it an all around better bike than the Pace 500. Would it be possible/practical to add a rise extension on the handlebars or maybe handlebars that are swept back and what changes would you recommend to the seat? Thanks

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Court
9 months ago

Hi Steve, I think you’re on the right path. My buddy Sam (really big guy who ran a bike shop in Fullerton, California years ago) would purchase these stem risers and occasionally swap handlebars (cruiser, upright, mid rise or riser) for customers. There are lots of affordable ways to improve body position such as sliding the saddle back further. You can definitely get a suspension post, and Thudbuster has a LT (long travel) which is sometimes connected to a longer 400mm post. Sometimes the actual difference between a medium and large frame is one inch reach and one inch higher seat tube, so getting these aftermarket parts for $30 a piece can transform a medium into a large or extra large ;)

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Ray
9 months ago

Love your reviews! I’m been researching ebikes for a couple months now and don’t feel like I have all the info I need unless I see your review on a specific brand/model! I took my first test ride today on an Aventon Level and think that is the bike for me, but I need to test my friend’s Rad City or he’ll never let me hear the end of it. My wife liked the Level as well, but she then rode a BagiBike B20 (or similar) folding bike and liked the ride as well. I wish you had any reviews for the Bagi as the ones I find look to be more advertising than review. Thanks again for your help! I will be a frequent visitor!

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Court
8 months ago

Hey! Thanks for the compliment, Ray. I have heard of BagiBike but never seen one in person. Is the B20 the specific model your wife is interested in? Maybe I can get in touch with them and do a deep review on it :) It looks like there are a few different versions of the B20 build, which one stands out as being the most interesting to you?

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Olga
8 months ago

Thank you so much for such detailed review of the Level Step Through commuter by Aventon. I am pretty close to buy it but, would you believe, the lack of lights really broke my heart. Not that I’m a night rider. But sometimes I bike at night. I know, I know…. Does it really matter? I live in Lima, Peru. As you know, this is a land of earthquakes. So, even the most modern and upscale neighborhoods have uneven roads and sidewalks. I’m 70 years old and I return home with pain in my shoulders. So, I will not be driving it in dirt roads or trecks but in city street with a permanent rattling.. Is this bike model up to this?

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Court
8 months ago

Hi Olga, I love it when ebikes have the integrated lights too! I think Aventon was trying to keep the price low and found that lights can get damaged in shipping more easily, so they skipped it. Before falling in love with a model, I’d suggest checking with local shops to see what they carry, and also checking with online brands to see if they are even willing to ship to Peru… because I suspect that many will not. I hope you find a great product locally, and I think that having slightly wider tires and a suspension fork will really improve your comfort, and help to reduce shoulder pain. I also think that having a handlebar that sweeps back a bit will make it more comfortable for you, like a cruiser bike :)

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Phil
7 months ago

Hi, and thank you so much for the great, in depth reviews. I’ve watched many of them from EBR. I’ve been trying to determine first which type of ebike will be right for me, and how much I need to spend to get a good, solid bike. I’m 6’2 and 230 lbs. and 58 years old. I mostly plan to ride on neighborhood roads, and bike / cart paths. I’m leaning toward a commuter style, class 3 bike with peddle assist as well as a throttle and cargo rack and fenders, though it’s not practical for me to actually commute to work on it. We live in the Atlanta suburbs, and unfortunately there isn’t a lot of choice when it comes to ebikes at local shops here.

So after watching many of your reviews, I’m strongly considering one of two bikes with some major differences. First, I’m very impressed with the Aventon Level. I think it delivers a lot of bang for the buck. My biggest concern with this bike though, is the availability of parts, and finding a local shop that can (and will) help me with maintenance when needed. I called Aventon’s toll free number today, and actually spoke with someone in CA that was able to answer a lot of my questions, and address some of my concerns. I’d be happy to buy from a dealer, but the nearest Aventon dealer to me is four and a half hours from me in Tallahassee, Florida, so not that convenient. I do feel that I can probably accomplish the initial assembly myself, and I did find a local shop willing to do for me if I decide to go that route.

The other bike I’m considering is at the other end of the spectrum, from a well known leader in the biking industry, Specialized, and is just over twice the price at about $3,650, and that is the Turbo Vado SL 4.0 EQ. That’s pretty much the high end of my budget. For the considerably higher price, you don’t get front or rear suspension, and a seemingly less powerful motor and lower battery capacity, but on the other hand, it is a sleek design and noticeably lighter, plus comes with integrated front and rear lights and higher end components. Most of all, there are lots of Specialized dealers, and getting the bike serviced shouldn’t be a problem. So I know this is kind of apples and oranges, but what are your thoughts and insights when comparing these two bikes? And again, thanks for providing such great reviews on both of these bikes.

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Gary Johnson
7 months ago

How will the Level 3 do on hills? Can it make a 400 foot climb? I also have a step hill up to my house that I can’t climb with a conventual bike. I want a bike for rolling hills and also for flat trails. Will the Level work for me?

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Court
7 months ago

Hi Gary! This ebike should perform at the higher end when compared to all hub-motor electric bikes, but you could get even more climbing power from a mid-drive ebike. The thing is, not all mid-drives have throttle operation. One that offers a lot of power and range is the DOST KOPE (or they have a step-thru called the DROP). Aventon is known for their affordability and good mix of quality and availability through some shops. DOST and some other brands are only sold on line. You could go with almost anything from Trek, Giant, or Specialized and do well with climbing power, but none of the mid-motor products have throttles. I hope this helps! You might get more feedback and insights on the Aventon forums from actual owners who could consider your body weight when making recommendations on climbing ability.

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Jeff Olszewski
5 months ago

How do you think this bike would handle on crushed limestone and/or some dirt/gravel trails? Plan is mostly paved but sometimes the trails I ride have some other portions unpaved.

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Court
5 months ago

Hi Jeff! I think it would be just fine… the tires are hybrid with some tread, and they aren’t supper narrow. You’ll get added stability and comfort, as well as traction based on this setup 27.5″ x 2.2″ and the suspension fork should also improve handling and comfort. I hope this helps… yes, there are other products with even deeper tread and wider tires, such as the Surface 604 Shred, but this Aventon should work alright.

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Algernum Van Voorthuizen
5 months ago

Hi, I am looking for a good e-bike class 3 if possible, step thru or low step under 50 pounds weight e bike, which one will you sugest to me? Thanks

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Court
5 months ago

Hi Algernum, I think the Aventon Level is a great ebike… and it does offer the higher 28mph top speed as a Class 3 model. You could also check out Surface 604 models, which look similar and can usually be unlocked to go ~26mph. Here’s a whole category of Class 3 ebikes for you to explore. The prices are all listed, so you can just skim through and explore a bit until something pops out. They are listed by review date.

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Chuck
3 months ago

I just ordered my Level ST this week and they are shipping today! Update: the default throttle now, per discussion with Aventon, is throttle on demand. I think this is actually safer, as it lets me get out of the way quickly or cross a street. I have indeed hit the throttle by accident on my previous bike (stolen), but it doesn’t happen nearly as often as my need to get moving. Thanks for the very informative review!

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Court
3 months ago

That’s great! Thanks for the update Chuck. I hope the bike works great for you, and I agree that throttle on demand is handy for those “catch up” moments, or starting from standstill at a sign or light. Hope the bike comes soon!

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Chuck Fields
2 months ago

Here’s a follow-up on my Level ST. It arrived in good time with no visible shipping damage and was easy to assemble. I was being extra careful so it was a few hours. I like it a lot, but have had some issues. Not surprised that I was not satisfied with the forward position of the handlebars, which I find uncomfortable and too much strain on my wrists, so I bought and installed a variable angle stem to move the bars back and up. I also like a softer seat so got a suspension post and a seat pad. Really getting it dialed in!

Sadly, there was a warranty issue; the shifter was very stiff and the return spring broke, becoming unusable. My bike shop replaced it and I filed the receipt with Aventon as warranty. Almost a month now and no response on that, but at least it was inexpensive and the replacement is working fine. Range is very good, 50+ miles, which covers my riding.

Chuck Fields
2 months ago

To follow up on my last post, there have been no more warranty issues and today a check arrived for the parts and labor of the failed shifter. Loving the bike and all is well!
People familiar with my previous bike model, the Magnum Metro, may be interested in comparison of the PAS levels. They are similar, with the key difference at low speed. Magnum’s 2 is about like Aventon’s 1, so the gentlest assist is just not there. I find if I just want a little assist I can pedal some, then stop pedaling until I want more. It’s a niche situation. Most of the time I’m making full use of PAS 1 or 2.

Bob De Dea
2 months ago

Court,

I love your reviews, thanks for sharing your enthusiasm and expertise! I have a friend who bought the Aventon Level (he lives in Santa Fe) and loves it. But I’m torn. Your review of the RAD Runner Plus is awesome, too. They’re such different bikes that it’s not easy to choose between them. For example 60# v. 75#, disc brakes v. mechanical, 27″ tires v. 20″, functionality v. style.

I am 63, fit, 5;10″, a long-time biker who likes trails and paths as well as city streets. I also recently moved and live at the top of a hella-big hill that I never want to pedal up 8] Although I rode a street bike for years, my current (and 15-year) ride of choice is a Gary Fisher Sugar 2 mountain bike. I also had a 500cc scooter so I’m not afraid of the Class 3 challenge :)

Any insights you could offer? And thanks, again, for all you do.
B^D Bob

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Court
2 months ago

Hi Bob! You’re right, these two ebikes are very different… but both awesome for the price! I see two ways to approach this! Since you already have an active pedaling traditional bicycle, the RadRunner Plus would be more of a funky scooter experience. I love that it still has the fenders, suspension post, lights, and a throttle. I suspect that I’d pedal less on the RadRunner because of the unique saddle (at least it can be raised up), but it’s less traditional and less comfortable to pedal for long distances (at least for me). By comparison, the Aventon Level is more “normal” and probably more natural to pedal with. You don’t get the fun wide tires and unique form factor. It might duplicate the experience of your Gary Fisher Sugar 2, even though it’s not a mountain bike. I hope that this gives you another perspective to consider… I like how the RadRunner looks, appreciate the stability it offers, and feel that Rad is a good brand with good customer support, but the Level is an easier bike to recommend here. It’s a lot like the RadCity models, in my opinion. You might actually want to check on backorder times because I suspect that both Rad and Aventon have some wait times for both of the bikes you’re interested in! Let me know what you decide, I’d love to hear your thoughts ;)

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Jamie
1 month ago

This is a great question. I wish there was an answer! I’m also wondering if the higher end components/higher price is worth it. I had a Giant LaFree in the 2000s that had a lead acid battery and weighed 75 lbs. and had a range of like 15 miles. I rode it 12 miles a day for years until the charger died and I couldn’t find a replacement. The technology has come a long way since then and I just don’t think I need to spend an extra $2k to commute comfortably. I’m trying to decide between the Level and the Rad City 4. I’m not too worried about the lights because I think the batteries on the rechargeable lights are great and LED tech is also great now, and I can get a brighter rechargeable light that I don’t have to mess w/ too much for the Level. I’m going to test ride both and we’ll see.

  Reply

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