Evelo Quest One Review

Evelo Quest One Electric Bike Review
Evelo Quest One
Evelo Quest One Planetary Geared 8fun Hub Motor
Evelo Quest One Battery On Off Switch Carging Port Usb Port
Evelo Quest One Large Lcd Display Control Panel
Evelo Quest One Spaninga Galeo Integrated Headlight Reflective Tires
Evelo Quest One Integrated Blaze Lite Led Backlight
Evelo Quest One Gates Carbon Belt Drive Single Speed
Evelo Quest One 10 Magnet Cadence Sensor
Evelo Quest One Folded
Evelo Quest One Electric Bike Folded
Evelo Quest One Folding Ebike Back
Evelo Quest One Folding Electric Bike Review
Evelo Quest One 2 Amp Electric Bike Battery Charger
Evelo Quest One Electric Bike Review
Evelo Quest One
Evelo Quest One Planetary Geared 8fun Hub Motor
Evelo Quest One Battery On Off Switch Carging Port Usb Port
Evelo Quest One Large Lcd Display Control Panel
Evelo Quest One Spaninga Galeo Integrated Headlight Reflective Tires
Evelo Quest One Integrated Blaze Lite Led Backlight
Evelo Quest One Gates Carbon Belt Drive Single Speed
Evelo Quest One 10 Magnet Cadence Sensor
Evelo Quest One Folded
Evelo Quest One Electric Bike Folded
Evelo Quest One Folding Ebike Back
Evelo Quest One Folding Electric Bike Review
Evelo Quest One 2 Amp Electric Bike Battery Charger

Summary

  • A folding electric bike that's fairly lightweight at ~41 lbs, clean and simple thanks to a Gates Carbon belt drive, and still feature rich with fenders and integrated lights
  • Available in two color choices, offers pedal assist and throttle on demand, highly adjustable extra-long seat post and telescoping stem, comfortable saddle and grips
  • Solid mechanical disc brakes with motor-inhibiting levers for safety, relatively easy to fold (in part because it's lighter), hidden battery and compact motor look nice
  • Single-speed makes starting slow so having a throttle is very nice, non-removable display is beautiful so be careful not to scratch when folding, no suspension features but the fatter tires reduce vibration and bumps

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Evelo

Model:

Quest One

Price:

$1,999 ($3,899 Fully Loaded)

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Urban, Travel

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Comprehensive, 4 Year (20,000 mile) Frame, Battery, Motor, Controller

Availability:

United States, Canada

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

41.1 lbs (18.64 kg)

Battery Weight:

4.1 lbs (1.85 kg) (Larger Pack 9 lbs)

Motor Weight:

7.4 lbs (3.35 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

11.5 in (29.21 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

11.5" Seat Tube, 26" Reach, 23" Stand Over Height, 23.75" Width, 64" Length

Frame Types:

Mid-Step, Folding

Frame Colors:

Crimson Red, Granite Gray

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid Aluminum Alloy, 100 mm Hub, 9 mm Skewer with Quick Release

Frame Rear Details:

135 mm Hub, 10 mm Axle with Nuts

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

1 Speed 1x1, 20T Rear Sprocket

Cranks:

Prowheel Forged Chariot Alloy Crank Arms, 170 mm Length, 70T Chainring

Pedals:

Wellgo Plastic Platform, Folding

Headset:

1-1/8" Threadless Internal Cups

Stem:

Alloy, Folding, 200 mm Base Height, Telescoping Height (0 mm to 180 mm), Quick Release Handlebar Clamp 25.4 mm Diameter

Handlebar:

Flat, Aluminum Alloy, 600 mm Length

Brake Details:

Tektro Aries Mechanical Disc with 160 mm Rotors, 5 Star Levers with Motor Inhibitors and Rubberized Front Edge

Grips:

Padded, Stitched, Faux Leather, Black

Saddle:

Medium Sport, Black (Optional Upgrade Program)

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

580 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

33.9 mm

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy, Double Wall, 36 Hole

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 13 Gauge, Black with Adjustable Brass Nipples

Tire Brand:

Kenda, 20" x 2.125"

Wheel Sizes:

20 in (50.8cm)

Tire Details:

40 to 65 PSI, Reflective Stripes

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Adjustable Length Kickstand, Aluminum Alloy Rear Rack with Spring (25 kg 55 lb Max Weight), Integrated Spanninga GaLeo Headlight, Integrated Blaze-Lite RL1900 Backlight, Plastic Fenders with Mud Flaps, Optional Comfort Package (Ergon GP2-L Ergonomic Locking Grips, Suspension Seat Post, Extra Large Saddle for $200), Optional Safety Package (High Powered Lights, Bar-End Mirror, Bell, Reflective Light Band for Pants $99), Optional Commuter Package (Teflon Lubricant, Tire Levers, Patch Kit, Mini-Pump, Hex Key Wrench Set $99), Optional Security Package (Heavy Duty Chain Lock, Pinhead Security Hardware System $199)

Other:

Locking Removable Tube Mounted Battery, 1.1 lb 2 Amp Battery Charger, 250 lb Max Weight Rating, Gates Carbon Belt Drive with CDX:EXP

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bafang 8Fun

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Motor Peak Output:

540 watts

Motor Torque:

45 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung (A, B Rated Cells) (Optional Panasonic)

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

10.2 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

367.2 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

5 hours (Up to 6 With Larger Pack)

Estimated Min Range:

20 miles (32 km)

Estimated Max Range:

40 miles (64 km)

Display Type:

Evelo Branded Bafang, Fixed, Color, Backlit LCD

Readouts:

Battery Level (5 Bars, Percentage), Speed, Average Speed, Max Speed, Assist Level (0-5), Power in Watts, Odometer, Odometer, Trip Meter, Timer, Clock

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad on Left, Full Sized USB Charging Port on Bottom, Night Mode (Hold Up Arrow), Walk Mode (Hold Down Arrow), Clear Timer and Trip Meter (Hold Up and Down), Settings Menu (Double Click Power Button)

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle (10 Magnet Sensor)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

The EVELO Quest One is a unique folding electric bike because it offers a Gates Carbon belt drive and is lighter than most of the others I test out. It’s clean, reliable, and quiet because of the belt, but you only get one speed to work with… and in my experience the optimal pedal speed is around 15 miles per hour. This can make starting difficult if you decide to pedal unpowered or rely on pedal assist only, requiring extra leg power before it kicks in, but thankfully there’s a throttle-on-demand feature. As someone with sensitive knees, I’m a big fan of trigger or twist throttles because they make stop signs and traffic signals a breeze and keep the riding fun vs. painful or just annoying. It’s a great setup, however I did experience some delay with the throttle at times, which caused me to push further, and when it did finally click on, I got more of a zip than I really wanted. My advice is to ease into the throttle and keep in mind that there could be a slight delay, just be patient with it. This electric bike comes in two unique colors, a glossy crimson red and metallic granite grey. The seat post is thicker and longer than average and the stem telescopes upwards, so it seems like the single frame size could accommodate a wide range of riders. Even with the plastic fenders and rear rack, this bike rode smooth and quiet on bumpy torn up streets. I didn’t have to worry about the chain dropping because the Gates belt has a center track design to keep it stable. Apparently, belt drives like this one can last longer than chains! The downside here, is that single speed… many full-sized electric bikes with belt drives have an internally geared hub with 3, 5, 7, or 8 speeds (usually from Shimano) and those add weight and cost. Priced at just under $2k, this thing is already on the expensive side for a folding electric bike, but it does offer a quality display, average sized removable battery, reflective tires, disc brakes, and a fantastic warranty with some of the best customer support I have seen in the industry. Evelo also recently opened a factory store in Seattle so you people can test ride and buy in person. I do not know if all of the hardware on this product is rust proof but I would expect the Aluminum alloy frame, plastic fenders, and belt drive to hold up well in wet conditions. Folding e-bikes see like a good fit for RVers, boaters, and people who just have limited space in their home or apartment. For me, the light weight is so applicable in folding, removing the battery, changing flats, or lifting into storage on the go that it makes this bike very attractive.

Driving the Quest is an 8Fun branded internally geared hub manufactured by Bafang. This thing is legendary, in the sense that it is commonly used on entry-level and mid-level electric bikes and sold in kits. In my experience, it’s zippy, lightweight, reliable, and produces a bit of electronic whirring sound when operated at high power or higher speeds. You can hear it in the video review when I test the throttle while climbing a hill. The motor is rated at 250 watts nominal, which is on the weak side for US electric bikes but legally the maximum in Europe. It seemed like Evelo may have overclocked the motor a bit because they said it peaks around 540 watts and delivers up to 45 Newton meters of torque… There’s no way for me to validate any of this information, but I can guess that it will sip energy from the battery vs. draining it if you ride with pedal assist in the lower two or three levels, and that it gains torque because of the smaller 20″ wheels. These wheels bring the bike lower to the ground and offer increased strength (even more so because of the thicker 13 gauge spokes). The motor benefits from a mechanical advantage because of the smaller diameter but this also changes how pedaling feels. Many times, I will see folding electric bikes, with smaller wheels like this, that have enlarged chainrings to make pedaling feel natural. If they didn’t do this, pedaling would feel fast and you would quickly need to shift gears and possibly max out your gears before reaching the oft-maximum 20 mph top speed. Since the Evelo Quest One only has “one” speed, they chose to use a much larger chainring that feels best pedaling around 15 mph for me. Again, this makes starting a bit slow and even delays the cadence sensor because the 10-magnet disc is also rotating slower. I would probably always use the trigger throttle to help me get going… so thank goodness it is active in all five levels of assist and offers full power at all times vs. making you arrow up and get distracted with the display.

Powering this bike is a very average sized 36 volt 10.4 amp hour Lithium-ion battery pack. Average is not bad when you’re trying to conserve weight and minimize bulk. And this would still be average for a heavier full sized electric bike… so in some ways, it’s a bit above average for a folder. I love how the battery pack slides into the frame and is protected and hidden there. You can peek in at it from the left side of the frame where a triangular rubber cover reveals the charging port, an on/off switch, and a standard sized Type A USB port. You can charge this battery on or off the bike and the generic 2 Amp charger works great, I love how the charging wire is not in the way of the left crank when charging on the bike as so many other electric bike charging designs are. The battery charger only weighs about 1.5 lbs and could easily fit into a trunk bag like the Evelo branded bag that also has zip-out panniers. One note about the battery is that you may need the key to slide it out of the frame tubing. Whether it’s locked in there or not, the battery seemed tight (Alex, an Evelo rep told me that reduces rattling) so just insert the key and unlock but then turn a bit to one direction and pull with the key to get it to slide out. Take your time and be careful learning how to handle the battery. This is one of the more sensitive and expensive parts of the bike. Evelo offers an incredible 2-year comprehensive warranty on their products and a sliding-cost battery replacement option so you shouldn’t be left hanging. They even offer a trial period for buyers, so you can decide whether it’s right for you and return if necessary. This is incredible and very unique for a direct-sale electric bike company in my experience.

Operating the Quest One is a two-step process starting with the battery on/off toggle switch and then the rubberized on/off button on the control pad (mounted near the left grip). Once it’s on, you can enter into the settings menu to adjust units and other options by double tapping this power button. Anyway, the control interface is very compact and simple. You get an up arrow, the power button in the middle, and a down arrow. Hold the up arrow to activate the lights and watch as the color LCD display goes from a bright white background to a darker background to reduce distraction in low-light conditions. Very cool! Unless, you want to ride with lights during the day for extra safety, then the display could be a bit more difficult to read. It’s hard to offer “everything” but still make a display simple to use. Another quick consideration is that the plastic up/down arrow keys can get bent up if snagged by clothing or if you crash or fold the bike roughly. I have seen it happen, and while the display may still work, the plastic cover might stick up permanently and eventually get ripped off entirely. Just be careful with it and know that the control pad is replaceable and has a quick-disconnect point in the wire bundle up front. Speaking of wires, most of them are organized and even hidden on this bike. Not internally routed, but hidden in a plastic channel along the bottom of the main tubing section. The front wheel has quick release for easy flat-fixes or tire replacement but the rear requires a pair of wrenches and you will have to disconnect the motor power cable… and that’s easy to do thanks to another quick-disconnect point below the right chain stay.

All things considered, this is a unique and enjoyable folding electric bike. It can be very expensive and difficult to offer belt drives on traditional frames because belts cannot be opened and reconnected like chains, they are permanently a loop. Many frames require a special cutaway section to make this possible but the Evelo Quest frame has a horizontal dropout and single-tube seat stay / chain-stay so it’s belt-ready. This is a somewhat generic frame that I have seen from other companies in the space, and many of them offer suspension forks and multi-speed cassettes but weigh a lot more and are noisier. The Quest is quiet, light, clean, durable, and still gives you all of the safety and utility features you might want while compensating for a single-speed drivetrain with the throttle override feature. Though I wish the throttle worked more immediately, perhaps this delay is intentional to reduce accidental bumps when mounting / dismounting and folding? I suggest always turning the bike off before attempting any of these actions. Big thanks to Evelo for partnering with me on this post and inviting me out to their store in Seattle. There were plenty of hills to test on and I felt that the motor performed very well on these (at least for me as a ~135 lb rider). The Quest was stable, and even though it didn’t have suspension, the softer grips and saddle paired nicely with the larger tires for a satisfactory ride. Both of the main folding mechanisms had safety locks and felt sturdy, also, I was able to ride with no hands and the bike tracked well.

Pros:

  • Very few electric bikes come stock with the Gates Carbon belt drive but it’s an awesome feature, lasting longer than a chain, weighing less, getting less dirty, being less likely to fall off because of the CDX center-track design
  • Plastic fenders keep you dry and clean, the flexible rubber mud flaps won’t get bent, cracked, or rust the way that metal ones would, which is nice when folding or riding over tall obstacles like curbs
  • Two integrated LED lights that run off the ebike battery improve safety and convenience, they won’t get left on accidentally or be as easy to steal as aftermarket lights, the reflective tires further increase your visual footprint
  • I personally think that this folding electric bike looks great, the battery is integrated and protected inside the frame (also keeping weight low and freeing up the rear rack for cargo) and the hub motor is compact and almost hidden between the cassette and 160 mm disc brake rotor, you also get two color choices!
  • Evelo offers some of the best customer service in the industry based on what I hear and have experienced as a customer when they were just getting started in 2013, you get a 2-year comprehensive warranty, a sliding-scale battery replacement plan, and they now have a factory shop in Seattle where you can take test rides
  • The display is large, bright, colorized and easy to read, I love that it shows battery percentage vs. just a 5-bar infographic and that it changes to a dark background when the lights are enabled (to reduce distraction) the motor control system offers both pedal assist and throttle on demand so you can get started from stop signs and traffic signals easily vs. always having to push
  • It’s very common for folding electric bikes to weigh as much as a full sized ebike, so I was excited to find out that this one is only ~41 lbs vs. 50+ lbs
  • The frame is very purpose built with protective cable housing and good weight distribution front to rear, the front wheel offers quick release but they sell locking hardware for people who are worried about theft
  • I love that the display has a standard sized USB port in addition to a second USB port on the battery pack! This means that you could charge portable electronics while riding and use them up at the cockpit without a lot of extra cable mess, but you could also use the battery pack as a backup power source off of the bike
  • In addition to the integrated lights, reflective tire stripes, and standard plastic reflectors in the pedals, I like that the bikes come with a flick bell for signaling in a friendly way
  • Minor pro here but the bike seemed slightly easier and simpler to fold than some competing models, I love how the seat post supports it and protects the chainring with plenty of room to spare
  • Evelo sells a few optional accessory packages and I LOVE the trunk bag option, it has reflective fabric and fold-out panniers for those times when you really need extra space… the bag is awesome and works perfectly with this smaller rack design, full sized panniers may hang down and rub (though I have not tested them)
  • I feel like Evelo found the perfect balance of control and safety with their throttle design, it is not active at assist level zero or when the brake levers are pulled, you can only activate the throttle in 1-5 assist and the trigger is mounted near the right grip (which feels natural for me as a right handed person), it’s still a good idea to always shut the bike off before folding or mounting/dismounting just to be safe
  • Even with the fenders and rack, which sometimes rattle on electric bikes, the Evelo Quest rode very quiet, even across the bumpy grass sections we tried
  • The extra-long seat post and telescoping-height stem make this a suitable platform for a wide range of riders (even though it only comes in one size option), it felt solid and stable to me (even when riding one-handed and filming)

Cons:

  • The power cable leading back to the hub motor is a bit exposed on the right side of the bike, this is not uncommon to see, just be careful not to snag it or let the bike tip over onto this cable because it could bend and break
  • No suspension on the fork or seat post, these smaller-wheeled electric bikes tend to be less comfortable because of the higher attack angle (the tires fall into potholes an cracks vs. spanning them) but at least the saddle and grips are soft and you get fatter 2.125″ tires
  • The kickstand offers some adjustability but is mounted near the left crank arm which means it can prevent the bike from being walked backward and just get in the way if you’re doing service on the drivetrain
  • The display panel swivels but is not removable which means it could take some damage from weather if parked outside frequently or get scratched during the folding process, there’s no magnet or rubber clasp to keep the frame folded so it could bounce around during transport (consider using your own adjustable bungee strap like these)
  • The cadence sensor is fairly responsive but not as quick as a cadence + torque or pure torque sensor (the most magnets I have seen is 12 and this one uses 10 for sensing, it can take a moment to respond because of the single gear size and slower cadence at start)
  • Minor grip here but I don’t love the pedals, they are a basic plastic folding platform design but aren’t as easy to fold as some with an internal finger release, for these you have to push the pedal in to fold and it requires more hand strength and balance
  • Because of the extra large chainring, getting started on this bike can require more leg strength and there’s only one gear, so it’s nice that the bike has a throttle to help you get going, I felt most comfortable pedaling at ~15 mph
  • I’m not sure why this was happening, but there seemed to be a delay in the trigger throttle, which resulted in me pushing further (to get it working) and then feeling a jerkier zoom vs. smooth start, it just seems like there’s a delay for some reason

Resources:

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Keith
3 months ago

Really appreciate these reviews, Court. You provide a tremendous amount of detail to help us choose our bike, some of which is not published by the manufacturers. With so many companies making these bikes now, this is a great resource. Continued success and happy riding!

Reply
Court Rye
3 months ago

Thank you so much Keith! I do my best to be thorough but also constructive and keep it interesting. It’s amazing how many little choices these companies have to make and how slight variations can change performance, fit, or price point. Have fun riding out there, whatever you get :D

Reply
jon
3 months ago

I happen to have stumbled onto another entry into the lower priced folding ebike category. The company has a nice looking line of folding regular bikes also. The company is Citizen and the e-model is the Frisco. It has a 250 watt motor, 36 volt 8.8 ah battery, throttle control. Mostly pretty normal stuff. Fenders, no lights or rack though, for $1099 and free shipping. The interesting feature is that is has a cruise control. And a gent reviews his here. Seems like a decent ebike at a decent price.

Reply
Court Rye
3 months ago

Cool, thanks for sharing this Jon, it looks like a decent value. One of the differentiators with EVELO (at least for me) is their great customer service, but perhaps Citizen is similar. If you buy one, feel free to share your experience with it in the forums :)

Reply
Floyd
2 months ago

Just had the chance to test ride the Evelo Quest and Galaxy TT at their Seattle shop. Actually wanted to check out the too-new Quest Max with their mid-drive and NuVinci hub, but they only had a pre-production prototype on site.

Alex recommended I try the Quest to get a feel for their folder and their cruiser/hybrid Galaxy TT to feel how the NuVinci hub works. Their shop is in a quiet residential neighborhood in Seattle so you can pedal along quiet, not too smooth pavement, up and down decent hills to get a feel for their bikes.

Was pleasantly surprised that the Quest wasn’t a struggle to ride uphills with the single speed, but the Galaxy TT shows how the NuVinci hub is the way to go if you don’t mind the cost and weight. So simple to use it’s intuitive inside of a minute or two of first riding with it.

Told Alex that now I needed to wait for Court’s review of the Quest Max before I would decide!

Reply
Court Rye
2 months ago

Hi Floyd! I’m glad my reviews helped you to discover and enjoy a new bike. I look forward to covering more of their products in the future, including the Quest Max someday :)

Reply
Ken H
1 month ago

Is it someday yet? Curious minds want to know more about the Quest Max!

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Kemper
2 months ago

I think I may have sold my stepdad on buying an Evelo Quest One for the back of his plane! We especially like the belt in lieu of chain... no grease or mess on hands and clothes.

TntE3+
2 months ago

So Dug into my pocket got me e3 without doing much of a test ride just around the block and little dirt trail. demo a Levo for few hours so had a comparison but not being a specialized fan I went with the bulls.
After a solid day on technical single track riding in Georgetown ca I quickly realized this bike wasn’t at all setup for chunky technical down hills or down hill speed at all. Front end tucked horribly when you pushed into any loose dirt corner with any speed at all. My cannondale Jekly was considerably more stable and handled light years better.
After going to dealer for help I quickly realized I had purchased the bike from the wrong dealer if I wanted any post sale support at all.
Not knowing anything about Rockshox components I went on a quest for internal parts knowledge and how to make these Yari forks a more versatile sx/DH friendly fork.
Not much info to be had on setup tips easily found for this bike so I’m gonna give what I have come up with and see if any you have gone the path. Or maybe you to want to try it.
Complaints, won’t hold corner, bottoms like a brick, nervous and twitchy, vague front wheel traction and tends to push.
Anitial setup. 20% sag front 45% rear.
Added a bottomless token and ran air pressure at 100psi bike still bottoms horribly on any speed hit and no drops. But harsh on chop and still nervous.
Ordered a 160mm air rod, added 2 bottomless tokens, set sag at 18% front and 35 rear and bike Settles down and front traction improved, bottoming well under control and not using last 1” travel on normal speed rough downhill sections.
But the bike still choppy.
Now comes tricky part.
Rock Shox doesn’t support this.
Complete tear down of the fork and replace grease in air chamber and balance chamber with click A kit oil, use Same oil on outer tube in small volume to keep fork bushings lubricated, small quantity of oil on balance air side and on the main pressure side of air ram.
Running 3-1/2 tokens. 3 not enough and 4 to much so machined a token down.
I can now say I have never ridden a ebike or any down hill bike as plush on small 1-4” chop and have bottoming protection to take a 3ft drop into the nose.
I have now moved almost every DH bike. Segmented downhill strava records and put the bulls e 3 on the KOM, on every run I have done so far. Crank the rear sag from 35% to 25% and your XC geometry is very similar to factory and pedal strikes are reduced and smooth ride is amazing.
This bike should have come with a 160mm front end as it makes the bike Best All mountain ebike out in My opp. Stock the Levo is better balanced handling bike on every terrain I rode it.

65.00 in parts and 2hrs time.

JamesY
2 months ago

This is what works for me. 1000w front hub DD motor with a 52v 10.5ah shark pack, 25 amp controller with cruise control and regenerative assist braking. 20 spd drivetrain with a gear range of 28" to 154" gear ratio.

First let me say that over 28 mph efficiency drops way off due to wind resistance, even in still air. Well it starts to have affect around 23 mph actually but gets exponentially worse and you will suck up the wh/mi even on flat ground like the image shows which used almost the whole charge.

Using a drop bar bike helps cut down the wind somewhat but still handles surprisingly well on single track and all the offload situations I have used it for over the past year from sea level to 11k. The two wheel drive feature works especially well in sandy areas, even with the narrowish >40c tires on 700c i23 tubeless rims @ 35psi +/-.

Also using the proper gear ratio and a decent amount of input of your choosing will help forward momentum, and efficiency and give you as much of a workout as you desire.

Flat ground still will eat up wh's if you have to stop and start a lot. Takes a good amount of energy to get back up to speed, even with active pedaling, but it is too much fun to be half way down the block before the cars from the light start going by you. My commute is a <40 mile r/t with about 1000' total elevation change and my average speed is consistently within this range but there is usually a pretty good headwind when I come home which is what this reflects also.

Interestingly it has taken me longer to do this route in my car than by bike. Mix of 2 lane, 4 lane with big shoulder, and neighborhood stop and go for 7 miles once I hit town. Grid lock just kind of fades out of the picture on a bicycle.

Good luck on your quest. The technology is out there.
Your bike is awesome

JRA
2 months ago

Hello!
i have a round trip commute of 34 miles (total). The road is mostly flat. I am looking for a fast class 3 bike that also offer offroad mode, that allows me to ride faster than 28 miles limit.

any recommendations?

thank you

This is what works for me. 1000w front hub DD motor with a 52v 10.5ah shark pack, 25 amp controller with cruise control and regenerative assist braking. 20 spd drivetrain with a gear range of 28" to 154" gear ratio.

First let me say that over 28 mph efficiency drops way off due to wind resistance, even in still air. Well it starts to have affect around 23 mph actually but gets exponentially worse and you will suck up the wh/mi even on flat ground like the image shows which used almost the whole charge.

Using a drop bar bike helps cut down the wind somewhat but still handles surprisingly well on single track and all the offload situations I have used it for over the past year from sea level to 11k. The two wheel drive feature works especially well in sandy areas, even with the narrowish >40c tires on 700c i23 tubeless rims @ 35psi +/-.

Also using the proper gear ratio and a decent amount of input of your choosing will help forward momentum, and efficiency and give you as much of a workout as you desire.

Flat ground still will eat up wh's if you have to stop and start a lot. Takes a good amount of energy to get back up to speed, even with active pedaling, but it is too much fun to be half way down the block before the cars from the light start going by you. My commute is a <40 mile r/t with about 1000' total elevation change and my average speed is consistently within this range but there is usually a pretty good headwind when I come home which is what this reflects also.

Interestingly it has taken me longer to do this route in my car than by bike. Mix of 2 lane, 4 lane with big shoulder, and neighborhood stop and go for 7 miles once I hit town. Grid lock just kind of fades out of the picture on a bicycle.

Good luck on your quest. The technology is out there.

1/4
Sonoboy
2 months ago

I just wanted to report back that I have decided to return the Evelo Quest bike after 10 days of riding it. So I'm again looking for a bike that suits my needs. Any other recommendations are welcome.
Kathy, can you share with us your reasons for the return? Thanks.

Kathy Smith
2 months ago

I just wanted to report back that I have decided to return the Evelo Quest bike after 10 days of riding it. So I'm again looking for a bike that suits my needs. Any other recommendations are welcome.

Kemper
2 months ago

So far so good! You may notice it's missing the rear fender... the fender support strut I received was a little short (causing the wheel to rub the inside of the fender). Replacement en route.

If anyone has been thinking about this bike and have any questions, let me know! I only have about 10 miles on it so far.

Striker
3 months ago

Hi Striker,

did you get an answer of your quest.

I am interested in that also.

Regards
Dimi

I never got an answer and I dont think the turbo S is hackable. Certainly not in the same way as the LEVO. I believe the speed for the turbo S is in the Firmware on the rear wheel motor. I tried using the Liteblue app with no success. If anyone has a solution, I'd love to hear it.

Dimi Tsintonis
3 months ago

Hi Striker,

did you get an answer of your quest.

I am interested in that also.

Regards
Dimi

Denis Shelston
3 months ago

They better ship my order soon, if not I will cancel it and get a Evelo Quest Max.

Wow, that Evelo is nice. Cool features and practically double the price. Web site says they start shipping in late October.

Voltbike says the new Urban ships early October.

tinotino
3 months ago

They better ship my order soon, if not I will cancel it and get a Evelo Quest Max.

Kathy Smith
3 months ago

Court just reviewed the Evelo Quest, I'd be interested if your impressions match his.
Hmm, I have not seen this review. The review says 41.1lbs but their site says 38lbs :(

Dewey
3 months ago

I ended up buying Evelo Quest.

Court just reviewed the Evelo Quest, I'd be interested if your impressions match his.

zap016VOLTAGE
3 months ago

Delfast bike offers 236-mile range on a single charge! :eek:

From ebiketips "Delfast are courier company based in Kiev, Ukraine, specializing in quick delivery of online purchases. Their quest to find the perfect delivery vehicle for their operations has led them to experiment with e-bikes, and ultimately build their own."

Their Kickstarter campaign will begin September 20th.
Delfast bikes may be just the ticket for commuters.
Can't wait for their kickstarter campaign.:)

Kathy Smith
3 months ago

I ended up buying Evelo Quest. It should be here next week. I have 10 days to try it. I can return it at no cost to me if I don't like it.

Kathy Smith
3 months ago

I see you already narrowed your selection to include the evelo Quest weighing 38lb which has a decent sized 360wh battery, 20" wheels, Gates carbon belt drive, for a reasonable $2k, here's the manual - on page 19 it looks like it uses a Bafang motor probably the Bafang Mini, the thumb control buttons are the same as my BBS01 mid-drive motor. I like the walk assist feature which helps me get my heavy ebike up some steps into my backyard. The Bafang Mini motor for the past few years had a model # G01 with a black casing but has recently been changed this fall to a new model # G320 with a silver casing, you might want to check how long Evelo will support the motor, I had a nasty surprise when Bafang changed the design on the BBS01/02 motor I bought replacing some internal parts with incompatible new machined parts.
it says that the motor warranty is for 2 years or 20,000 miles whichever comes first. That's interesting that you can use the walk assist feature to get the bike up. Haven't thought of that. Also, the battery is removable so that shaves off another 6lbs if I find it hard to carry 38lbs up the stairs!

Dewey
3 months ago

16" wheels are too small for me. I wish the BH EasyGo speed was 20mph.

I see you already narrowed your selection to include the evelo Quest weighing 38lb which has a decent sized 360wh battery, 20" wheels, Gates carbon belt drive, for a reasonable $2k, here's the manual - on page 19 it looks like it uses a Bafang motor probably the Bafang Mini, the thumb control buttons are the same as my BBS01 mid-drive motor. I like the walk assist feature which helps me get my heavy ebike up some steps into my backyard. The Bafang Mini motor for the past few years had a model # G01 with a black casing but has recently been changed this fall to a new model # G320 with a silver or black casing, you might want to check how long Evelo will support the motor, I had a nasty surprise when Bafang changed the design on the BBS01/02 motor replacing some internal parts with incompatible new machined parts. Thankfully my supplier had stocked up with parts for the old motor 'just in case' and it's been going fine for a year but Bafang have form now for screwing over their international distributors and customers.

Kathy Smith
3 months ago

I've been mulling over a Tern Vektron myself which doesn't meet a lot of your criteria but seems from the specs to be a better equipped bike. I've also checked out similar bikes as you aswell and would be interested to see what bike you finally end up with since I still haven't fully decided myself. I've checked out the luna mini and I like it even if it does have the "racier" look but like you reported not being able to put fenders on it stinks! I've also checked into the Evelo Quest but I got to say I was completely turned off by their website. I'm use to websites giving a bit too much information about a bike but for the life of me I could hardly find any specifications about the Quest on their website. It doesn't even tell you the most basic of facts like the wheel size! I own a Brompton which I'm completely spoiled by it's fold size and weight even though it at 25lbs is still a chunky monkey. I too wish to find something a bit bigger and built well.
The specs are on the bottom of the page, you need to click Specs Details and you get this:

Motor
Bafang 250W Brushless Rear Hub Motor, Variable Pedal Assist and Throttle Control

Battery
Samsung 36V 10.2Ah with micro USB Charge Port

Charger
36V 2A Charger

Maximum Motor-Assisted Speed
20 Miles Per Hour

Range
Estimated 40 Miles on Pedal-Assist

Electric Assist
Multiple levels, plus electric-only (via throttle)

Frame
Lightweight Aircraft Grade Aluminum Frame

Fork
Chromoly Fork, Fender-Compatible

Wheel
20” Alloy Rims

Brakes
Tektro Disc Brakes, 160mm Rotors

Seat Post
33.9mm 575mm Length

Stem
Quick Folding Stem

Drivetrain
Gates, 70T, 20T Rear Cog, Gates Carbon Belt Drive

Pedals
Wellgo 9/16” Folding

Display Panel
Multi-color 3.2” IPS Screen, 14 Function Display

Add-ons
Front and Rear Fenders, Front and Rear Lights Hard-Wired to Battery, Rear Cargo Rack, Bell, Kickstand

Bicycle Weight
38 lbs with Integrated Battery

Awakened987
3 months ago

I've been mulling over a Tern Vektron myself which doesn't meet a lot of your criteria but seems from the specs to be a better equipped bike. I've also checked out similar bikes as you aswell and would be interested to see what bike you finally end up with since I still haven't fully decided myself. I've checked out the luna mini and I like it even if it does have the "racier" look but like you reported not being able to put fenders on it stinks! I've also checked into the Evelo Quest but I got to say I was completely turned off by their website. I'm use to websites giving a bit too much information about a bike but for the life of me I could hardly find any specifications about the Quest on their website. It doesn't even tell you the most basic of facts like the wheel size! I own a Brompton which I'm completely spoiled by it's fold size and weight even though it at 25lbs is still a chunky monkey. I too wish to find something a bit bigger and built well.

Kathy Smith
3 months ago

I narrowed down to 3 bikes, which I can buy now. I'm having a hard time deciding between these three:
1. SAVADECK Z8 (https://www.amazon.com/SAVADECK-Electric-Pedal-assist-Foldable-Removable/dp/B073PSMQQT)
2. Luna Mini (https://lunacycle.com/luna-mini-folding-ebike/)
3. Evelo Quest (https://www.evelo.com/electric-bicycles/quest/)

The Savadeck Z8 is the lightest 30.7lb and the best looking but it has no throttle and not fenders, 200w, mid drive, chain, builtin battery. $2500 free return with no shipping cost via Amazon within 30days
The Luna Mini is the cheapest but overpowered 700w (which I don't need) and is the ugliest, no fenders, throttle, mid drive, chain, removable battery, 38.5lb. $1620 with shipping, no return if I use the bike.
Evelo Quest looks nice, comes with fenders, bike rack, 250w, throttle, builtin battery, no chain but belt instead (Gates Carbon Drive), brushless Rear Hub Motor, 38lb, $1799, 10 day free return

If Savadeck came with a throttle I would just get it but it doesn't.
Again, I had A2B Edge 200w and never felt it was underpowered. I weigh 100lbs, add 5lbs in case I gain weight. I don't drive in a hilly area, there are some slopes here and there on my daily commute. Do I need 700w motor? I'm used to rear hub motor but is mid drive better? I mean, will I notice a difference in my ride? I understand it's easier to replace tires etc but how different would it be while riding?

Any help you guys can provide in narrowing this down further would be greatly appreciated.

Kathy

willie2
4 months ago

Tora, while I thank you for the detailed information you supplied to us all, I myself do not appreciate your long winded reply.
My logic in business is if your going to build the best you include the best from the getgo. You as the designer/manufacturer knows best what this bike needs. Torque sensor, 21AH battery, Hydrolic brakes should not be an option, period. These are all items which should be standard on a bike of this caliber. Talking for myself I do not need an explanation of all the pitfalls in your quest to make this happen. I understood that my preorder would help finance your dream of building a great performance e-bike at a crazy cheap price. Yes when I prepaid $3000, for my bike I added all the bells and whistles for I felt they were necessary. I also preordered to lock in the price.
I think at this point in time you owe to all your customers a confirming e-mail of an invoice (not the PayPal generated) order receipt, thanking them. And some type of realistic lead time based upon when there order was placed. Everything i’ve Read in the past and even when asked to Luis have been answered too vaguely.
I got a confirmation and receipt when I ordered. This will be the last prepay pre-order I make though. Too risky. Live and learn I guess. Sounds like I'll be lucky to see my bike before November. So much for this season.

Serpent
4 months ago

Tora, while I thank you for the detailed information you supplied to us all, I myself do not appreciate your long winded reply.
My logic in business is if your going to build the best you include the best from the getgo. You as the designer/manufacturer knows best what this bike needs. Torque sensor, 21AH battery, Hydrolic brakes should not be an option, period. These are all items which should be standard on a bike of this caliber. Talking for myself I do not need an explanation of all the pitfalls in your quest to make this happen. I understood that my preorder would help finance your dream of building a great performance e-bike at a crazy cheap price. Yes when I prepaid $3000, for my bike I added all the bells and whistles for I felt they were necessary. I also preordered to lock in the price.
I think at this point in time you owe to all your customers a confirming e-mail of an invoice (not the PayPal generated) order receipt, thanking them. And some type of realistic lead time based upon when there order was placed. Everything i’ve Read in the past and even when asked to Luis have been answered too vaguely.

emco5
4 months ago

With population growth comes the need for more control to maintain order, and the fastest way to regulation and taxation is abuse of privilege. When I read about the Mopeds in bicycle disguise that the people at ES are creating, I cringe. In the US, our focus has been moving away from assisting a pedal bike's hill climbing ability into a quest for enough power to keep up with traffic, and that need is being met by some in the bicycle industry. That change is being observed by government. I cannot shout that loud enough. There is a reason why the European Parliament voted in a 250-watt eBike limit. From my perspective, as eBike popularity grows in the US it is entirely possible that we will adopt the Euro standards.

"We need a clear border line between what a bicycle is and what exceeds the definition of a ‘bicycle’… This is important for clear decisions on the use of infrastructure and facilities for bicycles that authorities have to make on the international, national, regional and local level…. The minute you start changing the definition of a bicycle, you’re opening up cycling to a whole range of nasty legislation… You don’t want to damage the reputation of cycling, and lose all the wonderful benefits that cyclists’ have.”
-- Ceri Woolsgrove https://tinyurl.com/y7g73ab9

Franklo
4 months ago

I am hoping to buy an e-bike soon, and am somewhat surprised at the weight of many of them (>45 pounds). How hard is it to ride a bike that heavy without the motor giving assistance? What factors make it easier to pedal a bike that weight: should I focus on finding a sub-45 pound bike or focus more on getting one that has 7+ gears? Are there any other factors that play a role? Do any of you ever deliberately shut off power, or choose to ride a long enough distance that you know you'll be peddling "on your own" for more than a few miles?

As a side note, are there any issues with putting a 50 pound e-bike on a rear-mounted bike rack? I assume you remove the battery first. Any other concerns to know about?

My bike is 43# without the battery. my rack is rated for 40# per bike. it's a 2 bike rack. so i do use it without problems. my other bike is 53# without the battery. i haven't tried that one on the rack and probably won't. and i definitely wouldn't put both on at the same time.
if you have a trunk or rear hatch type of rack, they're not usually rated much above 40# per bike, that I know of anyway. if you get a very heavy e-bike 60# or more, that type of rack might not work. you'd have to go to more of trailer hitch receptacle type.
plus, if you want to peddle without assist, a 60# bike would be a bit of a workout, but can be done ,especially on flat roads. my one bike has 20 gears the other (heavier one) has 28. i try to use minimal assist just for range- but it's sure nice to know you got that power when you need it.
Faraday makes a really light weight bike. I'm not sure how many gears they have though. My bikes are Easy Motion. one has a throttle and one doesn't.
I f you go back to the "general discussion" section of the forum and scroll down a few pages there was a lengthy discussion about e-bikes and racks. Good Luck in your quest!

Voodoo Six
3 months ago

I'll be buying an ebike over the winter, this on is high on my list, anxious to see the max version.

Gene Coppola
3 months ago

A real possibility for me, I like the bike, and the sales rep is someone I would like to do business with..

TarsierSpectral
3 months ago

Hi Court, their website states that the bike weights 38lbs with integrated battery.  Your review says ~41lbs.  Do you know why there is ~3lbs discrepancy?  Did you weigh the bike yourself?

Gogogordy1
3 months ago

Wow nice bike! That belt drive is sexy stuff and has become a higher standard in the motorcycle (and motorscooter) world, so why not? It appears as if a guard for the motor wiring connection point could be fabbed-up easily by someone handy, but better yet the manufacturer should've provide one at what, pennies per bike?

minnie saab
3 months ago

🚲🚲🚲🚲❤❤❤❤

Steve Mullholand
3 months ago

I've said it before and I'll say it again - YOU ARE THE BEST! Thanks for another amazing video!

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Thanks Steve! I'm definitely working to make these videos useful and interesting. It feels great to be recognized and I'm glad you're enjoying them :)

structure7
3 months ago

At 41 lbs this is looking better for what I have to carry up my stairs! I think I'll use that advice for a nylon strap to keep it together, maybe even something I can use as a strap over my shoulder to assist with the weight. Thanks!

structure7
3 months ago

Not yet... was looking at the Magnum folding bikes but I like this at 10 lbs lighter.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Sure thing, I'm not a huge strong guy so these lighter weight ebikes are appealing... even with some trade-offs in gearing, power, and range. The bike worked great for me. It sounds like you might already own this one?

Nguyen Dang
3 months ago

Hey bro it me I have that bicycle from Evelo Quest it a awesome e bicycle it cost a lot but worth the money I used it everyday so far now I road about 500 miles now no issue what so ever it my only transperation back and forward from school work and home I am so happy that I got this bicycle than the other one because of warranty is the best in market also I told them that the only reason why I know about electric bicycle is by you and they like I know him too wow the Evelo people working knows me by name now kool right

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Sweet! Glad you're enjoying the Evelo Quest One Nguyen, it's a nice bike and indeed, the people at EVELO are very quick to help and offer good support. I hope it keeps working well for you!

Mr Jhonny
3 months ago

20th like

Mr Jhonny
3 months ago

ElectricBikeReview.com Thats true!!!!!

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Somebody's slacking ;)

EPSTomcat11
3 months ago

Court - Do you think the future of ebikes is a mid-drive and belt drive? It just seems to make sense.

Jon Neet
2 months ago

Another big plus for belt drive is, there is no chain to rust. The climate here (big island of Hawaii) is brutal on chains, derailers, cars, motorcycles etec, etc. Anything metal will rust.

EPSTomcat11
3 months ago

TarsierSpectral Very nice Bike: https://www.evelo.com/electric-bicycles/quest-max/ Would love to see a review on it :)

EPSTomcat11
3 months ago

TarsierSpectral Really? Cool! I'll check it out.

EPSTomcat11
3 months ago

Jon Neet IKR and there are much fewer moving parts, saves on weight, and the manufacturing and assembly should be much easier and cheaper to optimize in the long run. For a regular bicycle it's overkill but if you're going to spend at least 2K on an ebike, the extra cost of a belt drive is relatively minimal, when considering the time and $ savings in maintenance. It's up to the ebike industry to push it perhaps. I also wish the industry pushed manufacturers to go with mid-drives instead of hub drives.

TarsierSpectral
3 months ago

Just an FYI, they just released a mid-drive version of this bike with a belt drive and gears but at a weight expense.

Honky Tonk
3 months ago

belt drive will never last as long as chain drive. same goes for timing chain and timing belt in cars.

Jon Neet
3 months ago

I dissagree. Belt driven motorcycles are all over the place and doing very well. All Harley-Davidsons have been belt driven for many years. All Victories , American made but now defunct did just fine with belt drive, and the Suzuki S40 (also known as Suzuki Savage) uses a belt. And while the S40 has a well known weakness, it has nothing to do with the belt drive. Belts are super quiet, seldome need adjusting, need to lubing, and outlast chains.

EPSTomcat11
3 months ago

Honky Tonk - Depends on the advances in materials. By the time the belt wears out, you'll want to upgrade your e-bike anyway. Also, a chain system is susceptible to issues when riding through sandy areas, so a belt drive basically extends the terrain of the bike to beaches, which is really cool.

Zsolt Velykovits
3 months ago

I have a few ideas for future models:
• You could release a sport model with no rack on it
• Offer it in a matt khaki green color
• Instead of the big display, I would prefer an iOS and Android app instead

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

The app idea is cool, I think we will see more of that in the future. I also like the idea of a khaki green color in matte, thanks for sharing your ideas!

Aayush Parmar
3 months ago

Please reply me. Do you know Elektron bg368 bike?

Aayush Parmar
3 months ago

ElectricBikeReview.com and yes $400.

Aayush Parmar
3 months ago

ElectricBikeReview.com :) it's $400 in India. It's having hub motor. It looks like giant road e

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

No, I haven't seen that one yet, thanks for sharing, maybe I'll get to review it someday :)

Chris
3 months ago

Buy Quality - Buy Evelo!

Steve Donovan
3 months ago

I have that display and like its features including the colors, and you can unlock a few things like the assist levels to get 9 and the upper speed limit. The belt drive seems to me to be what the future will definitely see as a common component, I'm curious how it stays on the sprockets not moving side to side. Glad to see another one about a couple grand, you're really showing great variety.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

Hi Steve, the CDX thing (center drive track) is a vertical protrusion in the chainring that keeps the belt from slipping to either side. The belt has an indentation that allows this protrusion to slot and keep it "on track" and it works great, I have never had an issue with a Gates Carbon CDX falling off. Does this make sense? Here's more info with some close up pictures for you, look at the black chainring with the line down the center: http://www.gatescarbondrive.com/products/cdx