Grace Easy Review

2015 Grace Easy Electric Bike Review 1
2015 Grace Easy
2015 Grace Easy Bionx Gearless Motor
2015 Grace Easy Battery Pack
2015 Grace Easy Display Throttle Handles
2015 Grace Easy Pedals Downtube
2015 Grace Easy Magura Disc Brake Rotor
2015 Grace Easy Gates Carbon Drive
2015 Grace Easy Double Leg Kickstand
2015 Grace Easy Disc Brake Rotor
2015 Grace Easy Bm Led Headlight
2015 Grace Easy Electric Bike Review 1
2015 Grace Easy
2015 Grace Easy Bionx Gearless Motor
2015 Grace Easy Battery Pack
2015 Grace Easy Display Throttle Handles
2015 Grace Easy Pedals Downtube
2015 Grace Easy Magura Disc Brake Rotor
2015 Grace Easy Gates Carbon Drive
2015 Grace Easy Double Leg Kickstand
2015 Grace Easy Disc Brake Rotor
2015 Grace Easy Bm Led Headlight

Summary

  • Clean design available in two colors, two frame sizes and multiple build configurations with a cassette and chain, three speed internally geared hub and carbon belt drive, fixed fork or suspension fork
  • Leverages a BionX motor and battery system known for being quiet, durable and efficient
  • Offers four regen and torque sensing assist modes, variable speed throttle and regenerative braking

Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Grace

Model:

Easy

Price:

$3,200 USD (Up to $3,999 Depending on Options)

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Commuting, Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Covering Manufacturer Defects (1,000 Charge Cycles)

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

20142015

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

42 lbs (19.05 kg)

Battery Weight:

6 lbs (2.72 kg)

Motor Weight:

9 lbs (4.08 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 T6 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

19.29 in (48.99 cm)21.26 in (54 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Medium 19.29" (Top Tube Horizontal 585 mm, Seat Tube Center to Top 490 mm, Stand Over Height 850 mm), Large 21.26" (Top Tube Horizontal 610 mm, Seat Tube Center to Top 540 mm, Stand Over Height 860 mm)

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

White, Anthrazite

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid Aluminum Alloy or RockShox Recon 29

Attachment Points:

Fender Bosses, Rear Rack Bosses

Gearing Details:

10 Speed 1x10 SRAM X9 or 3 Speed 1x3 SRAM IGH3 (Integrated Geared Hub) with Gates Carbon Drive

Shifter Details:

SRAM Grip Shifter on Right Bar

Cranks:

Sugino Mighty Comp Messenger

Pedals:

Schindelhauer, CNC Milled, Silver Color

Headset:

Ritchey Classic Series Accessoirs

Stem:

Ritchey Classic Series Accessoirs

Handlebar:

Ritchey Classic Series Accessoirs Riser

Brake Details:

Magura MT4 Hydraulic Disc Brakes with 180 mm Rotors

Grips:

Brooks Slender Grips Honey Color

Saddle:

Brooks Team Pro Honey Color

Seat Post:

Ritchey Classic Series Accessoirs

Tire Brand:

Continental Eco Contact, 28" x 1.6"

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

Reflective Sidewalls

Accessories:

B&M LUMOTEC Lyt 42 LED Front Light, B&M DToplight Mini Diode Back Light, Two-Legged Scissoring Kickstand

Other:

(Three Editions Including: Easy 1x10, Easy Gates, Easy Red Dot Speed Pedelec), Recipient of the 2013 Red Dot Design Award, Recipient of the 2013 Extra Energy Award for Best Classic Pedelec

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

BionX

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Gearless Direct Drive Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

350 watts

Motor Torque:

40 Newton meters (10 Nm Nominal)

Battery Brand:

Panasonic

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

6.3 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

302 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium Manganese Cobalt

Charge Time:

2.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

40 miles (64 km)

Estimated Max Range:

65 miles (105 km)

Display Type:

Removable Backlit LCD (Symmetrical Integrated Buttons for Right or Left Handed Users)

Readouts:

4 Proportional Assist and Generate Modes, Lighting Controls, Battery Voltage, Trip Distance, Odometer, Chronometer, Average Speed, Clock

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad

Drive Mode:

Torque Sensing Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)(Up to 26 mph for the Red Dot Speed Pedelec Class 3 Version)

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Written Review

The Grace Easy is a city style electric bike that comes in several flavors for improved comfort, luxury and speed. At the base level, it offers a 10 speed cassette with either a fixed or suspension fork and moving more towards the luxury end there’s an internally geared 3 speed hub with gates carbon drive (known for being clean and quiet) that comes with Brooks leather saddle and grips. Each model leverages a BionX gearless hub motor that’s extremely quiet but the internally geared version combines a SRAM system with the motor for near silent operation. One of my favorite design elements of this ebike is actually the battery configuration. It uses a standard BionX pack with premium cells but it’s partially integrated into the downtube while most other BionX kits have a blockier mount-on design. From the hydraulic disc brakes to the Busch and Muller LED lights, the optional fenders and rack to the classy saddle and optioanl speed pedalec Red Dot edition (that’s capable of ~26 mph in pedal assist vs. the standard 20 mph) this is a versatile platform and one that’s easy to appreciate. Ha!

The motor driving each version of the Grace Easy offers 350 watts of gearless direct drive power. While you sacrifice a bit of torque with a gearless design, you gain durability, reduced noise and the option for regenerative braking (which is put to use here). The motor exerts 40 Newton Meters of torque which is quite satisfying under normal riding conditions. Given the hybrid semi-slick tires and larger 28 inch wheelset there’s little resistance holding this bike back and that means you’ll go further with each ride. Of course, with four levels of regen (great for recouping some energy when coasting down hills or adding a “workout” challenge to flat riding) you can actually charge the battery a bit on the fly and there’s also regenerative braking with sensors built right into the brake levers. This motor isn’t especially light and it does add weight towards the rear end of the bike but that’s balanced out by the downtube mounted battery and given the rigid rear portion of the frame, this increased “unsprung weight” in the rear wheel doesn’t impact the ride. City style bikes like this are a perfect use of the BionX system and it really shines on the Grace Easy.

Powering the motor and LED lights is a high quality Lithium Manganese Cobalt battery pack (this chemistry is known for being light weight and durable). It offers 48 volts of power which is above average, improving acceleration, climbing ability and efficiency. With 6.3 amp hours of capacity, its size and weight are kept down and you still get a solid range of 40+ miles per charge depending on terrain, weather and rider weight. I love that the battery is removable for convenient charging on or off the bike (perfect for commuters) and that its shell matches the white or gray exterior paint job of the bike frame. A big part of what makes the Easy so beautiful is the limited branding marks and accent colors. The frame is all one color with a logo beveled into the battery cover only and this looks great with the standard black accessories or honey leather of the Brooks upgrade. With the included quick charger the pack should be full in under three hours which is 30% faster than other standard ebikes and that makes it even more usable.

Operating the drive system on this bike is very easy. Once you’ve charged the battery pack, just press the upper right hand button on the removable second generation BionX display panel. It lights up and displays your speed, battery level, range and assist setting. You can choose from no assist or go up through four levels of torque sensing pedal assist or down through four levels of regeneration as mentioned earlier. In addition to the display (which has up and down buttons) you can navigate assist levels with the break out button pad that also includes a variable speed trigger throttle! Note that the throttle won’t work until you’re moving at 2+ miles per hour (a safety feature common to all BionX systems). Most versions of the Grace Easy are limited to 20mph in assist or throttle mode but you can upgrade to the Red Dot edition (named for the 2012 Red Dot design award this bike received) and that one can go 26 miles per hour in pedal assist mode only.

This is literally an award winning electric bike with options that can make it perfect for anyone riding around paved streets. It’s not ideal for off-road, even with the optional suspension fork, but that’s fine because it benefits from improved efficiency with the stiffer frame and tire setup. While there isn’t a step-thru frame design you do get to choose from two high-step sizes and all of the options described above including two colors. Minor gripes for me include the lack of a seat post water bottle cage mounting point (seems like there was plenty of room to add them) and the added expense of fenders, rack and drivetrain upgrades. I really appreciate the Gates Carbon belt drive setup with internally geared three speed hub and while that does limit cadence range (and might make climbing a bit tougher) it’s just so quiet and clean, it’s hard not to appreciate and perfect for mostly-level commuting applications.

Pros:

  • Beautiful well balanced design with custom BionX battery integration in the downtube
  • Unique BionX hub motor also offers 3 internal gears for pedaling in the Gates Carbon and Red Dot editions
  • Optional 10 speed chain driven configuration for those who want more range when pedaling
  • Belt drive looks great, operates silently and is cleaner than a chain
  • Four modes of pedal assist and regeneration plus regenerative braking to extend range and reduce wear on disc brakes
  • Front and rear LED lights built in for safety, run off the main battery pack so they don’t add as much weight or inconvenience as add-on lights
  • Optional rear rack and fenders with mud guards for increased utility
  • Battery is lockable and removable making it great for commuters
  • Overall light weight of bike at just 42lbs makes it easy to transport, carry up stairs and pedal
  • Magura hydraulic disc brakes are smooth and easy to use with plenty of stopping power
  • Available in two colors (white and dark blue/gray “anthrazite”) with leather accents on Brooks saddle and grips as options
  • 28″ wheels paired with medium sized city tires for efficient coasting and great handling
  • Well integrated side-folding two-leg kickstand that stays out of the way when riding

Cons:

  • More rigid aluminum frame paired with city tires makes for a rigid ride, consider the optional suspension fork
  • No water bottle cage braze-on points on the downtube (due to battery) or the seat tube… seems like they could have added them

Resources:

More Grace Reviews

Grace One Review

  • MSRP: $4,500
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015

A unique blend of bicycle and motorcycle performance, one of the lighter weight electric bikes capable of going 30 mph. Completely custom frame with integrated battery and controller for even weight distribution, powerful halogen headlights…...

Grace MX II Urban Review

  • MSRP: $3,999
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015

Clean, quiet and efficient belt drive leverages the internalized NuVinci continuously variable transmission which can be shifted at standstill and provides leverage to the Bosch Centerdrive motor system. Excellent weight distribution (low and center) for improved balance, removable battery for convenient charging and…...

Grace MX II Trail Review

  • MSRP: $3,699
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015

One of the most affordable electric bikes with the Bosch Gen2 Centerdrive system offering 350 watt mid-drive motor. Beautiful frame with integrated cables, metallic brown paint, minimalist logos available in two sizes for…...

2013 Grace Easy Review

  • MSRP: $3,200
  • MODEL YEAR: 2013

Leverages BionX motor and a sleek custom designed downtube-integrated battery pack. Battery pack is removable, lockable and powers a front and rear LED light for safety...


Comments (24) YouTube Comments

Michel Caliroux
5 years ago

I am very impressed by the reviews you’ve made of all Grace bikes. I’m looking forward to buying an e-bike for a daily commute of 32 km one way (half on gravel and half on path). My area is very hilly (long hills), and I am wondering about the effeciency or the capabilty of Easy bikes transmission. Could you comment on the 3 types of transmission available: 10 Speed 1×10 SRAM X9, the 3 Speed 1×3 SRAM IGH3 or the NuVinci N360 infinite gears. Thanks

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Hi Michal, great question… the big differences are number of gears, service schedule and weight. The 10 speed SRAM cassette is best for more advanced riders who can perform maintenance themselves or don’t mind going to a shop regularly for tuneups. This option is the lightest weight and most versatile for climbing or pedaling comfortably at higher speeds. The 3 speed SRAM internally geared hub by comparison is going to require less maintenance and stay cleaner but it will weigh slightly more and of course, limit your cadence range which means that it’s best suited for around town riding. This is basically the same for the NuVinci continuously variable transmission (CVT) though it has more adjustability, it doesn’t have the same true range of pedaling speeds as the 10 speed cassette does. The NuVinci also costs more and weighs about two pounds more. One very cool feature on it is the ability to shift at standstill, even when stopped on an incline… you can shift and immediately begin pedaling with a lower gear. This is only partially true of the 3 speed internally geared hub, it may not shift at standstill when under heavy load. I hope this helps!

  Reply
Michel Clairoux
5 years ago

Thank you Court, Your answer will help me a lot since I consider myself a good cyclist able to maintain an average speed of 28 km/h with an all carbon road bike for more than an hour. But for an everyday long commute, this is becoming tiresome. It is why an electric bike could help me using my bike more often. I am enjoying your reviews, and because of you I realize now that electric bikes are sophisticated machines just as carbon road bikes and probably more. Keep up your good work. Michel Clairoux

  Reply
Harry Fuller
5 years ago

Can you comment on the different sizing options associated with the different versions of this bike? Is the red dot version only available in large as the grace website states? Is the red dot version the only speed pedelec version as you state? Thank you.

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Hi Harry! Great question I just spoke with the CEO of Grace USA. The Easy 1-10 (shifting version) and Gates (carbon drive version) models are now both also available in speed pedelec (sounds like a recent change towards the end of last year). So at this point it appears that every version of the bike can be setup as a speed pedelec! As far as sizing, the 1-10 and Gates models are both available in either Medum (49 cm) and Large (54 cm) while the Red Dot version (which has the fancier handlebar, stem, and seat post by Ritchey Classic and the Schindelhauer CNC pedals and Brooks team pro saddle and slender grips) is only available in Large (54 cm). Hope this helps!

  Reply
Harry Fuller
5 years ago

Thanks Court. I am really confused as to what size to get. I can’t seem to locate a place around me that has a bike to try out. I found a site online that will ship it for free, but I have received different advice as to what size would best fit me. I am 5’8″ with a 30″ inseam. I heard on a video that you did that you are 5’9″. Based on your experience, would the medium or large fit me better? If it makes a difference, I am leaning toward the speed pedelec Grace Gates. Also, thanks for doing all these great video reviews. It has made my comparison so much easier.

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Hello Harry, this is a difficult question to answer. I tend to err on the small side with frames and would probably get the medium here as a result. I feel more in control and have an easier time hopping and maneuvering off-road when the frame isn’t so overwhelming. For road bikes and cross country I might be open to a perfect or slightly large fit but even then, I tend to go smaller and just dial in the seat post. I guess I also prefer a more upright body position than stretching way forward which tends to happen on larger frames.

  Reply
Gwen
5 years ago

It is surprisingly difficult to find stores selling this bike. I have reached out to two who supposedly sell it and one said they no longer carry it because Grace was a pill to deal with and the other actively dissuaded me from considering the Grace, doesn’t have any in stock, and doubts he’ll get any more. Both had been offering the bike at significantly more than MSRP. As a result there is no one within several hours distance of me offering this bike for sale. I’m hopinig that local stores that work on Bionx bikes will at least service it if I buy it.

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Thanks for sharing your experience Gwen, that’s one of the challenges with electric bikes that goes beyond the hardware. If you reached out to reputable shops and they are avoiding the bike due to business challenges then I’d really take a moment to consider the purchase. I trust BionX and they offer good support generally but do it through dealers. If a dealer is forced to struggle working with the manufacturer they may charge you more but I don’t think they’d flat out reject helping you.

  Reply
Gwen
5 years ago

I contacted Paul of Electric Bikes of New England because, since I can’t find the bike locally, I needed to get it online. They have great reviews and great prices. Alas, the 2015 Grace Easy has sold out and remaining bikes are being reserved for the European market.

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Thanks for the update Gwen :)

  Reply
Kris
5 years ago

Court,, great review and great bike but I have one question. Do You think that this bike after changing the tires for ones with more off road capabilities will be good enough as a cross bike? I am asking because I want an electric bike that will be used not only for city travelling but also in weekends for trips for countryside where the terrain can be sometimes rough.

  Reply
Court
4 years ago

Hi Kris, interesting question… Given the ~42 pound weight (relatively light for an ebike) this would probably work alright as a cross bike but there’s no suspension so your body could take a beating. The BionX system is solid and the custom battery is well integrated here. I’m really not sure, one concern might be replacing this battery down the road since it is so custom. Have you considered something more like the Felt SPORTe which is also a light-weight rigid frame but balances the motor and battery weight better? Another possibility might be the Easy Motion EVO Cross which has a basic suspension and nicely balanced battery which is interchangeable with most other EVO models so replacements will be easier to get down the line.

  Reply
Kris
4 years ago

Court, thanks for the answer. Easy Motion Evo Cross is a fantastic choice for me but i can’t buy it in Poland, where I live :( Or to be honest, not even in whole Europe. The choice of cross e-bikes are very limited in my location and I don’t want to buy a classic mountain e-bike because most of the time I will use it to go to the work. The problem with the battery is less relevant for me because I am thinking of buying the version with 10 speed cassette and I don’t mind little pedaling when the battery will go dead :) My real concern is with the construction of the bike itself. It is a stiff, city bike and even with the the suspension fork and cross tires for more comfort offroad ride I am afraid that something will break sooner or later and Grace will tell me that I did not use the bike properly ;) The last interesting bit is the weight ballance of this bike. You said in Your reply that it is not as good ballanced as Evo Cross. But both bikes looks very similar to me in terms of where the battery and motor are placed. Can You tell me what are the real differences? Thank you very much! Kris

  Reply
Court
4 years ago

I see now, if the Grace Easy is available locally then that is a solid choice and it should hold up well with the BionX drive system. You are correct that it is similar to the EVO Cross in terms of balance, the Cross has a smaller and lighter weight geared motor vs. the gearless that BionX uses so that contributes to a more rear-heavy design on the Easy but not by much. I hope it works out for you, whatever you choose and Grace seems like a reputable brand, I think BionX definitely is :D

  Reply
Karl
4 years ago

Hi, Court. I really want a silent eBike, and also I am very tired of oily chains and cassettes. So the Grace Easy appeals to me very much. The integrated 3-speed hub is a big plus. But I live in a hilly area (Santa Cruz mountains). Do you think the low gear + the electric boost are low enough to climb steeper streets? I’m thinking that maybe the bike could be modified by adding a Schlumpf speed drive and make it a 6-speed? Is there any difference between the gearing for a normal 20mph version and a “speed” version with 28mph. With the hills, I am inclined to err on the lower gearing.

  Reply
Court
4 years ago

Great questions Karl, I think it would be worth trying stock before changing gears out. In pedal assist mode even gearless hub motors like this can be capable climbers. For the best performance while still having a belt drive I’d suggest the Grace MX II with a Bosch Centerdrive motor. I’ve tested other bikes with this drive system and was amazed with the climbing performance… It’s louder than the BionX system on the Grace Easy and doesn’t have throttle or regen mode but it’s very capable and offers excellent range.

  Reply
Karl
4 years ago

Sorry, I meant the Schlumpf mountain drive (2.5x under drive), and not the speed drive (1.65x over drive).

  Reply
Karl
4 years ago

Read a review from Australia. Turns out I can’t add a Schlumpf because the Grace Easy uses a special torque sensor in the bottom bracket. Too bad. 250% mountain drive x 186% SRAM iGH3 = 465% total. Would have been excellent. Thanks for advice; I’ll also look at the MX II Urban.

  Reply
Karsten
3 years ago

Thank you for the great review. I purchased this bike as a direct result of it and has not been disappointed. It really is a fantastic bike! The only thing I need at this point is a good bike lock that matches the style of the Easy;)

  Reply
Kim
3 years ago

Hi, I have been reading the good review, and the questions from the readers, and thought I would share a little of my experiences with 1,5 year with the bike. I bought my grace easy 3 -speed/25 mph…early last year 2015, and I haven`t regret it one second. It`s reliable, fun to drive and easy to clean with the belt and closed system. Nice gearshift., works perfect. It is very quiet and it runs very smooth, also without help from the battery. You can feel that it is heavier than a normal bike, but due to the good tires and the stiff frame, the good balance, it runs very well. I also think the belt-drive has lower friction than a chain

I have run 3300 km/2000 miles, since I bought it, mostly on flat terrain, but when used on small hills (lives in Denmark), I find it very easy to climb, the 1`st gear I think is very easy/low and it`s a joy to ride. The light on the bike also works great and are very useful in total darkness.

The only service I have had was yesterday where a dealer in Copenhagen has serviced the bike, to make sure everything is allright.It was.. I thought is was about time to ajust the gear cable which has functioned without problems but the cable was a little loose, which is normal when being used. It is something that you could have done yourself very easy, but I wanted to use the warranty on the bike.

By the way it is very easy to patch the rear bike- tire, because of plenty space between the rear-frame and the wheel… I charge my battery every day to be ready and full loadet for next days ride. It takes approximately 2-3 hours to charge from zero. It last about 60 km/40 miles full charged/ give or take ,depending on wind and how much you get help from the bionx motor, which works perfect.

Last but not to forget, the bicycle- computer works well, and you have all the necessary informations avaible. There are of course light in the display when dark.

I love to drive my bike and enjoying riding it every day to work/about 20 miles all, in all kind of weather. Not to worry about getting sweaty, or to clean the bike after rain. Make no mistake, you can work hard on the bike and get sweathy if you want to, but nice to know you can relax when you want to. You can also motor-brake by setting the possitions on the computer. In that possition it also charge the battery (also when you use the front brake). The motor-brake is very useful when you ride it in mountains to spare your brakes downhill, and get the battery charged at the same time. Have a nice day.

  Reply
Court
3 years ago

Wonderful feedback, thank you so much for taking the time to share Kim :)

  Reply
Adam Patel
3 years ago

I have a Grace Easy Bike, unfortunately I dont have a charger for the battery? any ideas of how I can charge it up or where I can buy a Charger from??

  Reply
Court
3 years ago

Hi Adam! That’s a bummer, have you tried contacting Grace directly? Here’s their official website. I believe this bike uses the BionX drive system and I can’t say for sure but it might be possible to use another charger directly from BionX to top off your bike. You can reach BionX through their website here, just mention the exact year and model you have and describe the drive system with the details from this review (battery voltage and amp hours).

  Reply

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