Juiced Bikes CrossCurrent Air Review

Juiced Bikes Crosscurrent Air Electric Bike Review
Juiced Bikes Crosscurrent Air
Juiced Bikes Crosscurrent Air 350 Watt 8fun Motor Speed Pedelec
Juiced Bikes Crosscurrent Air 48 Volt Samsung Battery Pack
Juiced Bikes Crosscurrent Air Led Button Console Trigger Shifters
Juiced Bikes Crosscurrent Air Integrated 5 Volt Usb Port On Battery
Juiced Bikes Crosscurrent Air 9 Speed Shimano Altus
Juiced Bikes Crosscurrent Air Plastic Chainring Guard
Juiced Bikes Crosscurrent Air Rigid Alloy Fork 180 Mm Mechanical Disc Brake
Juiced Bikes Crosscurrent Air Selle Royale Saddle Kickstand Wellgo Pedals
Juiced Bikes Crosscurrent Air 1 7 Lb 2 Amp Ebike Battery Charger
Juiced Bikes Crosscurrent Air Electric Bike Review
Juiced Bikes Crosscurrent Air
Juiced Bikes Crosscurrent Air 350 Watt 8fun Motor Speed Pedelec
Juiced Bikes Crosscurrent Air 48 Volt Samsung Battery Pack
Juiced Bikes Crosscurrent Air Led Button Console Trigger Shifters
Juiced Bikes Crosscurrent Air Integrated 5 Volt Usb Port On Battery
Juiced Bikes Crosscurrent Air 9 Speed Shimano Altus
Juiced Bikes Crosscurrent Air Plastic Chainring Guard
Juiced Bikes Crosscurrent Air Rigid Alloy Fork 180 Mm Mechanical Disc Brake
Juiced Bikes Crosscurrent Air Selle Royale Saddle Kickstand Wellgo Pedals
Juiced Bikes Crosscurrent Air 1 7 Lb 2 Amp Ebike Battery Charger

Summary

  • An affordable speed pedelec with high-definition cadence sensor, mechanical disc brakes and a nine-speed Shimano Altus drivetrain, it's well balanced and relatively light weight
  • Removable battery and quick release front wheel make it easier to lock securely and fill-up at your place of work or possibly in class if you're a student, integrated USB charging port for portable electronics
  • Fairly stealth with a compact planetary geared hub motor and tiny LED display console, might not attract as much attention... optional LCD display, torque sensor and battery upgrades
  • All-Aluminum frame without suspension can mean back and neck stiffness at higher speeds, mid-step model does not have bottle cage bosses, cables are exposed vs. internally routed

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Juiced Bikes

Model:

CrossCurrent Air

Price:

$1,195

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Urban, Commuting, Road

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedalec (Class 3), Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive, 2 Year Mechanical, Lifetime Frame

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

48 lbs (21.77 kg)

Battery Weight:

5.5 lbs (2.49 kg)

Motor Weight:

8.4 lbs (3.81 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

16.5 in (41.91 cm)17.5 in (44.45 cm)19 in (48.26 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

step-thru: 16.5" Seat Tube, 23" Reach, 27" Stand Over Height, 71" Length, High-Step Medium: 17.5" Seat Tube, 23" Reach, 30" Stand Over Height, 71" Length, High Step Large: 19" Seat Tube, 23" Reach, 31" Stand Over Height, 71" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step, Mid-Step

Frame Colors:

Flat Black

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid 6061 Aluminum Alloy, Custom Geometry (Interchangeable with Suspension Fork), 9 mm Quick Release Skewer

Frame Rear Details:

135 mm Length, 10 mm Threaded Axle with Nuts

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Rear Fender Boss, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

9 Speed 1x9 Shimano Altus Derailleur, 11-34T Cassette

Shifter Details:

Shimano Triggers on Right

Cranks:

170 mm Length, 52 Tooth Chainring with ABS Plastic Guard

Pedals:

Wellgo Aluminum Alloy Platform

Headset:

Neco, Threadless Integrated 1 1/8"

Stem:

Frank Alloy 80 mm, 6° Rise

Handlebar:

Frank Alloy Low-Rise, 27" Length

Brake Details:

Shimano BRM375 Mechanical Disc with 180 mm Rotor Front, 160 mm Rotor Back, Wuxing Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Grips:

Generic Flat Rubber

Saddle:

Selle Royal Free Way

Seat Post:

Frank Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

300 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Double Wall, Alloy with Reinforcement Eyelets, 36 Hole, Flat Black

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 12 Gauge Rear Spokes, 13 Gauge Front Spokes, Silver

Tire Brand:

Kenda, 700 x 45c (28" x 1.75")

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

50 to 95 PSI

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Optional Trigger Throttle ($99), Optional 20 mph Speed Limiter for Class 2 (Canada, Australia), Optional 8 Amp Quick Charger from Grin Technologies ($299), Optional Torque Sensor Upgrade ($199)

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, 1.7 lb 2 Amp Charger, 13 Amp Controller Output

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

8Fun

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

350 watts

Motor Peak Output:

624 watts

Battery Brand:

Samsung or LG, 3C Discharge Rating

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

8.8 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

422.4 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4 hours

Estimated Min Range:

20 miles (32 km)

Estimated Max Range:

40 miles (64 km)

Display Type:

King Meter, Fixed LED Console

Readouts:

Battery Level (5 Dots), Assist Level (Eco, 1-4, Sport)

Display Accessories:

Sport Button (Jumps to Highest Power), 5 Volt Standard USB Port on Battery

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist (High Definition Hall Cadence Sensor)

Top Speed:

28 mph (45 kph) (Optional 20 mph Limit with LCD)

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Written Review

Juiced Bikes started out in 2013 with electric cargo bikes designed to haul loads and go far… they offer some of the highest capacity battery packs in the space and tend to be popular with delivery cyclists. In 2016 they launched the CrossCurrent, a sporty city bike with more traditional battery integration, a suspension fork and hydraulic disc brakes at an impressive $1,500 price point and now, they’ve got the CrossCurrent Air. This is an even more affordable, stripped-down version of the CrossCurrent that still comes in three frame sizes and a mid-step for people with shorter inseams. You get mechanical disc brakes, no suspension fork and a slightly less sexy frame (boxier tubing vs. smooth rounded) for just over $1k. Yes, it’s still a 28 mph capable Class 3 speed pedelec and you can purchase a throttle accessory if you prefer that kind of riding (the throttle will cut out at 20 mph). This bike rides comfortably with nine gears and a low but not lowest-level Shimano Altus derailleur. Just like the regular CrossCurrent, you can pay more for larger battery capacity if you plan to ride further and you get a solid one year warranty (two year components and lifetime on the frame) and it can be purchased through dealers! Many of the other “affordable” electric bikes I see and review only ship direct. That means you spend more time unpacking, dealing with trash, tuning the bike up and possibly pulling the trigger on purchase without test riding and knowing exactly what frame size is best. Big props to Juiced Bikes for working with dealers and hitting a price point that can still support them.

Driving the CrossCurrent Air is the exact same 8Fun internally geared hub motor used on the standard CrossCurrent. It offers 350 to 600+ watts output and is zippier than most motors this size based on a higher 3C rating for battery current output. While the motor does produce a bit of whirring noise, it’s not too bad with the lower levels of assist and it really does get you up to 28 mph. Perhaps my only complaints here are the same complaints that most hub motors get which is the lack of quick release and a wire coming out the right side of the axle where the shifter cables and derailleur are. It’s not as tucked in as the latest fanciest ebikes and could get bent or snagged more easily. Just be careful with that wire and enjoy the fact that this hub motor is compact, built from a mainstream supplier (Bafang/8Fun) and much lighter than a 500 or 750 watt option. Note also that the spokes are slightly thicker and the rims (painted black to match the frame and hub motor) use reinforcement eyelets so they won’t crack as easily under pressure. Sometimes these speed pedelec models can be uncomfortable to pedal at higher speeds if they aren’t geared correctly but those nine options felt good to me and I liked how clean the cockpit was with trigger shifters only on the right. Note that the chainring has a plastic guard to keep your pants or dress from getting dirty or snagged but it’s just plastic and only on the outside so you could still drop the chain towards the inside if the terrain gets really bumpy.

Powering the Juiced Bikes CrossCurrent Air is an efficient, high output 48 volt 8.8 amp hour battery by default but you can get more amp hours with two battery upgrade options and that will take you further. Range depends on a lot of things including how actively you pedal, whether you ride above 20 mph frequently as wind resistance takes a lot of energy to power through and if you’ve got the throttle accessory. For me personally, I’d probably stick with the smaller two options since the goal here is to keep the price low and I like lighter weight ebikes for carrying up stairs and bringing into my room for storage vs. leaving outside overnight. With the mid-step frame option, the largest battery simply will not fit so that’s a consideration also. I do like that Juiced made an option for petite riders but was a little bummed that it didn’t have bottle cages like the diamond frame seen in the video review above. This frame would be the easiest to lift, put on car or bus racks and have the bottle cage but all frames have threaded bosses at the rear for adding a traditional rack and that can be a real back-saver if you’re a student with books, laptops and other gear trying to get across campus on a budget. Note that the Air does not have that suspension fork so your body and gear might get a little jarred around at those higher speeds.

Operating this electric bike is about as easy as it gets. Once the battery is charged and locked ot the frame (you can charge it on or off the bike) just press the power button on the little LED console and watch it light up and dance through the different power levels and charge readouts before staying solid to let you know the bike status. You can press plus and minus to navigate through eco, 1, 2, 3 and sport with the higher levels going faster and feeling zippier. Once you decide on a comfortable level, say level 2 or 3, you can instantly jump up to sport for the most power (perhaps to pass someone or ascend a hill) with just one button press on the console. The red sport button jumps you right up and then back down when pressed a second time and makes riding a little safer than if you had to press several plus or minus steps and look down. The display is compact, mostly black to blend in with the bar and grips and close enough to reach without taking your hand all the way off. It does of course lack speed and odometer readouts but Juiced Bikes offers an upgrade for that as well. You can pay extra to get an LCD console that’s more thorough. Another option is a cadence + torque sensor that will respond to how hard you push in addition to pedal rotation. I wasn’t disappointed with the standard torque-only sensor that the Air came with because it responded quickly and was tucked into the rear dropout vs. using a plastic disc with magnets at the bottom bracket. Again, if you’re going to get this bike… the more basic version, and save $400 off the standard CrossCurrent then why spend hundreds more to upgrade one area or another when you could get those hydraulic disc brakes, suspension fork etc. all at once? I guess the big reason is that the standard CrossCurrent also does not come with an LCD display, both bikes require an upgrade to get that.

All things considered, Juiced Bikes has done an impressive job balancing value with quality for the CrossCurrent Air. Little upgrades like Wellgo platform pedals, sealed threaded electrical connectors and textured brake levers usually aren’t found on the other $1k range e-bikes. You might not be able to see how fast you’re going or get a perfectly accurate charge level readout with the basic display and the motor might not be as robust as some of the larger hubs or mid-drive options on the market now but they still work well. The drive system spreads weight out across the bike and the hub motor does not impede gear shifting or pedaling the way some mid-drives do… requiring more finesse to use without damaging the chain, sprockets and derailleur. Tora, the founder of Juiced Bikes, speaks multiple languages and lives part time overseas to ensure that his products are made to the correct specifications and this is a company that has been in operation for several years now. He and his team have taken their time to add products to the fold and the Air really speaks to me as a useable electric bike that wouldn’t break just from getting banged up a little at the rack and wouldn’t be as devastating if stolen as some of the $2k+ models out there. I see it as a great option for students and other commuters with a limited budget. Big thanks to Juiced Bikes for partnering with me on this review and driving to meet me with a whole van full of models to compare back to back and show on camera :)

Pros:

  • One of the most affordable electric bikes I’ve reviewed that can be purchased through dealers, Juiced Bikes also sells direct but it’s great if you can test the sizes and have the bike setup in person… that’s a great value at this $1,095 price point
  • Solid warranty for the price, you get one year on the battery and basically two years on everything else including components (lifetime on the frame)
  • Even though the motor is rated at 350 watts, it peaks out above 600 watts and the controller has been tuned to feel zippy and go faster… it actually works pretty well but doesn’t weigh as much or look as obvious as some huge motors
  • I love the matte black color scheme, this electric bike blends in because the battery, wires and hub motor are all black and the display panel is super small and compact, it might not attract as much unwanted attention at bike racks
  • The display has a cool “sport” feature that lets you jump from any of the three assist levels up to the highest speed and then back down with just one press vs. a bunch of clicks up then back down
  • The battery capacity isn’t huge at 48 volts 8.8 amp hours and will deplete more quickly when you ride above 20 mph due to air resistance but they do offer upgrade options and frankly… I like that they used higher quality Samsung cells with a 3C discharge rating (faster for charging and discharging to give you torque and power) and included a 5 Volt USB charging port on the side of the pack, consider a right angle adapter like this to charge your phone, lights or other electronic devices
  • Great pedals, they match the bike, offer good traction and are large and stiff enough to accommodate taller and heavier riders who might have big feet and need the support
  • Even though this electric bike uses a more basic rear-mounted hub motor drive system, they balanced out the weight by bringing the battery forward and keeping it low, impressively, they were able to squeeze in a mounting point for a water bottle cage along the seat tube (at least on the high-step models), so many ebikes don’t include this but it’s very useful even for things like folding locks and mini pumps
  • There are three frame sizes to choose from including a mid-step which will be easier to mount and stand over for people with a shorter inseam… that’s incredible for such an affordable product in my opinion
  • Despite the lower price, you get a solid nine-speed drivetrain with Shimano Altus groupset (one step up from the lowest Tourney groupset) so you can climb or ride at higher speeds with a comfortable cadence
  • The wheelset is bolstered with reinforcement eyelets to help spread weight out and handle the higher speeds and different rider weights, the spokes are upgraded to 13 gauge which is thicker and sturdier
  • The bike comes with threaded holes along the seat stays (the bars that come off the seat tube and go down to the rear wheel dropout) and these can be used to add a rack! Juiced Bikes even sells a rack that will fit the bike so you could carry your gear more comfortably than using a backpack
  • While the bike comes stock with a cadence-only sensor that isn’t quite as fluid and responsive as the torque + cadence sensor on the higher level CrossCurrent, Jucied Bikes does let you upgrade this part for $199 more if you wish, they also let you buy a throttle so you don’t have to pedal if you prefer not to
  • The cadence sensor in use here measures hub rotation as you pedal with a hall sensor and seemed more responsive and better protected than some of the plastic magnet rings that I often see on the bottom bracket of cheaper electric bicycles
  • Both brake levers have motor inhibitors so they cut power when pulled and that’s a nice safety option, especially if you get the optional throttle accessory
  • Even though cadence sensors aren’t as dynamic and smooth feeling as a torque sensor, they don’t require that you push actively to make the bike go faster, it’s more like a throttle activated with your feet and for people with sensitive knees that could be a good thing

Cons:

  • Since this is a Class 3 speed pedelec that can reach ~28 mph with pedal assist, the ride can get a little bumpy… especially since there is no suspension fork, the medium sized tires and gel saddle help a little, I would definitely consider a 27.2 mm seat post suspension like one of these
  • The kickstand is positioned just under the bottom bracket and if you back the bike up while it’s in the down position the left crank arm will collide with it, would be better if it was mounted slightly towards the rear and out of the way (also so you could pedal the cranks backwards while servicing the drivetrain without need for a full stand)
  • The power cable running to the motor protrudes from the end of the right side of the axle where the derailleur and shifter cables are, this is a little crowded and more vulnerable than if it were tucked into the left side as some newer Dapu motors offer, also there’s no quick release on the rear wheel, just the front
  • I like that they included a plastic chainring guard but would love a full guide (plastic walls on both sides of the chainring to keep from dropping the chain on bumpy terrain)
  • The display panel is not removable so it could take wear from the weather and sunshine a bit more when parked outside (as well as being scratched or banged up) but it’s so small and relatively simple that maybe a few scratches aren’t a big deal compared with a fancy LCD
  • The shifter cables and electronic wires aren’t internally routed and hidden the way they are on some more expensive e-bikes but I was told they are more serviceable this way and since they are black, they blend in with the frame pretty well, the top tube is kept bare at least which makes it easier to lift and put on racks without snags
  • Since you only get an LED console display by default, you won’t see as many readouts or trip stats but they do offer an upgrade to LCD if you want that stuff… nice to have the option
  • I’m not a fan of the little rubber nipple that fits into the charging port on the battery, it’s tricky to get in and since it’s low by your left crank arm it could get dust and water inside if you’re not careful… I do like that you can at least take the battery off the bike for charging or cleaning
  • No slap guard on the chainstay, consider using a piece of clear packing tape there to reduce nicks and dings when riding on bouncy terrain or buy a Neoprene wrap like this

Resources:

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Liz
7 months ago

It makes me feel like I am going down hill both ways! Today when I took it out I thought, wow, this hill will be hard to climb back up again when I come back this way. But when I rode back I felt like I was going downhill for the most part. This was my experience the other day too.

It makes my ride so fun to go fast and not have to work overly hard. If I was in really good shape it would still be a lot of fun and I could go faster I bet. Without the pedal assist, I would have to get off the bike to go up a hill because I am not in super good shape. It gets me out to cycle and get some exercise while at the same time it makes it fun to ride and makes me look cool. So far I am only going about six miles but I want to work up to longer trips.

I had to take it into the bike shop to get it assembled but it was well worth it to get the brakes tuned exactly right. It is a great buy with a lot of bikes being in this price range or maybe a little more than an annual gym membership. But I prefer to be outdoors for exercise. If you are looking for something to make riding fun, fast and make the hills easy then this is a great bike. I haven’t done any super long, steep hills yet – kind of need more confidence for a longer trip over a mountain pass but it brings the idea into the realm of possibility.

Reply
Court Rye
7 months ago

Hi Liz! I enjoyed reading about your experience with the Juiced Bikes CrossCurrent Air. Made me smile… hope it works well for a long time and good luck with that mountain pass goal. Great job getting it setup correctly to start, that will help it last longer and of course, more enjoyable along the way :)

Reply
Rob
6 months ago

I am really looking hard at this one however really wish I could get even a pre-production model of the hyper fat due to most of the roads in South Louisiana have sub-standard shoulders so looking for beefy tires.

Reply
Court Rye
6 months ago

Hi Rob! I agree, the Hyper Fat looks very cool and I’ll be reviewing it at some point… I think that Juiced is double checking the parts, making sure it’s perfect before they really start pushing it :)

Reply
Greg
6 months ago

Hi Court. First up I love your detailed and informative reviews. Keep up the great work! Question, how would you rate the Air .vs the Cross Current? It will be my first e-bike. I was going to get a refurbished Cross Current but they ran out. Also, what size frame do you recommend for me – Medium or Large? I’m 5’8 – 5’9. Thanks

Reply
Court Rye
6 months ago

Hi Greg! I travel all around so the streets range from smooth to very bumpy… so the regular CrossCurrent with suspension would be my first pick. For the price savings, the Air is an excellent deal and I enjoyed testing it. Sounds like we’re the same height so Medium would be a good fit. The frame difference isn’t huge, you could fit a large if you prefer a more leaned-forward body position. I hope this helps :)

Reply
Greg
6 months ago

Thanks Court. I really appreciate your input. I decided to go with the Cross Current Air. The order is in for the next shipment which should arrive later this month. I’m really looking forward to my first e-bike. I will post my impressions when it arrives.

Reply
Court Rye
6 months ago

Awesome! Thanks for the update Greg, hope it works out well for you and I’ll be excited to hear back :D

Reply
Jerry chen
5 months ago

I am wondering how they ship the bikes out and how long that process takes?

Reply
Court Rye
5 months ago

Hi Jerry, I’ll reach out to the team and see if they can comment (or maybe a customer will chime in). I have no idea how long it takes to be honest with you, and timing may vary depending on which model is chosen and if a shipment is available or coming in.

Reply
BK
5 months ago

I can’t speak for other builds, but I ordered this CC Air on May 30th. I read somewhere they were shipping them sometime in June. I received an order confirmation the day I ordered, but no email, status update, or communication has been received since. I’m sure they’re busy and some things take time, but a simple email would set my mind at ease. I’ll be sure to update when the bike arrives.

Reply
Court Rye
5 months ago

Thanks BK, I hope they send you an update soon and appreciate your feedback here. Eventually, once you receive the bike, definitely chime in about how you like it and if there are any other details that might help others who are researching the product :)

Cesar Gordillo
4 months ago

I’m having the same issue. I ordered my CC Air on July 11th and they will send me the bike by late August. Electronic Bike City is not sending me any status on my order. I wish I would know this before I placed my order. Big letter said delivery in 7 days. This order is taking more time than a car manufacturing.

Court Rye
5 months ago

Hi Jerry, I reached out to Juiced with your question and they said: “In a box, UPS and about 4 days to Connecticut” so hopefully that holds true and I welcome your ongoing feedback about the product :)

Reply
Cesar Gordillo
3 months ago

45 days after my order I got this : *We are still waiting for the tracking number on your bike. There have been delays because they have to add racks to some bikes or add fenders and it really slows down the shipment or Fedex just decides to not show up some days. We will send you tracking by email as soon as your order ships out *

Peter Bilton
5 months ago

So the Crosscurrent Air is my second electric bike. The first was an Emazing Artemis, which I absolutely loved, but unfortunately it was stolen. I must say after owning this bike for a week I can understand why they sell out so quick. This bike feels like it was cleverly designed, well constructed, and boy is it fast! It looks stealthy in matte black , and the juiced decal on the down tube looks understated and elegant. My experience out of the box was very good. After putting on the front wheel, handlebar and peddles. I checked the front and rear discs to see if they needed truing up. Both discs were perfectly straight. The brakes will need adjusting, which you can probably do yourself with the allen tool that juiced provides. Watch a Youtube video for instruction on how to adjust the disc brakes. The gears did not require any adjustment. All I need do was lubricate the chain. As I am tall and like a more upright riding position I replaced the stem with a Sunlite adjustable, 125 mm stem. After ordering the bike I was concerned there may not be enough play on the electrical cables to add the stem, but it was no problem. You will also need a bag of 1-1/8 inch spacers. I added 2 x 2.5 mm. I also added an SP12 NCX suspension seat post. You could get by without a fancy suspension seat post, as the 700c x 45c tires do help to absorb road bumps. Inflate the tires to 50 psi, rather than the max 85 psi, for a more comfy ride. The reention battery is a really snug fit and at first i thought Juiced had given me the wrong key as I could not remove the battery. I then realized i didn’t have my battery removing technique down. The best way I found is to ignore the toggle on the battery case. Insert the key with your left hand and grab the top of the battery with your right, giving it a good yank toward you, whilst turning the key to the open position. The battery itself feels solid to hold and there is nothing loose or rattling inside. When you place the battery back on the bike you hear a clunk as it clicks into place and you know for sure its not going anywhere. I have the 11.6 ah battery. My commute is a 12 mile round trip which hardly touches the capacity of this battery. I also like the fact that the throttle overrides peddle asist regardless of which peddle asist level you are in. With my Artemis you had to be in asist level 5 to use the throttle which meant taking your eyes off the road to make the adjustment, not so with the Crosscurrent Air.

Reply
Peter Bilton
5 months ago

Just to add to my comments about raising the hight of the handlebars on the Crosscurrent Air for tall riders, and, or those who like a more upright riding position. Today I changed the Promax handle bar for an Atomlab pimplite 3 inch riser bar. So the original hight of the handle bars was 41.5 inches. With the riser stem and 3 inch riser bar the hight is now 48 inches. But that’s it folks, there is no more length on the electrical cables to go any higher. However that is the perfect hight for me at 6 feet 1 inch, 33 inch inseam.

Reply
Court Rye
5 months ago

Very cool, thanks for sharing this Peter! I linked to the bar you mentioned, which color did you get? I really appreciate the tip about how the wires won’t go any further. That’s the kind of detail that is very easy to overlook when you’re excited and shopping online for solutions ;)

Reply
Peter Bilton
5 months ago

You’re welcome Court. I figured I owe it to you for pointing me in the right direction, and to Juiced Bikes for a great product. I got the handle bar in black. The Atomlab Pimplite is about 2 inches longer and is slightly more swept back than the stock handle on the bike. I was fortunate in that the brake levers were too close to the end of the handle bar. That gave me about 4 extra inches of play after moving the brake levers back on the new handle bar. Aside from the handle bar and stem I have also added the Planet Bike Versa rack from Juiced Bikes and the SP 12 NCX suspension post. I plan to add schwalbe Marathon plus tires and Spank Spoon 110 peddles.

dan
4 months ago

Was the model you were riding the 17.5″ or 19″ frame? I was looking to purchase the step through model but it’s not in stock. Wondering if you were able to stand over the frame comfortably or not. Thanks for the awesome content!

Reply
Court Rye
4 months ago

Hi Dan, I don’t remember exactly which model is shown on film but I believe it was the Large because that is what my pictures show. In any case I did measure each of the two high-step models as follows: High-Step Medium: 30″ Stand Over Height, High Step Large: 31″ Stand Over Height.

I’m 5’9″ with a ~31.5 inseam and believe that either of the two models would have worked but it was probably the Large. There’s only an inch of difference between the two after alland I measure stand over height from just in front of the saddle nose for what a real-life bar height would be vs. down by the seat tube where it’s often lower. I hope this helps you and am sorry that I cannot guarantee for certain which I had.

Reply
Clement tsang
4 months ago

Heya,

Update: The Juiced Crosscurrent Air is now $1,195, but comes with a 500w motor.

Also, could you do a review on the Crosscurrent S?

Best, Clem

Reply
Court Rye
4 months ago

Hi Clem! I’d love to review the CrossCurrent S, will definitely be keeping an eye out for it and I appreciate your feedback on the price changes :)

Reply
mike rohfeld
2 months ago

Hello Court,

I’ve decided to purchase my first E bike and really want to thank you for all of your reviews. They have been extremely informative and very helpful in learning about ebikes. The last time I owned a bike was several years ago and I don’t recall ebikes existing back then.

I’ve since learned a lot about different features and so far, I am leaning toward the Cross Current Air, mostly because of the features and its price point which is really at the max of my intended purchase price.

I live in Orange County and will plan to visit Sam at some point in the near future. I called him last week to see if he had one of the CC Airs in stock (new or used) but he didn’t and the Juiced website looks like they are backordered, presumably because of their popularity?

My question however has to do with something I’ve not seen so far. With ebikes becoming more and more popular, there seems to be a growing market for used ebikes. I’m looking for information or a guide on purchasing a used ebike. I called one shop and they only had a 30 day warranty which isn’t enough for me, given the cost.

Have you written or are there any guides or places you can recommend discussing what considerations to consider in purchasing a used ebike?

Also, in looking for an ebike (either new or used) at around the $1000 range, are there any brands you can recommend? In going through your reviews, most of the bikes in that price range are made by either start up companies or offered over the web which is something I don’t want to do..

Any advice you can give regarding purchasing used bike or a new bike at that price will be most appreciated and I’m sure appreciated by others. BTW – I’m looking to purchase the bike for recreation only, mostly trails and bike paths, no off road use and not for commuting.

Thank you again Court, I really appreciate your help and all the advice you’ve given…
Mike

Reply
Court Rye
2 months ago

Hi Mike! If I were in your position, I would try to add a bit more money to your budget and then go to Sam’s shop to see if there are any last-year models that could be on sale. I have seen some great deals on Haibikes in particular and feel that their drive systems are very reliable. The CrossCurrent Air is indeed back ordered (the last time I checked with Tora) and that’s a reflection of the value and quality + support that they offer. I am always careful when buying a used electric bike because it can be difficult to tell how many charge cycles the battery has been through and a replacement can be $600+ often $800 for a Bosch battery. I realize these things can be expensive… I wish there was more I could offer you, but there is a used section of the EBR forums and I think Craigslist can also be worth exploring, especially in your area, California has a lot of electric bikes because of population density, weather, and wealth in some areas :)

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Mike Nemeth
5 hours ago

I have also found Juiced Bikes use a similar down tube case like ours. Their Oceancurrent and Crosscurrent models have either a 48V 8.8Ah and a 48V 12.8Ah. The 48V 12.8Ah retails for 699.00! Good batteries are expensive!

They have a nice battery chart on this page: http://www.juicedbikes.com/collections/oceancurrent-e-bike/products/battery-pack-for-crosscurrent-oceancurrent

They also make two extended range batteries that are 72 cells instead of 52. Larger batteries that fit the same down tube. 48V 17.4Ah $999.00 and 48V 21AH $1399.00 The last battery would almost double the range of our original battery at a cost of almost a 2nd bike!

Also I have been reading up on 52 volt batteries. They seem to work with 48 volt controllers but provide a higher top end speed. Interesting stuff.

I'm hoping that Li-Ion batteries become more universal that the price will come down. Kinda like flat screen TV's. Time will tell.

DMP
2 days ago

Ref CrossCurrent AIR, a few months old

Love this bike (other than the rear brakes), when it works, but unfortunately reliability is an issue and I need something reliable for commuting.

One persistent problem is flaking out in the rain, and I live in the north west, where it rains.

Tech support suggested water might be getting into the connectors, so I wanted to ask, has anybody experience with spraying the connectors with a water displacer such as WD 40? Used to work a treat on the spark plugs of my old car when they got damp but that was much higher power. Is there any reason not to try WD40? Any other suggestions or experience with this of note?

Thanks. If I can get this one solved I can ask about the other issues....

mal robot
5 days ago

Hi Tora,

Thanks for your reply & I'm glad future customers will have a better spoke setup. I am still very happy with how the CrossCurrent S performs and have 800 miles on the bike now. With respect to my situation, I now have 2 outstanding tickets against Juiced support (for this spokes issue and an issue related to a charger I ordered): #SU00006411 and #SALES-00006163. When I brought my bike in to Electric Bike Attack this morning, they said they've also had issues getting in touch with Juiced for another customer's bike who had spoke issues. Hope you can resolve these customer support issues soon.

Thanks!

Dewey
1 week ago

I have been looking at Juiced CrossCurrent S

For 100 mile range with the Cross Current S you would be looking at the 21ah battery plus the $400 fast charger and $100 Schwalbe tire upgrade so it will cost nearer $3,000, you'll want the 8a fast charger otherwise charging the large battery will take all day on the standard 2a charger. With that large battery the Cross Current S will be heavy around 60lb

A recent discussion thread about the lighter $4,000 Giant Road E (44lb) talked about the effort required to achieve 100 mile range on that bike's smaller battery. It would be much more comfortable to pedal long distance on the Giant if you ran out of power.

Petermo
1 week ago

Looking for an e-bike with the following characteristics:

- Relatively quiet.

- For suburban commuting and touring.

- Relatively wide tires for sand/gravel and winter conditions – though not on ice.

- Is reasonably pedalable without any assistance – I want to use my bike for getting around, running errands, AND exercise. I’d like to be able to ride 100 miles through rolling terrain with a mix of both e-assist and traditional pedaling.

- I’d like to keep the cost below $2K.

So far, I have been looking at Juiced CrossCurrent S (online, as I have not seen it in a local Colorado store). Any thoughts/recommendations?

Thanks.

Reid
2 weeks ago

I am looking forward to mid December--by which time a preorder CCS in red and black should be here--my first ebike in many years.

I have several near neighbors in this affluent neighborhood who will see the bike and I just bet they will become converts when they test ride the CrossCurrent S.

Part of the pleasure of an ebike is sharing the fun.

Reid
2 weeks ago

Juiced Bikes mail@juicedbikes.com via mail185.atl61.mcsv.net
1:30 PM (42 minutes ago)

to me

Dear Valued Juiced Bikes Friends,

We hope this finds you well.

We know everyone is eagerly waiting for their shiny new bike so we wanted to share the most current information regarding the "S".

All pre-ordered bikes are boxed and shipping to our warehouse here in the US now.

We decided to UPGRADE these bikes to the new Sapim spokes which took an additional few days. We felt it was the right choice to give our patient customer the best we had to offer - see below for more detail on the spoke upgrade.

Containers are likely to hit our dock right around the Thanksgiving holiday which may add a few days to the process.

We're targeting shipments to customers starting late November on a first in first out manner.

Thank you for your patience! We know it will be worth the wait.

Best Regards,
Your Juiced Bikes Team

----------------------------

Spoke Upgrade

As you know, our goal is to create great products at great prices and we source our components in such a way that you'll get the ride you want at a price that makes sense for your pocket book.

We don't take any of the components for granted, not even spokes.

Having high performance bikes is great but some riders carry heavier payloads than others and ride on extremely bumpy terrain. This puts a heavy load on the spokes.

High inflation pressure, heavy payloads, rough terrain, high performance hub motor, non-optimal lacing pattern, 12G spoke head not sitting totally flat on the hub flange all combine to create potential spoke failure.

We consulted with wheel experts and upgraded to 13G very high quality spokes from a Belgian company called Sapim. They are known for their race spokes and high quality materials etc.

Our rims will now handle both 12G and 13G spokes so if you ever do break one, you can get them anywhere, the spoke is not a special size. AND we include 2 extra spokes with each bike - so if you break one, you won't need to wait to get it fixed.

We'll be making detailed videos to show how easy it is to tighten up and replace a spoke if necessary, no need to even take the wheel off.

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Chula Vista, California 91911
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FredE
2 weeks ago

If you contact Juiced directly they have the 1095 Crosscurrent Air in stick with the smaller batt. Keep in mind this is a before tax price AND be sure you are comfortable with the reliability concerns that have been raised. M2S 350 Scout seems solid at 1200. And a 2 year warranty

BallzOne
2 weeks ago

Hey mal,
I posted a while ago in another thread but if you want a spare charger quick I have the stock CCS charger that I've never used because I have the Grin charger. I offered to anyone on here that I'll sell mine for $50 shipped 2-day FedEx.

It's this one:

https://shop.juicedbikes.com/collections/accessories/products/juiced-bikes-crosscurrent-charger-2a

Mark Adams
3 weeks ago

How do you like the Suntour seat post? I'm looking into getting one for my Crosscurrent S. Thanks for you reply in advance.
I really like it . And for less than 100 it seems to get just as good reviews as the more expensive ones. Also just found a YouTube video that shows how to service it .

geddyleesnose
3 weeks ago

How do you like the Suntour seat post? I'm looking into getting one for my Crosscurrent S. Thanks for you reply in advance.

PCDoctorUSA
3 weeks ago

Hi, I just wanted to write a little non professional review of the E-Glide ST. This is my first E-bike and my decision was based on price, components compared to comparable priced E-bikes, and the two reviews done by EBR. One on the ST and also one on Dave and the E-Glide outfit in Santa Monica.

I received the bike overnight Fedex and it was pretty simple putting it together as long as you have some allen wrenches and a crescent wrench. I paid an additional 75.00 for the Schwable Marathon Mondial tires and I also received the Maxi Ardent off road tires that where originally on the bike. I wanted a more street orientated tire and I love the highly reflective sidewalls on the Mondials.

Since I received the ST on May 9th I've gone on 4 rides, all of them rides I could not have done on my Giant 15 speed bike due to distance, elevation, and today, heat. I'm 57 years old and I just don't have the endurance I once had. The bike is 52 lbs which is not that heavy for an E-bike and with the electric pedaling assist the additional weight just disappears. I also have a bag I hang on the rack that I keep a igloo cooler full of ice and drinks and don't even think of having to carry the extra weight.

The bike is a joy to ride. I can drive farther now then I could if I was 15 years younger on a standard bike. The cadence assisted power is great but since I never drove a torque assist bike or a mid-drive motor I don't have anything to compare it to. The rear hub drive with the cadence sensor works very well.

Now my three little nitpicks.

(1) The controller speedometer is exaggerated and so then is the odometer. I added my Garmin E-Trex to determine the actual speed. This is something I have run across on both my Suzuki motorcycle and Honda scooter. I don’t know why manufacturers of vehicles do that accept maybe due to liability issues. Today I changed the wheel size on the controller to 26 inch and that brought it closer to the actual speed. Next time I ride I’ll try to reset it to 24 inches and see what happens.

(2) The steering stem is not adjustable. The bike is comfortable right out of the box but being a little older I would like a little more relax position with the handlebars. The ST is designed to handle dirt roads so the riding position is a little more aggressive then a comfort bike. I would like the ability to move the bars a little up and back for my taste. The problem with the control cables are you do not have a lot of extra length to work with. Same as regular bicycles and motorcycles. I think if I could move the bars and inch up and inch back it would work for me. Something you might want to consider on your purchase is what type of riding you will be doing. I also want to point out I purchased the 21 inch frame since I’m 6’ 1” and have a 32 inch inseam.

(3) The gear ratio seems like it should be higher to me. The power assist has 5 levels and I have kept it in normal which there are also eco and power modes. Most of my riding I seem to be in 9th and 10th gear. With the power assist even set on level 1 I don’t seem to use the lower gears. I have to say in level 3 in 10th gear I’m pedaling at 18 mph. Sometime I get to the point where I’m cruising and I wish I had another gear or an overdrive. I have to pedal very fast when I’m going like 24 mph. Yes, depending on the road elevation decline you can go a good clip! Once again it may be a safety thing so you are limited on how fast you can get the bike up to. The lower gears would come in handy if you all of a sudden did not have the electric assist to get you home. I seem to feel I would like to pedal a little more leisurely at 18-20 mph.

So my early impression is I got a great bike for the price and it has opened up a whole new world of riding abilities. I'm just starting out on E-bikes but now I got my foot in the door and can start my learning curve. I was also looking at the Rad City by Rad Power as my 2nd choice and if you check out this EBR site there are a lot of great bikes out there to fit your budget. I did not have to pay any sales tax on the bike being out of state so the bike was 1700.00, tire upgrade 75.00 and overnight shipping 175.00 for a total purchase of 1950.00. I have two E-bike stores in my city and a comparable bike out the door would have been 3000.00.
Thanks for the great review. I'm looking for my first ebike, but am limited with my budget ceiling of $2k and a delivery disadvantage of being in Honolulu. Had planned on going with Juiced Bikes CrossCurrent S, but the local ebike shop that was carrying Juiced Bikes has since stopped due to issues with getting replacement parts and poor communication with JB. I've also been following the JB forums, and JB seems to be experiencing some quality control issues that can accompany popular products in high demand. I figured it may be best to look elsewhere while they work out their issues. I also looked at Biktrix and Rad Bikes, but they want $400 to ship their bikes. That left 2 models from Voltbike on my list: Elegant and Yukon 750.

Both models fit comfortably within my budget, but I'm not a fan of Elegant's step-thru design. The Yukon 750 looks awesome, but some have commented it's not the best option for a commuter while others love it. If I go with the Yukon, I know that the first thing I need to change are those aggressive tires. Definitely not a good choice for 100% asphalt riding. I've also had my share of flats along my route, and changing out the tube on a fat tire bike sounds like a bear. Still, I've had good communication with Voltbike, they're a well-respected outfit, and they'll only charge me $120 to ship either bike to Honolulu.

The E-Glide ST definitely meets all my requirements and with only $175 for shipping I'm just under $2k. I just sent an email to E-Glide to confirm the shipping charge along with a couple of other questions. For 100% asphalt travels, I'm thinking of going with the Schwalbe Big Ben Plus tire upgrade. Your thoughts?

PCDoctorUSA
3 weeks ago

Hello forum members. I apologize in advance if this thread is annoying or repetitive. I recently got a new job 8 miles from home in a very urban city. Flat terrain. I want to continue to bike to work but often work erratic hours and feel that perhaps an electric bike could alleviate some of the stress of the commute and work I do. I weigh 180lbs, am 5ft6in and appreciate visually appealing bikes. Budget is under 2k. Also, i like to haul cargo sometimes. Like a random trip tp grocery store or whatever. Can you recommend anything? Thank you for reading.
Your commute distance is the same as mine, but I've got a few rises in the road to deal with. The fact that your commute is flat terrain gives you a lot more options since you won't need a powerful motor. You can do a search on EBR and filter it by price to start. Once you've got a short list of contenders, check out their full review on EBR as well as user comments here on this forum and from YT posters.

I too am shopping for my first ebike and need to keep it under $2k. Since I need power for hill climbing, I looked at bikes with no less than a 500w "geared" hub. My short list came down to models offered by Juiced Bikes and Voltbike. For JB, it's there new CrossCurrent S. For Voltbike, it's between their Elegant and the really cool Yukon 750 Limited. Voltbike is an online vendor, and living in Hawaii, a trip to their store in Canada is a little out of the neighborhood for me to do a test drive. One of the local bike shops here used to carry Juiced Bikes but after having difficulty getting replacement parts from them he stopped. So, going with either bike will be based on my research and the reviews of others.

Have fun shopping and just ask the Forum if you have any questions.

AndrewJB
4 weeks ago

Hello Keith and Bryan and other frustrated CC owners.

I have had mine for a few months and enjoy my crosscurrent bike a lot... until recently when the assist level led lights on my controller display would blink during a ride then the bike would turn itself off. At first it would happen once a ride, but lately it happens every five minutes or so. I tried disconnecting and reconnecting all the connections, including the one inside the downtube (battery to controller connection.) All connections seem to be good.
I don't know if the problem is just a loose connection or a problem with the controller, the controller display, or the torque sensor, or maybe even the battery (10.4 Ah). Haven't heard from Juiced customer support (despite putting in two tickets) that's why I am trying my luck on this forum. My bike is out of warranty but I just want to ride it again, and am willing to buy whatever part. Problem is, I have been waiting more than a month for Juiced to reply. I hope Tora or Luis from Juiced responds to my problem and yours.

I have a regular CC, with a similar problem: A few months back my CC display would light up all the LED's, then the bike power off. This problem disappeared for some odd reason so I did nothing about it until a couple weeks ago when it came back again - this time no LED's lighting up, just random losses of power.

When I took it back to the place of purchase, the owner did a quick 'on the spot inspection' and found rust forming on one of the front octopus cable connections. His fiddling seemed to trigger the return of the blinking LED lights and a new problem with the wheel motor now spinning of its own accord.

There seems to be a shortage of parts at the moment - my bike has been repaired and returned, but with some components cannibalized from another CC. In all, the throttle, display, octopus cables and controller were changed out - though I'm not really sure that all were necessary.

My CC is now up and running OK and even seems to have a bit more grunt than before - Could be just my imagination, but it feels s better able to maintain speed on some of the hills encountered during my daily commute.

Oh dear. That squeak from the hub motor - sorted a few months back - has reared it ugly head once again!!!

And just to put this out there - When it runs, my CC is like a rocket and I absolutely love it!! Can't complain about the level of after-sales support I've received - The local retailer and importer have both been excellent to deal with. Still, given the number of times I've had to return my CC for repair in the months that I've owned it, I do worry where I will stand a year or so from now when there's no longer a warranty to fall back on!

Tora Harris
1 month ago

What are everyone's thoughts on the
Prowheel 56T Crankset Upgrade $ 59.99 ?
https://shop.juicedbikes.com/collections/hype/products/hyperfat-crosscurrent-s-upgrade-prowheel-56t-crankset

If my preference is riding in the mountains and not going full speed as often, would the crank upgrade still be a good thing? (same performance slower?)

I can see how this would help people commuting to work at full speed, but it's unclear if their would be any negatives for slower/hill riders.

Use the 56T if you plan to do more high speed riding. It is not useful for uphill. For your uphill riding, you can use a smaller chainring, but those are very easy to find. We provide the bigger one as they are difficult to source.

Tronic Jon
1 month ago

What are everyone's thoughts on the
Prowheel 56T Crankset Upgrade $ 59.99 ?
https://shop.juicedbikes.com/collections/hype/products/hyperfat-crosscurrent-s-upgrade-prowheel-56t-crankset

If my preference is riding in the mountains and not going full speed as often, would the crank upgrade still be a good thing? (same performance slower?)

I can see how this would help people commuting to work at full speed, but it's unclear if their would be any negatives for slower/hill riders.

JayVee
1 month ago

The Cross Curent Air has a 16" step thru version according to the spec sheet. And it's $1095, which isn't too far outside your budget (although you might have to factor in shipping). It's built from fairly standard parts (the 8fun hub motor is well-known) and there's an optional thumb throttle up to 20mph. The standard battery is a little smallish but will probably get the range you stated, although you might have to pedal a little bit on longer rides. Having both pedal assist and throttle is a big advantage. You don't want to get rid of pedal assist. Even if you have a disability and can only pedal for a short duration, it can be a life safer. Particularly when you're running low on battery...

http://www.juicedbikes.com/crosscurrent-air/

Rooster
1 month ago

I agree with Pete assessment that the spokes need to properly fitted to the electric motor flanges; I have closely examined the provided pictures below for further in depth review and closer examination:

https://electricbikereview.com/wp-content/assets/2017/08/juiced-bikes-crosscurrent-s-8fun-650-watt-internally-geared-hub-motor.jpg

If one looks closely at the above provided link of the CCS electric hub's spoke are arranged with the spoke head's inserted into electric motor hub's flange; all with the spoke head's facing outwards on both the left and right electric motor hub flanges;

now normally a proper wheel design features an alternating spoke insertion pattern of one spoke inserted with ones spoke head facing outwards and then followed by the next spoke head hole in electric motor flange would be inserted with the spoke head facing inwards;

now this is to naturally and neutrally balance symmetrically the opposing left and right torsional forces that ones wheel typically undergoes;

https://electricbikereview.com/wp-content/assets/2015/08/magnum-mi5-350-watt-8fun-motor-by-bafang-1200x800-c-default.jpg

look in the above picture to see what a typical nominal average conservative wheel electric hub design looks like; notice how the spoke head insertion pattern alternates; by having one spoke head outwards facing and the next spoke head inwards facing;

now this helps to ensure a neutral symmetrically balanced wheel every time the wheel rotates around during its full anticipated lifetime;

now typically one might sees the spoke head all facing outwards on the electric motor hub flange; as a way of saving on labor costs since one can build a wheel this way in a fraction of the time; thus increasing the profit margin of the asian chinese contractor wheel builder company;

but this is actually very bad bicycle wheel building practice as it make it very hard if not actually impossible to actually true ones wheels down the line; when ones wheel actually does go out of true; because of the lack of necessary and desired symmetrical wheel building balance;

now if one has purchased the CCS already; one basically needs to actually re-thread the spokes with the spoke head alternating pattern and then re-tension the wheel in order to maintain the symmetrical wheel building balance to ensure the wheel stay true under load;

now the thing that is truly quite baffling indeed is that the front wheel of the CCS is actually built with the proper spoke head alternating pattern(see below-zoom up and in maximum value);

https://electricbikereview.com/wp-content/assets/2017/08/juiced-bikes-crosscurrent-s-sr-suntour-nex-coil-suspension-fork-with-lockout.jpg

now after the spokes have been replaced and re-inserted into ones electric motor flange on both sides with the alternating spoke head pattern; one hopefully should have no more broken spokes(fingers crossed);

depending on how much this this actually costs to have done in terms of actual cost bike shop labor wise; if one is not doing this work themselves; it may be worthwhile to in fact upgrade ones spokes to a 12 gauge branded name spokes such; as the excellent DT Swiss spokes and matching DT Swiss spoke nipples;

as that will probably provide the extra added wheel building insurance that the spokes will not likely ever break anytime soon; since one is paying for the bike shop labor premium to get ones rear electric hub wheel properly replaced, re-spoked, retensioned and entirely rebuilt from the ground up literally;

now of course the forum members who have been afflicted with this seemingly Juiced Bikes chronic spoke breakage problem can very readily both confirm and verify; if this might actually be the actual cause and actual fix of this seemingly rather mysterious confounding ongoing CCS chronic spoke breakage problem; also Tora Harris was originally saying the Ocean Current electric bikes spokes was not breaking like they are on the CCS electric bikes; but then the Ocean Current bikes only have the 500 watt electric rear hub motor; also we have no way of actually knowing if the Ocean Current spokeheads are alternating on its rear electric motor hub;

now over at Grin Technology; they have also said on the CCS electric hub wheel spoke breakage problem; that if somehow the spoke bend radius is to large or to far from the head, then it can flex up and down at the spoke bend elbow with each wheel rotation, eventually causing it to microfracture metal fatigue crack and then subsequently fail one right after the other ad infinitum without limit;

now this happens quite frequently and is especially common with the typical asian chinese overseas built electric hub motors; especially with Crystalyte electric hub wheels in Grin Technology experience; now the distance between the head and the bend in ones spoke has to match the thickness of the hub flange;

only then will the spoke breakage problems be entirely probably diminished and/or eliminated; Grin Technology also stated that in CCS bikes if one inserted a thin brass washer underneath the spoke head itself and also laced the rear electric hub in an over/under pattern such that the spoke tension compresses the spoke bend elbow part of the spoke tightly against and press fits into the hub flange surface countersunk holes itself under high enough spoke tension pressure; which shortens the bend radius into the hub flange that pulls the spoke in towards the electric motor hub while also reinforcing the spoke head itself, that would also help to reduce and/or totally eliminate the chronic spoke breakage problem that CCS electric bikes have been experiencing.
I Have the ocean current and it to has the spokes installed in the same direction but I have not broken a spoke. This could be because either the spokes are shorter or the the tires have a lot more cushion but you are right about the front rim, as it has alternating spokes.

daniel58
1 month ago

After my conversation with Juiced Bikes I feel a lot more confident in buying the new Cross Current S. This is an email conversation I just had with Tora at Juiced Bikes...

Me:
I have heard that broken spokes are common with your bikes. Have you addressed this with the new batch of Cross Current S and Air bikes?

Tora:

The CrossCurrent line of bikes travel at much higher speeds (nearing 30mph) than a normal bike and also can accept very high tire pressures of like 85psi, making the tire rock hard, but low ruling resistance. The load on the spokes are much higher than normal.

We have some reports of broken spokes, but the spokes will not just snap off for no reason. For reference we have had no broken spokes reported for the OceanCurrent which uses the same motor, spokes and lacing pattern.

It is recommended that the spokes be checked and tightened more frequently than a normal bicycle. If a very hard bump is hit at high speeds, check the spokes.

We use the spokes supplier which is also used by Giant Bikes. On the CCS we have improved the spokes fit to better match the flange of the hub motor.

We sent the actual motor to the supplier and had them custom fit the spokes. Also the spokes/rim setup can be interchanged with 13G or 12G spokes so any bike shop can service the spokes. We also now include 4 extra spokes and nipples with each CrossCurrent S bike.

We are continuously studying how the bike is used and finding ways to improve every aspect of the bike.

Thanks,
-Tora
I think a less than perfect fit is the key to the problem. The flange on the hub motor needs to be the same thickness as the J-bend. If the bend is longer, it creates a weakness. Something that might work that has been recommended is to add a small brass washer to every spoke head. That pulls the spoke in toward the motor, so the J-bend is shorter. It also reinforces the spoke head.

I agree with Pete assessment that the spokes need to properly fitted to the electric motor flanges; I have closely examined the provided pictures below for further in depth review and closer examination:

https://electricbikereview.com/wp-content/assets/2017/08/juiced-bikes-crosscurrent-s-8fun-650-watt-internally-geared-hub-motor.jpg

If one looks closely at the above provided link of the CCS electric hub's spoke are arranged with the spoke head's inserted into electric motor hub's flange; all with the spoke head's facing outwards on both the left and right electric motor hub flanges;

now normally a proper wheel design features an alternating spoke insertion pattern of one spoke inserted with ones spoke head facing outwards and then followed by the next spoke head hole in electric motor flange would be inserted with the spoke head facing inwards;

now this is to naturally and neutrally balance symmetrically the opposing left and right torsional forces that ones wheel typically undergoes;

https://electricbikereview.com/wp-content/assets/2015/08/magnum-mi5-350-watt-8fun-motor-by-bafang-1200x800-c-default.jpg

look in the above picture to see what a typical nominal average conservative wheel electric hub design looks like; notice how the spoke head insertion pattern alternates; by having one spoke head outwards facing and the next spoke head inwards facing;

now this helps to ensure a neutral symmetrically balanced wheel every time the wheel rotates around during its full anticipated lifetime;

now typically one might sees the spoke head all facing outwards on the electric motor hub flange; as a way of saving on labor costs since one can build a wheel this way in a fraction of the time; thus increasing the profit margin of the asian chinese contractor wheel builder company;

but this is actually very bad bicycle wheel building practice as it make it very hard if not actually impossible to actually true ones wheels down the line; when ones wheel actually does go out of true; because of the lack of necessary and desired symmetrical wheel building balance;

now if one has purchased the CCS already; one basically needs to actually re-thread the spokes with the spoke head alternating pattern and then re-tension the wheel in order to maintain the symmetrical wheel building balance to ensure the wheel stay true under load;

now the thing that is truly quite baffling indeed is that the front wheel of the CCS is actually built with the proper spoke head alternating pattern(see below-zoom up and in maximum value);

https://electricbikereview.com/wp-content/assets/2017/08/juiced-bikes-crosscurrent-s-sr-suntour-nex-coil-suspension-fork-with-lockout.jpg

now after the spokes have been replaced and re-inserted into ones electric motor flange on both sides with the alternating spoke head pattern; one hopefully should have no more broken spokes(fingers crossed);

depending on how much this this actually costs to have done in terms of actual cost bike shop labor wise; if one is not doing this work themselves; it may be worthwhile to in fact upgrade ones spokes to a 12 gauge branded name spokes such; as the excellent DT Swiss spokes and matching DT Swiss spoke nipples;

as that will probably provide the extra added wheel building insurance that the spokes will not likely ever break anytime soon; since one is paying for the bike shop labor premium to get ones rear electric hub wheel properly replaced, re-spoked, retensioned and entirely rebuilt from the ground up literally;

now of course the forum members who have been afflicted with this seemingly Juiced Bikes chronic spoke breakage problem can very readily both confirm and verify; if this might actually be the actual cause and actual fix of this seemingly rather mysterious confounding ongoing CCS chronic spoke breakage problem; also Tora Harris was originally saying the Ocean Current electric bikes spokes was not breaking like they are on the CCS electric bikes; but then the Ocean Current bikes only have the 500 watt electric rear hub motor; also we have no way of actually knowing if the Ocean Current spokeheads are alternating on its rear electric motor hub;

now over at Grin Technology; they have also said on the CCS electric hub wheel spoke breakage problem; that if somehow the spoke bend radius is to large or to far from the head, then it can flex up and down at the spoke bend elbow with each wheel rotation, eventually causing it to microfracture metal fatigue crack and then subsequently fail one right after the other ad infinitum without limit;

now this happens quite frequently and is especially common with the typical asian chinese overseas built electric hub motors; especially with Crystalyte electric hub wheels in Grin Technology experience; now the distance between the head and the bend in ones spoke has to match the thickness of the hub flange;

only then will the spoke breakage problems be entirely probably diminished and/or eliminated; Grin Technology also stated that in CCS bikes if one inserted a thin brass washer underneath the spoke head itself and also laced the rear electric hub in an over/under pattern such that the spoke tension compresses the spoke bend elbow part of the spoke tightly against and press fits into the hub flange surface countersunk holes itself under high enough spoke tension pressure; which shortens the bend radius into the hub flange that pulls the spoke in towards the electric motor hub while also reinforcing the spoke head itself, that would also help to reduce and/or totally eliminate the chronic spoke breakage problem that CCS electric bikes have been experiencing.

FA63
1 month ago

Thanks everyone for all the input. I actually went ahead and experimented today with my wife's CrossCurrent Air, the 500W version with the 7.8ah battery. The route I took was slightly longer than what I would usually do (12 miles instead of 11), maybe slightly hillier also. I started with a full charge, riding in Assist Mode 1 except when going uphill I would put it into Sport Mode. By the time I got to my destination, there was about 30 percent left, and the motor was starting to struggle a bit in the last mile or so.

Given the 17.4ah is more than twice the capacity, that probably means it will be plenty for my 22 mile round trip. 12.4 would definitely need to be topped off during the day. So it looks like the 17.4ah battery is a must for me, as most of you were suggesting.

Thanks again!

Larry Ganz
1 month ago

Hi Larry,
I've enjoyed your posts. I also have an XM700+ and have ordered a Powerfly 7 2017 ( hardtail ) . My plan is to use the Powerfly 7 on stone dust rails to trails rides,
any groomed trails and roads, but limited to 'back roads'. I tried my XM700+ on a stone dust trail, but didn't feel stable enough with the stock Schwalbe Energizer Plus
tires thus the Powerfly 7...The XM700+ will be for paved conditions.... How do like your Powerfly 7 off road, assuming you ride on stone dust etc ?
I'll never go true off roading so that is not a concern. I'm guessing the Powerfly performs well on paved roads?

Also I truly enjoy the XM700+ stock swept back handle bars, but Trek no longer carries them or I'd install them on my Powerfly 7. Did you stick with the stock
bars on your Powerfly ? I'm not comfortable with true flat bar/ Mtn bars and will be changing to something with a sweep. I installed a Bodyfloat seat post
on my XM700 because it was waaay too stiff, the Bodyfloat is great and made the bike very ridable for me... Is the Powerfly stiff like the XM700 ?
I've purchased a second Bodyfloat and was planning on installing it on my Powerfly. Lastly, how do you like your Powerfly 7 on the road?

Thanks in advance,
John from CT

I've taken the Powerfly 7 onto several gravel trails and it's pretty stable at 40psi tire pressure, although if you get into some deep soft <1/8" pea-gravel it will slow the bike way down as you sink in and you need to power up the motor to get through it rather than bogging down. It's not often that I run into that, where it feels like those old playgrounds with 12" deep soft loose round gravel. I imagine that if you were doing a lot of fine loose gravel it would be like riding on sand and you'd want a 4" fatbike instead, or lower the tires to 30psi (or go tubeless and go to 25psi).

On hard pack single tracks with gravel on top of the surface it seems to do pretty well, but as you know any 2.3" tire can still skitter around on gravel, so you have to keep your body loose and let the bike move around and find it's way. On those surfaces my wife can't keep up with me on her Neko+ with 1.5" tires and more of a hybrid tread. Her bike is geared all wrong for climbing on slow/loose dirt trails anyway, and is best on hard pack with mild gravel and pavement.

I've not had my front end wash out yet on loose dirt, but I've come close and it helps when I keep my weight back, which means getting off the seat and moving my butt back, but the bars are a longer reach forward than swept bars and without a dropper seat-post it's hard. Instead I did buy a suspension seat post, but just a better seat could be enough.

I tend to let the bike float between my hands and legs on bumpy surfaces, to absorb bumps and stay on track. So I haven't gotten much use from my Suntour NCX suspension seat post https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01IM2JZYY/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1 but when I force myself to take the weight off my feet and use the seat, I find that the seat post works very well and does a better job absorbing bumps than my front dual 100mm shocks set for 26% sag. If I sit too far forward on the seat then the Suntour seat post doesn't get enough leverage to move (it moves down and back with bumps). If I sit back far enough to get it to absorb everything then I can barely reach the handle bars with my spare tire in the way (okay, my gut).

On most rides I do use up 100% of my front fork travel, and have thought about spacers inside the forks to get it to be more progressive, so I can run a lower pressure for a softer street ride. I think my fork pressure is between 120-125psi but I haven't checked it since May. So, currently I can't go lower on the pressure without spacers to make it more progressive - the front suspension works better off road than on pavement where it doesn't absorb the small bumps as well.

My 2.3" dirt tires still do great on pavement without too much rolling resistance, although I suspect that the grip in emergency braking might suffer with less contact patch on the road due to the knobbies. I've taken mine up to 42.7mph downhill on pavement, and it's steering geometry is much more stable at high speed than the DualSport+ that I borrowed for a weekend before ordering my XM700+ and then canceling for the PF7.

It corners well, although I'd expect that the XM700+ would corner better/faster on pavement with it's tires. Regardless, a bicycle is not like riding a motorcycle, as I'm much higher off the ground (36" vs 28"). So I'm not as confident leaning hard into turns when I'm sitting on a tiny seat 3 feet off the ground. Countersteering still works, but I feel like if I'm leaning into the turn too much that I'll start to slide out. So I have not tested my limits on dirt or pavement, and I slow down to at least 15-20mph for turns.

I do keep the tires at 40psi for all rides now, as I usually have to ride on pavement to get to any off-road riding, and 3/4 of my ride miles are on pavement. I can pedal it up to 22-23mph comfortably on flat ground with a comfortable cadence, and occasionally 26-27mph but then the cadence is too high for me to maintain for long. There's one stretch on the ride back from the local Zoo where I can pedal at what I'm guessing is 100+rpm at 35mph for about 3/4 of a mile which is about a 2% downhill grade where the bike would coast at only 20-25 without pedaling.

I went for the smaller 55cm frame for my 5 foot 9 inch body (30" inseam) and I kept the stock bars. But I went with a shorter and steeper handlebar riser (maybe 110x45 I'm not exactly sure now) which brought the bars closer to me, although I'd wish they were 1" higher and 2" farther back for cruising.

For where I like to ride (street and dirt), and riding 10-20mph with my wife, the Powerfly 7 is perfect and very versatile. Although it would be nice to also have a 28mph speed pedelec with street tires, after dropping so much on the Trek if I get a 2nd eBike it might be something like the Juiced Crosscurrent S at a much lower price. I can't justify another $4K bike to my wife, but if money grew on trees my Bike #2 would be a Stromer ST2 S.

Jax
1 month ago

Hi Jax,

Is your new controller the 9 transistor one like the ones they have on the CrossCurrent S ? Thanks again.

Hi Bob,
Sorry, but I’ve been wondering the same thing. A Juiced rep replaced it for me. I suspect it has more transistors but don’t know for sure.

PCDoctorUSA
1 month ago

@IWantABike I'm in the hunt for my first ebike for commuting and since you mentioned the Surface 604 Rook you may want to consider the Voltbike Elegant for $1299, which looks nearly identical. Court Rye with EBR did a recent review on the Elegant, and though Court criticizes Voltbike's selection of entry level components from Shimano and Tektro, if you watch the video long enough into the actual test ride he becomes very impressed with the bike's performance. I've even asked Voltbike riders if they've had issues with these components and they've said, "no."

Like you, I was also considering the CrossCurrent S, but after speaking with a local ebike dealer here in Honolulu a few days ago I decided to move it further down my short list. He told me that he's experienced long delays in getting parts from them and communication has been poor. Being on an island out in the Pacific, and depending on my bike for commuting, I can't be waiting and wondering when a replacement part is coming. His experience may be isolated, but I take it into consideration nonetheless. As for the performance or quality of the bikes from JuicedBikes, he had nothing negative to say. The CrossCurrent S is definitely a feature-rich bike with a great look.

If you have any questions about the Elegant or anything else at Voltbikes, George Krastev is extremely prompt in responding. As far as I know, they only sell online although I think you can pick one up in person if you're near the distribution center in Burnaby, Canada or Blaine, WA. Otherwise, shipping is $70. Good luck!

IWantABike
1 month ago

Hi all! I need some help with choosing my first ebike. A little bit of info on me - I'm 5'7" and 130lbs. I'm planning to use the bike around town, run errands, and ride on trails once in a while for fun with my family. I also have a 9 year old daughter who has special needs and doesn't walk. So I'd like to go biking with her pulling a trailer with my daughter in it (the trailer is 34lbs and my daughter is 90lbs). We live in a fairly flat area. I've been looking and seems like the RadCity, Juiced CrossCurrent S, and Surface 604 Rook might be good. Thoughts?

IQ Denim
2 months ago

Before buying the CrossCurrent Air based on this review, go to Juiced Bikes' FB page and read the reviews there! This is a great review but it's only based on a one-day perspective, as opposed to prolonged use and/or dealing with the company from a customer standpoint.

Aleks bubyr
2 months ago

I'm gonna buy it

Voodoo Six
2 months ago

When will that display be available?

Jonathan Hudson
2 months ago

My 21 AH battery will not stay in place, it leans to the left and the locking mechanism doesn't work properly...it is easy to pull out of place and I can't get the charge controller to stay on without holding it firmly in place....kind of disappointed, would be curious if others are having similar problems

Andrew Chong
4 months ago

Can I please have a free electric bike to free your storage?

Paintbrush 1962
4 months ago

Is there any way of integrating the batteries into the frame ,like Stromer?

FOXHAN
4 months ago

Where can we get this bike in Europe?

_bermuda
5 months ago

Got mine over the weekend and I'm thoroughly impressed thus far. Ridden about 35 miles so far here in NYC and am pretty thrilled with it. Their warranty made the decision easy.

MarvFIT
5 months ago

juiced is changing the game

Ivan Turniphead
5 months ago

I got mine today....OMG!

Ivan Turniphead
4 months ago

Josiah Harlow I got the torque sensor it seems and a free throttle with mine. I rode probably 18 miles today, I live outside of Pittsburgh, lots of hills and some shitty roads. Suspension would be alright but I don't really care about, still had some battery charhe left. Only problem I had was with the gear shift cable, supposedly it needed to stretch. I like I got it because I got a cool dui so it's pretty great, still would have bought one though. Taking it to a beach or city would probably be nice.

Peter B
5 months ago

Hey Josiah, I have this bike and love it. I wrote my comments on the EBR Crosscurrent Air review page. You made a wise decision ordering this bike. I waited over a month for mine but it was worth it.

Josiah Harlow
5 months ago

Would like to hear your impressions. Did you stick with the stock cadence sensor? I have one on order with the torque sensor upgrade but won't be in stock until mid-august :(

Josiah Harlow
5 months ago

After about a month of researching electric bikes under $2000 I have decided to order this one based heavily on your review. I test rode a regular crosscurrent and decided to get the torque sensor upgrade for the Air. This really does seem to be the best value for a multi speed electric bike.

Qu Don
5 months ago

What a dickhead! You consistently talk over the guy, is that your idea of review? I quickly unsubscribed before the video was over.

Christopher Railwah
6 months ago

Hey where can I pick this up in New York ?

Raarz
6 months ago

Love almost everything about the bike and planning to get one. The only big turnoff for me is the ugly welds. See around 9:57 what I mean. It got me considering the regular CrossCurrent, but I realized it also has those ugly welds. So I will end up going with this and try to not let that little cosmetic issue eat at my OCD.

Maxi Putt
7 months ago

hey can anyone help me please ? i live in europe and i would like to buy this bike ... how can i get this bike? anyone who has bought this bike in europe? thanks for the best review @ electricbikereview

linkguy30
7 months ago

bike looks really awesome but I couldn't understand any of the terminology lol

Mr Sawyer
8 months ago

i like the square style frame

Mr Sawyer
6 months ago

agree

Alex NC
6 months ago

Mr Sawyer
Me too. It's talked about as a downgrade, but I like it better ... style wise. And I'm sure it's just as strong, if not stronger.

Jay Starr
8 months ago

18:05 Could the bigger battery pack be used to power an AWD bike?
_( does it have multiple outputs? )_

NWforager
8 months ago

GOod indepth info from the Juiced guy . sweet fast whip for 1000 bucks .

Richard Fillerup
8 months ago

I want to know about the hyper fat bike that Juiced is working on.