Magnum Peak Review

Magnum Peak Electric Bike Review
Magnum Peak
Magnum Peak 160 Mm Rear Hydraulic Disc Brake
Magnum Peak Shimano Acera Derailleur 24 Speed Drivetrain
Magnum Peak Handlebar Grips Lcd Button Control Pad
Magnum Peak Tektro Auriga Levers Velo Locking Grips
Magnum Peak Adjustable Suspension Fork Preload
Magnum Peak Sr Suntour Xcm Hlo Suspension 100 Mm
Magnum Peak Exposed Sealed Controller Hit Sink Fins
Magnum Peak Adjustable Kickstand Custom Frame
Magnum Peak Electric Mountain Bike
Magnum Peak Portable Charger 2 Amp
Magnum Peak Electric Bike Review
Magnum Peak
Magnum Peak 160 Mm Rear Hydraulic Disc Brake
Magnum Peak Shimano Acera Derailleur 24 Speed Drivetrain
Magnum Peak Handlebar Grips Lcd Button Control Pad
Magnum Peak Tektro Auriga Levers Velo Locking Grips
Magnum Peak Adjustable Suspension Fork Preload
Magnum Peak Sr Suntour Xcm Hlo Suspension 100 Mm
Magnum Peak Exposed Sealed Controller Hit Sink Fins
Magnum Peak Adjustable Kickstand Custom Frame
Magnum Peak Electric Mountain Bike
Magnum Peak Portable Charger 2 Amp

Summary

  • A high speed electric hardtail with with throttle on demand, hydraulic disc brakes and an extra large battery for $2k, all around good value with a 24 speed drivetrain
  • Optional rear rack for $50 transform the Peak into a sporty commuter, only one frame size and color scheme but the angled top tube makes it approachable, great saddle and pedal upgrades
  • Zippy 500 watt motor paired with a 48 volt battery and 9 Mosfet controller pushing 18 Amps, the controller is overbuilt and mounted separately for better heat dispersion
  • No bottle cage bosses, motor cable protrudes near rear derailleur but a metal guard helps protect it, quick cadence sensor, fixed display panel could be more vulnerable, lots of wires up front

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Magnum

Model:

Peak

Price:

$1,999

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Urban, Trail, Mountain

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedalec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States, Canada

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

55.1 lbs (24.99 kg)

Battery Weight:

9 lbs (4.08 kg)

Motor Weight:

8.5 lbs (3.85 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

19 in (48.26 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

19" Seat Tube, 22.5" Reach, 28.5" Stand Over Height, 72" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Matte Black with Blue Accents

Frame Fork Details:

SR Suntour XCM HLO Suspension with 100 mm Travel, Hydraulic Lockout, 9 mm QR Skewer

Frame Rear Details:

10 mm Axle with Nuts

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

24 Speed 3x8 Shimano Altus Front M310, Shimano Acera M360 Rear, 11-32T

Shifter Details:

Shimano Triggers on Left and Right Bar

Cranks:

Shimano 170 mm Length, 28-33-42T

Pedals:

Wellgo B087, Aluminum Alloy Platform

Headset:

Neco 1 1/8" - 1 1/2" Tapered

Stem:

Promax, 110 mm Length, Aluminum Alloy

Handlebar:

Flat, 25" Length, Aluminum Alloy

Brake Details:

Tektro Auriga Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Front Rotor and 160 mm Rear Rotor, Tektro Levers with Motor Inhibitor

Grips:

Velo Flat Rubber with Lockers

Saddle:

Selle Royal Gel (Magnum Branded)

Seat Post:

Promax

Seat Post Length:

400 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

30.9 mm

Rims:

Double Walled

Spokes:

13G Stainless Steel

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Smart Sam, 27.5" x 2.25

Wheel Sizes:

27.5 in (69.85cm)

Tire Details:

26-54 PSI

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Optional Metal Carry Rack ($49) with 25 kg Max Weight, Single Side Adjustable Length Kickstand, Integrated 5 Volt USB Charging Port, Metal Derailleur Guard

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, 9 Mosfet 18 Amp Current Controller

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Das-Kit

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Motor Peak Output:

700 watts

Motor Torque:

90 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung, Panasonic or LG

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

13 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

624 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium Nickel Cobalt Manganese (Li-NCM)

Charge Time:

6.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Estimated Max Range:

60 miles (97 km)

Display Type:

Das-Kit Fixed Backlit Monochrome LCD

Readouts:

Power Level (Power, Normal, Eco), Pedal Assist (0-6), Odometer, Time, Trip 1, Trip 2, Speed, Voltage, Battery Level (1-5), (Press Power Once for Backlighting, Hold Set for Menu)

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad (Power, Set, +, -)

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle

Top Speed:

28 mph (45 kph) (20 mph Throttle Only)

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Written Review

The Magnum Peak is a faster, more powerful version of the Mi5 electric trail bike (which is still available for $1,700). The Peak offers the same great looks at a still reasonable $2,000 price point but climbs better and can reach 28 mph top speed vs. the more standard 22 mph with the Ui5. Both of these e-bikes only come in one frame size and color scheme but they worked well for me, I think they look cool and the black hides the battery, hub motor and wires well. As a relatively lightweight 135 lb average height 5’9″ guy, the Mi5 is enough for zippy commuting and some mild packed trail riding but I wouldn’t actually mountain bike with it… I often go from pavement to dirt, taking new routes around town, and appreciate an ebike that’s capable on a variety of surfaces, but I also like actual climbing and trail riding. What the Peak delivers is that same versatility in town and a better experience in actual mountain conditions. Not perfect, but better. Most hard-core electric mountain bikes these days are built around premium mid-drive motor systems from Shimano, Yamaha, Bosch or Brose. They are much more efficient, better balanced (especially on full suspension frames) and more capable than hub motors for climbing because you can shift gears to enable them. The best drive systems even offer shift sensing technology because the forces being spread through the chain, cogs and derailleur are enough to cause real damage, real fast. And so, with the Magnum Peak, you get something a little different. A truly powerful motor that doesn’t care what gear you’re in, won’t strain your drivetrain and can be operated with throttle on demand whereas most mid-drives cannot. I had a blast riding it in the hills overlooking Salt Lake City Utah with the Magnum team. Amazingly, it maintained traction in the snow while climbing and was able to zip me along while filming with one hand over rocks and medium sized hills. It’s not a perfect product, the kickstand and battery plug are vulnerable to crank arm collision, it weighs a bit more than competing products due to a higher battery capacity and the motor power cable protrudes, but for the price it’s quite good.

Driving the bike is a 500 watt nominal internally geared rear hub motor from Das-Kit. I’m not as used to seeing this brand but felt that it performed at or above expectations. Normally hub motors struggle with hills but the combination of a higher amp controller, higher voltage battery and the additional copper windings and design of the motor excelled. I still pedaled along to help but once there was momentum, overriding with the throttle gave me more power and speed. Note that the trigger throttle only goes up to 20 mph while pedal assist can get you in the 28 mph range. The motor is painted black which helps it blend in with the frame. It’s compact and even though the power cable protrudes from the right side, getting jumbled with the derailleur and shifter cables, I like that it was somewhat protected by a metal guard. This is not something you’d see on premium e-mountain bikes but I think it makes sense and would rather the added weight and novice appearance than a bent or frayed cable. The rear wheel does not offer quick release but uses thicker 13 gauge spokes to accommodate the added forces and weight of the bike. I love that one area Magnum has opted to spend more on is with the tires. You get 27.5″ Schwalbe branded tires with excellent traction. They are truly off-road worthy and helped a lot in the snow. One area I feel they missed was the right chainstay which is naked, you’ll end up with nicks and chips very quickly riding off road. I saw a brand new Magnum Peak go from pristine to many chips with the single ride shown in the video review above. Consider adding one yourself or using some clear plastic packing tape.

Powering the motor is an extra large 48 volt 13 amp hour battery pack that resembles the one used for the Mi5, just a little taller. It protrudes from the downtube a bit but is otherwise kept low and centered on the frame. I love that the charging port and USB accessory port are now positioned on the side of the pack vs. on top because they were difficult to reach on older models (located near the seat tube and fairly cramped). I would definitely take the battery off when lifting the frame, and possibly the front wheel since it’s quick release, but love that it can be charged on if you’d like. Just keep an eye on the plug because it’s still very near the left crank arm which could collide and bend it. The plug isn’t magnetic or anything so don’t drip on it or the bike might come crashing down. Also, when you’re done charging, pay extra attention to the rubber battery plug cap as it isn’t super easy to close but could be worth tinkering with if you’re riding in snow like I was. Thankfully, the extra large kickstand is sturdy and positioned near the center of the bike to spread out weight. This is a love/hate design for me because the stand also collides with the left crank arm. People who spend a lot of time trail riding usually remove the kickstand altogether but I love how convenient they can be. If you do take it off, lay the bike on the left side and be careful with the disc brake rotors. They’re less sensitive than the derailleur and power cable mentioned before but can still get bent or dirty which can wreck the pads. the brakes themselves are very nice, hydraulic disc with motor inhibiting levers (four finger style). The front is a 180 mm rotor and the rear is 160 mm which is about right for this type of bike.

Operating the Magnum Peak is a snap. The battery clicks in and automatically locks if you don’t have the key handy. From here, a single press on the power button at the control pad (near the left grip) gets you going and a second quick press after that activates backlighting. I love that it doesn’t use automatic backlighting because that can be distracting for some riders. There’s a Set button just below and to the left of the Power button that cycles through different trip readouts and just above and below are plus and minus buttons. These allow you to cycle from 0 to 6 assist level and the menu loops. In some ways this is cool but can take a moment to get used to. I often press +, +, +, +… frantically to get to maximum power without looking but with the Magnum Peak, that could get me back down to zero or just confused. On the flip side, pressing – just once can go from no power to maximum power! In any of these levels, including zero, the slim trigger throttle is active and blasts full power. It’s a more advanced setup but one I enjoy. The trigger throttle itself is a custom design from Magnum that allows the right grip area to stay clean. The cockpit on this bike has a lot going on with two sets of shifters to control 24 gear combinations (three rings up front and eight in the back) along with the display, independent button pad, brake levers with motor inhibitors and that throttle… but it manages to feel clean. The only messy part is all of the cables protruding at the front. Again, they are black and blend in but one downside to the frame setup is that many of the cables aren’t internally routed. Instead, they are run along the top tube. It makes them easier to service but could get in the way when loading the bike on a rack or just lifting it. I don’t want to glaze over the point about brake lever motor inhibitors however, as this is a cadence sensing pedal assist ebike. They tend to be slightly less responsive than torque or advanced sensor activated but I found the hardware on the Peak to work well and be more compact and protected than some others. The only other grip is that the display looks so nice but isn’t removable. You can angle it to reduce glare and possibly put a sack or glove over it when parked to avoid scratching but it could be vulnerable in the event of a crash where the bike gets tossed. Note also that the display offers three power modes in addition to the six assist levels. These help you tone down torque and save the battery… Whenever you’re opening the throttle from standstill, climbing steep hills or riding over 20 mph you can expect the battery to drain much faster. Since the Peak encourages all of these scenarios, there’s a wide range of possible ranges per charge you might expect. And since the charger is a more average 2 Amp, it could take upwards of 6 hours for a full refill.

I love that Magnum is bringing more electric bikes to the US and growing their dealer network. It’s a company that is pushing the limits of value by offering a solid one year warranty and a range of accessories (including a cool sturdy rack for $50 that works with the Peak). I’d certainly be tempted to go for this version of their mountain bike because I like to go fast, but I still wouldn’t discount the Mi5 which is several pounds lighter and several hundred dollars less expensive. For heavier riders, those that might be facing steeper hills and people who can appreciate the little refinements being made (some of which also apply to the Mi5) this is a winning electric bike if it fits you. I was impressed with the frame stiffness and overall handling, loved the suspension fork and am even more excited about the 100 mm upgraded fork shipping on the production version. You could lock the fork out for efficient city commuting and possibly get a shorter angled stem and riser bars for improved comfort. Furthermore, a seat post suspension is something I frequently recommend when riding faster and for longer periods. The Peak has a thicker seat tube, designed for 30.9 mm posts. It would work well with a shim and a Thudbuster, Body Float or even a more generic post if you’re on a budget. Big thanks to Spenser for his mountain ride demonstrations and to Magnum for partnering with me on this post and making the trip to their headquarters in Salt Lake City possible :)

Pros:

  • The Peak offers throttle-only mode, allows you to override assist with the throttle up to 20 mph and can hit 28 mph in pedal assist… it’s one of the most open, fastest electric mountain bikes I’ve tested
  • You get 24 gear combinations here which is unique in the world of value electric mountain bikes, this also means more potential maintenance and weight but when you need to climb or hit the 28 mph top assisted speed I feel it’s worth it
  • Name brand Schwalbe tires and mid-level SR Suntour suspension fork with lockout and preload adjustment improve ride quality and won’t take damage as easily as super cheap options
  • I like that they ship the bike with a derailleur guard to protect the main derailleur, I’d probably leave it on in case the bike tips because that’s also where the power cable enters into the hub motor
  • While the Peak only comes in one frame size and color, I feel that the design is great because the top tube angles for lowered standover height, the head tube is tapered for improved strength and the black color helps wires and the battery blend in
  • The battery has a charging port on the lower left side vs. on top which is much easier to get to (of course it can also be charged off the bike if you want) and I like that there is a female USB port near the top (close to the bars for easy use), you can use the USB off the bike as a backup power source if desired, consider a right angle adapter for charging while riding
  • Hydraulic disc brakes with motor inhibitors in both levers keep you in control of the bike and are especially important for high-speed operation, you get a larger 180 mm rotor up front for improved braking power and the brake levers offer adjustable reach for people with different hand sizes
  • Even though it’s not removable, I like how compact the display is and appreciate that you can swivel it to reduce glare, there are lots of options built in, the button pad used to operate it is mounted close to the left grip where it’s very easy to reach and use on the fly, overall the cockpit didn’t feel super crowded even with the extra wires and two trigger shifter units
  • Minor pluses here but I love that the saddle and pedals are upgraded, less reason to have to replace them for improved comfort and traction respectively, they worked great for me even in the snow when my feet were wet and the trail was bumpy
  • Quick release front wheel and removable battery reduces weight significantly (by over 10 pounds) making the bike easier to toss into the trunk of a car or lift onto a storage hook in a garage
  • Magnum has a specially designed trigger throttle that is super slim so it doesn’t crowd the brake or shifter mounts and can be easier to reach, the cadence sensor is also slimmer, smaller and better protected by a plastic shell
  • The battery capacity is quite impressive, you get 48 volts and 13 amp hours which I would call way above average and the cells are premium brands (LG, Samsung or Panasonic) with a one-year warranty
  • In my opinion the price point of this bike is amazing, it really feels like a good value at $2k given all of the options and dealer network they’ve built (over 70 shops in the US carrying it at the time of this post)
  • The bike ships with a rigid 30.9 mm seat post which works fine and is a little thicker for added strength… this is one are you could potentially upgrade with a seat post suspension like Thudbuster or Body Float, you might just need a shim in some cases for the perfect fit

Cons:

  • Surprisingly, I didn’t see a slap guard on the right chain stay, this means you’ll get chips in the paint over time and possibly some wear on the chain itself, consider adding one yourself aftermarket like these
  • I’m accustomed to seeing internally routed cables, integrated batteries and compact motors as with the Peak here but the controller box stood out as being unique and potentially vulnerable… I asked about it (positioned in front of the bottom bracket) and was told it had to be overbuilt to dissipate heat due to the higher amp output and tapped it to be sure it was Aluminum and sturdy
  • Due to the hub motor design, there isn’t a quick release at the rear which means you’ll need extra tools for flat-fixing on the go, the power cable also protrudes a bit and could get snagged or bent easier than if it was fully tucked in
  • The kickstand is large, adjustable and sturdy but I wish it was mounted slightly back so the left crank arm wouldn’t collide, the demo bike had some nicks already, this is also a concern with the charging port as the pedal could snag it or bend the plug
  • No bottle cage bosses here, I suppose they wouldn’t fit on the downtube due to the larger battery case, thankfully there’s a special rack mounting setup so you could bring a trunk bag or panniers with extra gear… I could see this becoming a fun commuter platform during the week (I believe their rack is proprietary)
  • While I think they did a good job keeping the weight of the bike reasonable considering the larger battery pack and motor, this is about four pounds heavier than most other hardtail electric mountain bikes
  • One area for possible improvement would be a thru-axle on the fork for added stiffness and sturdiness given the off-road nature and higher speed capability of the bike, as it stands you get a regular 9 mm quick release skewer
  • Many of the wires are run along the base of the top tube vs. being internally routed, this combined with the angled nature of the top tube could make hanging style racks difficult to work with (snagging cables or just not fitting without first removing the battery pack)
  • If you’re commuting, especially at high speed, add some reflective stickers or lights because the matte black frame and lack of integrated lights combined with higher speed riding could make you vulnerable
  • The charger is compact and light weight at ~1.5 lbs but it’s not super fast with just 2 Amps output and that could mean longer waits given the larger capacity of the battery on the Magnum Peak

Resources:

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Billy
6 months ago

It seems ebike makers just can’t make a perfect bike. I’ll never buy one until Court reviews one without the all cons and at a sensible price.

Reply
Court Rye
6 months ago

Hey Billy! I don’t think I’ll ever skip a con or two… my goal is to be objective but share my own considerations which include “trade offs” and such. Magnum has done a great job here but it’s not perfect. If you’re willing to compromise on the areas covered then it could work :)

Reply
Dana B
6 months ago

Just wondering why this bike isn’t showing up on the Magnum website yet??

Reply
Court Rye
6 months ago

Hey Dana, I believe it’s coming very soon. Maybe you could ask your local shop when they expect to get them in or possibly call Magnum directly for more info :)

Reply
Nicolas
5 months ago

I think this Magnum hits many positive points and overall more so than the few cons it might generate. I’m thinking especially taking into consideration the price, which other makers don’t match as well. This is a solid e-bike for its price. I’m looking forward to a test ride :)

Reply
Court Rye
5 months ago

Yeah, it brings the speed and power with a cool look for a very reasonable price… and has a throttle, that’s neat :D

Reply
Phil
5 months ago

I ordered mine the first day it was on the web site (Feb 28). I can’t wait to get it. I talked to Spencer at Magnum on the phone. He said the bike should ship mid-April.

Reply
Court Rye
5 months ago

That’s awesome Phil! I’m excited for you, please share updates once you get it and try it out for a while. I enjoyed meeting with the folks at Magnum and feel that they struck a good balance of performance and price with the Peak ;)

Reply
Mike
3 months ago

dang – this or the XL Cross Current in RED w/10.4 a/hr batt for $1589 shipped (refurb thru JUICEDBIKES)????????

Reply
Court Rye
3 months ago

Hi Mike, unfortunately I have heard from several shops that their Juiced Bikes have had some technical issues… one shop said 40% of their bikes have required work but that the Magnum Ui5 (which has been sold to many delivery cyclists) has not had issues. The Peak is too new to say one way or the other about long term reliability but so far Magnum has a good track record and solid customer support in my experience.

Reply
Geoff
2 months ago

Ordered it right after your review – received it May 30. Dollar for Dollar, a fantastic value. Smooth, fast, attractive and practical. I challenge anyone to find anything close to the Magnum peak for even $1000 more then the Magnum price. Standard with 24 speeds, 48v battery, 700w peak output, 90 NM of torque, hydraulic disc brakes – all for $1,999.

Reply
Court Rye
2 months ago

Glad to hear you’re loving the bike Geoff! I heard they are temporarily sold out, looks like Magnum is doing a great job delivering what people want for a good price. Thanks for sharing your experience with the Peak :)

Reply
Geoffrey Bloom
2 days ago

Court,

Can you reccommend an upgrade to replace the shimano set up that comes with the magnum? Maybe a SRAM ? DO you know of any high quality precision gear shifting system that is compatible with the rear hub drive on the magnum?

Geoffrey

Sandor
1 week ago

After watching the review I did not understand if the motor provided enough power to climb the hill because the guy was paddling as I do on my non electric bike when he as going yup the hill. Can you share your experience because what I want is to avoid heavy sweating.

Reply
Court Rye
1 week ago

Hi Sandor! The Peak will climb moderate hills with throttle only as long as you have some speed going in and don’t weigh above ~170 lbs or have a lot of cargo, otherwise you might need to help just a little bit. You can see the same drive system being tested on some hills and through grass in the Magnum Metro review here. I hope this helps, you’re still getting excellent support, but if you try to start from zero, it’s probably going to stall.

PHIL
2 months ago

I received my Peak 2 days ago. It absolutely rocks! The power response and handling are excellent. I totally recommend this bike to anyone. I plan to put a bunch of miles on this thing this summer. I will update on long term when time permits.

Reply
Court Rye
2 months ago

Awesome! Thanks for the quick update PHIL, I’m excited to see your update, have an awesome summer :D

Reply
mike harris
2 months ago

I’m a 70 yr.old rider, looking to commute and only minimal off road bike paths. Would a lighter model suit me, or should I not be concerned about weight of the bike?
Thanks

Reply
Court Rye
2 months ago

Hi Mike! It’s difficult for me to say without knowing how big and strong you are… yes, this is a slightly heavier ebike, but you get additional power, the throttle operation, and a lower price point. The Magnum Peak has been a very popular ebike this year and I enjoyed testing it. I feel like the company is offering good support and value. I hope this helps you! I’m 5’9″ and weigh 135 but am fit-muscular and this model didn’t feel too heavy for me. Lifting it to load into a car or up stairs could be difficult, but at least then the battery and front wheel are removable.

Reply
jjsva
3 weeks ago

Great review. I would add a nice adjustable angle stem and moderate swept back bars for city commuting.

Reply
Court Rye
3 weeks ago

Good call, I think those would both be good additions for a commute setup. I might go for a rigid stem… but one that has a higher angle or is shorter vs. the adjustable type because they can rattle loose over time. Some are great, but the cheaper single-bolt designs don’t last as long in my experience.

Reply

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Timpo
2 days ago

Hello everyone, I'm thinking about buying an Amego Elevate, it's a Canadian bicycle.
https://www.amegoev.com/buy-electric-bikes/electric-bicyles/amego-elevate.html

As you can see, the speed(with pedal, non throttle) is limited to 40km/h (25mph)

But if you look at Magnum Peak, it goes up to 45km/h (28mph)
https://www.magnumbikes.com/product/magnum-peak/

They look very similar, probably come from same manufacture, anyways, what do I need to make Amego Elevate a full Class 3 ebike? Is it just as easy as swapping the display?

I called Amego and they said they can't raise it to 45km/h(28mph)...also I don't want to buy Magnum Peak since the shipping & US/Canada conversion rate won't be cheap.

Thanks

mrgold35
7 days ago

I was on the fence about a year ago between Sondors, Radrover, and Volt 4" fat tire bikes. I marked Sondors off the list because of the 30 day warranty and small motor. No one ever said "My ebike has too much power and I wish I've gone with a much smaller watt motor."

I'm about 270lbs and I add about another 20-25 lbs with bike accessories, rack+gear, and commuter back pack. The Radrover weights the same as the Radmini. I have zero issue pedaling in PAS 2-4 and/or using the throttle to get going across intersections in a hurry or up inclines. The Rad Power bikes have a nice feature of an on/off button for the twist throttle AND you have full 750 watts of power at any PAS level from 0-5. I added a clip on thumb throttle for easier access and better control. Also nice to have the throttle if you need to walk your bike up inclines or stairs. I trail ride a lot and thumb attachment makes it easier to access the gears, brake, throttle, and holding tight on handlebar grips. I would check with the Sondors X to see how the throttle works compared to the Radmini.

I ended up with purchasing two Rad Rovers and put over 3000 miles between them both in less than a year. I would also factor in a suspension seat post since the folding ebikes don't have a front suspension.

One side note: I always used PAS 5 on my work commutes with the standard Kenda tires and my top cruising speed was around 18-19 mph with peak (downhills) around 21-22 mph. I wore my rear Kenda out in around 800 miles and replaces with Vee8 tires. I can now cruise 19-20.5 mph in PAS 3-4 (depending on wind and how level) and my top peak speed is 23-25 mph on the same inclines. I never use PAS now and just use the throttle if I need full power for a short run.

fredi
1 week ago

This is my first ebike and my decision to buy her was based on getting the best ebike for me at the best price. First a little about me, I’m 60 years old, 6’1” and 230 lbs. A have a 34” Class-A RV and travel the east coast. On long trips I normally tow a Jeep Wrangler with a tray-style bike rack loaded with two or three mountain bike from a big box store. On short trips I leave the Jeep at home and mount the bike rack to the RV. Typical use of the bikes is for recreational riding in National and State parks. I thought it was time for a better bike and was intrigued with the idea of using ebikes and leaving the Jeep at home more.

I originally looked at Evelo because of their mid-drive with the NuVinci hub. They didn’t offer any local sales but work with local bike shops to provide service in conjunction with their 4-year/20,000-mile warranty. I was drawn to the Delta with the 750 watt mid-drive since all I’ve ever owned was mountain bikes and I wanted to make sure that it would get me up the hills. I soon discovered that where I live they only allow 500 watts and mid-drives are more efficient using the power, so while a 750 watt hub drive may struggle to get me up the hill, a 350 watt mid-drive should have less problems because they have higher performance, more torque and use less battery power. I also have always hated not being in the right gear at the right time and gnashing the gears and an Internally Geared Hub (IGH) like the NuVinci would solve those problems. Since I was planning on adding lots of comfort accessories like a plush seat, road tires, rear rack, fenders, lights, etc. and the Galaxy comes with all of those so I felt it was a better fit for me.

The Galaxy is billed as a comfort cruiser with an upright riding position, 27.5″ wheels and 2” tires on a ridge frame. Evelo makes two models the Galaxy, the GT with a step-through frame and the TT a traditional top tube frame. Each model comes in two versions, Premium or Fully Loaded. The Fully Loaded version upgrades the NuVinci N380 transmission to the Harmony fully automatic transmission and adds hydraulic brakes. So I ordered the Fully Loaded Galaxy TT version with a list price of $3899.

The bike came in about a week. She was double boxed and very well packed. The hardest part was getting the bike out of the box. I recommend having a little help here. Evelo isn’t kidding when they say the bike come almost fully assembled. Install the brake caliper, front wheel and fender, handlebars, headlight, and you’re done. They recommend charging the battery for 12 hours before the first use, so I plugged it in to charge overnight and then set about the process of assembling the bike which took about 30 minutes. They provided several allen wrenches, a couple of “real” boxed end wrenches and armed with the step by step instructions it was much easier to assemble than any bike I’ve ever bought from a big box store. My recommendation is that you put the fender on before you install the front wheel and then attach the brake caliper. The front wheel comes with a “Quick Release” so it’s really not a big deal.

The Galaxy is one of a small number of electric bikes that offer the NuVinci Harmony Automatic Transmission which allows me to enjoy the ride while it takes care of the shifting. In automatic it finds the proper gear while I dial in a comfortable cadence and set the assist level for my perfect ride. No more gnashing the gears and getting stuck on a hill because I was in the wrong gear. A simple button press changes the hub to manual mode, but I mostly I keep it in automatic on the lowest setting. The brushless motor combined with the Gates belt drive and the Harmony makes the ride smooth and virtually silent. I set the tire pressure to 50 lbs for a softer ride.

She comes with a 350 watt Bafang Max mid-drive motor (peak 600 watts) and uses a torque sensor (internal to the motor) and speed to determine how much power is drawn from the battery. The torque sensor uses a strain gauge inside the motor to measure pressure on the pedals. This allows for quick engagement and better sensitivity. I was concerned about the Galaxy’s uphill performance but found that she can easily climb hills at 8-12 mph that would normally bring me to a crawl. On level roads I can quickly reach the 20+ mph limit. At those speeds it’s nice to have the Tektro 180mm hydraulic disc brakes that provide great stopping power and simultaneously cut power to the motor. Once you stop there is a double fork kickstand to keep her upright.

The large backlit LCD display panel (made by King) is mounted center of the handlebars and can swivel forward or back to reduce glare. It’s easy to read and offers information about speed, distance, pedal assist, watts and a five segment battery charge level indicator. The control pad is located near the left grip, from there you can turn the bike on/off and select the level of assist. I really liked that holding the UP button turns on/off the backlight and holding the DOWN button activates “Walk” mode which moves the bike forward at about two mph. Pressing both the UP and DOWN buttons for 3 seconds puts you in the settings menu where you can increase the maximum speed to 25 mph, set the backlight level, and miles or kilometers. I set the wheel diameter to 27.5 inches since it defaulted to 26.

The bike has a thumb throttle but as a safety feature it doesn't engage unless the bike is moving. I originally thought I would need the throttle to get across an intersection or when starting up a hill, but the bike's torque sensor measures pressure on the pedals, so it quickly engages. It is so responsive and natural feeling that I haven't used the throttle much but I certainly have used “walk” mode several times.

The rear tail light is mounted directly beneath the battery rack so it isn’t blocked by my pannier and is powered by a couple of AA batteries. The LED Head Light has five modes and is USB rechargeable. It quickly installs on the handlebars with a rubber strap and the single large button on top makes it easy to turn on and change modes while riding.

Powering the bike is a 36 volt, 13 amp (468 wh) battery pack with an advertised 50 miles of range. I rode for over twenty miles before the charge indicator dropped from five to four bars. The battery weighs 8 lbs, can be charged on or off the bike and has its own level indicator. The small rubber cap protecting the charge terminal opens easily and stays closed. The battery is nicely protected in the full-size cargo rack and has a key lock which keeps it there and provides anti-theft security. You don’t need to leave the key in while riding and there’s a built-in handle to help remove the battery and carry it. Removing the battery makes it easier to lift the 46 lb bike onto my tray style carrier. The battery placement in the rack makes the bike a little heavy in the back, but frees up space for bottle cage bosses on the seat tube and allowed me to mount my folding lock on the down tube. All I did was add my Cloud-9 seat, bottle cage, pannier and a suspension seat post and I was ready to go.

After about a week of riding I took her to a local dealer for a full checkup. They did a minor adjustment to the brakes and gave her a clean bill of health, no charge. They were impressed at how well “I” put the bike together (LOL) and they loved the belt and throttle. I’ll be sure to make the checkup an annual event and return to that dealer.

Let me know if you have any questions

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NikkiK
2 weeks ago

Thanks guys, there's a lot of information in here to digest. After thinking about it some more, I wonder if I should not try to get the best out of all worlds (trail and road) because I may end up getting a mediocre at everything type of bike. I'm a traditionalist with my actual mtn. bike - Stunt Jumper hard tail from mid 90's. Every time I go to upgrade, I have a hard time justifying the purchase of something that doesn't have a motor. In this case of an ebike I guess I can make that justification a little better, but going up to the $5-7K range seems like I should be driving an entire car around (albeit a cheap car). I'm headed out to go 'test drive' a few bikes in Salt Lake and hope to be able to get a better feel for it. Considering the Magnum Peak as an all around, but will give the longer range ones a try too. Chris, the Riese & Muller Delite Mtn. looks like the top of the line and of course once I try one of those on (or it's equiv. bike in SLC) I'm sure I'll throw all caution out the wind and then want the best / most expensive. At this point though, I'm trying to keep the range closer to 2K. Maybe that's a pipe-dream, but I'll want to save some $$ to upgrade my actual mtn. bike one day. ;-)

One quick question though, how important is weight on these bikes? I noticed that some 'carbon fiber' bikes are only a few pounds difference than some other bikes and I would assume with the bike the Chris mentioned weight would really be a factor. Is there a different SOTP (seat of the pants) feel when driving vs peddling all that weight up hill / long distances?

gadgetguy
2 months ago

Thanks for the quick reply.
i weigh 190 lbs and don't really take the bike off road that much.
what will be affected if i do take the bike off road ... lower gears?
and every time i call a bike shop they tell me i can't change the front chainring because it's a ebike ect. and they don't know what there doing.
You have an e3 peak that you did it to ... right?

I do own and e3 peak, I think it is a 2014 model year. The front chainring is actually easier to change than the rear cassette. You just have to purchase one with the correct bolt pattern (I think the one I purchased is in a previous post). It just bolts on. No special tools required.

The smaller the front ring the more revolutions (motor will turn) to turn the rear wheel one revolution. The smaller front ring allows the motor to spin faster and lightens the load on the motor when climbing a grade. The motor will generate less heat because gearing may be more favorable and motor is not working as hard. Since I don't climb steep grades, I decided to install 46t so that I stopped running out of gears (pedal turn without resistance) when riding over 20 miles/hour. I do find with the larger front ring I do shift more, but rarely use the biggest gear in the rear. I like that I can ride faster, but still have enough gears at the low end to climb hills. Shifting more allows the motor to run more efficiently. I don't find the shifting excessive with the larger chain ring.

Off road you may use the big ring in the back if the grade is steep enough. If the grade is too steep, you might have to walk the bike to avoid overheating the motor.

Look at the factory specs on other electric bikes, chain rings are larger unless the bike is dedicated for offroad. This bike is marketed for trails, that is why they put the smaller chain ring in the front. I think the new model Peak now has a 42t instead of a 38t. I am happy with my setup and if I change my behavior its no big deal to put the smaller ring back on ( I doubt I will ever change it).

fast
2 months ago

Thanks for the quick reply.
i weigh 190 lbs and don't really take the bike off road that much.
what will be affected if i do take the bike off road ... lower gears?
and every time i call a bike shop they tell me i can't change the front chainring because it's a ebike ect. and they don't know what there doing.
You have an e3 peak that you did it to ... right?

Al P
2 months ago

My 250w motor will reach 500w at peak, but even when shifting down, I still have to apply considerable force to get up steep hills. Add to that high speed pedaling while going nowhere. This defeats the whole purpose for buying an ebike. My 500w bike has 750w peak power and climbs steep Adirondack hills with no problem. Even my wife's 350w motor climbs with ease. If it didn't, she would be clamoring for a new bike. I would never buy another bike with a 250w motor unless I lived in a place like southern Florida, where there are no steep hills.

Ann M.
3 months ago

@GuruUno are you trying to figure out wiring for this battery? If so, you need it to go to the controller first, not directly to the motor. The Izip E3Peak was first produced in 2014 and Currie Tech/Raleigh has some technical information on its old site that may help. I've included a link to page with images of a TransX motor replacement which has a couple of pics with wiring visible that may help.

Also, consider contacting RPE (Rechargeable Power Energy) in Nevada, they specialize in rebuilding ebike batteries along with other lithium power packs. You ship them the battery, they do diagnostics and come back with recommendations and pricing.

GuruUno
3 months ago

"proprietary battery with different voltage output at different pins"
I noticed this while trying to get a readout, and saw the different voltages, which is another thing that has been bugging me.
There is a thread about using a 48v horn on an e-bike.....I can't get any activation of the horn when connecting to the 48v pins.
Last year I posted on this with no replies:

I've read that some have used a 48v electric horn on their 48v e-bikes.
I bought 2 of them, as I was of the belief the 1st one was no good.
The second one I got also did not work.
I take the battery off of my iZip E3 Peak, I take a voltmeter/tester to verify the voltage from the proper pins are correct (one set reads 48v, another reads 36v), and I test the horn by placing one wire on each terminal that shows voltage (the 48v set), and I get zero response from the horn.
Am I missing something?
I make reference to this link that discusses the use and installation, I sent the author an e-mail months ago, zero reply.
(link: http://www.ebikeschool.com/review-a-super-loud-ebike-horn-for-only-3/ )
Anybody have any ideas how/why?
I really, really want this horn.

Thomas Jaszewski
3 months ago

So I found some stats on US sales of ebikes: https://www.statista.com/statistics/326124/us-sales-of-electric-bicycles/

This only goes to 2016, since numbers are counted at the end of the year, but it shows the danger of judging sales by anecdotal talk from vendors. After a peak in 2014 sales are actually down. Since these are small numbers even if 2017 were to be a banner year it still means that ebike sales in the US are a blip. I assume that part of these small numbers are because if only early adopters are buying these it would follow the early adopter curve, so after this small group buys their bikes there is no mass market to follow through. There could be a million other reason such as lack of infra-structure and other things, but maybe there is an opportunity for a vendor to consider building ebikes that appeal to the mass market in the US with good after sales customer support and common sense build for the US market. A lot of what we're getting is made to comply with EU regulations and conditions. As the SmartCar fiasco proved just because something makes sense in the EU doesn't make it suitable for the US.
Exactly what you'll see with the venerable Vespa scooter. Owners struggling to understand why they don't get all models and great support in the USA. Muricans are wasteful idiots. They'd rather drive 10 miles over the limit in an SUV, who the feeling it's their total right.

Solom01
3 months ago

So I found some stats on US sales of ebikes: https://www.statista.com/statistics/326124/us-sales-of-electric-bicycles/

This only goes to 2016, since numbers are counted at the end of the year, but it shows the danger of judging sales by anecdotal talk from vendors. After a peak in 2014 sales are actually down. Since these are small numbers even if 2017 were to be a banner year it still means that ebike sales in the US are a blip. I assume that part of these small numbers are because if only early adopters are buying these it would follow the early adopter curve, so after this small group buys their bikes there is no mass market to follow through. There could be a million other reason such as lack of infra-structure and other things, but maybe there is an opportunity for a vendor to consider building ebikes that appeal to the mass market in the US with good after sales customer support and common sense build for the US market. A lot of what we're getting is made to comply with EU regulations and conditions. As the SmartCar fiasco proved just because something makes sense in the EU doesn't make it suitable for the US.

LimboJim
3 months ago

From what I have read about history of mountain bikes and their fight to gain access to basically hiking trails, it shouldn't come as a surprise that mountain bikers will distance themselves from ebikes-regardless of wattage, power, disabled ebiker, etc. For good reason.
General public and those who spend much time hiking could care less about the subtle differences us fanatics may see as night and day.
Is it powered? Yes, but only…… STOP! Hiker or general public or mountain biker doesn't care about pedal assist. And for the good of most- the ebiker needs to accept that and ebike where the dirt bikes go. In socal, if you want to ride a dirt bike you go to the desert or Gorman.
Gorman is a state ran dirt bike park with thousands of acres that a ebike could safely coexist and possibly not even see a dozen dirt bikes all day. The mountain bikers can usually do it in almost their backyards(but they have to use pedal power.;/)
There are no gains to be had by general public.
Street ebiking, especially for transportation, the general public can easily be sold on- for every ebike= 1 less car. Eventual goal to create bike paths and everyone is a winner. I suppose with enough emtbs- the goal should be ebike trails- like skateparks, I guess.
BLM land is another possibility " this land is our land, this land is your land" where pretty much anything goes. Maybe there is some of that closer than you know- check it out.
I appreciate your perspective, but will counter that MTBers fought for hiking trail access in the early days, but have since built many, many more trails that often weave between those old trails. As a general rule, I've always steered clear of popular hiking trails, even before eMTBs came into my realm.

Dirt bike/motocross trails near me are usually in "open" areas where trees are sparse, and I very much prefer to ride in the shade. There's very little cardio exertion involved with dirt biking, but I sweat a LOT on my eMTBs - sun exposure won't work for me. Add to that the speed of motos far exceeds that of my eMTBs - I'd be scared sh*tless to ride among them!

So I ride my local singletrack off-peak (weekdays), and except for the rare MTBers that ride at those times, no one's the wiser because I ride responsibly and my bike does no more damage than unassisted bikes. I happen to live next to a State Park with maybe 75-100 miles of trails (roughly half of which are singletrack built by MTBers), and the Head Ranger's fully aware that I'm out there riding pedal assist. As long as no one complains, he says, "Ride ON!"

fxr3
3 months ago

The real problem I see with more powerful eMTBs is TRAIL ACCESS in the long run. 500W is still pretty reasonable, but folks like Luna, HPC, Stealth and Optibike "peddle" 3000W and more! Sure, they generally disclaim these eMotos as "for use on private land only," but we all know folks will ride them wherever...

In my region of the good ol' USofA, the predominant MTB association, New England Mountain Bike Ass'n (NEMBA), outright opposes the use of pedal assist on any and all MTB-designated trails. They specifically call on the Int'l MBA and local land managers to condemn and ban pedelecs, lumping them in with these high-powered eMotos that can reach 50mph, but which cannot easily be differentiated from lower, more reasonably powered ebikes on sight. Unless they're going 50mph, of course, but trying to chase them down would be cray.

NEMBA's lobbied hard to get my state (MA) to keep calling all ebikes "motorized vehicles" regardless of Federal guidelines, technically prohibiting me from riding 90% of my area's best singletrack. I ride during "off-peak" hours and have avoided detection for two years now, but fear "No Electric" signage to come. NEMBA says that allowing true pedelec (no throttle) eMTBs on their trails a slippery slope of sorts, one that would create a "management nightmare." It didn't help my cause that someone literally tore up some "non-motorized" trails near me with a two-wheeled vehicle recently, presumably with an eMoto as it was near a densely populated area and no one heard it happening.

For anyone who cares to read it, here's NEMBA's "Open Letter..." It's well-written, sensible, and endorses accommodations for "senior citizens or people with disabilities" I'm 54 and endure chronic Lyme Disease symptoms, and I tend to agree with many of their positions. Marketing and promoting high-powered ebikes, especially ones that don't need to be pedaled, should focus on the motocross segment, and true pedelec eMTBs to the 50+ and "differently-abled" MTB crowd.

From what I have read about history of mountain bikes and their fight to gain access to basically hiking trails, it shouldn't come as a surprise that mountain bikers will distance themselves from ebikes-regardless of wattage, power, disabled ebiker, etc. For good reason.
General public and those who spend much time hiking could care less about the subtle differences us fanatics may see as night and day.
Is it powered? Yes, but only…… STOP! Hiker or general public or mountain biker doesn't care about pedal assist. And for the good of most- the ebiker needs to accept that and ebike where the dirt bikes go. In socal, if you want to ride a dirt bike you go to the desert or Gorman.
Gorman is a state ran dirt bike park with thousands of acres that a ebike could safely coexist and possibly not even see a dozen dirt bikes all day. The mountain bikers can usually do it in almost their backyards(but they have to use pedal power.;/)
There are no gains to be had by general public.
Street ebiking, especially for transportation, the general public can easily be sold on- for every ebike= 1 less car. Eventual goal to create bike paths and everyone is a winner. I suppose with enough emtbs- the goal should be ebike trails- like skateparks, I guess.
BLM land is another possibility " this land is our land, this land is your land" where pretty much anything goes. Maybe there is some of that closer than you know- check it out.

RoadWrinkle
3 months ago

Took deliver at the end of April. First must say this bike is well engineered and rides better than any ebike I have ridden in terms of handling and ride quality. BULLS puts together a high quality MTB. I tried all the assist levels with a variety of conditions and surfaces. In general, I worked much harder than with the 350w Bosch CX powered Haibike I owned previously. In fairness to BULLS, I am 6'2, 250 lbs, and would naturally assume a smaller rider would not have the same experience. Also, while I had big problems with the BULLS dealer I purchased through (they shall remain nameless), interacting directly with Barney at BULLS USA was a positive experience; they were very responsive and went above and beyond to remedy the issues I had with my bike. The point of this review is to let the larger riders know what my experience was. I would not hesitate to buy another BULLS (Bosch powered) bike in the future, in fact looking forward to seeing what the next few years will bring. Hoping the mid drive manufacturers will create 500-750w/48v/30A (fully integrated) systems for the riders that NEED more assist. Bafangs are there but the riding experience is no where near as natural feeling and no real integration. The quality of any motors torque and cadence sensors directly corresponds to ride quality and natural feel. BULLS/brose would be perfect (for me) in a 500w nominal/1000w peak design.

1/1
LimboJim
3 months ago

Bob, its "under power and slow," = lack of power with any grade over 10%, we spent most of our time riding in mountain in So Cal. The Brose below 10% rides like all of them, but anything over 10%, the Brose is a dog, anything over 15% be prepare for a workout, over 20%, you better be running a 36t in the rear. In the mountains, we rarely go past 12-15 mph on single track riding, but in certain areas it requires torque to get you out, there were it lacks the power.

Brose stealthy look is my favorite, out of the Big 3, but torque power is my least fav....
My Bulls...FS3 Plus, rated at 90Nm, has at least as much torque as my 80Nm Yamaha-powered SDURO AllMtn Plus, and both eMTBs climb 20% grade hills with relative ease. The Brose motor's definitely more subtle, with its peak power coming at lower cadence than my Bosch, but I've yet to experience a CX. The Yamaha also seems to peak at a lower cadence than Bosch.

FWIW, I posted about a broken chain experience I recently had with my Bulls in its first 120 miles or so, which I believe was caused by large chainring to large sprocket cross-chaining. My concern is that, when the chain broke, the Brose motor spun furiously fast, making a horrible, very high-pitched whining sound for several seconds. I've broken a hi-torque ebike chain before (on my 2015 iZiP Sumo), and its much lower-tech TranzX motor shut right off.

The fact that the Brose kept spinning makes me worry about the long-term - it rode fine after we fixed the chain but it was an AWFUL sound! Barney's put in a query with Bulls' Germany HQ because he's never heard of this happening.

RoadWrinkle
3 months ago

'Perfect' being a relative term.

1.) 750w nom/1200w peak, fully integrated mid drive with PAS that has torque and cadence sensors, as well as throttle over ride at all levels AND a 27-speed IGH 'transmission' designed to operate with the motor for an all in one system. Motor parameters fully programmable. Belt drive, no chain.

2.) 48 volt/ 15Ah battery fully integrated into the down tube, 30 amp controller.

3.) 27.5 Hardtail MTB design, boost hubs with large thru axles, tires 2.35 wide, ergo bars and grips, adjustable stem, FOX front air shock w/lockout. Integrated front and rear LEDs, large diameter hydro disc brakes with anti-lock shift levers, SLX components.

4.) Brooks saddle with Thudbuster post. Ibera 'Pack Rack'.

Full motor-battery-frame integration. Nothing hanging off the bike.
Under 50 lbs without the rack. Cost?

Zoumios
4 months ago

Quick discussion I have to bring up considering I know little to nothing about ebikes.

As I understand it, peak motor watts is designated by the volts x amps that the bike posses (ex: 36V x 15A = 540 watts)

Here's the quandary:

This E3 ProTour is listed as a 500 nominal watt ebike, yet it's battery watt hours is only 417.6. Isn't that a contradiction? If its peak watts, not even nominal, is 417.6, then how is it claiming 500? https://electricbikereview.com/izip/e3-protour/

Here's another scenario, though:

This Specialized Turbo Vado 5.0 is listed as only a 350 watt ebike, yet it pumps out 604.8 watts. Couldn't the nominal be considered higher? https://electricbikereview.com/specialized/turbo-vado-5-0/

In both instances, I assume the answer is not only easy but obvious for someone who actually knows what they are talking about.

Note: I am not directly comparing the bikes or claiming they are similar. I used them both as individual examples for this question.

Thank you in advance.

Dewey
4 months ago

I would prefer pedal assist to throttle only. I see that you suggested a bike with quite a powerful motor- is that because that is what is necessary to get up the hills?

I understand, I adapted my bicycle with a mid-drive motor and I ride it using pedal assist no throttle. Among a convenience sample of other riders on a recent ride with my neighborhood family bike group 3 of 6 parents towing children had adapted their bicycles with the same type of ebike motor which is a Bafang BBS01/BBS02 rebranded and sold under several names such as 8fun, Dillenger, Lunacycle, Empowered, EM3EV, eRad, and my preferred supplier California Ebike (Doug the owner is super helpful). It isn't a turn key solution like a complete ebike, I needed help from my local bike shop to remove the bottom bracket and replace the chain/make sure the gearing worked because in the conversion process you lose your other front chain rings, turning my 21 speed bike into a 7 speed. I have the lower powered BBS01 with a 36v battery and I programmed the controller to 18a, but the more powerful BBS02 48V model with a 25A controller setting is powerful enough (1200 watts peak power) to get up most hills. Power is necessary to climb hills when you are hauling extra weight. One of the links I posted above is from two parents with the Juiced ODK, one of whom claimed to be able to achieve 7mph up a 23% hill at full throttle. With my much less powerful controller/battery settings (648 watts peak power) I would be standing on my pedals to achieve the same speed on that grade hill. Because I adapted my old 1990's heavy steel hybrid bike, the added weight of me, my daughter, the trailer, the motor, and battery, means my system is underpowered for the weight I'm trying to haul uphill, it works most of the time if I'm not carrying anything else but I get a real workout when we haul the weekly groceries.

Dewey
4 months ago

Do you know if there is a guide available to help figure out the size of the motor/ battery needed to tow a certain weight up a certain grade with an e-bike?

Justin at Grin Tech in Vancouver has this motor simulator based on the motors he sells. Play with the battery, wheel size, hill grade, and weight parameters and look for the intersection of the red line (power) and black line (load), then look to the right of the vertical axis and that will tell you how many watts of power are needed to achieve peak proficiency for a given hill grade. Peak power for any ebike system can be calculated by multiplying the battery voltage by the amps the controller can handle e.g. a 20A controller using a 48V battery has a peak output of 960 watts.

Dewey
4 months ago

Really struggling to find any mid drives in my price range.
The BBS02 500W 48V mid drive kit might fit the bill. The advantage is it will have 500W stamped on the motor to satisfy MD law, then when you move to TN you could buy a USB cable and reprogram the controller amp setting to increase the amps to 25A and turn it into a 750W nominal 1200W peak power version. I bought my similar BBS01 kit from California Ebike and battery from Luna Cycle. To meet your budget you would need to use a Chinese vendor but shipping is expensive and support uncertain if anything goes wrong which is why I chose to go with reputable US suppliers, paid more but received good after sales support. The Bafang isn't a turn key conversion, I needed help from my local bike shop to remove the bottom bracket which had seized up, and unless you buy a chain ring spider/adapter you lose your extra front chainrings which turned my 21 speed into a 7 speed bicycle so I needed a new chain, to be fair I don't miss so many gears because I stay mainly in 4th and change the PAS level to maintain a comfortable pedal cadence. Also because I bought kit and battery from different suppliers I needed to solder matching electrical connectors to battery and motor.

Dewey
4 months ago

do I want/need a 500w motor and what is the difference in performance between a 36 V and 48V battery?
Hi Dave,

I think Maryland regulates ebike power to 500W, but in Tennessee ebikes are not regulated according to Wikipedia. The federal CPSC regulated ebike definition is 750W and 20mph and this definition is used by insurers. Peak power is calculated by multiplying the battery voltage by the amp setting in the controller e.g. 36V x 18A = 648W, or 48V x 25A = 1200W, usually controller amps are listed on the tech specs. This blog post describes how to calculate the watt hours of a battery pack which helps estimate range. Climbing ability is sometimes described in terms of torque, in his reviews on this site Court Rye generally lists torque rating in Newton Meters. There are a few articles that talk about the pros and cons of different types of ebike motors e.g here, and here. Some off-road riders advocate for high-power electric motorcycles but the mountain bike community does not want ebikes to threaten bike access to trails. People for Bikes have a database of eMTB trails for off-roading.

Mark Peralta
4 months ago

??????? You can program the controller to do just about anything you want. As I recall...from memory the upper (speed) limit is 99, can't remember if it's KPH or MPH, but either way you'll be moving right along. Perhaps I'm not pedaling at 120 RPM (cadence) but I regularly go well over 100 RPM (cadence) when climbing steep grades.

Court J.

I posted this addressed to Court Rye the administrator since I noticed that whenever he reviews a OEM mid drive, he always mention about the high cadence limitations, and that the Bosch has a higher top end compared to other mid drives. This old notion does not apply anymore to newer OEM mid drives. Bosch has an indicated top end of 106 RPM, however, the newer Yamaha based Synchdrive has a top end of 110-120 RPM.

The Bafang BBSHD is a whole different league, it has a top end of 150 RPM at 48 volts (130 RPM at 36 volts). A well trained bike sprinter also has does 150 RPM clown pedaling at its peak performance. Maybe, Bafang took into consideration that well trained athletes may also be using their ebikes?
http://image.dhgate.com/0x0s/f2-albu-g3-M01-A0-2B-rBVaHVZT2G-AQCdDAAMu4_r7Ufw810.jpg/hot-sale-b-bike-new-design-good-quality-48v.jpg

And that may be the reason why Bafang won in the Ebike endurance race in Germany?

Bike_On
4 months ago

Typo, sorry about that.

Bosch speed bikes have 60nm or torque and 350W ave power, likely 500-700W peak however.

The Opti 15R has 175nm of torque and 1500W ave power, maybe more for peak. That will accelerate much faster.

To maintain 28mph requires the full 350W Bosch output, leg power, a flat road with a good surface and smooth tires and a crouch position. The 34mph advertised Opti speed is upright and throttle only. Remember, power increases exponentially with speed due to air resistance.

My thought was the same R15 with a mode to limit to 28mph, but the same acceleration and PAS vs throttle control.

Would the ebike community then accept Optibike as a class3 pedelec or still consider it a motorcycle?

EyeInTheSky
2 weeks ago

Hello Court! Thanks for that review! can you tell me, what specific hub motor is used in this bike? Thanks in advance! 👍

Mike Malloy
2 months ago

Great review! I like everything about this bike except that the display is not removable for when you park this bike at a public bike rack for a few hours. Thieves would think, oh, someone left their smartphone then realize, it's an electric bike. Either way, the display could grab unwanted attention when no one is around. I do like the throttle. Can it be used at all power levels or only when power level is set at zero?

Mike H.
2 months ago

too bad they don't make a bigger frame...19" is just too small for me.

Jeff Coleman
3 months ago

Hey Court, I love your reviews, you've been a great help. I am in the market for an e-bike, I've narrowed it to the Magnum Peak, and the Sondors X. Which do you think would be the better purchase?

Alexi Thunderbird
3 months ago

was that porn on the computer behind the mechanic?

Stars fall. I stand.
3 months ago

Can someone please tell me which companies will accept a payment plan ? rather then paying out 3,000 in one shot .

Kyle Kraus
4 months ago

I am sort of ne to electric bikes. Is there a mode where you can ride without any assist, or maybe without the battery on at all to reduce weight?

Mike Malloy
2 months ago

There are different power levels, you just set the pedal assist to 0 and your on your own power. Yes, you can remove the battery and still use the bike.

TSCM Corporation
5 months ago

Hi Court, thanks for your awesome site and reviews. I am 6' 1.5" feet tall and 234 lbs. Do you think the Magnum Peak would be a good fit for me ? The bike looks great and the price is nice :)

Sodisna
5 months ago

How is 2K, "affordable"?

Mike Malloy
2 months ago

Because ebikes can be much more expensive depending on quality, $2K is at the low end of the scale. Like cars, you can buy base model or high end model.

Mark S
6 months ago

Website info on this ebike is now posted!!! Thanks guys!!!

Andrew Sansoucy
6 months ago

Get more views at U 2 B Z O N E . C O M to drive more traffic to your video

cadanes
6 months ago

If the Peak can double as a commuter then it should come with a rear rack, fenders, and front and rear integrated lights at $2k. I'll never understand the outrageous prices of electric bikes.

Harry Liang
2 months ago

If you factor in that the ebike becomes your everyday transportation commuter vehicle. The cost will pay off for itself very fast.

Mike Malloy
2 months ago

When I first started looking at ebikes, I had sticker shock too, especially since my 1yr old manual bike I bought at a local sports store cost ~$350, works great, just not electric. Skip forward a few months, (still shopping), I've gotten used to the price so $2K is not bad compared to other ebikes. Battery/Motor/Display drive up costs as well as component quality. You can buy Walmart/Sport store quality or professional quality so you have plenty of choices based on your needs and budget.

slappy76
5 months ago

What do you expect this to cost? The majority of the cost go into the battery. It's 624WH which is pretty damn big. You could get something with a 375-400WH for less but you've cut your range by a 50% or more.

I challenge you to buy a non electric bike with similar components and retrofit it with an equivalent motor and battery. You'll be spending about the same.

George Herman
6 months ago

Fair Price but there is no way I could ride that thing. That seat would destroy my manhood.

CncObsession
6 months ago

Please buy a camera mount for your helmet. 1 handed riding leaves a bit to be desired. Maybe a drone.

richard Powell
6 months ago

the one qualm I have with your videos when you are receiving mountain bikes is that you don't actually do any trail riding with them to showcase how they actually work for what they were meant for

Mike Malloy
2 months ago

Court, thank you for all you do. It's a huge help especially since many of us don't have access to all these ebikes locally when shopping around. We especially appreciate your un-biased and detailed reviews.

ElectricBikeReview.com
6 months ago

Very fair point Richard, I rode this more than is shown on camera but struggled to balance in snow while holding the camera. Many of my "reviews" are more like comprehensive overviews. I do my best with the time and terrain available :)

Micha A.
6 months ago

Nice Haibike copy, is it from China?

Larry Conger
6 months ago

Not internally routed, but price is fair, has lots of wires, Haibikes are still the best but I would like to see a throttle on some of the Bosch motors wud be kind of cool

TSCM Corporation
5 months ago

Larry Conger yes a haibike with throttle would be awesome!

Mark S
6 months ago

Magnum Bike web page says its 350 watt hub... You say 500 watt hub... Which is correct??? 36v or 48v??

Yoni Kayman
6 months ago

Mark S yes the bike has throttle only mode and pedal assist mode

Mark S
6 months ago

Thanks... Does it have a throttle only mode?? Very interesting-- hope they get their website updated soon!!

ElectricBikeReview.com
6 months ago

I'm told they will be posting it to their site soon... I guess I published a little early ;) and you're right, it's not the same as the Ui5

David Daboin
6 months ago

Mark S I think you're confusing it with the Mi5, I was too, but I don't see this one (peak) on their web page, anybody knows where to get this one?

Nisco Racing
6 months ago

Great video and place to film and test the bike!

MBA NONI
6 months ago

Hey court, between this bike, voltbike Yukon 750,radrover and the bitrix juggernaut (mid drive) , how would you rank them in order. I read all the full reviews on the site and just wanted to know your personal opinions on these bikes. Btw the Yukon 750 now comes with a bottle cage mount, chain slap guard.also I'm 6'2 220ibs

Robert Groves
6 months ago

I think that's an excellent idea. Court, maybe you can do some head to head comparisons. I like a lot of these bikes but I'd be interested to see which bike hits its top speed quicker. These bikes are getting closer to what I'm looking for.