Magnum Ui5 Review

Magnum Ui5 Electric Bike Review
Magnum Ui5
Magnum Ui5 350 Watt 8fun Geared Hub Motor
Magnum Ui5 Downtube Samsung Battery 36v 13ah
Magnum Ui5 Grips Shifter Lcd Console
Magnum Ui5 2 Amp Charger 1 5 Lbs
Magnum Ui5 Combined Display Button Console
Magnum Ui5 Optional Rear Rack Selle Royal Saddle
Magnum Ui5 Prowheel Cranks Aluminum Bash Guard
Magnum Ui5 Schwalbe Big Ben Cruiser Tires
Magnum Ui5 Spanninga Integrated Led Headlight
Magnum Ui5 Sr Suntour Xct Suspension Fork
Magnum Ui5 Tool Free Adjustable Angle Stem By Promax
Magnum Ui5 Electric Bike Review
Magnum Ui5
Magnum Ui5 350 Watt 8fun Geared Hub Motor
Magnum Ui5 Downtube Samsung Battery 36v 13ah
Magnum Ui5 Grips Shifter Lcd Console
Magnum Ui5 2 Amp Charger 1 5 Lbs
Magnum Ui5 Combined Display Button Console
Magnum Ui5 Optional Rear Rack Selle Royal Saddle
Magnum Ui5 Prowheel Cranks Aluminum Bash Guard
Magnum Ui5 Schwalbe Big Ben Cruiser Tires
Magnum Ui5 Spanninga Integrated Led Headlight
Magnum Ui5 Sr Suntour Xct Suspension Fork
Magnum Ui5 Tool Free Adjustable Angle Stem By Promax

Summary

  • A beautifully designed, purpose built, affordable electric bike well suited to urban riding or commuting
  • Step-thru frame is easy to mount but relatively stiff thanks to a double tube mid-section, integrated battery pack keeps weight low and centered - it seems well protected in case of tips and is easy to remove
  • The charging port and USB power outlet can be tricky to reach, the throttle is limited in power by the pedal assist level you choose
  • Solid one year warranty, quality Samsung battery cells, longstanding international presence with good performance (this is a fifth generation build even though it's new to the US)

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Magnum

Model:

Ui5

Price:

$1,699 USD

Body Position:

Upright, Forward

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Urban, Commuting

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2015

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

51 lbs (23.13 kg)

Battery Weight:

7 lbs (3.17 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

17 in (43.18 cm)

Frame Types:

Step-Thru

Frame Colors:

White with Blue, Gray and Black Accents

Frame Fork Details:

Basic SR Suntour XCT Suspension with 100 mm Travel

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Tourney TX

Shifter Details:

Shimano Triggers on Right Bar

Cranks:

Prowheel Ounce

Pedals:

Wellgo C127, Aluminum Alloy Platform

Headset:

Oversized, Tapered

Stem:

Promax, Tool-Free Adjustable Angle

Handlebar:

Mid-Rise

Brake Details:

Tektro Mechanical Disc with 180 mm Front Rotor and 160 mm Rear Rotor, Artek Levers with Motor Inhibitor

Grips:

Flat Rubber

Saddle:

Selle Royal (Magnum Branded)

Seat Post:

Promax

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Double Walled

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Big Ben, 26" x 2.15

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)

Tire Details:

Kevlar Lined, Reflective Sidewall Stripe

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Optional Metal Fenders ($29), Optional Metal Carry Rack ($39) with 25 kg Max Weight, Integrated Spanninga Kendo LED Headlight, Independent Spanninga Solo LED Backlight, Aluminum Alloy Bash Guard, Single Side Adjustable Length Kickstand, Sticker Slap Guard, Integrated USB Charging Port

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, Quick Release Front Wheel

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

8Fun

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

350 watts

Motor Peak Output:

600 watts

Battery Brand:

Samsung 18650 26F

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

13 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

468 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium Nickel Cobalt Manganese (Li-NCM)

Charge Time:

6 hours

Estimated Min Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Estimated Max Range:

55 miles (89 km)

Display Type:

Fixed Backlit Monochrome LCD

Readouts:

Power (Current), Battery Level (6 Bars), Speed, Assist Level (0-6), Odometer, Trip Distance, Trip Time

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle

Top Speed:

22 mph (35 kph)

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Written Review

Magnum electric bikes are relatively new to the US but they’ve been successful in Israel and parts of Europe for several years. The Ui5 is an “urban” model with “integrated battery” offering “5th generation” technology… It’s one of my favorite ebikes from their line because it looks great, is well suited to city riding or commuting with an average sized motor and battery and has a relatively clean cockpit that’s easy to use. There are a few issues with the bike including limited access to the charging port and USB outlet (when the battery mounted), only one brake lever with a motor cutoff switch, an independent rear light that requires AA batteries vs. being wired in and limited throttle control (you can only get as much power as the level of assist you’re in so it’s not really an override). Still, given the very reasonable ~$1,699 price point, purpose built frame, balanced weight distribution, clean wire integration, disc brakes, suspension fork, cheap fender and rack upgrades and the solid one year warranty this is definitely a winner in my book.

The motor is a 350 watt internally geared hub mounted in the rear wheel. It’s extremely normal, a piece of hardware I see more and more on value priced electric bikes because it’s produced in such large quantities by Bafang in China. I like that for the Ui5 they chose a black version to match the spokes, rims and battery. The motor whirs a bit depending on the level of power you’re applying but it’s not super loud, nor is it very heavy. I like that this e-bike has a quick release on the front wheel but you’ll need tools to access the rear. There’s a seven speed cassette with entry-level Shimano Tourney TX derailleur there and a quick-disconnect in the power cable so you can completely remove the wheel and motor together without any loose wires getting in the way. Seven speeds is decent for neighborhood or city riding and if you keep the chain lubed and drop in for an occasional tuneup everything should last. I especially like the aluminum alloy bash guard on the front chainring because it protects your pants or dress from getting greasy or snagged.

Powering the Magnum Ui5 electric bike is a beautifully integrated Lithium-ion battery pack. The downtube is partially cut away in order to sink the pack “inside” which provides more security and strength while simultaneously lowering the center of mass. It’s not quite as clean as the pack on Easy Motion or Stromer models but for a “value” offering it’s one of the best I’ve seen to date. Inside the pack are 18650 sized cells manufactured by Samsung. They are known for being long lasting, light weight and efficient in transferring power and I usually see them on mid to high-end models. Not only are you getting quality cells here, you also get more of them… I usually see 36 volt 10 amp hour ebikes at this price level but this one offers 13 amp hours for increased range. A few other “extras” on the battery include an integrated LED power level indicator (that isn’t especially useful when mounted to the frame because it’s not very bright and is blocked by the downtube) and a USB charging port. I know I’ve stressed this earlier and in the video review above but it would be nice if the outlet was placed at the top of the pack instead of the bottom so it could be reached and used more safely while riding. As it stands, the port is precariously close to the chainring and crank arms.

Activating this ebike is a two step process once the battery is charged and securely locked to the frame. First, you press a rubber power button at the top end of the pack and then you press a second power button on the display panel. It takes an extra second or two to do but the big concern is that it makes forgetting to switch the pack “off” much easier once you park the bike. The display panel is one I’ve seen on other brands including Pedego and features four buttons. Set allows you to change from odometer to trip distance and trip time while up and down allow you to select different power levels for pedal assist. The higher you go (up to 6) the faster the bike will ride but the more juice you’ll use in the process. I do like that you’ve got a throttle and pedal assist option with the Ui5 but the throttle isn’t as useful as it could be. You can only activate power up to the level of assist you’re in which means that level zero is very slow, one is a bit faster, two is decent and so on. It would be nice to set the bike in assist level two (for improved efficiency when pedaling) and then be able to override this using the throttle for short periods in order to climb a hill or pass a fellow cyclist on the trail. I also found that the pedal assist sensor on this model was a bit delayed. I’d call it average… and I do like the design of the sensor because it’s so small and well sealed against dirt and water but there must be fewer magnets inside because it just didn’t start or stop as quickly as some 12 magnet designs I’ve demoed recently.

To sum everything up… the price really makes this bike shine but even if it weren’t so affordable the matching paint, integrated wires, upgraded batteries and other extras like the lights really set it apart. Sure, you have to manually activate those lights but they are actually fairly high quality coming from Spanninga. The suspension fork adds a lot of comfort but you don’t get lockout or any kind of rebound adjust. For me, that’s completely fine and at 51 pounds I’d actually consider the bike light given the larger tires and that fork. I love the color and the adjustable stem, this ebike will fit a wider range of riders and for those who want to commute or run errands the rack was very impressive for just $40. It attaches to the top of the seat stays while many similar racks come in on the sides which adds clutter to the derailleur and disc brake mounting points. I do like the disc brakes on the Ui5 but was a little surprised that they only include one lever with a motor inhibitor. I’m not sure how much money that saves, it probably decreases clutter up front but I’d opt for two and then upgrade to a 12 magnet cadence sensor if I could change anything here. Overall it’s an impressive product and clearly refined (being a fifth generation design) even if it’s new to the United States.

Pros:

  • The battery secures to the frame well, looks good and is easy to take on and off even though it’s fairly snug beneath the top tube (since it slides out to the side), seems well protected by the frame in case of tips
  • The frame is fairly stiff due to the double tube top tube + down tube design and oversized tapered head tube, it looks beautiful with the internally routed cables and color matched fork
  • Very affordable for a purpose built electric bike with a one year warranty, upgraded battery size and brand name Samsung cells
  • Offers throttle and pedal assist, the controls are fairly compact and reachable in the cockpit, moreso than the Mi5 which has two shifter units
  • Optional carry rack and fender set are sturdy and very well priced, the addition of LED lights here adds great utility for commuting
  • Comfortable ride given the larger Schwalbe Big Ben tires, Suntour suspension fork and Selle Royale saddle
  • Nice colors, even the suspension fork and grips match, this is not always the case with lower priced electric bikes
  • The motor and battery offer “average” power for a US electric bike but the battery is actually slightly larger than standard with 13 amp hours vs. just 10 on most models

Cons:

  • The USB charging port is located at the lowest end of the battery pack very near where the downtube intersects with the seat tube, it is difficult to reach for use while riding and any wires extending out here may get snagged in pedaling or come into contact with the chainring
  • Only available in one standard size with one color option but the adjustable angle stem helps to broaden support for people of different heights
  • Throttle mode can work in tandem with pedal assist but does not fully override assist because power output is still limited by the assist level you select, in zero the throttle is very weak and slow
  • No bottle cage bosses, you can add storage by purchasing the fitted rear carry rack for $39 and getting a trunk bag or panniers
  • The LED lights are great but it would be nice if both were integrated (the rear light requires two AA batteries), each one also has to be manually turned on vs. using the display to do it
  • The battery pack has to be switched on before the bike is turned on, this takes extra time and makes it easy to forget to tun off the battery which can slowly drain the battery due to an LED indicator built in, this LED indicator isn’t visible when riding due to a dark filter cover and the top tube
  • Only the left brake lever features an integrated motor inhibitor, if you squeeze the right lever to stop it will still activate the rear disc brake but the motor may continue because pedal assist is a bit delayed

Resources:

More Magnum Reviews

Magnum Metro+ Review

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Magnum Peak 29 Review

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Magnum Cruiser Review

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A handsome, cruiser style electric bike with neatly integrated cables, strong alloy fenders, a clean plastic chain cover, and uniquely designed rear cargo rack, everything matches. Emphasis on comfort for the rider with soft Big Ben balloon tires, an extra-wide saddle…...

Magnum Metro Review

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Magnum Classic Review

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Magnum Peak Review

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Magnum Premium Review

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Kaldeem
3 years ago

Um, The heading for this review is called Magnum Ui5, but the video is the review of the Velo KS bike.

Reply
court
3 years ago

Thanks for the heads up! I accidentally used the wrong video code and will fix it ASAP!

Reply
John Carey
3 years ago

Magnum Ui5 and others which have a battery turn on before the computer works. In turning them off why not just switch off the battery , that would solve the two step problem. But with separate lights, you have to remember to turn them off also, especially if you use them for safety in the day time. I would love to have a Kalkhoff but for money reasons I think I will order a Ui5. thanks for all your hard work, and great reviews. I’m sure you have helped many find their best bike for them.- JLC

Reply
court
3 years ago

Great points John! I think you’re correct that simply turning the battery off will also de-activate the display. The Magnum Ui5 was a solid bike and I feel like the company is doing a lot to offer good support. I realize that even a relatively “cheap” electric bike can seem expensive, it actually amazes me how much regular bicycles can cost. Ride safe out there :)

Reply
Nirmala
3 years ago

I just ordered one of these based on your review. Thanks for all of the information on this site which was invaluable in helping me decide which bike to buy. If we like this Ui5 as much as I think we will, we plan to buy a second one for my wife!

Reply
court
3 years ago

Awesome! Glad the review helped you Nirmala, I do my best but time is often limited so it ends up being more of an informed “overview” than a true deep dive. I’d love to hear about your experience with the bike, feel free to follow up with comments here good or bad to help others :)

Reply
Jeff
3 years ago

I think you are a little hard in your cons: Do not care about the following: Only one size, it either fits or not! Anyone who cannot turn on of off lights is lazy. USB port is in wrong place — how many $1499 bikes have a USB port! Left brake cuts motor – a point but no big deal. You already discussed turning off main battery you do not have a two step process. Based on my analysis this is a 9.5 bike and for the price probably a 10!

Reply
court
3 years ago

Great points! I do my best to be complete and over-share on pros and cons to help people consider and re-consider which ebike is best for their needs. Admittedly, some “cons” are more just considerations and reminders about what was covered in the full writeup. I agree that an excellent price can create a lot of value even if systems aren’t perfectly refined :)

Reply
Jeff
3 years ago

I appreciate your fair response.

Reply
court
3 years ago

Thanks, I do this because I care… I realize my reviews are subjective and based on my opinion so it’s great to have differing opinions shared in the comments and I appreciate critical feedback. I want to do a great job with this and be fair :)

Reply
Nirmala
3 years ago

So, our Ui5 arrived today. I had a few hiccups setting it up: I was not familiar with the Neco headset and so at first I had no idea how to get the fork attached properly – you tighten a hex bolt inside the stem to connect the stem to the tube coming up through the headset from the fork.

Also the adjustable stem still has about 1/2 inch of play in it even after I tightened it up very firmly. This means the handlebars move up and down 1/2 an inch as I ride. It is a little annoying, but it is still very ride-able. So far Magnum has been very helpful over the phone and I am still hoping to work with them to solve the up and down play in the stem. I will report back on how that gets resolved.

In the meantime, I was able to take it for a couple of nice long spins. Here are my first impressions:
1-Size is a little small for me. I am 6’0″ and I have a 32 inch pant inseam. With the seatpost all the way up to the maximum allowed, my legs were still a little too bent while pedaling. Fortunately, I had a different saddle (this one) and that gave me a few more inches of height than with the stock saddle, which is now almost enough. The stock seat post is only about 300 mm, so it seems to me that Magnum could give you a bit longer seatpost to accommodate taller riders. I am also thinking of getting a Thudbuster suspension seatpost, and I know they have a 450 mm extra long version in the 27.2 diameter, so with that seat post, I will have more than enough height.
2-The fenders are included now in the base price (rack is still $39 extra), but I immediately removed them as they were rubbing a bit, and here in Arizona, I will probably never need them. I do not commute to work, so I will not head out on rainy days which are few and far between in this climate.
3-I used the trick of turning off the bike by only using the power switch on the battery. That way, everything gets turned off for sure, so I intend to make that a habit when shutting it off.
4-Now for the fun part: this bike was a joy to ride. It handles very nicely, is much lighter than some other electric bikes I have rented by the day, and boy, is it fun to have that assist helping me along. I rode up some moderate hills and with full assist and low gear, I made it up pretty easily. There were a few steeper stretches where I still had to work a bit, but even then, the electric assist made it doable. The hills around here will mean that I still get some exercise even if I use a lot of electric power.
5- I am about 180 lbs and I was riding up and down hills and sometimes against the wind for over an hour, and the battery is still showing about 2/3rds of its charge, so I think the 13 amp hour battery is going to be plenty for the kinds of moderate rides I intend to do on this.
6-Someone at Magnum said that most people end up leaving their bike in power assist level 6. And again for a nice 1-3 hour joy ride where conserving battery is not an issue, I can see why that might be true for me. I quickly got spoiled by the effortless speed on the flats and also not having to think about upping the assist when approaching a hill. I guess it would be nice to have a full power throttle override in all assist levels, but when riding in the top level (6), it becomes a moot point. I also found that I quickly got the hang of adjusting the assist on the fly to a lower level whenever I wanted a more relaxed pace, and actually used the throttle less than I thought I would. Pedaling was generally so easy that I tended to forget about the throttle. Note: Pedal assist is a new experience for me as the ebikes I have ridden in the past were throttle only. I did go off road for just a little bit, and there I could see using the lower levels of power assist as it gets tricky to have the motor surging when you are navigating rougher terrain. But the Ui5 is not really a mountain bike, so I will probably stick to smoother dirt trails.
7-This bike looks really good in person. I like the color scheme and the brown tires are classy. They also are a good compromise between a thicker tire for cushioning and a fairly smooth tread for easy rolling. I intend to add some slime to the tubes, and between that and the kevlar puncture resistance, I am hoping to not have to worry too much about flats. When these tires wear out, I am thinking of trying a pair of the Tannus tires that never go flat and never need pumping up: http://www.tannus.com/#intro

To sum up: I think this bike offers a lot for the money based on having read a lot of the reviews on here, although I have not tried many other ebikes, so my opinion is based on very limited actual experience. It easily blows away the rental ebikes I have tried, and I have enjoyed the Ui5 a lot so far. I did have a few problems with the setup and assembly, even though I worked on a lot of bikes in my younger days. I spoke to someone at Magnum and they explained that they will be mostly selling through dealers once they get their network established, so anyone buying an assembled bike will avoid that issue.

I hope this is helpful to anyone considering this bike.

Reply
court
3 years ago

Very helpful Nirmala! Thanks for taking the time to share your in-depth experience about assembly, the fenders and your preferred saddle. It’s always great to get this kind of honest constructive feedback and hope the bike works well for your intended use. Also glad to hear that Magnum was responsive when you reached out :)

Reply
Derek kerton
2 years ago

Nirmala. I’ve got the same loose problem you have with the handlebars on the Ui5, but since it’s later than your post, I was able to find a video that solved the problem completely here.

Turns out Magnum *hid* an important pair of screws under a sticker on the headset. Watch the video, and you’ll see the location of these, and a third hidden bolt. With that video, my problems were quickly solved. You probably figured that out by now, so I am posting this for others.

Reply
court
2 years ago

Awesome tip Derek, thank you for sharing it :D

Nirmala
2 years ago

Hi Derek, Yes I did find my way to that video, and it worked, although I found I needed to use Loctite on those screws or they would just work themselves loose again. I guess this is a common problem with adjustable handlebar stems.

CJ
3 years ago

Thanks for your review. I bought a UI5 after doing a lot of research on your site. I just put mine together but it didn’t come with instructions. Do you know what the little lever on the right side, forward of the gear switcher switch and under the right brake lever, is for? I can’t figure it out. It doesn’t seem to do anything. BTW, Thanks for your all your hard work! [EDIT] Nevermind, I figured it out. Both the levers are part of the gear switcheroo.

Reply
court
3 years ago

Awesome! Glad you figured it out and sorry to hear there were no instructions? I think Magnum is planning to sell through dealers so customers won’t have to assemble. Would love to hear how it works for you after some real world rides :D

Reply
CJ
3 years ago

Definitely! Initial impressions are very good. It’s a very fun ride. My first ebike, so the power is really surprising. Will be putting it through its paces in the following weeks.

Reply
Nirmala
3 years ago

Some more observations to report:
1-I definitely need a longer seatpost, so I am going to order the 450mm long Thudbuster. Even my wife who is 5’9″ found that she needs every inch of available seatpost as well as the added height provided by the cushier saddle we added to the bike. So anyone who is a bit taller may need to plan on at least getting a longer seatpost than the 300 mm post that comes with the bike.
2-I put slime in the tires and added some other weight ( a rack, bag, toolkit, etc) but the motor is still plenty peppy enough for me. Very occasionally I need to work a bit on really steep hills, but that is also a chance to get some good exercise. The motor still makes a big difference on the steeper hills, compared to no electric assist, and more moderate hills are a piece of cake. I may someday upgrade the rear cogs to a wider range freewheel. Currently, the rear cogs are 14-28 and the front chainring is pretty big for a single chainring at 48 teeth. I think a 11-34 tooth freewheel set would work a bit better for the hills around here.
3- Magnum has continued to be very helpful with the problems that showed up. They posted a youtube video that explains how the handlebars and stem are mounted and adjusted and I strongly recommend anyone who is interested in this bike to take a look: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8IZc9MC6-Bc This video also showed me how to fix the problem with the 1/2 inch of play in the handlebars.
4-Mount your handlebars right away when the bike arrives as otherwise the fork will fall out of the headtube and the bearings might get lost. If you are not particularly handy, you might want to take the bike in its box to a bike shop as the assembly is a bit challenging, or wait until Magnum gets more dealers up and running, and buy your bike assembled.
5- A couple of other problems that showed up: My rack must have gotten slightly bent in shipping (it was in the box with the bike) and so it was a bear to get it on the bike. The good news is that it will probably never come off as the screws holding it on are under a bit of pressure. Also the charger that came with my bike was defective (the light should turn red when charging and green when fully charged) but Magnum took care of that with a replacement.
6-I am quickly getting used to the controls on this bike. While the throttle override is limited to the assist level you are in, it is not at all difficult to change assist levels on the fly. It is no more complicated to operate than a typical multi-speed bike with both front and rear derailleurs, only instead of a front derailleur, you select different assist levels with your left hand. I am still surprised at how little I use the throttle on this bike. I just shift gears and power levels to adjust to the terrain and keep a nice easy cadence most of the time. Someday, I would like to try a mid-drive bike to see what it is like to have the motor drive the chain, but for now, I think I prefer having the motor input and my own pedaling input function separately to drive the rear wheel.
Overall, I am very happy with my purchase. Now that we have both had a chance to ride this bike, we are definitely going to buy another Ui5 so my wife and I can ride together.

One more comment that might apply to any ebike: I found that when maneuvering at very slow speeds, such as when making a tight u-turn in a cul-de-sac, it helps to lightly apply the left brake. This cuts the motor and allows me to pedal through the turn without the electric assist kicking in and surging me forward at the wrong time. It seems easier to balance also when pedaling through tight maneuvers at slow speed, and the motor surging can really mess you up if you are not careful. So the motor cutoff on the left brake lever has proven to be a very helpful feature.

Reply
court
3 years ago

Awesome feedback Nirmala! Thank you for sharing in such a complete and organized way. I’m sure this will help others who are considering the Magnum Ui5 and I’m excited to hear that you’re planning to get another one so you and your wife can take rides together :D

Reply
Nirmala
3 years ago

Some more real world experience with our Ui5’s to report: I wanted to condition the new battery of our second bike, so I ran it all the way down. In doing so, I covered 45 miles, and I was not babying the battery at all, riding mostly in the 3 to 6 pedal assist levels and doing lots of hills and using level 6 on the uphills. This is pretty impressive range. Unfortunately, our second bike has a problem with the controller so it only made it 4 miles or so and then the motor would not work. Magnum is taking very good care of us so far with these problems as they show up. I have no idea if these kinds of issues are typical, and it would not be fair to come to any conclusions regarding the reliability of their bikes given that we have only ridden two of them. The first bike is actually running great and the problems with that bike were all very minor and easy to correct. Magnum is saying they will fix the issue with the second bike even if it means shipping us a completely new ebike. This is a reassuring level of customer service when dealing with buying a bike online. I am still enjoying this bike immensely. I ride around for hours with a big grin on my face.

Reply
court
3 years ago

Awesome! Thanks for sharing your time to report this… Always good to hear positive feedback, glad the Magnum team is helping you out and standing behind their product so well :)

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Nick
3 years ago

Hi Court, what do you think the usability of the Ui5 is for light trail use? My primary use will be commuting (hills, but not super steep grades), but I’m thinking that if I get into it I might like to try out some of the trails around here, which are basically pretty groomed. Overall, I’d like an e-bike that is still a bike: I want to get some real exercise while taming the hills a bit, then maybe explore the wilds. Any others beside the Ui5 that come to mind? This one seems to stand out for value. Thanks so much for your efforts!

Reply
court
3 years ago

Hi Nick! Great question… Aside from the tires, this ebike is very similar to those offered by Easy Motion and other companies (standard frame, basic suspension and an efficient hub motor). I would choose it based on the lower price, aesthetic and step-thru frame (if that’s something you want). Have you seen the other Magnum ebike? The Mi5 model comes with studded tires, a sloping high-step frame (which will be stiffer for off-road) and is the same price. The Mi5 is just a 19″ frame vs. 17″ so the standover height is taller and the reach might be longer, I’m 5’9″ and felt great on it. Coming back to the Ui5, if you like the style and mostly want on-road riding then the tires will be a bit better for that. I hope this helps, either bike would do fine on groomed trails and they are very similar ;)

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Nick
3 years ago

Thanks so much Court. Sounds like the the main differences (aside from lights) would be the frame size (i’m 5’10”, so not sure it’s too much of an issue, tho I keep Nirmala’s comments above in mind) and some difference in the controls due to more speeds on the Mi5, which seems to add up to superior usability for the Ui5. And the knobbies. The style of either I find attractive. I hunted up and down on your site, and apart from some material on the high end, couldn’t find really anything that seemed distinctly better for my needs. I think I may have found a match in the Ui5. Thanks again.

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court
3 years ago

Awesome! Well I hope you have a great experience with the bike and invite you to report in your thoughts after spending some time in the saddle. I also really like the look that Magnum has chosen for their bikes, both look great and the team seems dedicated to offering good customer service :)

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Nirmala
3 years ago

So we got our replacement bike, and I think we now have two working Ui5s! It is great that Magnum was so quick to replace the bike with the motor controller that failed. Good customer service is a a real treasure.

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Jeff
3 years ago

I have had my UI5 for 2 weeks and just love this bike..I trail ride in large forest preserve with some modest hills. generally use pedal assist 1 or 2. I can also confirm that the battery gets about 45 to 50 miles. Very smooth riding and very well built. My bike came with fenders and a back rack for $1499, but now price is $1699, still a very good value. No mechanical issues.

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court
3 years ago

Awesome feedback Jeff! Glad to hear the bike is working well for you out there, the forest sounds like a wonderful place to ride. You’re getting excellent range, do you mostly ride with pedal assist? Which levels?

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Nirmala
3 years ago

I just wanted to add that the most recent time I ran a battery down all the way, I only got about 35 miles. So maybe the other time when I thought I got 45 miles was a fluke, or maybe I miscalculated the mileage :) It was two different batteries, but I doubt there is that much difference in capacity.

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Jeff
3 years ago

Court, I use pedal assist all the time. Assist levels 1, 2 and 3. Mostly ride in level 2.

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Nirmala
3 years ago

I tend to ride in level 3-4 and sometimes bump it up even higher for big hills, so that probably explains why I am seeing more like 35 miles of range. This is a hilly area also which definitely reduces range. Also, I can report that the bike does fine on smooth dirt trails, but not so good on rougher ground. But then, I am not really an off-road kind of rider.

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court
3 years ago

Nice! Appreciate the feedback Nirmala :)

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Jack
3 years ago

Court, Jeff & Nirmala, thanks to each of you for all the helpful info. Together, you’ve created one of best ERB review segments.

Can one of you offer more info on the corporate entity? Yes, I see all the European models on the Magnum webpage and Court mentioned Magnum had a presence in Europe for a few years before being introduced in the U.S. But my impression is that Magnum is a Chinese company that first found a distributor for Europe and then subsequently found one located in Southern California for the USA. The Ui5/Mi5 duo look like they might be a fit for me. I would just appreciate knowing a bit more about who I’m buying from, especially given my relatively distant location in Montana.

Magnum dealer distribution at the moment is interesting. A very few, widely dispersed dealers in only a couple of regions outside of the San Fran-to-San Diego megalopolis. I can appreciate their desire to expand their dealer network…but given the slow growth of ebikes in the U.S., aspirations aren’t the same as practical realities. I notice my closest Magnum dealer is two mountain ranges and a 2.5 hr flight time away. Which made Nirmala’s report on issue resolution very helpful. Thanks, everyone.

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court
3 years ago

Hi Jack! I wish I could provide more information about Magnum for you but I really only know what I’ve been told (that it was started in Israel and is now moving to the US for more customers). This is based on what the founder and the North American rep told me in our face to face meeting when I created this and other Magnum reviews. That said, my understanding is that the vast majority of electric bikes are manufactured in parts of Asia including China. That includes bikes from major brands, maybe they are designed in California (like Pedego and Specialized) but the frames and components are usually produced in China.

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Andrew Clifton
2 years ago

I just bought a new MagnumUi5, and I ABSOLUTLY LOVE IT!!!! I bike about 1,000 miles per year(3-4 miles per day, every day). I am 71 years old and have a health condition that made it a BAD idea to be peddling hard up hills. So this bike is perfect for me since I only use the motor assist on hills! It is so much more fun to not have to peddle up those damn hills, but still get good exercise peddling on the level!

I have one question that was mentioned in an earlier comment on the Ui5. How can I make the handle bars not have that 1/2 inch up and down play from the attachment rotating slightly when you pull or push on the handle grips? Any suggestion or remedy will be greatly appreciated!

Thanks, Andrew Clifton

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luc
2 years ago

bonjour, superbe vélo mais remarquer qu’il n’y est pas de carde boue imaginez vous avec le vélo en temps de pluie ! pour le prix domage que les ingénieures n’est pas pensée à ce détaille qui as sont importance dans des pays pluvieux!

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court
2 years ago

I translated your comment and found that you were sad that they did not include fenders on the bike to use in wet conditions. I agree that in certain locales it is important to protect from water and mud and one option to help with that is after-market fenders that you can add yourself! I actually think the rear rack would provide good protection against water but for the front it may be difficult because the suspension fork and light are already mounted. I have seen these plastic fenders that can be added to the downtube that you may wish to consider.

Je traduisais votre commentaire et a trouvé que vous étiez triste qu’ils ne comprennent pas les ailes sur le vélo à utiliser dans des conditions humides. Je suis d’accord que, dans certains endroits, il est important de protéger contre l’eau et la boue et une option pour aider à dire après-marché ailes que vous pouvez ajouter vous-même! Je pense en fait le porte-bagages arrière serait une bonne protection contre l’eau, mais pour l’avant il peut être difficile parce que la fourche à suspension et la lumière sont déjà montés. Je l’ai vu ces ailes en plastique qui peuvent être ajoutés à la diagonal que vous pouvez envisager.

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Nurse juno
2 years ago

Hi all! Just bought it in NZ after reading all your kindly left, detailed information and reply, and love it! However, just wonder if there has been any change in battery power button as mine does not turned off from battery pack but only from the panel. The seller does not even aware of this web site and doesnt much care as it is not mechanical failure or something. Is it kind of change has been made or different from County to country? One more thing, r u all charging battery everyday regardless of battery left or once it reached some level? I just afraid it kill its capacity due to memory effect. Thx all and sure your kind reply will help so many others to choose a right ebike as it did to me!

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court
2 years ago

Hello! I’ve heard that the 2016 model has been improved and this may include changes to the button or it could be your geography? Hard to say for sure but I intended to review the updated bike soon so we will see. As far as charging, I usually take my battery pack inside to avoid heat and cold and will plug it in for a charge if more than 30% has been used. If storing for a long time I may leave it at 50% to relax the cells.

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Brian
2 years ago

Really liked your review on this bike and I’m considering purchasing the ui5, but I’m not certain if the 350w motor will have enough power. I’m 59 years old, 5’7″ and a muscular 220 lbs, so I don’t know if I should go with an ebike with a 500w hub motor instead. I did 1400+ miles last year on my hybrid bikes doing very few hills, but I plan on having hip replacement surgery soon and thought an ebike would be beneficial until I get back in shape. I won’t be riding up any steep hills, but will occasionally need throttle power to help get me up a few low grade hills.

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court
2 years ago

Hi Brian! That’s a tough call… Given your average height and upcoming surgery it makes sense to get a step-thru like the Ui5 and the value on this bike is great… pretty well priced and well specced. I think you’d still get great performance from the 350 watt motor, human athletes put out ~220 watts continuous on endurance rides so you’re more than doubling your own healthy effort. It does have a throttle and if you dial up pedal assist you’ll get decent power. I personally like the way this ebike looks and have heard from shops that now carry it that customers haven’t had issues. You could check out all of the other step-thru models using this link and consider the BESV JS1 for a bit more or Biktrix Stunner if you’re willing to give up the suspension fork but still want affordable. I hope this helps! Good luck with your surgery, an ebike will be a lot of fun and I admire your drive to stay healthy and active :)

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Jensen L
2 years ago

Hello Court! Been reading reviews here for the last few months, finally bet on a Flux bike. I see this model has the same (or extremely close to it) battery pack style, 36v and 11ah. I’m wondering if there is a way to see if the battery pack in the Flux (can’t wait for delivery!) can be changed out with the one in the Ui5. I’m looking to buy a road/cruiser style bike for my wife, and it would be great if we could swap batteries. This seems like a good value bike and has the ‘look’ my wife could go for, and a price she won’t kill me over.

Either way, thanks for the great reviews, this site is a great resource and I appreciate your thoroughness. I’ve been turning folks on to ebikes, and I send them to your site for information and shopping help. Keep it up!

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court
2 years ago

Awesome! Congrats Jensen… I wish I could help and give you some feedback about interchangeable batteries but it’s a very sensitive subject. I don’t want to suggest something that could result in a fire or failed warranty. In my experience it’s best to keep batteries and chargers with the bikes they are designed for. Sometimes you can get two ebikes from the same manufacturer and then it’s more okay but still, manufacturers like Pedego had different voltage batteries for different controllers and motors so interchange is not always possible. Whatever you decide on, I hope your Wife and you enjoy the rides together! I bet she’ll be very excited once she tries your Flux :D

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A
2 years ago

hello! I love your reviews. thank you for the hard work. wondering if you’ll review the magnum premium folding bike? thanks!

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court
2 years ago

Hi A! Yes, it’s on my list and I plan to review it eventually but can’t say for sure exactly when. Thanks for expressing your interest :)

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Beni
2 years ago

Hi..just bought a new ui5 and do not know how to max speed as the speed is limited to 6km/h..as i understan there is a way in the display panel to change it and to max speed.please advise.thanks

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court
2 years ago

Hey Beni! I don’t have the bike in front of me at the moment but I believe if you try holding the plus and minus keys simultaneously it could launch the settings? Sometimes holding up and power or double pressing power or information can do it. I’ll reach out to a rep from Magnum to see if they can chime in and help :)

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Beni
2 years ago

Thanks, ill wait for your answer if you reach Magnum..thanks again…

Anonymous
1 year ago

Hello, thank you very much for the detailed review, Court. Comments of other owners are also valuable and highly appreciated. I am really up to this bike now thanks to all this info.

Just as an addition to the initiated above discussion about Magnum dealer distribution. It seems to me that Magnum is in fact merely a US company representing another holder selling pure Chinese bikes across the world. Take a look at this website and this one.

There are a whole bunch of Magnum Ui5 modifications and various versions of it and Leisger bikes. Moreover, one can read both companies are located in the Hannover airport area (in Germany) and mentioned websites are similarly designed. Unfortunately, the design is a bit amateur and some points struck my eye, such as pictures with technical characteristics instead of normal text and some not working links.

I guess all these bikes are of pure Chinese origin and design, and are therefore sold so cheap under different names in US, Europe, and New Zealand and who knows where else. In no way it makes them worse or inferior. I just wanted to share information I came upon. I personally will buy Ui5 and put it on test :)

Have nice rides,
Igor

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court
1 year ago

Hello Igor, I appreciate your insights… Having met two of the guys who run this company (Magnum and Leisger) I was told that they are actually an Israeli company but I have no doubt that their products are built and mostly assembled somewhere in Asia. That seems the be the case with nearly ever single company I’ve looked into. Designs are made in Europe, the US or elsewhere and that’s where final assembly and sales are made but the physical goods are all from China, Taiwan or even Vietnam. One of my distant relatives fought in the Vietnam war and is completely opposed to any products made overseas… he won’t even ride in some cars. I respect his feelings and perspective but am glad that for the most part, the global economy lets people contribute different parts from different areas and we can all work together. I also tend to be willing to pay more for products sold in local shops because of the service provided and the extra polish of finalized bikes vs. a rejected prototype or last-season model with worn battery etc. those are all risks you run but indeed, the product may be very similar or even the same at times :)

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Igor
1 year ago

Thank you for the reply! I was also wondering if you by chance know, whether one can hook up another throttle lever, e.g. half-twist grip? I have never done e-bike assembly before so I am not familiar with the way the throttle is connected to the motor.

Robert
1 year ago

Court, Thanks so much for your articulate and intelligent reviews. Based on your comments, I purchased the Ui5. I finished the assembly with little difficulty. I’ve been an avid biker for years. However, at age 74, with weak knees and a heart condition, I thought I was finished as a cyclist. Then, online, I discovered e-bikes and a new world opened to me. Now, I enjoy a level of appropriate exercise, open air and sunshine. The step-though frame of the Ui5 is ideal for me and likely would be appreciated by others in circumstances similar to mine. So far, Magnum support has been excellent, solving issues by phone. I probably will not subject the bike to extensive use, so I am hoping it will not require professional service. Alas, there are not any sales outlets or service facilities near my city of residence.

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court
1 year ago

Good for you Robert! Staying up to date with technology, getting outside, and enjoying the ride. I agree that if you take care of the bike and keep your riding smooth (and store the battery in a cool, dry location at ~80%) it should last a long time. Magnum has decent customer support and their ebikes are simple enough that most regular bicycle shops should feel comfortable adjusting the derailleur, fixing flat tires and cleaning the chain etc. Do check that the tire pressure is within the recommended range each time you go for a ride. I check by squeezing the tires and estimating by their firmness if air is needed. Low tires not only produce drag and inefficiency but also allow the inner tube to get pinched and eventually punctured when riding off curbs and over bumps.

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Ken Sobel
1 year ago

I’m interested in getting this bike for my wife. Does the right brake lever stop the motor in its latest iteration?

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court
1 year ago

Hi Ken, I just heard back from Magnum and they say that “yes it does” have the right brake lever motor inhibitor. I hope this helps you out :)

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Robert
11 months ago

Court, you’re the best! It is difficult to find reliable reviewers these days–be it for restaurants, movies, etc. When it comes to e-bikes, however, you have no doubt helped many buyers make intelligent choices. I watch your many reviews even though I have already purchased the Magnum Ui5.. Still love this bike! It’s ideal for my purposes. Before I discovered your reviews, I bought what turned out to be an entry-entry level e-bike from X-Treme–the so-called Trail Climber. It’s just OK. Sort of a beginner’s vehicle, Do you know of the X-Treme line? I haven’t seen any reviews online except for some by other commentators.

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court
11 months ago

Hi Robert, thanks! I do my best with this site and try to be objective and honest about trade-offs or concerns but also excited and constructive in how I present. X-Treme has been on my radar for several years but I never see their products in person anywhere and the company hasn’t offered to have me visit their headquarters though I did reach out to them once and share my site. I’m sure I could pour some energy into finding a bike or even buy one to review but there are so many companies who know what I offer and actively work with me… I could get two or even three of those models covered for the same time/energy as one X-Treme so I just haven’t done it. I did buy a couple of cheaper ebikes off of Amazon to review recently but most of what I cover is either at a company’s HQ or in a shop :)

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Ken Sobel
11 months ago

Court,

Could you arrange for a review of the Magnum Metro, a 500w version of the UI5? I believe that this has the same frame, but it has hydraulic disk brakes and a number of improvements over the UI5.

Thanks.

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court
11 months ago

Hi Ken! Definitely… In fact, I just got back from Utah yesterday. Magnum invited me out to test their new Metro, Updated Peak, and new Cruiser model. I should have those on the site in the coming weeks :D

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Ray
3 months ago

Does any know if any of the Cons found on the Ui5 have been addressed on the Ui6?
Thanks

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court
3 months ago

Hi Ray, I cannot say for sure but I think it’s the same product and may be the last year we see it in the US. Magnum seems to be focusing on some of their other models like the Metro here.

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Mark Peralta
1 day ago

Comfortable riding position is utmost importance to me so I thought the Magnum Metro+ provides good fit for me in a way that I don't have to modify anything since it has adjustable stem. However, after riding it for several miles I found out that it cannot provide the same comfortable riding position that I am used to from my other bikes.

The handle bar reach is too far for me. If I adjust it to be nearer, the height becomes too tall already and I cannot put my weight on it since my elbow is already at an angle.

I ended up replacing the adjustable stem and handle bar, added an instrument bar for cadence meter, relocated the throttle to the right where I'm used to and also changed to C-9 spring mounted saddle for additional vertical travel. Now I am satisfied with the comfortable and familiar bike fit.

Figs
4 days ago

Emailed twice, called, no response. Called my CC company and cut the money off. Looking now at getting a Magnum Ui6 from LBS. I figure if I can’t reach them now, I won’t be able to reach them later if I have a problem.

Too bad, I liked the Elegant.

Citycrosser
7 days ago

I've ridden just over 1000 miles in 4 months or so with my Metro+. No issues yet! Can't comment on the extra seat or pull behind trailer. The brakes on the Metro+ are outstanding (as I'm guessing all disc brakes are), so stopping shouldn't be an issue. I liked having a local bike shop that sells the Magnums for support, test rides, and parts if needed. This helped sway my decision over a Juiced.

Chris Hammond
7 days ago

So I can offer you a bit of perspective. My commute is 30 miles each way. I historically did this on my road bike, but fighting headwinds on the way home alot had me taking the train far more than I wanted. I began researching ebikes late last year, I quickly zeroed in on the Juiced CrossCurrent S as being a great value for high speed, long distance commuting. I continued researching for a good while, and flip flopped between the idea of building a bike, or buying a pre-built. I obviously finally settled on the CCS with the 52V/ 21Ah battery option. I received my bike May 9th, and have put over 1000 miles on it since.

Here are some things I would place priority on in your search:
1) Battery, battery, battery!
Any bike with a 500 Wh battery or less should be crossed off your list. On my commute I average ~ 500 Wh each way; high use days fighting headwinds have had my use over 600Wh. I only charge my battery to 80% to promote longevity of the pack, and have yet to drop it below 30%. Any ebike will experience a drop in performance as the voltage in the pack drops. I can notice this as well, but its not dramatic as my pack voltage remains relatively high. Dropping batteries below 20% negatively affects longevity as well.
Plan on a minimum of 20 Wh / mile, more if you want to be travelling over 30 mph. Higher speeds require exponentially more power due to the poor aerodynamics of the riding position.
2) Bikes designed as class 3, high speed commuters should be your focus. These bikes tend to have a more forward seating position improving aerodynamics some; they also tend to have better brakes; and tires that are bigger to absorb high speed bumps, etc.
3) Mid-drives are less advantageous as high speed commuters. The basic physics of the design dictate that the motor cannot apply full motor torque to the rear wheel when you are using the higher gears in your cassette (smaller cogs). The Bosch Performance Speed motor is the best mid-drive in this regard as it uses an internal gearing to allow for a small front charinring.
Hub drives do not experience this loss in torque at high speeds and are in fact at their most efficient when operating at high motor speeds. Many individual builders actually use direct drive hubs for their high speed builds, as it is where they become their best. However, a geared hub motor with a high speed winding is a great option in this regard as well.
4) Go test ride several bikes if you can. The Trek SuperCommuter 8S is a great bike that I really enjoyed riding. If it had a bigger battery and lower price, I'd have been happy to own it. You will find out quickly, just because a bike says Class 3, doesn't mean you can maintain or even attain 28 mph on level ground. The Magnum Metro+ is a great example. On paper it looks very similar to my Juiced CCS. The ride performance is like a family sedan versus a Corvette.

Good luck in your search.

mstotes
7 days ago

Curious if anyone has a Magnum Metro and if there is any difficulty hauling kids? We would probably get a combo of a Yepp seat for our 1 year old and/or a Burley or soon a pull behind trailer bike for our 3 year old.

*If anyone has had issues or long term success with Magnum, feel free to chime in--we haven't purchased yet but seems like it will be our choice over a RadPower or Juiced*

Thanks!

jhoblo
1 week ago

What is your wife's folder that has a full suspension? I agree that 20" wheels and potholes/dirt roads are tough, but seatpost suspensions can impact how they fold, depending on the bike.
I've never ridden a Brommie, but now that REI sells them I considered one- no choice in colors- red is fugly :( Too bad that they don't have any demos in store that I can test ride. There is no comparison to the tidy Brompton fold.

harryS
1 week ago

For good looks, it would be the Motiv Stash for me, but taking the battery out for storage might put some extra wear on the connectors and wires. It's also a smaller battery at 9AH. Magnum is 13 AH and Blix is 11 AH? If all three of these makers goes away, it might be easier to find the rear batteries from a third party seller.

I would expect over 30 miles at 14 mph and pedal assist out of the Motiv, based on what our folders will use at that same speed. My wife was at 32 miles recently with a 36V 9AH battery and probably had another 4 miles range. She would love a step-thru bike.

At our speeds, the rim brakes on the Blix would be fine, and I think that good rim brakes feel better than most mechanical disks.

Being able to test ride and test fold the bike woud be very nice. I would suppose some of thes ebikes don't fold or carry so well.

Citycrosser
1 week ago

2017 Magnum Metro+, 500 Watt Das-Kit, rolling terrain, rail to trail path, PAS 4, 190 lbs + 10 lbs of stuff, 40 miles using the 80/20 (and I'm pedaling along fairly hard with an average HR of 140 or so (same as 9:30 pace running if that helps).

My commute is 36 miles and I'm normally starting with an 80% battery charge and ending at about 25%, and generally use PAS 4 for a top speed of about 20. I'm guessing it will make it at least 4 more before dropping below 20%. I have a giant 1.5 mile long climb on the way home right before my house so I'm always a little conservative to leave plenty to get up that hill.

With PAS 5: 35 miles (using the 80/20 rule)

PAS 6: 30 miles tops but I haven't tried it.

48 volt battery, 13.5 a-h

I'd love to try it on PAS 6 but would need a 2nd battery or a larger battery to make it to work.

michael mitchell
1 week ago

I have a vika+ with about 1600 miles. I've ridden it on rough roads and bike paths in Seattle, through heavy rain many times. I highly recommend it. The thing climbs like a beast. Speeds on the flats usually max out at about 19.5mph, but the high torque gets you to that speed quickly. It will be a more upright position than a road or mountain bike (I'm 6'0" with a 34/35 inseam), and you should look at getting a good suspension seatpost like a thudbuster LT or bodyfloat/kintekt. The walk-up may be tough for any ebike that weighs approx. 50lbs, but I guess a good thumb throttle would help.

Depending on your budget, you may also want to look at getting a brompton and adding a grin tech kit.

jhoblo
1 week ago

Which Tern did you ride? A couple have Bosch motors, but I think that one still uses the 350W Bafang. I’ve thought about adding a BBSHD on a Link D8.
You know, folding bikes with small wheels without motors are sluggish. It’s a compromise between how portable you need your transportation to be and comfort. I seriously thought about doing a Grin conversion on a Brommie, but that kit is sold out. I didn’t ask if/when they will get more in. I don’t know that I’d like the ride on 16” wheels, but that fold is sooo nice!

BiscuitHead
2 weeks ago

It'll be a commuting bike that will be stored in my trunk, as I live in a walk-up without an elevator. My commute is ~4 mi each way with ~1.5mi long hill, and I used to do it on my pedal-powered hybrid but now I get too sweaty for the workplace & need another option.

I'm currently deciding between the Magnum Classic (low step), Blix Vika+, and Motiv Stash, and leaning towards the Vika+ or Motiv Stash. I like that the battery is built into the frame on the Stash, but I tend to lean on the grips a bit and for that reason having a throttle on the grip makes me nervous. The Vika+ has a better warranty and cheaper replacement battery ($400 vs. $600 for the Stash/Classic), but I am wary of the high investment in marketing with the brand.

Beyond Court's reviews, does anyone have any experience/opinions about these bikes?

I plan to buy at a local shop, and unfortunately the Vika+ is being sold at a shop that is farther away so it would be more difficult to get it serviced.

Edit: I also test-rode a Tern but honestly the mid-drive system did not impress me -- it felt sluggish even at higher pedal assist levels. I think I like a throttle option too.

vasubandu
2 weeks ago

Thanks so much. Most of these are entirely new to me, and the power information is rally helpful. I don't think I am going to get what I need under $3k, and I would like to keep it below $4k. I am going to have a briefcase with me all the time and perhaps a box of documents from time to time.

Court
2 months ago

Following are some of the original comments that were made on that post:

WARP
I understand that you’re only showing bikes that you reviewed, but so I would like to add a few suggestions of my own.
The reason is that I have been looking for a e-assist bike for my wife. The options are quite limited for extra short people. My wife is 5′ and her inseam is around 28 inches. She likes to have a bit of clearance when straddling the bike.
A lot of the e-bikes that come in only one size are non starters. In the regular bicycle world, many bikes come in at least 3, often more. That’s why it’s frustrating to shop for e-bikes, they usually start at a men’s medium or large. For my wife, she needs a bike made for petite women, and even then she needs XS or XXS to enable her to comfortably straddle the top bar (top tube). Although the folding models would probably work, we want to go with a full sized wheel for more stability
And it’s not just matter of standover clearance, a low step over frame doesn’t mean a great fit either….for example, we tried out the Easy Motion Evo Easy Street, and she was way stretched out on that frame, even though she can easily straddle the frame. She looked a bit lost sitting on that bike….coming from her 44cm road bike frame, the one size fits all Easy Motion looked like a tank.
The companies that are real bike companies often the best range of sizing. Examples that would probably work for her:
Raleigh Detour iE Step-Through – comes in a small size in a low step frame.
Trek Conduit+ – Small size would fit somebody who’s around 155cm (or just over 5′)
Trek Lift+ – has a men’s and also a low stepover model and comes in small size
Devinci Newton S Bionx – comes in three sizes. The WF is a women’s model and comes in a Small (which is smaller than the men’s Small)
In the end, I’m probably going to build my own bike for my wife around a Bionx kit, we can choose an XS frame and use the rack mount Bionx kit. Ideally we would have liked to buy a complete e-bike, but this way gives us the best option for getting a fit she’s comfortable with.

COURT
Hi warp, I can understand your frustration… It’s uplifting to hear how much energy and time you’ve spent trying to find a perfect fit for your wife and I think the BionX option is a good one. Kits definitely have their place but I can understand the desire to have a more turnkey solution as well. The good news is that more and more electric bikes are being produced each year and a wider variety of sizes and shapes have come to market. Companies https://electricbikereview.com/pedego/24-step-thru-comfort-cruiser/ have started selling more models with 24″ wheels and the step-thru frame. I realize reach may still be an issue but with a bit of effort adjusting the bars (or even a replacement bar) the bikes can become more accessible to petite riders.

WARP
Yes, we’re looking for a “regular looking” fitness style hybrid, and even though some of those cruiser designs would fit, we’d prefer a design that is geared toward sporty riding. e.g. she’d riding with me when I’m on my full carbon road bike, for both speed and giving her a boost on the hilly parts.

RALPH LINIADO
Warp, I just read this thread. My wife is petite at 5′ just like your wife. We stopped into Small Planet Bikes in Dallas last season, the day after Court was there doing some tests. I was excited that they had the Evo Street as I had heard it was just what a small framed women would like, but my wife hated the bike. It didn’t fit. We tried everything he had and nothing worked. The salesman than suggested the Easy Pedelar T350, and inexpensive bike that is the heart of their rental fleet. My wife rode the bike and loved it. It was under $2,000 and we bought one on the spot to be shipped to us in Florida. I had never heard of the brand, yet I bought it without any research. Turns out https://electricbikereview.com/ez-pedaler/t350/ just the day before as I came to find out when he posted his review.
This is a small step thru bike. It has lights, a rack, a bell, and it is built like a tank. My wife thinks it is beautiful. Obviously the reason why they have a rental fleet of them at Small Planet, which is a great shop and all electric bikes. They had everything you could imagine on the floor. Fantastic. My wife loves it because it fits her small frame. It’s not as elegant as some of the other big name bikes, but it fits and it works great. I had it shipped to my local LBS who charged me $25 to put the handle bars on it and away we went. Hope this helps.

COURT
Awesome advice Ralph, thanks for taking the time to help and share your experience :)

RAY T
thanks for the comment….the bike you bought seems like a decent value for under $2K. Looks pretty comfy and it seems like a great choice for a small rider with its downsized wheels and low step frame.
I went ahead with my original plan to build my own. So I took a 13″ Trek 7.4 FX Womens, and added a Bionx rear mount kit. This is pretty much the smallest adult bike that Trek makes (and smaller than many other brands offer). I would have much preferred the battery to be on the frame but the bike frame is so small it wouldn’t fit. The rear battery rack makes the bike very rear heavy but that’s the tradeoff to get a bike that fits. here is https://flic.kr/p/H9C2Lu.
It ended up costing about $3K, which is higher than I wanted to spend, but at least we got a bike that fits right with a good e-assist system from a proven manufacturer. Now we’re itching to put some miles on it

JOHN HESLIN
Hi – really enjoy your reviews! Wondering if I can ask for your opinion. Are 20″ folding bikes too cramped for the average rider? I saw your E joe video and I think I can probably “fit” but at 5′ 10″ / 220 lbs. I’m not really sure. I’m a recreational user and ride mostly for exercise so pedaling is important. The key issue for me is whether the typical 20″ folding bike be pedaled normally with full leg extention? Thanks.

COURT
Great question John, folding bicycles tend to have longer seat posts to reduce that cramped leg feeling… My knees get sore and feel sensitive if they aren’t extending fully so I can relate to your concern (I’m 5’9″ by the way). On of the folding ebikes that felt lager to me was the https://electricbikereview.com/pedego/latch/ (notice the first photograph shows the seat fully extended). The downside here is that the Latch is heavier and has a rear-mounted battery, but at least it’s removable for easier transport. The founderf of Pedego are larger guys who weigh a bit more and I feel like the motor power and overall strength of the frame are designed to accommodate them. https://electricbikereview.com/gocycle/g2/ also felt large and had suspension to soften the bumps and the https://electricbikereview.com/tern/node-d8-with-bionx/ is also a bit larger with 24″ wheels vs. the standard 20″ that lifts the frame up higher and improves ride quality a bit given the narrower tires. I hope these ideas help you find a good product that will work well for your intended use, folding bikes usually present a compromise but there is a nice variety to choose from these days :)

ALASTAIR CAMPBELL
These are good reviews but none of them focus in on my requirements. Are there any ebikes with the following attributes: Pedal assist only, top speed on hills of 10 kms (6mph), 100 km. range (60 Miles), panier. puncture proof tires, small frame, minimum bike weight up to 45 pounds, can fit on a standard bike rack. This bike will be needed on bike trips with ordinary pedal bikes so no need to go fast up hills. Price up to $3,000 US. Want financial stability of manufacturer and a ‘vast’ dealer network in North America. Reasonable quality of components not made in China.

COURT
Hi Alastair! Thanks for sharing your detailed list of “must haves”. No ebikes I know of even come close to what you’re asking here because they are mostly all produced from parts made in China… especially in the sub $5,000 range. Most weigh at least 45 lbs and the vast majority are 50+ lbs and the speed up hills is so dependent on rider weight, cargo and environment (like wind) that I cannot say for sure. My first thought for you was the https://electricbikereview.com/kalkhoff/sahel-compact-impulse-8/ but it’s heavier than you want. A light weight ebike that isn’t as powerful but fits your other requirements (besides price) is the https://electricbikereview.com/faraday/cortland-s/. Hope this helps! You can use the advanced search tool on the right rail of each page here to narrow down by price, weight etc.

MARK
GOOD JOB COURT !!!

COURT
Hey mark, glad you enjoyed this article! Thanks for the props :D

FRED
Old thread but I thought I’d share. I have the same challenge for my wife. She’s 4’11”. We went with an XS Specialized Vita paired with a Bionx system with the battery mounted on the down tube. They had to drill a hole in the batter bracket mount given the odd position of the bottle cage mounts, but it fits great and balances the weight out nicely. Call the https://hostelshoppe.com/ and ask for big Scott. They are a dealer for both specialized and bionx.
If your wife has a 28″ inseam without shoes, she might fit on a Specialized Turbo for women. Standover is about 29″ in the Small. I’m going to beg them to make an XS and also ask if they have plans to motorize the fat boys. The Helga has a 26″ standover height and should be able to fit the bionx as well if the down tube triangle is at least as big as the Vita.

COURT
Hey Fred! Sounds like you and your wife got set up at the Hostel Shoppe, thanks for sharing your tips and ESPECIALLY the measurements around the small Turbo for women. I’ve been really impressed with the Specialized lineup of ebikes in different styles and sizes so far… maybe we will see an XS and a motorized fat boy someday :)

FRED
That would be sweet! You’re welcome for the info. The guys at the hostel shoppe are top notch. People come from all over the Midwest to go there.

GIL
I want my wife to be able to ride with me – at least 20 miles with light hills. She’s 5’2 about 250 lbs and has a bad knee. We’ve been looking at ebikes and understand we’ll probably need a small frame (15 inch?). She wants to look at options and try them out in the Chicago area – or southwest Michigan. Want pedal assist for physical therapy but also full throttle to coast. What models do you recommend we check out? Can you recommend a store(s) to try them out? Also, I want to be able to transport the ebike on my car. I only have a trunk mount bike rack – no hitch. Other option to consider is a folding bike that could fit inside the trunk or back seat. What recommendations do you have for such bike carrying capability?

COURT
Hi Gil, thanks for explaining your goals so well… I think I understand and can relate given that my own girlfriend is about 5’2″ and has had some struggles with mid-step models (even women’s frames) that we’ve tried. Since you’re in the Chicago area, one brand that comes to mind is https://electricbikereview.com/brand/volton/, they’re based there and the founder Joe is really cool. I just reviewed their latest model which is a mid-drive step-thru but they sell a very similar one with a hub motor that’s less expensive and has throttle on demand. I’d recommend going to their website and calling him. To carry this model or many of the step-thru ebikes out there with your trunk mount bike rack you’ll probably need a crossbar adapter https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000ELSSZE/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=elecbikerevi-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B000ELSSZE&linkId=7b2e5668a19575e25cca7cd87df72a46 and I’d recommend taking the battery off the bike before loading to reduce weight… and always mount it close to the car so it’s not hanging way out since even the frames tend to be heavier than normal bicycles. A couple other low-step models with assist and throttle that might be worth exploring are the [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/e-joe/gadis/']e-Joe Gadis[/URL], and the [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/easy-motion/evo-city-wave/']Easy Motion Evo City Wave[/URL] which looks beautiful but costs a bit more… given that they are a larger company (with a great warranty) and were sold in 2015 and 2016 you might be able to get a deal on “last year” inventory at your local ebike shop :)
As far as folding bikes go, they do tend to be smaller but not always lighter. Here’s [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/category/folding/']the full list[/URL] of models I’ve reviewed recently and you can also use the advanced search to look for compact models that don’t fold but are smaller and lighter. One consideration with folding is that they tend to be less comfortable due to the smaller wheels. If you can get a regular bike with 24″ or 26″ with the deep step-thru design that would probably be more enjoyable for your wife. I hope this helps! I realize there are a lot of options out there… Consider asking in the forums, there’s a section called “[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/forum/forums/choosing/']help choosing an electric bike[/URL]” I made for this exact sort of situation :D

GIL
Thanks for your thorough reply. Most helpful was the recommendation for a crossbar adapter.
I think I may have the choice down to the final 2: X-treme Malibu Beach Cruiser or Prodecotech Stride 300. The Malibu front wheel can easily be removed so I can put the bike in the back seat. The Stride comes in a fold-able model so I could put it in the trunk. The challenge remains that there’s no place close to home for my wife to try out either one prior to a purchase.
One other thing suggested by the guy at FarBike.com is that I wait til early Spring to make a purchase as riding in Chicago’s winter is unlikely. Purchasing closer to the time of use means a fresher battery.

COURT
Hey Gil, glad my tips helped you a bit. The Spring will bring all new models to bear and give you some time to think. In the mean time, feel free to poke around [URL='http://electricbikereview.com/forum/']the EBR Forums[/URL] and share your experience or ask more questions. I’ve made a few real life friends there and it’s fun to geek out about bikes and consider different options :)

ANNETTE NELSON
I am 4’9″ and 67 yrs old and trying get out of my house a little more. LOST MY HUSBAND 2 1/2 yrs ago and have suffered from depression and need sunshine. I thought an electric bike would be a good way to do it and guarantee my ability to get home should I go a little too far..I HAVE HAD 11 back surgeries and still have some back pain.
I bought a PRODECO MARINER 500. online and received it the day after Thanksgiving. Thank goodness my sons were here to help me put it together and watch me ride it. THE SALESMAN ON THE PHONE TOLD ME THAT I should have no problems riding it even hough I TOLD HIM MY HEIGHT AND THE concerns I had being able to lift my leg over the tall center bar. WELL! THERE WAS NO WAY I could lift my leg that high to get onto the bike. MY SONS HELD THE BIKE WHILE I lifted my leg using my hands and rode it down the block. Then to get off of the bike. I stopped, then my sons each grabbed the bike while I used my hands to lift my leg…when I STARTED FALLING BECAUSE I couldn’t get my leg over. One of my sons grabbed me and his fingers broke my ribs. I CONTACTED THE STORE AND THEY RECOMMENDED A STEP TROUGH BIKE? What can you recommend

COURT
Hi Annette, sounds like you’ve had a rough experience with electric bikes so far… they do tend to be heavier and many of the cheaper models only come in one frame size and style. ProdecoTech has a range of options but it sounds like you would do better with a true step-thru like the [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/pedego/boomerang/']Pedego Boomerang[/URL]. This particular brand has a bunch of dealers across the US so you can actually try the bike before deciding to buy. Also, the rest of my tips and suggestions on this page still stand. You can get further suggestions by connecting with others [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/forum/forums/choosing/']in the forums[/URL] or using the advanced search tools here on the site. I Hope this helps!

TRISH
Hi, I am an older(50+) rider. I don’t feel as comfortable on my 26″ wheel bike anymore as sometimes my sense of balance just feels a bit off. I also have some problems with arthritis etc. But I still want to go on adventures for as long as I can! So I am looking for an ebike that can go on trails, (there are some very cool rail trails here in BC, but sometimes there are portions that are a bit rough.) so probably a fat bike style for comfort. I am thinking a 350W motor should be plenty? I need a rack for my camping gear. My issue is that I am only 5′ and want a bike I can comfortably put my feet down if I feel wobbly. Even the 20″ tire bikes seem to have quite a high seat. I am not rolling in cash LOL, so don’t want to spend more than 1500.00 CAN. I was thinking of cobbling together some bikes we have around and putting a hub motor on it. But it looks like hub kits plus battery is going to cost me over 1000.00 CAN anyways? Seems its the batteries that cost the most by far. Any ideas? Thanks!

COURT
Hey Trish! I was thinking the Pedego 20″ Trail Tracker would be a good fit in terms of lower stand-over height and having those fat tires… but it is priced a bit higher. I can’t think of too many kits that work with small fat tires but I’ll keep my mind on it and perhaps you can ask [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/forum/']in the forums[/URL] to see if anyone else has an idea for you :)

MAE
I’m interested in going to an ebike, but I don’t want to jump into a large investment until I know that I like them. So I’m thinking about starting off by purchasing an ebike conversion kit to put on my current bike. I am only interested in pedal assist. Does anyone know of a conversion kit that offers pedal assist? Thanks in advance for any help you can offer. Mae

COURT
Hi Mae! There are many kits out there to choose from but I’ve reviewed a few [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/category/kits/']here[/URL]. I realize it can seem like a big investment but purpose built ebikes tend to just work better… I know a few people who tried to get a deal the first time around and had buyer’s remorse pretty quickly then upgraded to a more well-built ebike. This is part of the reason I don’t review kits as much these days. If you have a local ebike shop, I’d highly recommend visiting and doing some test rides before pulling the trigger on anything. In any case, good luck and please share your experiences :D

MAE
Hi Court. Thanks for the advice on purpose built ebikes. Wondering if you have ever reviewed the x-treme Sedona step through ebike. It is quite affordable at $1100, but I don’t see where it has been reviewed or has any buyer comments. I’m also considering these ebikes: Izip Vibe plus, Raleigh Sprite iE, Prodecotech stride series, Genze recreational e102, Tidal Wave, and Magnum ui5. Any helpful information you can offer about any of these bikes – good or bad – would be appreciated. I love your reviews and your love of this sport.

COURT
Hi Mae! I had a pretty good experience with the GenZe and Magnum products. Raleigh Sprite iE is also a good product from a larger company (with more dealers and a good warranty). I haven’t seen as much ProdecoTech stuff lately and have never seen X-Treme products… They caught my interest of course, people ask occasionally but I just don’t see them in shops and don’t know anyone who has bought one. Here’s [URL='https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u188uF4Pt9w']an interesting video[/URL] interview I did with the President of Raleigh Electric talking about the value of more expensive ebike products as I realize the trade off in cost can raise some questions.

DEWEY
Regarding converting a pedal bicycle, an interesting source of ideas for donor frames for shorter riders is [URL='https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1j3f51td6emppjuBaTNjZXgtVPK923HtOudacuyt-g0Y/']this spreadsheet[/URL] on the City Bike subReddit – a list of step through pedal bikes available in North America with links to the manufacturer websites then you can check what frame sizes are available and where your nearest dealer is located.

COURT
Cool, thanks for the tip Dewey! Did you create a conversion ebike for yourself or find one that fit straight away that was already electric?

DEWEY
My thinking before converting my pedal bicycle was to make it easier for my local bike shop to help with the conversion and maintenance. I experimented with a [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/clean-republic/hill-topper/']24V hill topper kit[/URL] but I found it didn’t help me up the hills I climb so I bought a [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/8fun/bbs01/']36V BBS01 crank motor kit[/URL]. I would like the more torquey [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/8fun/bbs02/']48V BBS02 kit[/URL] but I need to stay under the [URL='https://www.markelinsurance.com/bicycle/resources/electric-bikes']750W 20mph[/URL] limit for e-bike liability insurance purposes.

ANDREJA
I am overweight, tend to feel unstabile on bikes, often am too short for various models (164cm and 100kg). Sometimes, because of the size of my belly, I can’t fully lift my leg. Can you suggest something for me? Regards from Croatia! :)

COURT
Hi Andreja, I think the first step would be to search for any electric bike dealers in Croatia. If you aren’t able to find one where you can go in for a test ride then it makes sense to look online. Unfortunately, I don’t think many brands will ship around the world and I’m based in the USA… so? who knows. But! One shop that has told me they will ship internationally is Motostrano in California. [URL='http://www.motostrano.com/']Here is their website[/URL], they have lots of ebikes and surely sell one that might work for you but they tend to be expensive. Another option is to see if [URL='https://sondors.com/']Sondors[/URL] will ship to your location, they have a cheaper folding model that might fit you and feel stable because it has fat tires.

ANDREJA
Thank you for your promt answer. Let’s say I have an option of buying suitable product whereever, hence I would be very interested in a model you can suggest, regarding the detals I described earlier. My problem is I can’t find right model that is suitable for overweight people. If you can suggest few, I would be grateful. :)

COURT
Hmm, I think the [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/pedego/24-step-thru-interceptor/']step-thru Pedego with the smaller 24″ wheels[/URL] is a great option. You can get it with pedal assist and throttle and it will be easier to mount and stronger for added weight. Beyond that, I like the [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/eprodigy/banff/']eProdigy Banff[/URL] and depending on how tall you are, the [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/corratec/lifebike/']Corratec Lifebike[/URL].

DAYRATE
How are the RadMini and Voltbike Mariner looked upon for rider height suitability? At 5’9″, like you, I figure either would be great for me, however, at 5’3″, I wonder about my wife fitting on one of these bikes. We are very interested in the Mariner. The frame geometry specs I have read don’t seem out of line with her height, what’s your opinion? Thanks for your well written and produced bike reviews!

COURT
Yeah, [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/voltbike/mariner/']the Mariner[/URL] is a pretty good ebike for petite riders, my girlfriend is similar in height to your wife and she had a blast riding it on the beach. She also tried [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/rad-power-bikes/radmini/']the RadMini[/URL] but I think the clamp design bumped her knee and thigh more easily. That one seems to have a higher stand over design as well. The cool thing about both products is that they use fat tires which are very stable and add some comfort when riding over bumps :)

BROCK HARVEY
Wow, what a fantastic article, and there’s even more information in the comments. You guys are all incredible!
I recently found [URL='http://www.ireviews.com/comparisons/5-best-smart-bikes-2017']this article[/URL], but I’m looking for some validity to their claims from people much more experienced than I.
Any info would be incredibly beneficial, so I’d really appreciate it! I’m looking to really change my life around in terms of my fitness. I’m 29, have a bit of expendable cash, live in a very cycle friendly city, so I think this could be a life changing purchase for me :)
Pretty excited, to say the least. Thanks heaps!

COURT
Hi Brock, thanks for sharing that article! More and more technology is coming to the ebike space and the models in their “five best smart bikes 2017” leaned more towards road and city. Drop bars are still pretty rare but I’ve seen a few from Bosch in recent years. Try exploring here by using the category drop down up top, it might guide you towards the high tech speed models if that’s what you’re into or you can ask around in the forums. My goal is to keep the space open and honest, people are pretty friendly and it’s exciting to share the latest tech but I have also seen that sometimes it never becomes publicly available… more like concept prototypes. All of the ebikes you see here have videos and are actually for sale (or were for sale at one point). If you have any specific questions, feel free to ask.

KERIN
**I am 5’1″ tall, about 140 pounds, and am in my mid 70’s and in good health. I am looking for a small ebike to ride on city streets and easy trails. I would prefer both throttle and pedal assist with a price of no more than $1,500. I live in a small town where there are no ebike dealers within several hundred miles where I can try out a bike to see if it fits. Anything out there that might meet these requirements?**

COURT
Hi Kerin, I speak with a lot of petite riders who choose folding ebikes because they tend to have smaller 20″ wheels that lower the frame and also have step-thru frame designs. I just reviewed [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/velomini/plus/']the VeloMini Plus[/URL] which could work and fits your budget. I like how lightweight it is too.

KERIN
Thank you. The Velomini Plus sounds good. Will the small wheels work successfully on trails that that have a gravel surface rather than being paved? How much assembly is required?

COURT
Hi Kerin! The 1.5″ wide tires aren’t going to be great for gravel, you might want to consider one of the fat folding ebikes for that such as the [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/rad-power-bikes/radmini/']RadMini[/URL] and [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/voltbike/mariner/']Mariner[/URL]. Most mail-order electric bikes require minimal assembly, the VeloMini Plus is especially easy and straightforward, you basically just unfold it :)

LUCY
Anyone have thoughts/advice How is the tern vektron for 5′ 2″ person with a short-ish reach? Ride Brompton now with M handlebars and the reach is a teeny tiny bit too far.
Deciding between Vektron and an Ohm 2017. Love folders ’cause I can take it anywhere….and Ohm is just amazing, too.
LUCY
And now I just rode the trek super commuter. So nice. So many great bikes.

COURT
Yeah, Trek is really doing great this year, lots of ebikes to choose from and the Super Commuter is awesome :D

COURT
Hi Lucy! The Vektron is a great bike one of the highest quality around right now (in large part because it uses Bosch). I’ll be reviewing some new OHM models soon and will record all of the measurements like reach and stand over height to help you decide. If you want light and compact, I think the [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/velomini/plus/']VeloMini Plus[/URL] is pretty cool.

LUCY
Looking forward to that review! I did, however, already purchase the Trek Super Commuter. I know! The most money I could spend in one place, like, ever. It was a good fit in the 45cm frame and I have great local bike shop support. I went to the Electric Bike Expo and road a Tern, Ohm didn’t bring their smallest frame, so didn’t get to try that bike. The range on the Trek/Bosch combo (long commute to work) and the excellent local support sold me on Trek. Shout out to Freewheel Bike!

BIKING WITH A LITTLE E-HELP
Hi, I’m looking for an e-bike with good e-power assistance as I am getting older and slower at normal biking especially up inclines… I am 170 cm tall and longish legs so am looking for a medium sized frame but still the space for my legs so that I can reach the ground easily when stopping yet have a good leg extension when pedalling and am not all squished up. Any suggestions of models to look for? TIA

COURT
Do you think you’d want a medium step-thru [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/bulls/cross-lite-e-step-thru/']like this[/URL] for easy mounting or prefer a higher stiffer frame? I just reviewed the [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/ohm/urban-ebike/']OHM Urban[/URL] which has a powerful motor and throttle operation (most mid-drive ebikes do not). They sell it in four sizes so you could dial in fit and the stand over height is reasonable because of the top tube design.

BIKING WITH A LITTLE E-HELP
I’m afraid it really needs to be a much lower instep. She has such the above items asked for on her current e-bike, however the e part is designed for long country rides and has not so much support/power for the city riding that she wishes to have such as being able to take off at the lights with the rest of the riders and keep up speed around the city on short journeys.

Ken M
2 months ago

The most significant negative impact of adding mass to the wheel is unsprung weight. In other words, the suspension can react much quicker to terrain changes and this is a huge factor if riding a mountain bike but not so much for street riding.

Give this some thought because it's something you never hear talked about. Mid drives benefit for the drive train gear ratio so long as the front to rear tooth count is 1:1 or less. If you are riding at high speeds on say a 44T front and an 11T rear with a hub drive, 75% of the motors torque is lost in the gear ratio. A hub drive may have lower torque delivered at the rear wheel at slower speeds but at speeds faster than 20mph most of the time they are delivering more torque to the rear wheel than a mid drive. Bosch did a pretty smart thing by having a small front chain ring spinning at 2.5 cadence because it minimimized torque lost at higher speeds.

You mentioned "very agile and stable" in the same sentence as attributes. Typically a stable bike is not agile. A stable bike may have much heavier tires to create gyroscopic stability (this can be important if you are riding an eBike at 28-35mph (the stability of the bike become more imporant that the agility of the bike. Agility is a trait best reserved for mountain biking. I think too many people think a great solution can be common for both applications ... not really.

I tend to want a fast urban pedelec for commuting about 15 miles each way. I have Haibikes with a Bosch and a Yamaha mid drive and I can honestly say that my hub drive PIM bike puts them to shame at speeds above 20mph. Most people don't feel comfortable above 20mph (they are bad drivers in cars as well) so I would recommend the mid drives to them all day long as they are very efficient and powerful at these grandpa speeds.

Bicyclista
2 months ago

Adding mass anywhere on a wheel is a bad idea because it adversely affects handling and acceleration. A hub motor adds many pounds of mass to a wheel, and it has a negative effect on ride quality.

You can test this out for yourself. Take a regular, non-electric bike, and add mass to one of its hubs. Ankle weights come to mind. Ride it around a bit. Feel how it handles, how it turns, how it accelerates. Now switch the ankle weights to the downtube or the seattube, close to the bottom bracket. Ride it again. I'd be surprised if you don't find that when the mass is on the frame the bike feels more agile.

The adverse effect is even more pronounced if the wheel is suspended, such as with front fork suspension (with hub motor on the front wheel) or with full suspension. Does anyone even make bikes with a hub motor on a suspended wheel?

I owned a Magnum Ui5 with a rear hub motor and I sold it within six months because I did not like its ride quality. It just did not feel agile. I have been riding a full-suspension Haibike with mid-drive motor for nearly two years, and it feels very agile and stable. I haven't had any issues with the motor, the battery, the electronics, or the drivetrain. I did replace the chain after 2,000 miles, which I consider normal maintenance.

That said, I think there should be room in the market for both kinds of motors. They each have their advantages and disadvantages. The key is to choose knowing full well what the tradeoffs are. There may be very good reasons why a hub motor may be a better choice for a given application, such as price or power. But don't ignore the negative effects of adding mass to a wheel, something that is almost never discussed.

Mike's E-Bikes
3 months ago

The Ui6 is the same frame, components, tires, brakes, as the Ui5, but it comes with a 500 watt motor (instead of the Ui5's 350 watt), and a 48 Volt, 13 AH Samsung battery. It also has a newer display from Magnum. It's priced (MSRP $1799) at only $100 more than the previous Ui5, so its a pretty good value. The motor has a peak output of 700 watts.

Vs, The Metro is a different ebike , priced at $1999. It has the same wattage motor, but its Das-Kit versus Bafang, and the ebike is capable of a higher speed at 28 mph (assist only). (versus 22 mph for Ui6). The display is different too, a bit nicer and larger. It'll have a slightly higher grade derailleur (Shimano Altus), and better trigger shifter. And hydraulic brakes vs mechanical brakes on Ui6. Also has a better quality suspension fork than the Ui6. Lastly, they are including a suspension seat post. Functional but won't be the higher quality of a Thud Buster or Body Float.

Mike's E-Bikes
3 months ago

I would go with the Magnum Ui5. You should be able to find it on sale for around $1500. (msrp$1699) It has everything you want, and they've been around longer than any of the folks you mention. For that short of a trip, you don't need anything more. Has a rack, lighting, integrated battery, tires slightly over 2" wide. If you advise where you are located, can suggest a shop. Otherwise I'd sell you one if you were close to Chicago. (p.s. they are transitioning to the Ui6, which has a 500,48v watt motor, but otherwise everything else is staying the same, which is great and since the Ui5 is a proven and high selling model.) Stay away from Addmotor, and the others. You aren't getting value with those where you need it, in terms of reliability, and paying extra for stuff on the others you don't need. I could show you the differences in person, which are obvious when you physically see the bikes. Hard to do that over the internet. Ui5 is also a very comfortable ride.

Bicyclista
11 months ago

I would definitively recommend buying from a shop nearby that can provide service.

I am curious about why the shop selling the "demo" Specialized won't provide a warranty. Usually, demo bikes are sold with the manufacturer's warranty. In fact, the first ebike I ever owned was a demo Magnum Ui5, and it came with a full manufacturer's warranty. Maybe that Specialized was actually owned and used previously and then put into service as a demo?

Monica Piñeros
11 months ago

Hi everyone! In the next months a want to buy an ebike but I am absolutely lost about which one is the perfect match for me. Here are some info about my location, budget and needs:

- I live in Bogota, Colombia. I work as a real estate broker and I am tired of traffic and cars. Here traffic is caotic, so ive been moving in a mountain bike and its great. However, the city is not a plain at all, part of it is steep terrain so I need a ebike that helps me with that, without being so heavy.

- Budget: Between $1300 and $1700 USD

- Bodytype: Im short! But I like big wheels bikes. Not the small ones.

- Since I dont live in the US, its important to know how good customer service is, or if it has International support. If the bike damages, can i fix the problem easily?

Ive been reading and some options ive seen are: SHIMA A2B, MAGNUM UI5 and RadCity commuter bike from Rad Power. Any suggestion? Preference? Recomendation?

Or if you have other options please let me know! Thanks your your help.

Lost
1 year ago

Did you order the fat tire adapter?

Nirmala
1 year ago

Here is the rack I use for our two Magnum Ui5's: http://amzn.to/1Q8KIna

It will hold up to two 60 pound ebikes with either a 1 and 1/4 inch hitch receiver or with an optional metal apaptor for 2" hitches, so it should work if you remove the battery from the Radrover first. You can also order optional wheel cradles for fat tires.

Nirmala
1 year ago

Even though 60 miles is probably unrealistic with most ebikes, you can always purchase a second battery and carry it along with you on longer rides. I do that occasionally on my Magnum Ui5 and therefore am able to cover 60 miles when I want to.

Garri
1 year ago

Oh, wonderful, thank you for the fast answer, Nirmala! Now I'm really determined to get the Ui5. Unfortunately I currently live in Germany so it would be a bit of a hassle to import the bike here. And there is another reason to buy it in US: Germany laws are stupid enough to completely (!) forbid the throttle on E-bikes and motors exceeding 250 W in power unless one has to get a driving license and special insurance etc.

I may praise Magnum customer's service too as these guys are ready to ship Ui5 internationally and even offered a discount for it.

To sum up, I regret my not being in the US now because it would just take more time to get the bike and I cannot test it in gorgeous landscapes of Sedona :)

Nirmala
1 year ago

The throttle works fine. The only limitation is that the throttle will only apply as much power as the level of assist that you set. So if you are in level 1, the throttle would be pretty weak. If you are in the top level of 6, then the throttle is very strong and uses the entire power and capacity of the motor. It is very easy to raise and lower the assist level as the buttons are right at hand on the left side next to the handlebar grip. I regularly change the assist level while riding, and do not even need to look down to do it now that I am used to the controls.

In contrast, some ebikes have a set up where the throttle always applies full power no matter what level of assist you are using. But the throttle on the Ui5 is still very usable as needed.

Roxanna Bradford
1 year ago

Is this ok for someone short? I'm 5 ft and considering this bike.

Veranda Tales
1 year ago

Great ROI bike, just needs a basket up front, a suspension seat and a 1000 lumen light. Oh before I forget no flat tires. Makes for one sweet ebike, over 1000 happy miles..
fyi i have noticed that the battery recharger brick needs to be disconnected from the AC after each recharge and reconnected before charge, for some reason if you leave the brick connected to AC it seems to remember the battery has been fully charged and does not charge unless you reset it by unplugging on the AC side of the brick which is easy to do

Veranda Tales
1 year ago

go to the Magnum ebike site where there is a dealer locater tab, i suggest a dealer near you if possible in the event you need support. the number one option in my mind is to have them replace the tire inner tube with a solid core, note i got a flat a week after purchase about a quarter mile from home which is no fun at all, so i took the ebike to a nearby local bicycle shop to replace the inner tubes with a solid core which my ebike dealer did not offer, i don't understand why this is not standard practice

NorceCodine
1 year ago

Thanks. Is there anything you want to point out about the bike? In particular, are there licensed dealers out there you can buy from, or just any bike store might have it?

Veranda Tales
1 year ago

yes the motor is still good, you can get the battery from the company. i connect the charger every day after a ride, 8 months and 2300 happy miles so far, the weight distribution is good with the battery mounted on the center down tube which makes for a nice handling ride.

NorceCodine
1 year ago

So, is the electric motor still as good as it was when new? Can you get a new battery pack from the company? I am assuming the battery can handle about 500 recharge.

atalla esen
3 years ago

Do you think energie cycles 2,6 tm is good for me?

atalla esen
3 years ago

And 1 more thing i wont pay more than 1700$

atalla esen
3 years ago

What is the best bike for me? I weight 55 kilos! And i need a bike which can climb hills, and i want it fast what you reccomend to me?

atalla esen
3 years ago

Can you put max speed in your descriptions because its the most important thing usually

John Moura
3 years ago

That tool-free adjustable stem is miraculous!

Zeev Kirsh
3 years ago

court--------when do you think bafang will roll out a torque sensor on their bbs02 mid drive.

do you think doing that will blow bosch out of the water as many more bike makers shift to the mid-drive option?

i know it doesn't look sleek, but i'm still just imagining the perfect mid-drive and it would be this magnum ui5 with a middrive and internal gear hub.

basically the grace one for less than half the price. actually closer to a third. maybe even less!.

Zeev Kirsh
3 years ago

this is not only beautiful, but super duper practical. LOVE IT. the throttle on bikes is slowly getting to where EVERYONE knows it needs to be.

the automatic switch from a full throttle mode simply by pressing the throttle to defaulting back to pedelec mode just by letting off the throttle.

like so many things in the ebike world, it seems SOOOO obvious, and yet takes so long to implement as a standard thing on bikes.

EVERY YEAR these bikes just get so much better. amazing.

morganliu7928111
3 years ago

You said throttle is weak on zero assist mode.  Does that mean weak only on that mode?  If I have it on assist mode 6 and just use throttle will I still get the bike up to 20mph?  I basically want a second bike that I don't have to pedal, but go 20 mph.  Thanks.

morganliu7928111
3 years ago

+morganliu7928111 nm Later on in the review this question is answered.

KaiserFailed
3 years ago

honestly, like, how dare those dogs try to overpower your voice? how rude.

ValhalaFiveSix
3 years ago

First Girlie bike biotches!