Pedego City Commuter Review

2015 Pedego City Commuter Electric Bike Review 1
2015 Pedego City Commuter
2015 Pedego City Commuter 500 Watt Geared Dapu Hub Motor
2015 Pedego City Commuter Locking Removable Lithium Battery Pack
2015 Pedego City Commuter Gull Wing Handlebar And Lcd Display
2015 Pedego City Commuter Twist Throttle Padded Grips
2015 Pedego City Commuter Tool Free Adjustable Angle Stem
2015 Pedego City Commuter Full Length Aluminum Fenders Mudflaps
2015 Pedego City Commuter Matching Aluminum Chain Guard
2015 Pedego City Commuter Oversized Kickstand
2015 Pedego City Commuter Oversized Padded Saddle Bumpeers Suspension Post
2015 Pedego City Commuter Battery On Off And Fuse
2015 Pedego City Commuter 7 Speed Shimano Acera
2015 Pedego City Commuter Electric Bike Review 1
2015 Pedego City Commuter
2015 Pedego City Commuter 500 Watt Geared Dapu Hub Motor
2015 Pedego City Commuter Locking Removable Lithium Battery Pack
2015 Pedego City Commuter Gull Wing Handlebar And Lcd Display
2015 Pedego City Commuter Twist Throttle Padded Grips
2015 Pedego City Commuter Tool Free Adjustable Angle Stem
2015 Pedego City Commuter Full Length Aluminum Fenders Mudflaps
2015 Pedego City Commuter Matching Aluminum Chain Guard
2015 Pedego City Commuter Oversized Kickstand
2015 Pedego City Commuter Oversized Padded Saddle Bumpeers Suspension Post
2015 Pedego City Commuter Battery On Off And Fuse
2015 Pedego City Commuter 7 Speed Shimano Acera

Summary

  • A sturdy and powerful electric bike that's a bit more active than the cruisers (more forward body position, narrower handlebars) and is available in several frame sizes for improved fit
  • Lots of great extras including full length aluminum fenders, chain guard, puncture resistant tires with reflective sidewalls, suspension seat post, integrated lights and a sleek bell
  • Responsive pedal assist with throttle override, large capable disc brakes, solid warranty, rear heavy design

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Pedego

Model:

City Commuter

Price:

$2,595 USD (Up to $3,295)

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Urban, Commuting

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive, 3 Year Limited

Availability:

United States, Canada, Mexico, Australia, New Zealand, Europe

Model Year:

2015

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

60 lbs (27.21 kg)

Battery Weight:

7 lbs (3.17 kg) (9 Lbs for 48 V 15 Ah)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

14.5 in (36.83 cm)16 in (40.64 cm)17 in (43.18 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Small 14.5" (43.5" Axle to Axle), Medium 16" (44" Axle to Axle), Large 17" (47" Axle to Axle)

Frame Types:

Step-Thru, High-Step

Frame Colors:

Black, White, Steel Blue, Taupe

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid

Attachment Points:

Fender Bosses, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Acera M360, 12-32T

Shifter Details:

Shimano Tourney FT55 SIS Index Shifter on Right Bar

Cranks:

175 mm 3-Piece Aluminum Alloy, 46 Tooth Chainring

Pedals:

Pedego Aluminum Alloy Platform

Stem:

Tool-Free Adjustable Angle

Handlebar:

27" Aluminum Alloy, Gull Wing Style

Brake Details:

Avid BB7 Mechanical Disc with 180 mm Rotors, Tektro Levers with Motor Inhibitor

Grips:

Padded, Stitched

Saddle:

Padded, Oversized

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy with Basic Suspension

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Spokes:

12 Gauge Stainless Steel

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Fat Frank, Balloon, 28" x 2"

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

Reflective Sidewall, Puncture Protection

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve, Pre-Slimed

Accessories:

Integrated Spanninga MICRO FF LED Headlight and LED Backlight, Integrated Bell on Left Brake Lever, Matching Full-Length Aluminum Alloy Fenders with Mud Flaps, Matching Aluminum Alloy Chain Guard, Integrated Carry Rack with Spring Latch, Oversized Kickstand

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, Replaceable Fuse on Battery Pack, Tool-Free Quick Adjust on Brake Calipers (Red Twist Disc)

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Dapu

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Battery Brand:

Samsung

Battery Voltage:

48 volts (Optional 36 V)

Battery Amp Hours:

15 ah (Optional 10 Ah)

Battery Watt Hours:

720 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

15 miles (24 km)

Estimated Max Range:

40 miles (64 km)

Display Type:

Fixed, Backlit LCD on Left Bar

Readouts:

Current Speed, Ride Time, Odometer, Trip Distance, Pedal Assist Level (0-5), Battery Power

Display Accessories:

USB Charge Outlet

Drive Mode:

Twist Throttle, Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist (12 Magnet Pedelec Sensor)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

The City Commuter has long been a favorite ebike model for me, especially from the Pedego lineup. It’s comfortable but more active than some of the cruisers they sell with a shorter handlebar and lighter frame. In recent years they’ve improved the way the throttle works (letting you override pedal assist) and introduced a smaller size playfully referred to as the “Mini Commuter” for petite riders. This new version has a shorter frame that also sits lower to the ground thanks to 26″ wheels vs. the standard 700c ~28″ available on both the standard high-step and step-thru models. Pedego still offers the professional black and white color schemes but now has a metallic blue (that sort of changes color when the light hits it) as well as metallic taupe that looks handsome. On the positive side, the City Commuter is feature rich with integrated LED lights, full length fenders, a chain guard, puncture resistant tires and an integrated rack but there are some trade offs. The bike is rear heavy and the saddle isn’t as comfortable to pedal on as it is to just sit on. I love the seat post suspension, padded grips and adjustable angle stem and appreciate the warranty (which is comprehensive for the first year and then pro-rates the cost of a replacement battery for two additional years). The other neat thing about this ebike is the battery choice options which let you maximize range and power or save some money and reduce the overall weight of the bike.

Driving this bike is a 500 watt planetary geared hub motor that’s made by Dapu (the same company that Easy Motion uses for many of their electric bikes). It’s one of the zippier, more powerful geared motors I’ve tested and on the City Commuter it delivers a lot of strength for overcoming wind or climbing moderate hills. It does produce some whirring noise, especially under full power, but that hasn’t bothered me as much as some other models and almost feels satisfying because the bike rides more like a moped. This is an important point… even though the bike offers seven speeds to pedal with and is one of the most active rides (ergonomically speaking) in the Pedego lineup, it is still heavier and less comfortable to pedal with than some other electric bicycles I’ve tested. For this reason, the more powerful motor, cadence sensing pedal assist, twist-type throttle and louder operation feel right. This is a great bike for cruising around the neighborhood or commuting short distances without over exerting yourself. It’s one of the best options for throttle-only operation that I’ve tested.

Powering the motor, the backlit LCD display and the front and rear LED lights is a beautiful Lithium-ion battery pack that uses high quality Lithium-ion cells from Samsung. The pack is available in four configurations with either 36 or 48 volts of power and either 10 or 15 amp hours of capacity. Basically, the larger the pack, the more you pay and the more it will weigh! A question I hear a lot about these battery sizes is “should I buy the 36 volt 15 amp hour or the 48 volt 10 amp hour?” and the answer is that it depends on the weight you intend to move. If you weigh (or plan to have a maximum load) over 180 lbs, I believe it is more efficient to go with the 48 volt system so that the motor will get full power and operate at optimal efficiency. Still, if you’re getting one of the smaller sized bikes and don’t weigh a lot then the 36 volt packs should perform just fine. Whichever configuration you choose, the pack offers some great conveniences like being able to charge on or off the frame, having an integrated replaceable fuse and offering a toggle on/off switch to reduce phantom draw while storing. The on/off switch can actually be annoying at times given that you have to click it before the display will turn on and this may require dismounting the bike after you just hopped on… basically, it’s a second step that you should really take every time you get on or off of the bike. It will help deter tampering with the display while you’re not at your bike for example. I like that the pack features an LED charge level indicator (great for checking status when it’s not on the bike) and that it locks to the frame. You are not required to leave the key in while riding which is actually a big deal because panniers may otherwise collide with the key and bend it (I recommend taking them out in this case especially). The big drawback to this battery is now it’s mounted to the frame (high and towards the back). With weight ranging from eight to nine pounds, it can create a bit of a “crack the whip” feel with aggressive riding and makes transport and parking less stable. Thankfully, the oversized kickstand works great.

Operating the e-bike systems is pretty easy on the City Commuter. Once the battery is charged, mounted and locked to the rear rack you press the toggle on/off there and then again on the display panel. I like the LCD unit that Pedego is using now because it combines the LCD unit with four interface buttons that are large and reachable while riding. It swivels up and down but is not easily removable which means that it could take more weather wear over time. Using the “Set” button you can see your trip distance, time and odometer and access a bunch of different settings if you hold “Set” for a few seconds. I was able to change from Miles to Kilometers, edit the wheel size and adjust the top speed (which defaults at 20 mph). The other two buttons are “Up” and “Down” which let you navigate through five levels of pedal assist and a zero “throttle mode”. The lowest assist level felt smooth and quite which would be perfect for navigating crowds or conserving battery while the highest felt exciting and powerful. At any time you can twist the throttle and override assist and this is handy for boosting up a hill or getting started from rest. The bike uses a cadence sensor to activate pedal assist which means that once the bike is up to speed you really don’t have to push to get the motor to help out (which is the case with torque sensors). The drawback to cadence sensors is that starting from zero requires all rider power because the motor hasn’t “woken up” yet and this can be a pain if you’re in a higher gear. Again, this is where the twist throttle override comes in super handy. I found myself riding in level two or three assist and gear level six most frequently and I did use the throttle regularly :)

At the end of the day, the City Commuter still honors the relaxed cruiser style that Pedego is known for (large saddle, powerful motor, twist throttle) but offers a slightly more aggressive body position with narrower handle bars that are responsive and easier to fit through doors. When it first launched, this was one of the only models that offered integrated lights and fenders but Pedego has since added them to all of the others as well. I like the adjustable stem, sleek integrated bell, modern diamond frame (vs. the cantilever curved style on the cruisers) and all of the sizing and color options here. I have had great success actually commuting with one of the older City Commuter models and while it can sometimes feel stiff and bouncy at speed (especially if your tires are extra full) the seat post suspension shock, padded saddle and grips really help. The spring latch on the rack isn’t incredibly useful but there are lots of ways to mount your own bag or panniers. If you like the style then this ebike could be a great choice because of the solid warranty and excellent dealer network that is now global. Pedego electric bikes are also commonly used as rentals and tend to hold up well. If you get the chance to rent one for a fun tourist ride it could help you choose between this or one of the more relaxed cruiser designs.

Pros:

  • Neat integrated USB charging port built right into the LCD display panel mounted to the left bar, charge your portable electronics while riding
  • The swept back handlebars, padded grips, oversized saddle with suspension seat post and large balloon tires help to smooth out bumps for a more comfortable ride
  • Available in four frame sizes with two wheel sizes and two frame styles for a truly comfortable fit (smaller wheels bring the frame closer to the ground, step-thru frame is easier to mount and stand over)
  • Integrated LED lights and backlit display are powered by the main battery pack so you don’t need to worry about purchasing additional cells or having them run out independently
  • Several professional and fun color schemes to choose from including the classic black and white or a metallic blue and taupe
  • Nice safety extras including the integrated bell, lights, reflectors and reflective sidewall stripe painted on the tires
  • Very zippy and powerful ride (especially with the 48 volt battery which is recommended if you plan to transport 180lbs or more in rider weight or rider+gear)
  • Variable speed twist throttle can be used in level zero as “throttle only mode” or override one of the five levels of assist offering full power
  • Rear rack surrounds and protects the battery and is useful for adding a trunk bag or panniers (I like the Elements from Basil)
  • The battery locks to the frame for security but is removable for convenient charging and to reduce the overall weight of the bike during transport
  • Integrated motor inhibitors cut power immediately when activated, oversized 180 mm disc brakes are smooth and powerful
  • Threaded eyelets are included on each model (even the smallest!) so you can mount a portable pump, folding lock or water bottle cage

Cons:

  • The battery pack must be activated independently from the LCD display, this might deter tampering but requires extra time and may be forgotten (leaving the battery pack on to drain slowly)
  • Rear heavy design with the hub motor and battery pack mounted at the back of the bike, the battery is also fairly high and the rack weighs more because it is reinforced
  • The padded saddle is a bit wide and for active riders may not feel as comfortable, on long rides my inner thighs have felt a bit tender
  • Tubing on the rear rack is wider and thicker than I see on most standardized racks which means it may not work with some clip-on panniers
  • Chain guard looks nice and is functional but may be bent easily if kicked or stepped on, be extra careful on the step-thru models

Resources:

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Luis
1 year ago

So quick question, can you remove the display? If you cant easily do it is it at least possible with a bit of work? Thanks

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

Hi Luis, I don’t think the display is designed to come off easily… maybe with a screw driver or hex wrench you could actually unscrew it and use the disconnect point to take it inside (which probably wouldn’t be that difficult) but it’s not like a quick slide on/off like the Easy Motion design. If you live where the weather is an issue (like lots of rain) maybe put a plastic sack over it with a rubber band to keep water out?

Reply
Luis
1 year ago

Ok, great! Thank you Court.

Reply
Michael Rhodes
1 year ago

Thanks for a great review. I just bought a City Commuter 28 inch 48V / 10. Will pick it up next week. I had a total knee replacement on my left knee and wanted to be able to ride again, but with the added benefit of the motor should the knee start to hit its limits – to make sure I can get back home. The added assist should be very helpful. One thing I haven’t seen in any of the reviews is how the e-bike performs if the motor is turned totally off and you must peddle full force to get back home should the battery run out or something happens. Guess I will find out next week, as I wanted to have a good feel for what its like to peddle without any assistance. Your reviews are very helpful since you cover a wide range of features, and include riding the bike. I like the hill section and the bike seemed to perform really well. Thanks again, your reviews really helped me come to a decision despite not taking an actual ride before purchase.

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

Hey Michael! Great suggestion… I don’t usually perform an unpowered ride test because my knees are also sensitive, it’s how I got into ebikes actually ;) one thing that is listed here for each review is the bicycle weight. Most are heavy ~50lbs and it’s not fun to pedal them unless you’re in a lower gear to make it easy. Pedal assist is a wonderful feature on bikes like the City Commuter because it almost makes the bike perform like a light weight normal bicycle and then if you need extra help for a hill just twist that throttle! Not all of the electric bikes I’ve tested have throttles but the City Commuter does and in my opinion it’s a great bike! Hope it works well for you, feel free to comment with an update once you’ve tested it out.

Reply
Michael Rhodes
1 year ago

Court, I picked up the City Commuter today from Irvine and am very impressed with it. With power off, I could peddle it, but not without some difficulty. Didn’t appear to be any resistance from the motor, but simply the weight as you noted. But even when only at “Assist Level 1” I was able to peddle just fine, and of course moving to 2 or above was very little effort at all. Amazed at the hill climbing. Now that I have used the Throttle – I couldn’t imagine not having that feature. The bike is very well made, bigger than I was expecting, and of course heavier. About the only complaint I have, is that for $3K I would have expected a better light. I added a 320 lumens USB rechargeable light which solved the problem for $24. But still, Pedego could have included a more powerful light for very little more. The integrated taillight and fender mounted lights are nice, just not bright enough for me and lack a strobe feature. Other than that, the bike is making me smile.

Sue Smith
1 year ago

I am keen to purchase a Pedego city community since riding my friend’s city commuter in NZ. Is there a store in Sydney that sells them. I went to Sydney Electric Bikes but they do not stock Pedego

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

Hmm… I’m not sure Sue? I believe Pedego has been expanding globally and they have a special “dealer locator map” on their website here. Looks like there might be a Pedego dealer in Sydney according to this other map that seems to list more points. Hope this helps! Wish I could be more concrete :)

Reply
Michael M
1 year ago

I bought my City Commuter last week and I have to say I am very impressed. It rides more like a moped than a bike, which I love as I use it to commute the 10 miles each way to work and back home. I purchased the 36V/15amp battery and have yet to see an end to its charge on an outing. I spent an entire Sunday just driving along the beaches (Siesta Key Fl) and ultimately put 25 miles on it. Great bike.

My question is at what point do I take it in to have it serviced and tweaked after the breaking in period i.e. spoke tightening and other adjustments to the components? I’m am pretty much clueless with ebikes let alone bikes in general. Also, if I were to upgrade to the 48V/10amp battery, would I really get that much increase in acceleration/torque? I’m pretty lightweight ~150lbs. Thanks Court!

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

Hi Michael! Sounds like the standard 36 volt 15 amp hour battery is working well for you… 15ah is actually above average compared to most ebikes I test. You might feel some torque improvement with a 48 volt battery but I’m not sure you can make that upgrade because it requires a different controller and even motor in some cases… can’t say for sure. Batteries are expensive so if you’re doing well with the 36v option just stick with it ;)

As for tuneups, it really depends on the riding conditions you encounter like water, mud and even how you ride like how much braking is happening and whether you shift gears a lot and know to ease off pedaling when shifting so the sprockets and chain don’t get beat up. For me, it’s usually time for a tune when I hear the bike making scratchy or clinking noises as I pedal… the chain probably needs to be lubed in that case and maybe the frame cleaned. I also pay attention to my brake levers and if they are being squeezed way down I try to tighten the cables using the twist wheel on the calipers but eventually new pads are a requirement as well. Tightening spokes isn’t something I do or hear about very often but yes, sometimes the wheel needs to be trued if the bike tips or is being transported in a car on its side. Being proactive about tuneups could make the bike last longer and honestly, the shop should be able to give you feedback about this so if you just stop by and ask (or ask the place you bought it from) about what they recommend that could be a great place to start :)

Reply
Jennifer C.
1 year ago

Hi Court – thanks for the in-depth reviews! I’m considering buying one of these Pedego Commuters, and I actually asked the same question as Michael about upgrading to a 48V battery, and the dealer told me that the whole bike is wired for either 36V or 48V, so you can’t just switch from one to another.
Keep up the good work!

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

Thanks for chiming in Jennifer! That’s my understanding as well, the bike is either setup for 36 volt or 48 volt and that’s it… so you can upgrade on capacity of amp hours but just not voltage which is more of a power thing.

Reply
Mike
11 months ago

I weigh about 275 and am 6′ tall. Any thoughts or suggestions?

Reply
Court Rye
11 months ago

Hi Mike! I really like the Pedego Interceptor for heavier, larger riders because it can have many of the same features as the Commuter here (lights, fenders) but provides a more upright, relaxed layout and you can even get cast rims vs. spokes which hold up better under weight. I also feel like it fits taller riders better without stretching them forward and in my experience the frame just isn’t as stiff which makes it feel smoother.

Reply
Kirk
9 months ago

Thanks for a great and thorough review. Do you have any idea what the replacement cost is for the battery? Thanks again.

Reply
Court Rye
9 months ago

Hi Kirk! Thanks, glad the review helped you out. I believe the replacement costs for Pedego batteries varies depending on which size you get ie. 36 volt or 48 volt and the number of amp hours but it might be in the range of $700 just based on what I’ve heard from shops and seen online. I’d love to hear back from you if you figure out a more detailed answer?

Reply

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Dewey
7 days ago

Have Easy Motion changed the throttle settings on the 2017 City Wave so you can use the twist throttle to over-ride PAS? In his review of the 2016 City Wave Court reported the throttle only worked in PAS level 0 obliging him to arrow down the PAS before he could use the throttle. It doesn't appear to be the case on other models using the Dapu hub motor like the Pedego City Commuter. Just curious, cheers.

Dewey
1 week ago

For what you're looking (PAS + throttle), Easy Motion EVO City (Large) would fit very well. Juiced Cross Current in XL frame would be another choice.

According to Court's review the Easy Motion Evo City throttle works only in pedal assist level zero so you would need to use the thumb pad to turn down the PAS before you could use the throttle. I don't think that's true for other ebikes using the Dapu hub motor like the Pedego City Commuter as Court's review mentioned he could twist the throttle to over-ride the PAS. The Izip/Raleigh boost button looks like a simple on/off switch so it doesn't look like you can hold the speed as with a twist or thumb throttle. I think all the current ebikes from Trek, Specialized or Giant are pedal assist with no throttle.

I would avoid the upcoming Juiced Cross Current S until the speed limit issue is resolved. The spec sheet for the new batch Cross Current S model lists an "off road mode" unlimited motor setting and "user configurable" speed settings in the LCD display. A promotional video shot in China demonstrates >30mph performance, which falls outside both the federal CPSC and California 3-class e-bike definition, and is a motorcycle. Unless there is a VIN # an e-bike cannot be registered or insured as a motorcycle. Juiced should not attempt to sell these as an e-bike as currently specced.

Tom W
2 weeks ago

The following is a summary of my experience owning, albeit briefly, a 2017 Giant electric bike. To cut to the end, it did not go well. I returned the bike to Giant after the events I describe below, but feel that I have an obligation to let other riders know what happened, as I believe there are serious safety and honesty/integrity issues involved.

Based on a successful test ride of the Giant Full E+1 electric mountain bike, I purchased a 2017 Giant Full E+0 in mid-June 2017. My only major reservation was the square taper crank interface, as these have not been used on real mountain bikes well over a decade. But given Giant’s size and reputation, our satisfaction with the three Giants we've owned over the past 15 years, and the fact that their website listed the crankset supplier as Praxis Works, I mistakenly believed that Giant had done their homework.

After a thorough check-over to eliminate the standard shop assembly issues (under-torqued bolts, no grease or washers on the pedals, chain with only storage lubricant on it, etc), I took it out for a first ride. Minutes after starting the first downhill trail, on an innocuous 60 cm drop over some rocks to a smooth, downhill-sloped landing (shown in the photo), my brand-new Spank Spike pedal ripped completely out of the drive-side crankarm.

I was very lucky that the pedal provided just enough support as it came out that I didn't lose control. As I skidded to a stop, my immediate thought was that the square taper interface must have failed, but only the pedal was on the ground. The failure had nothing to do with the pedal, it was the crankarm internal threads that had failed catastrophically.

The cause of the failure was simple: Giant made a choice years ago to partner with Yamaha for their motor technology. Yamaha only makes a square taper interface for their power unit (until the 2018 model year). Giant chose not to specify and procure a proper crankset for the intended service of the bike (i.e. enduro mountain biking). Instead they specified an FSA CK-745 crankset. I have no idea what testing Giant did at the time, but that crank is designed for a different market (commuter ebikes that are used to buy groceries and ride around in the city). And it is made very cheaply - full retail is $38 on FSA's website. The design of the crank is probably fine, but I believe that the material is not. I didn't have the resources to have it tested, of course, but I strongly believe that the aluminum used would not come close to the strength required by the 6061-T6 specification, which is the standard aluminum for an MTB crank of this type and application. The FSA webpage on the square taper CK-745 just says the material is 'alloy', which is meaningless and likely indicative of the very low quality aluminum used.

Beyond the quality of the part is Giant's misleading specification sheet. You'll remember that the crankset was supposed to be a Praxis Works according to Giant's website (quoting Giant Canada’s website when I bought the bike: “Crankset: Praxis Works Custom Forged, 38”, where 38 is the number of teeth on the chainring).

In reality Praxis Works had nothing to do with the crank at all. They had provided only the chainring. So Giant was using Praxis Works' name to mislead consumers, by suppressing the FSA part number to hide the low quality of the crank. When I confronted Giant Canada on this, they said it was a simply a mistake.

It is curious to think how often such 'mistakes' are made when the advantage goes to the consumer rather than the company.

To Giant Canada’s partial credit, they quickly changed the crankset description on their website to "Giant Custom Forged by FSA" after my initial complaint and warranty claim, with a separate note about the Praxis Works chainring.

However, this new wording is still clearly intended to deceive the public, as there is no doubt that the actual crank installed on the bike is an FSA CK-745. The only 'custom' thing Giant did was to take FSA's logo off the visible side. When I confronted the Canadian brand manager with this, he said he was completely comfortable with the ‘custom’ wording and would not change it. Two weeks after leaving numerous voice messages and sending them an email with a version of this posting attached, Giant USA has not had the courtesy to even reply to me.

Some of Giant’s international websites have an additional line in the crankset description saying that the cranks are 'minimal Q-factor'. While the deception attempted here is less important, the claim is ridiculous. A properly designed crank for the Yamaha drive system could easily reduce the Q-factor (the perpendicular distance between pedals) by 20-25 mm compared to the supplied FSA cranks.

So here are my conclusions: If you own or are considering buying a Giant ebike from any model year, you are in danger of crank arm failure at the pedal interface. In this mass-produced world, the chance that my bike had the only defective crank arm is essentially zero. Giant's specification of such a low-end crank on an otherwise high-end (US retail $7700) bike is, in my opinion, unforgivable. And may be worthy of a lawsuit in the unfortunate but almost-inevitable event that someone does lose control and is seriously injured when their properly-installed pedal rips out of their crankarm. I was very lucky to walk away uninjured, and under no circumstances would I recommend that anyone trust such a low-end crank for real off road riding.

Furthermore, as far as I am aware owners of Giant ebikes have no other viable crank options at this time. Nobody in the world makes mid- or high-quality square taper cranks for the Yamaha drive.

Giant is the world’s largest bike manufacturer and they could easily have had a proper set of cranks manufactured for this line of bikes. They should have been made of at least 6061, and preferably 7000 series, aluminum, with proper Q-factor for the Yamaha motor. But they chose not to bother.

Giant should now be taking a whole series of actions, including a thorough investigation of the pedal interface strength of this crank and others like it, warnings to consumers, and, if testing shows similar defects in other cranks, then a recall should be initiated.

And no more deceptive specification sheets. Every one of Giant’s global websites should list FSA CK-745 as the crank on this bike, and similarly for the specifications of all their other bikes. If a manufacturer customizes something they have to say what they’ve done, not hide low quality parts behind a ‘custom’ façade after changing only the graphics.

This issue is not isolated to just Giant bikes either – there are many other ebike companies using low quality drivetrain parts. And it is probably not isolated to just 2017 and earlier model Giants. Some of Giant’s 2018 ebikes will have an ISIS drive interface, but the quality of the cranks they use will probably be the same (the advanced sales literature still refers to them as ‘custom forged’). So they will probably be just as likely to fail at the pedal interface as earlier models.

The following are more detailed technical notes, and are included only for those with an interest in the minutiae of the failure. I’ve included them on the basis that unusual claims require a higher level of proof:

• First, keep in mind that all the photos were taken after the trail-side incident was over. At the time the pedal came off I was stranded on the trail, and the crank was clearly destroyed. As darkness was falling, I tried to screw the pedal back into the deformed threads so I could limp home. However, the first few threads just ripped out completely. So the photos show the outer section of the pedal thread in the crankarm torn out, but this did not happen at the same time as the crankarm failure.

• The Full E+0 has 140 mm travel with a Rockshox Super Deluxe shock, which was pressurized to 190 psi. It did not bottom out on the small drop, and neither did the Lyrik fork. I did land the drop with my weight biased to the right side (probably 80%) when the crankarm failed, but there is nothing unusual in that. The drop is tiny by enduro mountain bike standards.

• The cranks did not suffer any rock strikes prior to the failure. The pedals and cranks are unblemished except for a dent in the pedal bearing housing that must have happened as the pedal flew off the bike. It could not have happened during the failure (if it struck a rock as I landed, for example), as the dent has a distinct direction - about 25 degrees sideways - which is completely inconsistent with a rock strike while moving forward at ~15 km/h. And beyond that, there is no matching mark on the crankarm.

• Many of you are probably thinking that the most likely cause of such a failure is a pedal that has become partially unscrewed. However, I installed them myself to 35 ft*lb (with grease), and pedals are threaded so that precession acts to tighten them, so the probability that they were partially unscrewed is already extremely small. But evidence inside the crank arm proves the failure occurred when the pedal was fully threaded into the crank. With the Spank pedal and pedal washer in place there are two unengaged threads inside the crankarm.

The photos attached show that the damage starts at the third thread (subtle damage, paint is missing), which is the first internal thread that engages with the pedal. And there is progressively more damage on each successive thread, moving from the inner side of the crankarm to the midpoint. The fourth thread is clearly deformed. From the midpoint on the threads are stripped away completely as I described earlier.

The pattern and orientation of the damage to the crankarm threads is consistent with the back of the pedal thread levering itself up into the top of the crank threads as it came out, with the crank at the 4:30 position (looking at the drive side of the bike). This is consistent with my right foot being forward as I rode over the drop. At the time of failure, vertically upward corresponded to the direction from the pedal centerline toward the ‘4’ in the ‘CK-745’ logo printed on the crank.

In contrast, the other side of the crankarm thread (which was facing down as the pedal ripped out from the opposite side of the crank) appears to be undamaged.

• For completeness, the OD of the pedal thread on the Spank pedal exactly matches the stock Giant pedals (14.0 mm on my cheap micrometer, nominal is 14.022 mm). So there was nothing wrong with the pedal. The pedal threads do not appear to be damaged but the dent in the bearing housing has effectively destroyed the pedals. And no, Giant did not offer to replace them. Spank, however, has offered a crash replacement at reduced cost.

For the record I have no financial interest in, nor any social ties to, any other bike company.

Please spread the word on this issue so that it creates real change. And if you work for Giant or another company that uses cheap drivetrain components on mountain ebikes: do something about this before someone is seriously injured.

Regards,

Tom W

Burnaby BC

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Paul Cavasino
2 weeks ago

2013 Stealth Bomber

Love My PEDEGO CITY COMMUTER !!! 6/'17

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Paul Cavasino
2 weeks ago

Sometimes the soldering or connections are so small that it is easy for them to break or come loose, let us know what you find out.
Oh Yes,...One "Bare Wire" Connection on My Best Friends 26" City Commuter Came Loose @ The Connector Clip to the Headlight...We Will Attempt to Solder it Back on Complete with "Heat Shrink Tubing"...Compliments of PEDEGO !!

Monica Piñeros
2 weeks ago

Hi everyone! In the next months a want to buy an ebike but I am absolutely lost about which one is the perfect match for me. Here are some info about my location, budget and needs:

- I live in Bogota, Colombia. I work as a real estate broker and I am tired of traffic and cars. Here traffic is caotic, so ive been moving in a mountain bike and its great. However, the city is not a plain at all, part of it is steep terrain so I need a ebike that helps me with that, without being so heavy.

- Budget: Between $1300 and $1700 USD

- Bodytype: Im short! But I like big wheels bikes. Not the small ones.

- Since I dont live in the US, its important to know how good customer service is, or if it has International support. If the bike damages, can i fix the problem easily?

Ive been reading and some options ive seen are: SHIMA A2B, MAGNUM UI5 and RadCity commuter bike from Rad Power. Any suggestion? Preference? Recomendation?

Or if you have other options please let me know! Thanks your your help.

mrgold35
2 weeks ago

I don't know what the official weight limit is, but a Pedego City Commuter is built like a tank... for that matter, so are the rest of them, I suspect. I know they have heavy duty wheels as an add on to several of their models as well. Certainly a mainstream bike with a solid reputation. My wife has one - no weight problem for her - and loves it. Worth a look.

I looked at the owners manual online and it stated on page 12/Safety/Weight Capacity of being 250 lbs for all models (Boomerang, Boomerang Plus, City Commuter, Comfort Cruiser, Interceptor, and Tandem): http://www.pedegoelectricbikes.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Master-Manual-WEB.pdf

Saratoga Dave
2 weeks ago

I don't know what the official weight limit is, but a Pedego City Commuter is built like a tank... for that matter, so are the rest of them, I suspect. I know they have heavy duty wheels as an add on to several of their models as well. Certainly a mainstream bike with a solid reputation. My wife has one - no weight problem for her - and loves it. Worth a look.

jharlow77
2 weeks ago

I am torn between these two. Suggestions?

BurbManDan
3 weeks ago

This is an email I sent without response to PeopleForBikes, which is pertinent to this discussion, so I've copied it in as sent:

For the past three years (approx 30k miles) I've commuted from north side of Thornton to the south side of DTC on a speed pedelec (Felt NINEe 20). My commute is 35.4mi each way, of which only about 7mi is on the street. The majority is on multi-use paths, on which I cross portions of Thornton, Northglenn, Commerce City, Brighton, Denver, Glenndale, Aurora, Greenwood Village, and Englewood. Given that CRS 42-4-1412 (2016) clause 14, states riders on e-bikes should not use the motor on paths, except as authorized by local governments, is there anyplace where people can find these local government's position regarding motor use on paths? If not, is that something that an advocacy organization like People for Bikes could research and publish?

While I'm glad to see e-bikes being recognized and partially sanctioned, I'm concerned about the "model" legislation in Colorado and elsewhere that bans speed pedelecs (class 3 bikes) from the multi-use paths. Multiple classes of bikes with differing rules leads to confusion and error, as made clear in the Denver Post's recent article where speed pedelecs are described as "higher-powered rides that are essentially electric mopeds."

The posted speed limit for many portions of the path is 15mph. Cyclists, regardless of what they are riding, should be ticketed if they are riding recklessly or too fast. It is impossible to distinguish between most major manufacturer's Class 1 and Class 3 bikes by looking at them as they pass. To enforce this legislation, e-bikes would have to be stopped, and inspected for a classification sticker, or tested. As written, this "model" legislation is likely to be used as a politically expedient method of making life difficult for all e-bikes the moment someone is injured in an accident involving an e-bike. Accidents will happen involving e-bikes, just as they do for regular bikes, pedestrians, joggers and motorists. Multiple classes with different rules just ensures that all e-bikes will be targeted when an accident happens, even those who are riding responsibly.

Thanks,
-dan

•••

PedegoElectricBikes
3 weeks ago

Longtime pedal bike shop owners choose Number 1 electric bike brand for new store

FOUNTAIN VALLEY, Calif., July 6, 2017 — The world’s 100th Pedego® Electric Bikes store is now open in Simsbury, Conn. Owned by Mike and Rachel Wolf, Pedego Simsbury is the fifth Pedego store in New England. Pedego also has stores in Boston, Rhode Island, Cape Cod and South Norwalk. Pedego Electric Bikes is the Number 1 electric bike brand in the United States, according to Navigant Research. There will be ribbon cutting ceremony by the Main Street Partnership on July 6th to celebrate the opening.

“We're pleased to announce that Pedego Simsbury is our 100th Pedego electric bike store in the world,” said Pedego Electric Bikes CEO and co-founder Don DiCostanzo. “Opening the 100th Pedego store is a testament to the growing popularity of electric bikes, and we’re delighted to be leading the revolution.”

THE PUBLIC IS INVITED TO JOIN THE RIBBON CUTTING CELEBRATION

WHAT: Ribbon Cutting Ceremony by the Main Street Partnership including refreshments and free test rides

WHERE: Pedego Simsbury store, 528 Hopmeadow Street, Simsbury, Conn.

WHEN: Thursday, July 6 at 4:30 p.m.

WHO: Store co-owners Mike and Rachel Wolf, plus representatives from the Main Street Partnership, Simsbury Chamber of Commerce, and City of Simsbury as well as Pedego representative Cassidy Castleman

Store owners Mike and Rachel Wolf, 77 and 71 years old respectively, are well-known in the area for their two long-established cycling shops. Nearly 67 years ago, Mike’s father established Connecticut's oldest bike shop, Bloomfield Bicycle & Repair Shop. Mike has worked there for 64 years, since he was 13 years old, and today, it is the oldest bike store in the region. It also carries the largest inventory of electric bikes in the area, with 150 electric bikes in stock. Of the nine electric bicycle brands Wolf carries at his Bloomfield bike shop, Pedego is the leading brand, which led him to open the Pedego Simsbury store. The Wolfs also own the Bike Cellar in Simsbury, which specializes in pedal bikes.

“Electric bikes are a game changer, enabling people of all ages to ride bikes,” Mike said. “We firmly believe that 60 percent of all bike sales in the future will be electric bikes, and we’ve decided to go with Pedego, the Number 1 electric bike brand, as Pedego is devoted to delighting its customers and empowering its dealers.”

The Wolfs are not only Pedego electric bikes salespeople, they are big fans themselves. An avid Pedego rider, Mike lost 54 pounds and lowered his cholesterol and blood pressure over the past 18 months with his Pedego electric bike. Weather permitting, the septuagenarian rides more than 20 miles every morning. He said, “Not only have I gained back my health, I’ve also gotten better looking, thanks to my electric bike.”

Pedego Simsbury’s opening is the culmination of Mike’s decade-long friendship with Pedego CEO and co-founder Don DiCostanzo. They met when DiCostanzo owned an electric bike shop in Newport Beach, Calif., long before he co-founded Pedego. DiCostanzo said, “We are thrilled to welcome Mike and Rachel to the Pedego family. They share a passion for bringing electric bikes to the region and getting Baby Boomers back on bikes.”

Pedego Simsbury offers sales of all 12 Pedego Electric Bikes models that empower riders to zoom up hills and through headwinds. All Pedego bikes have a 500-watt hub motor that helps riders cruise distances of 30 to 60 miles without getting tired and sweaty. Now available at the new Simsbury store are California-styled cruisers, including the Pedego Platinum Interceptor, a fully loaded cruiser bike; the Pedego Interceptor, which boasts a 48-volt battery that propels riders with extra power; and Pedego’s Comfort Cruiser, which is powered by a 36-volt battery for gentle help with hills. Also available are the Trail Tracker fat-tire bike for riding on gravel and snow; the Ridge Rider electric mountain bike; the sleek City Commuter; the sturdy Stretch cargo bike and the Latch, an ingenious folding bike, designed for portability and convenience. Pedego also recently introduced the Airstream model for camping devotees.

Rentals and sales of Pedego bikes are available. Located near the Pedego Simsbury store are the Farmington Canal Heritage Trail and Farmington River Trail, two scenic trails that meet in the town. The Farmington River Trail is part of the rail-to-trail bike path network that takes riders up into Massachusetts or down into New Haven, Conn. The store provides maps so renters can enjoy riding through the beautiful countryside. Simsbury was recently voted the most bike-friendly community in Connecticut.

Pedego Simsbury also offers top-notch service for Pedego electric bikes. Everything from maintenance to customizations can be handled by the team.

About Pedego Simsbury

Pedego Simsbury has the distinction of being the 100th Pedego Electric Bikes store in the world and is the region’s premier dealer in Pedego Electric Bikes. Pedego Simsbury offers a large selection of Pedego electric bikes sales, rentals, accessories and service. Free test rides are available. Located at 528 Hopmeadow Street in Simsbury, Conn., Pedego Simsbury is close to the Farmington Canal Heritage Trail and Farmington River Trail, two trails that combine for a scenic ride through a forest. The store is open seven days per week: Monday through Friday, 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Saturdays 9:00 am. to 5:00 p.m., and Sundays 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. To learn more and reserve a test ride, call 860-413-2543 or email info@pedegosimsbury.com. Follow us on Facebook and visit our website at http://www.pedegoelectricbikes.com/dealers/simsbury/

About Pedego

Pedego® Electric Bikes is the Number 1 electric bike brand in the United States, according to Navigant Research. Pedego manufactures 12 high-quality, innovative models, including cruisers, tandems, commuters, fat-tire bikes, mountain bikes, cargo bikes and a convenient electric folding bike. Sold at 100 Pedego-branded stores and hundreds of independent electric bike dealers worldwide, Pedego’s stylish “pedal or not” electric bikes boast powerful, whisper-quiet motors that let riders sail up hills and breeze through headwinds with a smile. Available in hundreds of color combinations, Pedego electric bikes deliver a green alternative for transportation, exercise and recreation — transforming lives with fun and delight. Founded in 2008, Orange County, Calif.-based Pedego inspires riders to say, “Hello, Fun!”

PR CONTACTS:
Teri Sawyer, T&Co.
714-801-1687
TeriSawyer@me.com

Sandra Eckardt, T&Co.
949-400-2258
Sandra@EckardtStrategies.com

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PedegoElectricBikes
3 weeks ago

Electric Bikes energize the town with fun and fanfare

FOUNTAIN VALLEY, Calif., July 5, 2017— A Pedego® Electric Bikes store is now open in Petoskey, Mich., bringing an exhilarating new activity to town. Pedego Petoskey co-owners Bryan Newman and husband-wife team Bill and Pat Anton are excited to introduce the nation’s Number 1 electric bike brand with a party that includes free test rides on the elegant electric bikes. It is the 99th Pedego store worldwide. Pedego’s enormous popularity grew from the brand’s stylish designs and quality components. Every Pedego bike features a 500-watt motor that empowers riders to conquer hills, headwinds and long distances with ease.

THE PUBLIC IS INVITED TO JOIN THE GRAND OPENING & RIBBON-CUTTING CELEBRATION

What: Grand Opening and Ribbon-cutting Ceremony will include free test rides and snacks

Where: Pedego Petoskey, 438 East Mitchell Street, Petoskey, MI, 49770

When: Thursday, July 13 from 4:00 to 8:00 p.m. Ribbon-cutting Ceremony at 4:45 p.m.

Who: Store co-owners Bryan Newman and Bill & Pat Anton, store manager Dawn Marie Hansen, Friends & Family, Petoskey Chamber and various City Ambassadors will be present as well as Pedego California representatives Tom Bock and Cassidy Castleman.

Newman is an experienced Pedego dealer as he also owns Pedego La Quinta and Pedego Palm Springs, both in Southern California. Every winter since opening his other stores, Newman has had visitors from Michigan rave about the electric bikes as the best part of their California vacation, so he decided to bring the fun of Pedego electric bikes to Petoskey, an established vacation destination. “I chose to become a Pedego dealer because it’s all about fun, and now I'm thrilled to bring the fun to Petoskey,” he said.

Pedego riders can cruise for hours enjoying Petoskey’s miles of scenic paths without over-exerting. Located in the Northwest tip of Michigan’s Lower Peninsula, Emmet County offers a variety of paths that blend scenic splendor with rich historical sites. Long stretches of sandy beaches, quaint downtowns and year-round activities beckon outdoor enthusiasts, including families. Little Traverse Wheelway, a re-established turn-of-the-century trail that goes from Walker Road, Charlevoix, to Hoyt Street in Harbor Springs, presents more than 26 miles of pure riding enjoyment. This and several other trails await riders who want to explore the area while having fun on electric bikes.

Pedego Petoskey offers sales of all 12 Pedego Electric Bikes models that empower riders to zoom up hills and through headwinds. All Pedego bikes have a 500-watt hub motor that helps riders cruise distances of up to 60 miles without getting tired and sweaty. Now available at the new store are California-styled cruisers, including the Pedego Platinum Interceptor, a fully loaded cruiser bike; and the Pedego Interceptor, which boasts a 48-volt battery that propels riders with extra power. Also available are the sleek City Commuter; the Trail Tracker fat-tire bike for riding on gravel and snow; the Ridge Rider electric mountain bike; the sturdy Stretch cargo bike and the Latch, an ingenious folding bike, designed for portability and convenience. Pedego also recently introduced the Airstream model for camping devotees.

Available for rent are Pedego’s cruiser-style Interceptors, sporty Ridge Riders, ultra-low step-thru Boomerang Plus bikes, fat-tire Trail Trackers, Stretch cargo bikes, sleek City Commuters and a shiny red Tandem. Helmets and locks are included with rentals.

“Petoskey is such a beautiful place with miles and miles of scenic bike paths to enjoy,” said Pedego Electric Bikes CEO and co-founder Don DiCostanzo. “We're very happy that riders will now be able to see, experience and enjoy Petoskey on Pedego electric bikes.”

About Pedego Petoskey

Pedego Petoskey is the region's premier dealer in Pedego Electric Bikes. Offering a large selection of Pedego electric bikes for sale and rental as well as accessories and service. Riders can cruise near sandy beaches, through quaint downtowns and enjoy year-round activities on Pedego electric bikes. Little Traverse is a local bike path offering more than 26 miles of scenic splendor combined with fascinating historical sites. Open Sunday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Located at 438 E. Mitchell, Petoskey, MI 49770. To learn more and reserve a test ride, call (231) 881-9488 or email info@pedegoPetoskey.com. Follow us on Facebook and visit our website at http://www.pedegoelectricbikes.com/dealers/Petoskey/.

About Pedego

Pedego® Electric Bikes is the Number 1 electric bike brand in the United States, according to Navigant Research. Pedego manufactures 12 high-quality, innovative models, including cruisers, tandems, commuters, fat-tire bikes, mountain bikes, cargo bikes and a convenient electric folding bike. Sold at nearly 100 Pedego-branded stores and hundreds of independent electric bike dealers worldwide, Pedego’s stylish “pedal or not” electric bikes boast powerful, whisper-quiet motors that let riders sail up hills and breeze through headwinds with a smile. Available in hundreds of color combinations, Pedego electric bikes deliver a green alternative for transportation, exercise and recreation — transforming lives with fun and delight. Founded in 2008, Orange County, Calif.-based Pedego inspires riders to say, “Hello, Fun!”

PR CONTACTS:
Teri Sawyer, T&Co.
714-801-1687
TeriSawyer@me.com

Sandra Eckardt, T&Co.
949-400-2258
Sandra@EckardtStrategies.com

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PedegoElectricBikes
3 weeks ago

Pedego San Diego brings energetic vibe to Downtown’s fashionable BRIC

FOUNTAIN VALLEY, Calif., July 5, 2017 — The first Pedego® Electric Bikes store in Downtown San Diego has opened a pop-up shop in front of their soon-to-be permanent location on the ground floor of the elegant new BRIC center on San Diego Bay. Pedego San Diego offers Pedego’s 12 stylish models of powerful electric bikes that enable riders to enjoy cruising all over town with ease. Pedego Electric Bikes is the Number 1 electric bike brand in the United States, according to Navigant Research. Pedego San Diego is Pedego’s 98th store worldwide.

The Pedego San Diego pop-up shop offers free test rides, sales and rentals of the popular electric bikes. They're located at BRIC San Diego along with the Marriott Residence Inn, Spring Hill Inn and Suites Bayfront Hotels at Lane Field, just one block from the Santa Fe Depot train station. The store is open Sunday from Noon–6 p.m.; Monday from 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Closed on Tuesday; and Wednesday through Saturday from 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

Store co-owners husband-and-wife Sean and Chelsea Chavez, and Sean’s dad Celso Chavez, are excited to bring Pedego electric bikes to Downtown San Diego, giving visitors and locals alike an easy, fun and green alternative to cars. “With Pedego electric bikes, you can discover more of this beautiful city without the hassles of parking or worrying about hills or headwinds,” Sean said.

From the store, riders can easily cruise to the city’s great landmarks, including the Gaslamp Quarter, Petco Park, Balboa Park and museums, Old Town and Harbor and Shelter Islands. Riders can also take their bikes on the ferry to Coronado Island or bike to the island via the full 24-mile Bayshore Bikeway, which conveniently begins across the street from the store.

Pedego San Diego offers sales of all 12 Pedego Electric Bikes models that empower riders to zoom up hills and power through headwinds. All Pedego bikes have a 500-watt hub motor that helps riders cruise distances of 20 to 60 miles without getting tired and sweaty. Now available at the new San Diego store are California-styled cruisers, including the Pedego Platinum Interceptor, a fully loaded cruiser bike; the Pedego Interceptor, which boasts a 48-volt battery that propels riders with extra power; Pedego’s Comfort Cruiser, which is powered by a 36-volt battery for gentle help with hills; and the Pedego Tandem, the most stylish and powerful electric tandem available. Also available are the Trail Tracker fat-tire bike for riding on sand and gravel; the Ridge Rider electric mountain bike; the sleek City Commuter; the sturdy Stretch cargo bike that allows for extra cargo or an extra adult or two children to ride along; and the Latch, an ingenious folding bike, designed for portability and convenience. Rentals start at $20 per hour and $75 per day, depending on the model.

“San Diego’s famous sunshine and outdoor lifestyle make it a perfect home for a top-notch Pedego store,” said Pedego Electric Bikes CEO and co-founder Don DiCostanzo. “Pedego riders will enjoy riding longer, farther and faster, seeing more of this great city without having to deal with traffic or parking.”

About Pedego San Diego

Pedego San Diego is the region’s premier dealer in Pedego Electric Bikes, offering a large selection of Pedego electric bikes sales, rentals, accessories and service. Test rides, rentals and sales are available at a nearby pop-up site during construction of the store’s permanent location in the elegant BRIC hotel complex, an exciting lifestyle destination in the heart of Downtown San Diego. Riders can cruise to the city’s great landmarks, including the Gaslamp Quarter, Petco Park, Balboa Park and museums, Old Town and Harbor and Shelter Islands. Open Sunday Noon–6 p.m.; Monday 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Closed on Tuesday; and Wednesday through Saturday 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Located at 900 Bayfront Ct., Suite 100, San Diego, CA 92101. To learn more and reserve a test ride, call (800) 604-7187 or email info@pedegoSD.com. Follow us on Facebook and visit our website at www.pedegosandiego.com.

About Pedego

Pedego® Electric Bikes is the Number 1 electric bike brand in the United States, according to Navigant Research. Pedego manufactures 12 high-quality, innovative models, including cruisers, tandems, commuters, fat-tire bikes, mountain bikes, cargo bikes and a convenient electric folding bike. Sold at nearly 100 Pedego-branded stores and hundreds of independent electric bike dealers worldwide, Pedego’s stylish “pedal or not” electric bikes boast powerful, whisper-quiet motors that let riders sail up hills and breeze through headwinds with a smile. Available in hundreds of color combinations, Pedego electric bikes deliver a green alternative for transportation, exercise and recreation — transforming lives with fun and delight. Founded in 2008, Orange County, Calif.-based Pedego inspires riders to say, “Hello, Fun!”

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1/1
Over50
4 weeks ago

I am a bike shop employee and I just ordered one of these after an extensive test ride...
Nice review. I also posted about desiring a suspension fork on that bike. I have the same tires on my R&M and I run them close to max inflation for my commute (seems more efficient that way) and I set the suspension fork pretty stiff too. It can be a bit of a rough ride but I feel like its efficient. The BodyFloat seatpost helps. I'd be curious to know how the SC feels over a good distance on crappy pavement with railroad track crossings etc with the tires close to max psi. I've never had the opportunity to ride on a carbon fork (apart from my very brief ride on the Super Commuter) or carbon bike so I wouldn't have any idea how that ride compares to a suspension fork or to my chromoly steel city commuter (not electric and with rigid steel fork).

Stan Wilson
4 weeks ago

Anyone out there know how to downgrade/reprogram RadRover controller firmware? I had Rad Power bikes upgrade my Rad Rover controller to the same version of firmware as my wife's bike. The preset speeds for each of the power levels on her bike was different than mine, making it hard to maintain speeds when we ride together. Unfortunately when the controller firmware was upgraded, instead of upgrading to my wife's version, it was upgraded to the latest version which is significantly different. Instead of each power level being related to a speed, it's now related to a wattage. That means now my speed varies wildly based on if I'm going up or down a grade.

I talked to several people at at Rad Power bikes and they all say they can't downgrade the firmware. I can't believe they can't, since as a software developer I've updated and downgraded lots of firmware, including on electric bikes. It's not that hard. You hook up the right software to the right ports and follow the instructions. My guess is they have other reasons.

I would also like to be able to adjust the controller. I just bought (6/20/2017) my 16 inch Rad City Commuter. I like it very much, but the 5 pas settings seem to be off. They come in about 65, 170, 350, 450, 550. For my usual relaxed ride, I like to ride about 10 to 12 mph and I want to "feel" the pedals, rather than getting a "freeride". This is so I can get a little exercise and lower the power consumption by"helping" the motor a little. Power 1 at 65 carries the bike to about 12 mph, and after that, I'm spinning my legs madly, but not helping the motor. Ideally, I would like the controller to go to about 50 which would let me "help" starting at about 10 mph. I've sent several notes to Rad Power Bikes. Apparently, the controller is not user adjustable (darned) But, Scott Vandivort offered a suggestion which may be helping. He suggested "lowering" the maximum speed from something like 35 kph to 20 kph. I've experiemented and found that 23 gives me a cut off at about 10 mph. This way, I can "help" for anything above 10 mph since the motor simply stops increasing. By switching gears, I can "cruise" at about 12 mph while "helping" a little. This also seems to be lowering my power consumption as I rode 12 miles and the power bar just dropped one bar. It used to drop one bar at about 7 miles. The only problem is that if I want to go faster than 12 mph, I have to do it all!

The next "easiest" fix seems to be switching from a 48 to 53 (or so) chainring. The only problem is that this will change all of my gear ratios and lower my "hi" so that it will be harder to crank when I face those inevitable steep inclines.

Thanks,
Stan Wilson
Dodge City, Kansas

Bunny Hand
4 weeks ago

Hello! I'm moving back to Austin, TX from SE Asia. I sold my car when we left and would prefer not to get a new one and opt for an ebike instead. I'd like to get a used bike that can withstand street riding, gravel (like the Hike & Bike Trail), as well as actual trail riding (although this last one is optional).

I can't decide if I should go for a mountain bike? Or if a standard city/commuter bike will do ok with a little bit of light off roading. Any experience with this? Also, if I go with a mountain bike should I choose full suspension or hard tail? From my little knowledge on this I'd assume that full suspension might be overkill, but I could definitely be wrong.

Other preferences include pedal assist and small frame (I'm 5'2). Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

Over50
1 month ago

Thanks, Over50. I did see some of the locking threads and there do seem to be some good options out there. I was mostly curious if there were those who are taking the risk of leaving their beautiful ebike out there and exposed for the day...and what methods (locks, motion sensors, etc) they use to deter. What has your experience been? I must have a little PTSD in this area as I had my beautiful mountain/road hybrid bike that I loved dearly stolen at a bus station years ago - it's painful to think about 20 years later. :)

That is a bit of a different situation (having to leave all day sight unseen). I am parking in front of two different office buildings. Both are high traffic and have security teams. Which isn't to say that I have a lot of confidence they are monitoring the bike racks. The one in front of my office is a hangout for the office smokers so from 8am to 5pm there is generally someone standing close by. And me being paranoid I check on it about 10 times per day. The other office building I use about 50% of the time because the racks are covered- but it is 3 blocks from my office. So I can only check on the bike a couple of times per day. I had the Boomerang GPS but the unit failed and I haven't worked out a replacement yet. Your situation is why I wasn't commuting by bike prior to getting the ebike. I did have the option of riding my regular bike to a bus stop about 5 miles from my house and taking the bus to work. But I didn't feel there was a safe place to lock the bike for the entire day. The ebike gave me the ability to ride all the way to work and back. I would have a tough time leaving either my ebike or my human powered city commuter locked up for the entire day in any of the areas around my office or even my home if I couldn't check on it from time to time. I probably have too much separation anxiety for that...

Saratoga Dave
1 month ago

<<quite hilly with stop signs in the middle of the hills>>

Hub drive with a throttle. Far easier to get going and across a street quickly, then ride as usual with the pedal assist helping as you desire. I'd say a Pedego City Commuter, but they're heavy (and top heavy as well, since the battery is on the rear rack)... very strong throttle. That Cross Current mentioned above with a throttle might be a good idea. A lot lighter than the Pedego.

You can certainly get going on an XM700 - I own and love one - by making sure you are in a low gear and kicking up the assist to Sport, but the throttle jobs are really simple and great for that purpose.

mrgold35
1 month ago

I did take a 22 mile all paved bike ride loop around the city starting at 2:30pm just to see how hot is too hot on an ebike. It showed 101 degrees on the internet; but, it was probably 100-107 depending on the part of the city (started heading east from work near downtown, headed to north side of ABQ, cut down towards the west to the north/south river trail, and back home on west side). The Radrover rode like a champ the entire way. Never felt under powered, zero issues with braking, or it had any issues maintaining PAS 3 at 17-21 mph. I did up the PAS to 4 for longer inclines to maintain my speed and used the throttle at full 750w on short but steep inclines.

SPEED is your friend! It really helped keeping my speed +17 mph because it aided in the cooling. I never felt overheated during the ride (commuter Osprey backpack, vented bike helmet, sunglasses, half finger glove, long sleeve bike shirt, extra long baggy bike shorts with spandex under, and regular running shoes). I like the long sleeve shirts to keep from getting sun burned when riding.

I ran into a few other bikers and they could only travel 1/2 to 3/4 of my speed on the same paved trails. A few were walking their bikes or taking breaks in the shady spots along the river. I did the same loop on my old pedal bike last year during the summer and that left me tired into the next day.

Themis1988
1 month ago

Because I want to buy from a local dealer, I went to Ichi Bike in Des Moines' East Village today. They were out of Pedego models so I test rode the Izip E3 Vibe+ on a medium frame and the E3 Path Plus commuter on a large frame. I definitely need the large frame. Not being an aggressive rider, the frames felt very sturdy. It was my first time on an e-bike and was thrilling, a bit scary, and reassuring all at once. I loved that I could start from a stop quickly and get up the steep local hill without any difficulty. Wow, those can fly downhill! :D I really liked the cush of the Vibe with fatter tires and had no problem on the hill with it, even at low to mid-throttle. Maybe I didn't shift correctly on the Path, but without throttle, the pedal assist was not quite as helpful on the hill. This was probably my error but I love the option of either or both pedal assist & throttle on the Vibe. I wouldn't have any problem with either of these bikes and felt very comfortable with the upright position, but would go with the Vibe over the Path because of the softer ride over pavement bumps and the throttle assist. Either would need a suspension post and softer seat. ;) I ordered a Pedego 28" step-thru City Commuter to try without purchase obligation. When it arrives I will test them against each other. I am HOOKED! :p

Themis1988
1 month ago

What a great site and forums! I've asked Court to review the Electra Loft Go! with step-through frame. Wanting to get into some semblance of shape again after too many years at a desk job, I would like to find an electric bicycle to be gentle on my knees when needed on starts and hills. Otherwise I plan to pedal with minimal assist. I am female, age 57, 5'10" large-frame and 260# so need a sturdy ride to run errands, exercise and for general cruising. From searching specs and forums so far, I need a 500 w motor and 48 v 15 amp battery. My budget is in the $2500 - $3500ish range. I also plan to retire and buy a van-sized RV in the next year or two, and will take my e-bike along on a rear-mount track rack (?) for supplemental transportation within parks and shorter-range sight-seeing. I'm concerned cruiser handlebars may be too wide for this rack style. This site has enabled me to do lots of homework and I have narrowed choices to Pedego Step-Thru Interceptor, City Commuter or Comfort Cruiser, or Electra Loft Go! or Townie Go! I'm not confident about the weight capacity of some of the other brands (Raleigh and Izip) with local dealers in Iowa. Appreciating your insight and advice,
Themis

JohnT
2 months ago

I agree that buying local is a good idea. We have a few special needs customers, and they tend to be hard on their bikes and greatly benefit from having us nearby to help with any issues. If possible, I suggest buying from someone within riding distance.

Ebikes are heavy, especially if they're built sturdy. I want to recommend our Pedego City Commuter 26" Step Thru, but it's not light, and the battery being in the rear rack puts the center of gravity a bit high. If weight is a deal breaker, I'd recommend something with a lower battery. It might not be much lighter, but it might be more manageable. I'm sorry I'm not familiar enough with other brands to be able to suggest one.

If the weight is ok, this Pedego is the perfect size for him; I'm 5'6" and my wife is 5'1", and it fits us both well. It's a step thru for easier access, but it's not as low and curvy as some step thrus. To help with fit, it comes with a quick release adjustable stem. It has a throttle and pedal assist, either of which could be disconnected if it turned out to be too complicated for him. It's available in 48v and 36v power options. If you hang panniers over the rack to hide the battery, it's hard to tell it's electric.

It doesn't come fully assembled if it's shipped, but all you have to do is install the pedals and put the stem in the fork, and you're ready to go. Removing the bubble wrap and stuff is harder than the assembly required!

Drumulac
2 months ago

I enjoyed reading everything you wrote. I am glad I got the NuVinci, but only because of my riding stlye. The Rohloff is definitely better. I use the bike for going to a number of destinations around the city and I like to get done quickly, so I am constantly shifting as I ride around very quickly. If I owned a Rohloff, I'd likely get used to it but when I tried a demo I just hated it. I have been testing the limits of the bike a lot, and have crashed a number of times. The bike never gets hurt really, and the Nyon back is scuffed up from a couple spills but still works great. It is very detailed and I like looking at my rides afterwards. I ride almost always in Turbo, I only ride in Tour if I will be running out of battery. Hard to believe I know, but I frequently do over 60 miles on the bike at once. I am really looking forward to upgrading the suspension on the bike and having a set of MTB tires for off-roading. I have been testing the limits of the bike and have fallen off a number of times, so once I upgrade the rear shock and fork, I want to avoid scratching them lol.

There are a lot of paved trails near me and also some dirt and gravel trails too. I went up a steep climb on a 6 inch wide dirt path covered in roots and boulders like it was nothing. Coming back down was a bit scary with the Super Moto X tires that have 1500 miles of wear on them, I am sure I will feel much more confident with some nobby nics on like the GX has I believe. I never did any trail riding before, but I really had a blast trying it out and will be doing a lot of it in the future.

More on the Nyon, I really am glad I upgrades. It just looks so much cooler and gives you a ton of information. I know the exact battery percentage as well which is a plus since steep sections of a ride can really distort the range for the overall ride. You can see a map of your path and can see your altitude, cadence, speed, and power output and any point along the ride. I like the navigation, but it is not as good as Google Maps. It is just like using a tomtom or garmin sat nav. The directions are fine but the city has a lot of close streets, it would be nice to see the street names on the map but it just shows the roads with no names. Sometimes of course navigation lags a little, so it would be nice to see the name of the roads on screen. It does not show the names of random streets around you on the map, nor the name of the street you are supposed to turn onto next, and also not the street you are currently on. No street names, just an animation to follow. I really just like the Nyon for how it looks, the Intuvia works fine but it is such a simple display on a bike that has so much more to offer (not to mention it looks high tech).

The Nyon display does take a few extra seconds to load up, and sometimes restarts during a ride (not often). The good thing though is that the power assist works from the second you hit the power button, even though the display is loading. And when the Nyon restarts mid-ride for no reason, the assist never stops, so really doesn't bother me. One other thing is that the Nyon does not allow me to turn on the High Beam of my Supernova M99 Pro. The Intuvia light button worked for the high beam and also for turning it on during the day, but with the Nyon connected, the headlight is completely independent. It won't turn on when the sun is out, and won't turn off at night nor turn the high beam on, the light button is useless even though the light icon appears when I click it. Perhaps I need it to be changed to switchable from a shop, I have not checked yet. Worst case scenario I will have to attach the high beam button that came with the light, but it will not reach my handlebars since the light is mounted on the fork crown. I like it better there, the lighting is perfect and cars can see my lights better in their mirrors because it is at the same level as car headlights. I will have to epoxy the button onto the actualy light or something lol.

Hey Matt - love that you're pushing the limits of your Delite. Due to a number of factors, most of which are not under my control, I've only got 500 miles on mine so far, which are mostly straight forward commuter runs.

Interesting re: the Nyon. I would purchase it for the more detailed battery stats more than anything else. Sounds like it needs a few firmware/software tweaks - hopefully, you can simply do upgrades via the usb port as they (inevitably) are offered. I have a Garmin 1000 Edge, which I switch out between bikes. It more than covers all those post-ride statistics and is nice since it automatically pushes the data to my phone as soon as I save the ride via Bluetooth and also to my tablet bv wifi or direct connection when recharging. All sorts of fun info to sort through - mapping, cumulative/comparative ride stats, profiles, temperature, course creation tools, etc. It does give you side streets, upcoming turn alarms, etc. So I certainly wouldn't need the Nyon for those functions. Too bad the Nyon reboots mid-ride on you. Maybe a connector problem? The light issue doesn't surprise me. For whatever reason, my Intuvia stopped turning on the rear light at around 100 miles, whatever mode you put it in (high beam, on-off, front light handlebar switch, etc). Don't know what that is about, but I'll put Propel on notice and eventually have them look at it. I think I read somewhere in this thread that the same thing happened to someone else? Was that you? I have an older model Dinotte tail light with the external battery that I put on when that happened so that works well - in fact, much better than the factory light - since it flashes in different modes and has quite the output. I'm o.k. as long as my headlight is still working . . . super pleased with the Supernova M-99 that came with the GX. In any case, I think I'll wait until the bugs are ironed out before I go for the Nyon.

Ann M.
2 months ago

I agree with JoePah that bike theft is an issue on any college campus; however, as someone who bike commuted for 20+ years, the only time I had a bike stolen was when I didn't use a hardened U-Lock or one of those super strong Abus flat steel folding locks. Never depend on a cable lock for serious protection. For my long stops while working at a local junior college, I used both a U-Lock and cable lock. The cable added a little extra protection for the wheels and meant a thief had 2 locks to break. That extra second or two can be enough to deter most thieves.

Did a couple of searches for upright style commuter bikes & city style bikes on the main EBR site and there's a lot that would work. Plug in what features you want into the expanded search options to see a lot of choices with reviews. Remember, some come with a lot of the accessories that are handy for commuting, like a rear rack & lights but not all and those are not expensive to add on. If your son wants something that's a hybrid between road and trail use, re-run the search. Many hybrid style bikes with slightly wider tires would work and again, racks & lights can generally be added.

Just quick thought, Juiced, Easy Motion (EMotion), Raleigh, Specialized, Riese and Muller all have good quality bikes under $4K. Differences will be in motor size & power output, accessories, etc. Since the college is located in relatively flat terrain, your son may not need a big motor for adequate support. I imagine it's the books & computer & other stuff carried in saddlebags that will add a lot of weight, so he'll still want good power & range. Remember, he will be riding this bike other places than just around campus; Ann Arbor is a great college town.

Waqar Khan
1 day ago

the front clock water proof, with the starter button?

Mike Turco
3 months ago

I have a 2016 48/14 city commuter and get only 23 mile range.

Iain Hendry
3 months ago

Hi there,

Can't thank you enough for your videos. My husband an I have probably watched 50 of them over the past few weeks! Yesterday, we settled on this bike, the City Commuter, thanks to your videos helping us dial in on what type of assist bike we wanted to get (and several test rides)!

Greetings from Canada,

-Iain

The Pirate
9 months ago

Cool bike, decent review except for the obsessive, superfluous and uncontrolled use of the word "like." Otherwise, very articulate and informative - thank you.

Frank Westgate
11 months ago

the weight limit for these bikes?  saying person size .. weight limit

geoffrey welsby
12 months ago

can I ask. if you were getting an ebike which one would you choose..

Ken Johnson
1 year ago

You convinced me to get my first Pedego City Commuter and I think it's time to get a new one with all the upgrades.

Florida Scot
1 year ago

+Ken Johnson... I've got 6500 miles on mine black 2014 with big apple tire upgrade, these bikes are far from perfect but they work & are quicker .I couldnt go back to 20 MPH bikes sometimes I have to out run the pit bulls, lol

John Migliore
1 year ago

I would like to see you employ an audible warning as you approach slower moving traffic. Like using the bell, or calling out: "Passing on your left."

Lynell A
2 years ago

Amazing video. Im getting one now!

Pablo Taboada
2 years ago

Nice job!  really nice!

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Pablo Taboada Hey, thanks! I'm glad you enjoyed it. I've got some new camera stuff and am working to be very thorough and make the videos more comprehensive :D

Christ devera
2 years ago

Its an awesome bike but i just cant afford it

Juan Castro
2 years ago

+kris devera buy a used one and save 30% ! I think I am going to get one of this... in my opinion, a world class electric bike :)

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+kris devera Yeah, Pedego is an upper mid-priced bike. They seem more affordable now that Haibike, Felt and Specialized are selling for $4K+ but they still aren't cheap. Here's a list of some lower priced options: http://electricbikereview.com/tag/affordable/

cody1b
2 years ago

Court, I have a Citizen Tokyo folding bike with 16 inch tires. I really want to convert it but uncertain if I should go with the 8fun mid drive or leaf bike hub motor. Any recommendations or suggestions?

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+cody1b Hmm... I'd go for a basic 250 watt geared rear motor kit (or front) to just keep it light and use a smaller battery as well. One good option might be the LEED PBJ (they sell a bunch of different battery options): http://electricbikereview.com/leed/pocket-bike-juice/ and for a bit more Dillenger also makes some good kits. It really depends on how you want to mount the battery to your frame and how much you weigh, how far you want to go etc. The 8Fun BBS02 mid-drive is a great kit but might be difficult to fit on a folder. Honestly, adding a rear rack with a simple battery might be best here or you could get a premade folding ebike like the e-Joe Epik: http://electricbikereview.com/e-joe/epik-lite/

Fayez Patel
2 years ago

I can do about 60 miles/day on a carbon road bike in about 5hrs, so 12mph avg speed.  With a lot less effort, I could probably do the same thing on an electric bike.  30-60 miles range for the 48volts 15amp hours 500watt geared motor version, even with the extra 60lb weight of the bike.  I could probably even do it quicker, since max speed is 20mph.  That's not calculating rider weight, terrain, weather, etc.

I just don't know if, compared to my carbon bike, this is what I want: A slighty more costly and heavy e-bike that needs battery replacement every few years and is going to be outdated with drastically better technology soon.

Maybe this is similar to when people used horses and the automobile was introduced. Eventually it become more efficient (cost/convenience), and we accepted the automobile as the standard means of transportation, but at what cost to the environment? The batteries on these bikes have a really destructive impact on our environment, but maybe not as bad as driving alone in a Hummer.

Great reviews nonetheless!! Detailed and great audio/visuals, how do you flip the camera around while riding?

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Fayez Patel I like the sound of that and appreciate your clarifications about batteries, recycling and electricity generation sources :)

Fayez Patel
2 years ago

+ElectricBikeReview.com I wasn't seriously comparing an e-bike to a Hummer (even with 7 passengers). I just wanted to bring to light that there is an ecological impact with lithium-ion batteries (mining, processing, recharging (most of US is still on fossil fuels) and disposing (even with recycling programs)). But I'm looking forward to improvements in battery technology.

It would be better I think if there were lighter e-bikes with on demand power, days I don't need the battery I can just take it off, or if I'm hauling a heavy trailer with my bike I could add more power. The average carbon bike with tires and everything is about 9kg. Add 3kg for FlyKly. Add 1kg for Litelok bike lock. Total 13kg. :)

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Fayez Patel "but maybe not as bad as driving alone in a Hummer" not by a long shot... Think about forging all of that extra metal, plastic and foam then shipping that giant car to a dealer and ultimately driving with gasoline that is also mined from a remote location, refined and then delivered (with big trucks) to then be burned locally, emitting toxic fumes that also create health issues. By contrast, an ebike uses a fraction of the materials, does not pollute locally and can use energy that is generated with solar, wind or other renewable processes... the fuel gets cleaner. If batteries are disposed of properly (most Best Buy locations will take them) then they are recycled and materials are reused because they are valuable. Thanks for the props on the review, I use three cameras and just practice a lot to stay balanced. If you like carbon bikes that are light weight, check out this carbon ebike from last year (you could probably find it cheap): http://electricbikereview.com/easy-motion/neo-carbon/

EndtheDrugWarToday.com
2 years ago

Wow.  Great lookin bike.  Great review.

Oh boy you really have improved your audio quality to professional levels.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+EndtheDrugWarToday.com Thanks! I've spent a lot of time practicing and purchased a few new tools that really help, glad you noticed :D

Michael John Battista
2 years ago

A good reveiw

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Michael John Battista Thanks! Doing my best ;)

Z StHope
2 years ago

Excellent review and product; plus you look as if you had fun on a commuter?

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Zavier H Thanks, I enjoyed testing the bike out and was excited to see the little updates that Pedego has made :)