Populo Sport Review

Populo Sport Electric Bike Review
Populo Sport
Populo Sport 250 Watt Internally Geared Hub Motor
Populo Sport 36 Volt Samsung Battery Pack
Populo Sport Flat Rubber Grips Low Rise Bar
Populo Sport H500 Monochrome Display Control Pad
Populo Sport Tektro Ebike Levers
Populo Sport Mid Dish Double Wall Rims Black 36h
Populo Sport 46 Tooth Chainring
Populo Sport Electric Bike
Populo Sport Electric Bike Review
Populo Sport
Populo Sport 250 Watt Internally Geared Hub Motor
Populo Sport 36 Volt Samsung Battery Pack
Populo Sport Flat Rubber Grips Low Rise Bar
Populo Sport H500 Monochrome Display Control Pad
Populo Sport Tektro Ebike Levers
Populo Sport Mid Dish Double Wall Rims Black 36h
Populo Sport 46 Tooth Chainring
Populo Sport Electric Bike

Summary

  • An affordable, fairly stylish, surprisingly peppy single speed electric bike that would be great for urban riding, available in five frame sizes and four colors
  • Very affordable at just under $1k, especially considering the wires are internally routed through the frame, the torque sensor is so compact and there are two USB charging ports
  • Nice looking battery, locks securely to the frame but can be removed for charging or reduced weight... the bike only weighs ~37 lbs with everything attached!
  • Wish the display was removable for protection, no suspension and all-Aluminum frame with narrow tires can be a little stiff, no rack or fender mounts, basic brakes

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Populo

Model:

Sport

Price:

$999

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Pedal Assist (Class 1)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Years Electronics, 3 Year Frame

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

37 lbs ( 16.78 kg )

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Sizes:

19.29 in ( 48.99 cm )20.47 in ( 51.99 cm )21.65 in ( 54.99 cm )22.83 in ( 57.98 cm )

Geometry Measurements:

30.5" Standover Height

Frame Material:

Aluminum Alloy

Frame Colors:

Matte Black, Silver Polish, Satin Orange, Gloss Blue

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid Aluminum Alloy

Frame Rear Details:

12 mm Axle with Bolts

Attachment Points:

Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

1 Single Speed, 14T

Cranks:

YD 110 Alloy, 46T

Pedals:

HI Alloy Platform with Rubber Tread

Headset:

4.5 cm Riser Stack, 1-1/8"

Stem:

4" Length, 2° Rise

Handlebar:

Low-Rise Alloy, 23" Length

Brake Details:

Promax Linear Pull, Tektro Ebike Brake Levers with Rubber Edge and Motor Inhibitors

Grips:

Flat Rubber, Black

Saddle:

Velo Active

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy, Black

Seat Post Length:

300 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Alloy Double Wall, Mid Dish, 36 Hole

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 14G, Black

Tire Brand:

CST Super HP, 700 x 28c

Wheel Sizes:

28 in ( 71.12 cm )

Tube Details:

Presta Valve

Accessories:

Full Size USB Charger on Battery Pack and Display, Walk Mode (Hold + Button), Hold Set to Adjust Power Mode, Press Power Button for Backlight, Park Branded Kickstand

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, Plated Stainless Steel Horizontal Dropout with Torque Washers

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

HLGE

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Battery Brand:

Samsung

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

10.4 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

374.4 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

3 hours

Estimated Min Range:

20 miles ( 32 km )

Estimated Max Range:

30 miles ( 48 km )

Display Type:

H500 Fixed, Monochrome, Backlit LCD

Readouts:

Amperage Meter, Power Level (Eco, Normal, Power), Speedometer, Assist Level (0-8), Voltage, Battery Level (5 Bar), Time, Odometer, Trip Distance

Display Accessories:

Integrated Button Pad

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist

Top Speed:

20 mph ( 32 kph )

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Written Review

I’ve been reviewing electric bikes now for several years and I got into it because my knee is a bit sensitive. I wanted to commute to work in Austin, Texas but struggled with pain towards the end of the week as I had several hills along the way. So, with a little Internet searching I discovered ebikes then quickly felt overwhelmed by the price and possibility of damage or theft. The Populo Sport addresses these two latter concerns perfectly by being affordable and super tough. Having only one gear, you don’t have to worry about adjusting a bent or broken derailleur or cracked shifter levers. This is key for crowded bike racks. Also, the frame looks simple which helps it blend in and the battery is removable so it’s easy to protect and recharge when you’re at work or school. Taking it off also means you’ve got portable energy because there’s a USB port built in (and they placed it well along the lower edge of the pack so you can still use it while riding without getting in the way of your feet or crank arms). Amazingly, there’s even a second charging port on the bike located just under the control pad / display panel. This is perfect for keeping a smart phone topped off if you’re using it for GPS directions or music. I guess it’s not really amazing to have two USB ports but it is kind of rare, especially at this price point :)

As much as I like the display, it’s easy to reach and large enough to see clearly when seated upright, I do wish it was removable and some of the settings are a bit more involved than other e-bikes. The display is really the one vulnerable spot on the bike, especially when parked outside at a public rack. It’s the one thing that might attract unwanted attention from a thief and given the size and nature of the LCD screen it could get worn down more by weather weather and other handle bars coming into contact over time than a simpler LED readout. This isn’t the only non-removable LCD display out there on the market and people make it work (some cover theirs with little cloth pouches or plastic bags), just an area for consideration and improvement by Populo. Frankly, given that this was the first time I’d even heard of the company, I thought they did a great job with most of the bike and I love having more readouts about battery capacity, how far I’ve ridden and how fast I’m going than with the simpler displays.

The battery pack on this bike resembles some other downtube styles and is curved and streamlined without being gaudy. It’s narrow enough that you don’t clip it with your shoes or legs and it has an integrated loop ledge at the top that works like a handle. You get a very average 36 volt 10.4 amp hour capacity but I was told the cells inside are made by Samsung… Upgrade! Unfortunately I didn’t get to see the charger to see how many amps it puts out or take the battery off to weigh it (feel free to chime in with comments about this below if you get the bike). The motor used here is a real superstar, it’s rated at just 250 watts but performs more like a zippy 350 and it compact and discrete, blending in with the black spokes and rims. It did produce a bit more noise than some others I’ve tested but it was mounted well with stainless hardware and a torque arm on the horizontal rear droput. This is another area that seems nice but could be improved with a screw tensioner. And I love that the bike has a kickstand but wish it was rear mounted vs. center to stay clear of the left crank arm.

At the end of the day, this thing is priced well, it performs and it looks good. In fact, it looks better than most of the other low-priced single speeds I’ve tried. I cannot understate the five frame sizes they offer or the four color options. Possibly the biggest win is just how light and well balanced the Populo Sport is. At just ~37 lbs it’s easy to lift and carry up stairs and that’s key if you live in an apartment. Sure, I wish it had fender bosses and rear rack bosses so I wouldn’t have to wear my backpack to carry gear but at least it has bottle cage bosses (or so I was told it would by the rep). Yeah, lights would be nice but many helmets now have them and in the city there are street lights. Please consider reflective clothing and the silver frame if you ride in the dark a lot because it will help keep you safe. I guess we’ll see how well this thing holds up as customers chime in but my experience was good and Populo has an entire line of ebikes now so I hope to review more soon. It’s neat that they are selling through shops too, so people can take test rides and get warranty coverage. I could hardly believe they offer two years comprehensive warranty for this thing at this price. Big thanks to Populo for partnering with me for this review.

Pros:

  • Extremely light weight at just ~37 lbs, this is the sort of electric bike you can easily lift up steps or mount on car and bus racks
  • Super simple and durable single speed drivetrain… much less likely to drop the chain when riding or get damage when parking at the bike rack
  • Low price point of $999 makes it hurt less if/when the bike gets damaged or stolen if you ride in the city but you still get a high quality battery with Samsung cells
  • Impressive torque and pep from the 250 watt geared hub motor, I wasn’t expecting it to feel as zippy as it does… hopefully it holds up over time as I’m not super familiar with HLGE motors?
  • Available in five frame sizes! So even though it’s a high-step, it should fit better than some other affordable city bike models
  • I like the color options, choose from four colors including timeless black or silver, the bright orange and blue look nice and the branding is minimal, I love that the cables and wires are all integrated (this is a purpose built electric bike)
  • Mid-frame battery keeps weight low and center, I like that it locks to the frame but is removable for reduced weight or charging separately (and protection)
  • Reinforced stainless steel horizontal dropout (for tighetining the chain) with a torque arm washer to improve strength and handle motor forces
  • Two full sized USB ports, one on the battery to use for portable power and the other on the display panel for use on the go (phone gps, music or lights)
  • Nice to have brake levers with motor inhibitors that override the motor… especially since this bike uses a cadence sensor for pedal assist that’s sort of average in terms of response time
  • Pretty impressive warranty considering the price, you get two years comprehensive and three years on the frame, being sold through shops so you can test ride and get support vs. online

Cons:

  • I wish the display panel was removable… everything else on the bike is tough and built for the city but that display is vulnerable to weather or getting scratched and broken at the rack
  • All-Aluminum frame and fork make for a stiff ride, especially given the narrower 700c road tires, consider a compact 27.2 mm suspension seat post like this but note that it will still raise the minimum seat height by about three inches (to be honest, the bike felt better than I expected during my ride test, more comfortable)
  • I like that it has a kickstand but prefer the rear-mount design vs. mid-mount because this one gets in the way and collides with the cranks if you walk the bike backwards
  • The brakes are kind of basic, given how light and cheap the bike is they work alright but I’d much prefer v-brakes for more power or disc brakes that stay cleaner
  • I love that it has bottle cage bosses but wish it also had rack and fender bosses for those who commute with gear or have to ride in the rain… lots of aftermarket fenders, racks and lights to choose from but it’s nice when they aren’t piling up on your seat post and mount stronger (note that Sam was wearing an LED Torch helmet which is a great way to be seen without the hassle of on-frame lights)
  • The three drive modes and eight levels of assist just seemed like a lot compared with most other ebikes I test (that only have for our five levels)… it almost seems like you could miss the modes entirely but I do see their purpose (less power use but still capable of higher speeds), hold set to enter the modes and change them with plus or minus for eco, normal and power)
  • In order to tighten the chain you have to manually pull the rear wheel backwards in the horizontal dropouts whereas other bikes with a similar setup often have a screw tightener tool that’s easier to work with, this just means extra screwing around and possibly a two person job if you have to take the wheel off to fix a flat
  • Narrow high pressure tires need to be checked and topped off a lot more regularly, it’s way easier to get a “snake bite” or “pinch” flat, no quick release so changing flats is more work
  • The motor makes a bit more noise than some of the other geared motors, especially in higher power modes

Resources:

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bikerjohn
2 months ago

Nice review, Court! That Populo has a clean look. Hoping to see a review of the Populo Peak, soon.

Court Rye
2 months ago

Thanks! Yeah, I'm excited to check out some of their other models in the future and learn more about the company :)

Susan
2 months ago

This bike checks off everything on my list except for the stupid non-removable display. I have had countless parts stolen off my bikes when forced to lock up outside. Even if the thief couldn't remove the display, there's a good chance they would just smash it out of frustration- so then that leaves you with a non-operational motor. Wonder if Populo would replace it.

Court Rye
2 months ago

Hey Susan! Unfortunately part of my girlfriend's bike rack was just stolen the other day... for no reason! Now she can only put one bike on it and I'm guessing that somewhere out there, possibly in a bush, is the extra bar. Sometimes people are lame... Anyway, I do think that Populo would be likely to have replacement parts for sale. They seem like a bigger company with their act together but you might want to reach out and ask first (and check the price). I'm guessing the displays will be $100 a pop. The other approach would be to actually unscrew the display and re-mount it with velcro then unplug at the end of each ride when parking. Hope this helps... None of the more affordable electric bicycles seem to have removable displays.

Diego Carrington
1 month ago

Hi Court! I just left a message on the voltbike elegant and I thank you very much for your response and even going further getting a code for a better price, you are really awesome.

Your website is so detailed and extensive that when you think you found a great option, you come across to a different great review.

That made me come across this model, populo sport. As I mentioned before, my budget aims for a cheap and reliable option and from what I can read this one hits good points. It looks discrete enough to not get unwanted attention (hopefully saving it from robery) and I think that the accessories missing (fenders, rack and light) can be covered with around 100 bucks using the options you provided. Also... 2 year warranty!

I promise I won't be jumping on any more reviews asking if they are "my new best option" but knowing that the voltbike elegant might be small for me (6'2, 200 lb), what do you think comparing this Populo Sport with the radcity and its $1450 price? (which the sweet 50$ off).

I'm just a little concerned about the 250w not being powerful enough for me and from my Ebike lack of experience I don't know if the lack of throttle is a must when buying one.

I really thank you for your time and attention!
Diego

Court Rye
1 month ago

Hi Diego! The bikes each offer something unique and I find myself justifying each... whether based on price or the specific use case scenario. I find that shops and companies promote their own as "the best" and people often use power as a deciding factor but you've kept a really open mind and that shows a lot of wisdom. Professional long distance cyclists put out around 200 watts from what I've read so if you get an ebike that can offer up to 250... and usually beyond that with peak output, you're going to have a good experience. In parts of Europe they limit ebikes to 250 watts and people like them just the same. That said, since you have option and are a taller and heavier rider who wants something that will last and work with accessories I'd still push you towards the RadCity. The rack is sturdy, the fenders fit and won't rattle as much, the tires will provide some cushion (along with the suspension). The Populo and other bikes like E-Glide are awesome for being minimalist but that's not what I hear you describing as the use case. I have been in the position of trying to save money and then disappointed later when the bike didn't perform (and I hear that a lot about ebikes, buyer's remorse for not going higher quality). If you're in this for a tool, get the right tool. The Rad Power bikes are still very affordable value oriented products, saving $400 or even just $300 after you get fenders, rack, lights etc. might leave you feeling like the extra power and strength and size would have been worth it. But again... any of these bikes can be GREAT if you work with them and look on the bright side of the base technology :)

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Mark Peralta
1 day ago
TheProfaneAngel
Hi everyone,

I'm super new to this forum and actually everything bike-related because I haven't owned a bike since I was 13 haha.
Anyway, I need some help to find a bike that'll fit my needs. A bit about myself:
I'm in my twenties, 5 feet and weigh 110 pounds. I'm currently living in a farm in MA and need the bike to take me to the nearby cities (max commute would be 18 miles one way - although I can always cut that in half by taking the bus). I have opted for an e-bike because there are too many regulations around scooters in MA. However, a few years ago I suffered an accident in which I broke my tailbone, which makes it very difficult for me to ride bikes with the traditional saddle.

Here's what I'm looking for in a bike. I know I'll have to compromise some of these, but this is the "ideal" version of what it would look like:
- Foldable
- Light
- Can go 15-20+ mph
- Range of at least 20 miles w/o pedal assist
- Can go up some hills (not too steep)
- Removable battery
- Comfortable seat
- And of course, cheap. I really can't afford anything more than $800.

Of course some of these can be switched out. Like if it's super compact, I don't need a removable battery and if it goes less than 20 miles, pedals would be nice. LCD screen, basket and USB port would also be nice, but not necessary.

Some of the bikes/scooters I've been looking at are:
Genesis Transformer
Genesis Commuter
LEHE K1S
Airwheel E6
Airwheel E3
Urb-E Sport
So far I'm leaning towards the Genesis Transformer, but I can't find many reviews and the 15-mile range is a bit of a turn off.

Thank you for your help! Can't wait to hear what you have to say.
None of those you mentioned will survive a 15 mile regular trip. You need to pedal it so it can reach 15 miles in one charge. I think you should look at thus one instead;

Here's the full review
https://electricbikereview.com/vilano/ion/
James Kohls
4 months ago
Coming up on 500 miles; today I had my first flat. Big hard piece of metal wire, about 6 inches long, skewered the rear tire. Thankfully, I always carry a flat repair kit with me (attached to down-tube in water bottle holder in top photo).



I was a bit worried that an electric bike might make noticing flats more difficult with the motor giving so much assistance. But it was blatantly obvious as the big 47c tires make a very loud flapping noise. I was glad I had prior experience removing the rear axle, so i knew what to expect. I really recommend everyone try it at least once instead of learning during your first flat. Especially if you've never owned a bike with a thru axle before.

Here is a little trick some may not know about their SRAM X7 Rear Derailleur for loosening the chain.



Once the rear axle was removed from the non-drive-side, I laid the bike down on the non-drive-side to remove the rear wheel. If you can find a place with grass, this would be idea to keep from scraping up parts on your bike. The wheel had some heft to it, but it didn't really hinder the process.

I will say the trigger sport tires are fairly easy to remove and replace without tire levers. I had them, but really didn't need them. Overall, saving time using CO2 to fill the tire (vs a mini pump), it only took me about 10 minutes to change the tube with my spare. I'm really happy with how my Park Tool IB-2 performed. It is super small, but never felt like I was lacking leverage.

500 Mile Update

I've really been happy with how my Turbo X has performed. It is just a really fun bicycle. I think my favorite part about it is that it really feels like a bicycle...not some bike/moped hybrid. I don't miss having a throttle at all. The bike does just fine providing the power I need when I need it.

The longest trip I've taken so far is about 33 miles. In Eco 50 with 42% remaining on my return. 99% of the place I ride are within a 10 mile radius. Anything longer is usually a trip for pleasure. My worst range so far was during a very windy day. 20-30MPH gusts put me in Turbo mode the entire way. It was windy enough that when it hit me as a cross wind, I was actually leaning about 10 degrees to the side while I rode. A 10 mile bike trip ate up almost 50% of my battery. I passed a number of other bicyclists who were barely moving forward.

I did my own tune-up today—checking for loose bolts/screws/spokes, etc. Overall, things are still pretty tight. A few tweaks on some of the rear spokes is really all I needed.

Since I got my bike, my car has sat mostly idle. This bodes well for my eventual plans to not replace my car when it finally dies. I haven't had to put gas in my car since I bought the bike (and it has been several months now—still 1/3 of a tank left). With a cargo trailer, I can easily grab 3 full size grocery bags of food an bring it home with me. While it is over-priced—I would like to get a Burley Travoy some day for over-sized items.

The trailer is rated for 70 pounds, but I've used it to take home two 50lb bags of rock salt for my water softener. The Turbo X pulled it like a champ. I hardly knew it was there. Even up hills.

The Turbo X already has plenty of battle scars. I store my bike inside and have banged the pedals on my concrete steps more times that I care to admit.



I also used the kick stand on somewhat uneven ground and watched how quickly and hard a 50 pound bike can fall.



No matter. Battle scars build character.

Overall I am very happy with my purchase. The price of admission was steep, but it is paying off well. I have no regrets with the route I've taken and I am even more confident in sustaining a bike-only future for my transportation.

Accessories

Here are a list of some of the accessories I've gotten for my bike:

- Cateye Rapid X2 Front Light
- Cateye Rapid X3 Rear Light
- Ibera PakRak IB-RA5 Touring Plus Bicycle Carrier
- Topeak Modula II Bottle Cage Mount
- Flat Repair Kit:
--- Specialized KEG Storage Vessel
--- Park Tool IB-2 multi-tool
--- Park Tool GP-2 Pre-Glued patches
--- Genuine Innovations CO2 Kit
--- Generic tire levers and glue patch kit
- 12x135 1.0mm Thread Pitch RobertAxleProject Threaded Hitch Mount (ONE005)
--- Stock Axle says 12x142, but if you replace your axle you need a 1.0mm thread pitch axle with a length of ~160mm. You can see my video here on replacing the axle.
- Allen Sports ACT200 Cargo Trailer
- Phone Mount
- Kool Stop Organic Brake Pads
- Two Wheel Gear convertable pannier/backpack

MLB
7 months ago
JoePah
https://www.specialized.com/us/en/bikes/mountain/turbolevofsrcomp6fattie/113963

$5500 MSRP

EBikes have arrived in Miami! A very well respected bike store near UM, called Mack Cycles, is now carrying electric bikes.. Specialized, Cannondale (who knew?) and Townie.

The Turbo Levo is a proprietary motor/battery/frame from Specialized.. Very light.. 45lbs and it is cleverly built in with motor and battery. If you believe the salesman, the bike is good for 5 hours of track use. He also told me that the same people who designed the iPhone battery designed this pack.. :::eyeroll:::

What I really like about this bike is that it addresses my concerns about eBikes on bike trails...The bike has a built in power meter, and it will not add more than 100% of your pedal power with the motor. This will limit the acceleration and give a lot more foot control. 3" low pressure tires give plenty of grip over anything.

Rode it around the parking lot, didn't seem any more responsive than any other ebike i've ridden.. hard to say... Not a roadie bike. .Strictly off road. Hoping they have a demo day at the Virginia Key MTB trails...

Maybe Court can get some saddle time?
Nice bike, as it should be for the price. What motor are they using?
Worth noting that ALL Ebikes have "power meter" that limits power. They are the Levels and each corresponds to an equivilancy of human power. IE: Eco = .50 x human power, Norm = 1.0 x human power, Sport = 2.0 human, etc etc. They may all vary, and use different labels, but all restrict the power by levels.
NeuroNP
9 months ago
This is my first post, but boy have I been using this site and community to research my first electric bike purchase! A big thanks to everyone here, especially Court.

I wanted to contribute my thoughts for anyone considering getting this bike. I've owned an ST1 Limited Edition (identical to the ST1T except for the headlight) for a few months now and still can't believe how much I love it. Fast, powerful, and beautifully engineered. I love bicycles, but I'm out of shape enough that going for a ride though our very hilly area was more chore than fun, so the stationary bike has been getting more mileage lately. Although I gave it up when I moved to Philly, I also used to commute by motorcycle, and really miss being on that kind of bike.

The ST1 perfectly filled those gaps. I still can't believe how fast, powerful, practical, and FUN this thing is. In "eco" mode, I get great range (at least 25 miles through lots of hills) and a good workout. There have been a few times that I wished I had a lower gear range, but to tackle the big, long inclines, I just put it into "power" mode and zoom past the surprised cyclists in front of me. On level pavement, this thing goes 0-30 in seconds... can't wait to start using it for the daily commute.

One of the most surprising pleasures of this bike is how much it handles like a motorcycle. It is incredibly stable and requires countersteering at anything over about 10mph. There is a distinct advantage of having a heavy, well-balanced bike - all that inertia lets you glide over even the bigger bumps at 30mph. The fastest I've gone is about 50mph (those hills!), and I felt much more confident on the Stromer than I have on road bikes.

Until now, the most expensive bike I've ever owned was the Specialized Rockhopper Comp that 14-year old me purchased with paper route money way too many years ago. The local ebike shop gave me the ST1 Limited plus an extra 14.5Ah battery, an extra charger, and installed the shock forks from an ST1 Sport for $4100. Even with Stromer's new extra battery promotion, I haven't had a single regret. Just pure joy at how much fun this thing is to ride.

The guy who runs the local ebike shop was incredibly friendly and easy to work with. Sadly, his service guy tried to murder me when he shimmed my front brake caliper with washers instead of using a Magura mounting bracket. The moral of this story is to do your own maintenance.

I hate the Limited's headlight and wish I had the Supernova. Upgrading the lights to make a night commute safer is next on my list of fixes.

I miss having a bajillion gears, but I'm adapting. It would be nice to have more high and low end for the long hills, but for 98% of the riding I've done, nine speeds is adequate.
tinasdude
10 months ago
Bike island looks to have Bikes Direct blemished bikes a little cheaper. Limited models, sizes, and colors, but worth a look. I have a the juggernaut. Fun to ride. Heavy. Not very nimble. Great all season commuter or light rec bike.Was going to put a BBSHD on a mongoose fat bike I have, Then I read this today. Makes more sense. http://electricbike.com/forum/forum...-diamonback-overdrive-sport-27-5-gets-a-bbshd... I can get a 27.5 off Bikes direct for reasonable money. Trying to find out the weights on some of those bikes. Haven't found that yet. Would make a good all round bike. Add a suspension seat post and your ready, and obviously ebike chain. I figure around 1700 bucks. That would include beckie bling ring and suspension seat post purchased from Germany. If you need a high capacity battery, like in the article, it would be a little over 2000. I personally would get another Dolphin battery. Fits in a rack bag. Don't have to bring it and carry the extra weight on short trips. Less weight on trail rides. Can't afford the diamondback, but they have some respectable looking 27.5 hardtails in the 350 dollar range on bikes direct. Quite a number of people have gotten bikes direct bikes as their electric platform.
Ron Adamowicz
11 months ago


E-BIKE Sport / Fat E-BIKE


* Lightweight Aluminum Frame Forged 6061 Series

Free Option - Choose Your Fork:

* RockShox XC 28 TK Coil Forks
Crown: Forged 6061 T-6 Aluminum
Steerer: Aluminun Upper
Tubes: 28mm 4130
Steel Lowers: Magnesium

* Origin8 Chromoly Front Fork 4130 Proprietary Chromoly

* Ultra Light Alloy Rims 26" Halo Tundra

* Shimano SLX M675 Disc Brakes
Hydraulic Disc Brakes Featuring Ice Technology

* Shimano Acera M361 Crankset
Forged Aluminum 175mm Length 7 Speed

* SRAM PC 870 Chain W/Powerlink

* Shimano Tourney TX Derailler Intelligent Performance

* Shimano RevoShift 7 Speed

* Venzo Padded Seat

* Kore OCD M35 MTB Handlebars
7050-T6 Aircraft Aluminum 35mm Bar Clamp

* Easy Swap-out Lithium Battery Pack
Charge on e-bike or indoors

* 4 Power Options:

#1 - 48v 11.6ah Lithium Pack with 250w motor
#2 - 48v 11.6ah Lithium Pack with 500w motor
#3 - 48v 11.6ah Lithium Pack with 750w motor
#4 - 48v 11.6ah Lithium Pack with 1000w motor

* Battery Life 1500 - 2500 Cycles

* Charge Time 2- 4 Hours On or Off Bike

* Range 25 - 50 Miles (depends on weight and terrain)

* LEB Torque Sensor Technology
LAZER ELECTRIC MOTORSPORTS Advanced Sensor

* LEB Brushless Rear Hub Motor
LAZER ELECTRIC MOTORSPORTS PATENT PENDING

* LCD Mutlifunction Display
EASY TO READ AND OPERATE

* LEB Intelligent Hi-Fire Controller
LAZER ELECTRIC MOTORSPORTS MAXIMUM AMP

* Thumb Throttle
EASY TO USE THUMB THROTTLE

* Max Load 265 lbs / 120.2 kg

* Weight 47 lbs / 21.3 kg
(larger batteries will slightly increase weight)
OldGuy
11 months ago
"Not to insult your thread, but this isn't really the kind of ebike we discuss here."
Since there are a number of scooter-type e-bike reviews and a DayMak forum here, you may be mistaken.

"We can have speed limits AND sports cars. And because someone has a sport car, does not mean they have to travel with it floored. Electric cheating seems to be a spectrum disorder. Meaning even Ebikers can think another Ebiker is cheating."
Well said.

For myself, I've got two e-bikes (both can do 28mph on the flats) and a sports car, but I hate parking in the city, and it's not very effective to go to the grocery every other day if you can't pack enough food home on a bicycle.
A scooter like this would work great for my 70+ body and 800-ft. hill, as do the e-bikes, but this would have substantially more utility, and there are places around Portland (like all the bridges) where it would be extremely hazardous to travel with a 20-mph-limited vehicle, but which do have bike paths.
I'm also attracted by the thought that bike theft around here is probably a lot higher than for scooters parked in high-traffic areas, because you can strip and resell bike parts...
Jim123
11 months ago
J.R. this article has a section on higher watt systems https://www.electricbike.com/52v-battery-3077-fet/ . The Cameleon has shorter range than I would have guessed. The higher heat and less efficiency of higher volt FETs sounds like a good explanation. EBR doesn't have a moped community section that is separate from the bike section. I love hearing details about them here, even though the pedals are a legal bypass. Edit I looked closer at the Daymak review and it has 2 battery options. I thought the range was for the larger battery option. Further Edit: I have to agree with OldGuy in his statement about top speed. We can have speed limits AND sports cars. And because someone has a sport car, does not mean they have to travel with it floored. Electric cheating seems to be a spectrum disorder. Meaning even Ebikers can think another Ebiker is cheating. Handicaps and weight issues make the challenge of going out and enjoying a bike something that needs a crutch.
Greg A
1 year ago
Jack Tyler
Maybe it's just due to the l-o-n-g list of ebike brands here plus the absence of a current Optibike review from Court, but I'd missed researching Optibike until I ran into two excellent tutorial interviews with Jim Turner. I do have a question for you Optibike owners, but first wanted to point out to other visitors here like me that Bofeili branded 'sport ebikes' are now available on eBay. BUT it surely is a case of apples vs. oranges: steel frame, smaller battery with no reference to the Lithium battery chemistry, non-integrated controller, funky non-LCD display, only one (26") wheel size, and a 'disguised' seller (I can't tell who it is other than someone in Oregon, perhaps just a freight forwarder) who may offer zip in the form of customer service and does not allow returns. Given the earlier discussion about cheaper Bofeili-branded ebikes similar to Optibike, I thought I'd point that out. Cheaper, yes. Same or similar? Not from that seller, not even a little bit.

For folks like Allen & Greg, who bought Optibike products, do you know what is the source(s) of the chronically late deliveries? And @Optibike_Austen, I'd welcome an explanation from you, as well. I can imagine a variety of business-related reasons, some actually beneficial to the customer (e.g. a biz decision to avoid significant flooring/inventory financing to keep the price competitive) and others more worrisome (such as an unreliable manufacturer). The answer is certainly not just dock strikes. Given my move to SW Montana and to a town in a valley surrounded by mountains, the mid-drive system with lots of battery and lots of gears might be the best fit for my needs. And the owner praises here are surely encouraging. But whether fair or not, I'm always worried when a business can't reliably supply its product.

Thanks for all the helpful posts, everyone.

Jack
Jax, FL to Bozeman, MT
Jack,
I don't have inside knowledge of why it takes them so long to deliver. That is a question for them. I was made aware of the lead time when I ordered.
Mine arrived a few weeks later than they thought it would be.

I've run a business myself for near 25 years and "stuff" happens to delay things all the time. It's not something that would keep me from buying from them again as the bike is awesome and far exceeded my expectations in it's performance, and I've yet to have any issues with it. It also came with some nice upgrades that I hadn't anticipated.

Jim is a really good guy and treated me right. I'd probably deal directly with him if/when I order again.
Bike_On
1 year ago
Jack Tyler
Maybe it's just due to the l-o-n-g list of ebike brands here plus the absence of a current Optibike review from Court, but I'd missed researching Optibike until I ran into two excellent tutorial interviews with Jim Turner. I do have a question for you Optibike owners, but first wanted to point out to other visitors here like me that Bofeili branded 'sport ebikes' are now available on eBay. BUT it surely is a case of apples vs. oranges: steel frame, smaller battery with no reference to the Lithium battery chemistry, non-integrated controller, funky non-LCD display, only one (26") wheel size, and a 'disguised' seller (I can't tell who it is other than someone in Oregon, perhaps just a freight forwarder) who may offer zip in the form of customer service and does not allow returns. Given the earlier discussion about cheaper Bofeili-branded ebikes similar to Optibike, I thought I'd point that out. Cheaper, yes. Same or similar? Not from that seller, not even a little bit.

For folks like Allen & Greg, who bought Optibike products, do you know what is the source(s) of the chronically late deliveries? And @Optibike_Austen, I'd welcome an explanation from you, as well. I can imagine a variety of business-related reasons, some actually beneficial to the customer (e.g. a biz decision to avoid significant flooring/inventory financing to keep the price competitive) and others more worrisome (such as an unreliable manufacturer). The answer is certainly not just dock strikes. Given my move to SW Montana and to a town in a valley surrounded by mountains, the mid-drive system with lots of battery and lots of gears might be the best fit for my needs. And the owner praises here are surely encouraging. But whether fair or not, I'm always worried when a business can't reliably supply its product.

Thanks for all the helpful posts, everyone.

Jack
Jax, FL to Bozeman, MT
Jack,

Optibike is notoriously late.... no excuses, they are very small... They moved operations from being in Boulder to Jim's residence outside of town.

I have owned and ridden an Opti 5 years. Don't have one now. I'm interested to get back on one, after a time with ddhubs.

They are expensive. I'd buy one from the optibike owners group on Google. Offers come up. They are not perfect. They need a PAS system on their 700W+ bikes. The SIMBB has much promise - low weight, 600W, decent battery size, normal looking, rack+accessories doable. Not much feedback on them to date. And YES, Court needs some updated reviews with Opti on their higher speed offerings.

Best-
Dan
Allroad Commuter
1 year ago
Jack Tyler
Maybe it's just due to the l-o-n-g list of ebike brands here plus the absence of a current Optibike review from Court, but I'd missed researching Optibike until I ran into two excellent tutorial interviews with Jim Turner. I do have a question for you Optibike owners, but first wanted to point out to other visitors here like me that Bofeili branded 'sport ebikes' are now available on eBay. BUT it surely is a case of apples vs. oranges: steel frame, smaller battery with no reference to the Lithium battery chemistry, non-integrated controller, funky non-LCD display, only one (26") wheel size, and a 'disguised' seller (I can't tell who it is other than someone in Oregon, perhaps just a freight forwarder) who may offer zip in the form of customer service and does not allow returns. Given the earlier discussion about cheaper Bofeili-branded ebikes similar to Optibike, I thought I'd point that out. Cheaper, yes. Same or similar? Not from that seller, not even a little bit.

For folks like Allen & Greg, who bought Optibike products, do you know what is the source(s) of the chronically late deliveries? And @Optibike_Austen, I'd welcome an explanation from you, as well. I can imagine a variety of business-related reasons, some actually beneficial to the customer (e.g. a biz decision to avoid significant flooring/inventory financing to keep the price competitive) and others more worrisome (such as an unreliable manufacturer). The answer is certainly not just dock strikes. Given my move to SW Montana and to a town in a valley surrounded by mountains, the mid-drive system with lots of battery and lots of gears might be the best fit for my needs. And the owner praises here are surely encouraging. But whether fair or not, I'm always worried when a business can't reliably supply its product.

Thanks for all the helpful posts, everyone.

Jack
Jax, FL to Bozeman, MT
Jack Tyler
1 year ago
Maybe it's just due to the l-o-n-g list of ebike brands here plus the absence of a current Optibike review from Court, but I'd missed researching Optibike until I ran into two excellent tutorial interviews with Jim Turner. I do have a question for you Optibike owners, but first wanted to point out to other visitors here like me that Bofeili branded 'sport ebikes' are now available on eBay. BUT it surely is a case of apples vs. oranges: steel frame, smaller battery with no reference to the Lithium battery chemistry, non-integrated controller, funky non-LCD display, only one (26") wheel size, and a 'disguised' seller (I can't tell who it is other than someone in Oregon, perhaps just a freight forwarder) who may offer zip in the form of customer service and does not allow returns. Given the earlier discussion about cheaper Bofeili-branded ebikes similar to Optibike, I thought I'd point that out. Cheaper, yes. Same or similar? Not from that seller, not even a little bit.

For folks like Allen & Greg, who bought Optibike products, do you know what is the source(s) of the chronically late deliveries? And @Optibike_Austen, I'd welcome an explanation from you, as well. I can imagine a variety of business-related reasons, some actually beneficial to the customer (e.g. a biz decision to avoid significant flooring/inventory financing to keep the price competitive) and others more worrisome (such as an unreliable manufacturer). The answer is certainly not just dock strikes. Given my move to SW Montana and to a town in a valley surrounded by mountains, the mid-drive system with lots of battery and lots of gears might be the best fit for my needs. And the owner praises here are surely encouraging. But whether fair or not, I'm always worried when a business can't reliably supply its product.

Thanks for all the helpful posts, everyone.

Jack
Jax, FL to Bozeman, MT
Dej
1 year ago
Herb
OK, my Neo Volt Sport now has 685 km on the clock and my feelings have mellowed a little. I'm annoyed that I have to remove the battery to charge it, but I no longer feel the rage. I have learned to cope with the pedelec in slow twisty stuff and realised that any time I feel the pedellec is taking charge, a quick dab on the brakes disconnects the motor.
It's still the best electric bike I've owned. The thudbuster modification stops the bike from biting my butt, and I keep finding reasons to like folding bikes. For example, I can take my car for service and ride home on the bike. And later in the day, I can use the bike to fetch the car.
I have a neo volt sport and I weigh 205 and in the lowest level of assist I traveled 65 miles....wow real awesome
Steve Ryu
1 year ago
Logan Gogarty
http://www.motostrano.com/Raleigh-Misceo-iE-Sport-Electric-Bike-Motostrano-p/misceoiesport.htm is this the IE Sport Raleigh? It says it goes 28 mph online. I'm not familiar with the Shimano STEPs system is it reliable?

Here is the diamondback http://www.diamondback.com/bikes-ebike-ecity-trace-exc

Any suggestions on front fork suspension? Is that a critical component for a lot of ebike riders or are rigid frames bearable?

I'm trying to decide how important fenders, lights, and the the bike cargo tray are. I know I can get these things aftermarket and bolt them on or I can find a bike that already has it. I know the bike rack is essential to keep my back from getting sweaty from a backpack. I also would like the ease of having lights that I don't forget to turn off and drain the batteries on. Fenders are not the most important if I'm changing my clothes anyways but I may not have to now with an e bike. Just a bunch of random thoughts I have the
@Logan Gogarty The Diamondback Trace is the exact bike I was referring to. Due to the additional weight of a hub motor, it's always nice to have a shock, as sometimes going over bumps can be a bit jarring, especially with 700c tires that tend to ride at a higher PSI (tire pressure). An additional $150 would get you outfitted with both front and rear quality fenders (SKS), a rack as well as some rechargeable lights that are very commuter friendly

The Misceo doesn't have a suspension because it's a lighter bike and rides very similar to a road bike. The Misceo iE is 43 lbs with battery and pedals. Shimano is still new to the eBike game. Their benefit is that their entire motor drive system is made by Shimano (motor, battery, chain, derailleur...) I haven't had one break down on me yet, but this is quite a different ride than the Dash/Trace EXC. Just to be very clear, the Shimano STEPs motors are NOT 28mph capable.

Depending on how much you want to spend, you may want to look at a 2016 Dash. The 2016 Dash now comes stock with Fenders, wired in lighting and a rack and now comes in a mid-drive configuration.

I'm at the IZIP Store in Santa Monica feel free to give me a shout if you want to talk it out.
Logan Gogarty
1 year ago
http://www.motostrano.com/Raleigh-Misceo-iE-Sport-Electric-Bike-Motostrano-p/misceoiesport.htm is this the IE Sport Raleigh? It says it goes 28 mph online. I'm not familiar with the Shimano STEPs system is it reliable?

Here is the diamondback http://www.diamondback.com/bikes-ebike-ecity-trace-exc

Any suggestions on front fork suspension? Is that a critical component for a lot of ebike riders or are rigid frames bearable?

I'm trying to decide how important fenders, lights, and the the bike cargo tray are. I know I can get these things aftermarket and bolt them on or I can find a bike that already has it. I know the bike rack is essential to keep my back from getting sweaty from a backpack. I also would like the ease of having lights that I don't forget to turn off and drain the batteries on. Fenders are not the most important if I'm changing my clothes anyways but I may not have to now with an e bike. Just a bunch of random thoughts I have the
Steve Ryu
1 year ago
Logan Gogarty
Ok I've found some bikes I'm pretty interested in

http://www.motostrano.com/IZIP-Express-Electric-Bike-p/express.htm
http://www.motostrano.com/Izip-Currie-Tech-E3-Dash-Electric-Bike-p/iz-dash-l-gy16.htm
http://www.motostrano.com/Raleigh-Misceo-iE-Sport-Electric-Bike-Motostrano-p/misceoiesport.htm

Has anyone ordered a bike from this Mostostrano store? I think I'm also considering the specialized turbo base model and maybe a diamondback.

Please let me know if there are any red flags with any of these bikes. I did see that the IZIP express has a 7 rating.
The Express is a Monster with a Belt Drive. Definitely different than the rest of the IZIP line with a large capacity battery. It is a heavy bike though but nice components

The Dash is a popular model for commuting (28mph), if you are looking at Diamondback, the Trace EXC is the Diamondback equivalent to the Dash. Trace is a little lighter and uses tires a little more narrow than that of a Dash (They use the same motor). The Trace uses a Dash 2014 Screen and Button pad.

Misceo has a 20mph max using the Shimano STEPs system. Not a speed pedelec, does have the walk assist function that was mentioned earlier. The Misceo Sport is not out yet, although you can purchase the Misceo iE, both are very light bikes.

The guys at Motostrano are very knowledgable.

I currently have the Diamondbacks on special at the shop.
Logan Gogarty
1 year ago
Ok I've found some bikes I'm pretty interested in

http://www.motostrano.com/IZIP-Express-Electric-Bike-p/express.htm
http://www.motostrano.com/Izip-Currie-Tech-E3-Dash-Electric-Bike-p/iz-dash-l-gy16.htm
http://www.motostrano.com/Raleigh-Misceo-iE-Sport-Electric-Bike-Motostrano-p/misceoiesport.htm

Has anyone ordered a bike from this Mostostrano store? I think I'm also considering the specialized turbo base model and maybe a diamondback.

Please let me know if there are any red flags with any of these bikes. I did see that the IZIP express has a 7 rating.
Haseeb2
2 weeks ago

Do you have to pedal extremely fast and hard to keep it around 20 mph?

Ivan Zhong
2 weeks ago

How much is this in cad

benjie alcantara
4 weeks ago

Purchase this bike from Sam awesome ebike! my very first, perfect for
riding around town. planning to take it to the beach! great reviews my
friend..

chgofirefighter
4 weeks ago

I stopped watching after the 20mph top speed limit, I love my Stromer ST 2
:)

Diego Carrington
1 month ago

Hi Court!
I just left a message on the voltbike elegant and I thank you very much for
your response and even going further getting a code for a better price, you
are really awesome.

Your website is so detailed and extensive that when you think you found a
great option, you come across to a different great review.

That made me come across this model, populo sport. As I mentioned before,
my budget aims for a cheap and reliable option and from what I can read
this one hits good points. It looks discrete enough to not get unwanted
attention (hopefully saving it from robery) and I think that the
accessories missing (fenders, rack and light) can be covered with around
100 bucks using the options you provided. Also... 2 year warranty!

I promise I won't be jumping on any more reviews asking if they are "my new
best option" but knowing that the voltbike elegant might be small for me
(6'2, 200 lb), what do you think comparing this Populo Sport with the
radcity and its $1450 price? (which the sweet 50$ off).

I'm just a little concerned about the 250w not being powerful enough for me
and from my Ebike lack of experience I don't know if the lack of throttle
is a must when buying one.

I really thank you for your time and attention!

Diego.

Danny Frank
1 month ago

Would you know of any dealers in the NYC area that sell this model?

Bharath Naik L
2 months ago

Hi, How are you ? I'm following your channel and like the content very
much. I recently built an fat ebike with 1000w motor, 26A controller, 48V
10ah Battery. The problem is that I'm not get mileage.. It comes nearly
15-18km. Why is that ? Please help!! :(

Bharath Naik L
4 days ago

DJ Vendetta I fixed it. I limited draw current and set max speed as 35kmp.
I'm getting around 30km with only throttle.

DJ Vendetta
4 days ago

Bharath Naik L ah capacity is too low for 1000w

Drealmers S
2 months ago

Another affordable bike, Great!!!

Rui Coelho
2 months ago

250w is europe legal...

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

Exactly, in much of Europe electric bicycles are limited to 250 watt motors
without a license and registration so this model would be allowed there, as
long as the top speed was limited to 25 kilometers per hour :)

Mark Elford
2 months ago

Dig it.

cresshead
2 months ago

good price and it looks very decent too.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

Yeah, it's a nicer looking bike for sure :D

Mike Suding
2 months ago

It looks similar to the Propella 1.0 bike I bought last year. Their version
1.5 has an intro price of $799. It seems like a good value because it has
disc brakes, front quick release, and throttle (in addition to pedal
assist). It's a bummer the Propella is the battery is 6.6Amp-Hours. At 4:10
he mentioned the Populo is 10.4Amp-hours (much higher). That probably
explains the weight difference of 2lbs. Also very similar as he mentions is
the Sondors Thin which is now $598 + $194 shipping. Sondors also has disc
brakes and 8.8Ah battery.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

You're right on Mike, I hope to review the latest Propella model sometime
next year :)

Jaladhi Pujara
2 months ago

Another nice review! What helmet is Sam wearing? Do you know?

Jaladhi Pujara
2 months ago

Thank you!

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

I believe it's a Torch helmet like this: http://amzn.to/2ftnPiS

rccrashburn
2 months ago

Overpriced because there's no suspension, has cheapo brakes, no throttle,
no light or reflectors, sorry but I'm just not all that easy to impress
like most of you.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

I'm kind of with you... just tend to communicate more constructively and
gently since I'm speaking to a wide audience. $1k is still a lot of money
but at this time in the industry, it's a low price for a bike with these
specs and this kind of finish. Adding $5 to the BOM to add lights and
better brakes would be worth it. I believe the final production version has
reflectors as it's a legal requirement

alif bagas
2 months ago

road bike have no suspension indeed

Ron Sebastian
2 months ago

Cheaper and cheaper please :)

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

I'm with ya... and I think we're headed in that direction :D

d k
2 months ago

Cool fixie look 🤘🏼

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

Yeah! And they kept it clean and pure without so many stickers or paint
stripes, I like that :) and the deeper rims look

smAsPa
2 months ago

It looks great but the lack of a throttle is a huge bummer. I use it every
time I start off on my THIN.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

Yeah, that's one of the big trade-offs but it also makes the bike Class 1
which is legal in places like NYC

Kenneth King
2 months ago

I definitely would like a bike like that

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

Just save up for one! It's one of the most affordable models out there, do
you have a job or are you a younger person?

Carlospicywiener
2 months ago

Very nice bike for the price,hopefully the production will have v-brakes
rather than inferior cantilever.v brakes must be cheaper

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

Hmm... I feel like v-brakes offer more stopping power, better leverage for
the pads vs. cantilever

James McClellan (Mercuryan)
2 months ago

Amatronix I'm v brakes are inferior to cantilever and dual calipers. Don't
get everyone confused. v brakes are impossible to get set right and once
you do they don't stay set right and constantly rub.