Populo Sport Review

Populo Sport Electric Bike Review
Populo Sport
Populo Sport 250 Watt Internally Geared Hub Motor
Populo Sport 36 Volt Samsung Battery Pack
Populo Sport Flat Rubber Grips Low Rise Bar
Populo Sport H500 Monochrome Display Control Pad
Populo Sport Tektro Ebike Levers
Populo Sport Mid Dish Double Wall Rims Black 36h
Populo Sport 46 Tooth Chainring
Populo Sport Electric Bike
Populo Sport Electric Bike Review
Populo Sport
Populo Sport 250 Watt Internally Geared Hub Motor
Populo Sport 36 Volt Samsung Battery Pack
Populo Sport Flat Rubber Grips Low Rise Bar
Populo Sport H500 Monochrome Display Control Pad
Populo Sport Tektro Ebike Levers
Populo Sport Mid Dish Double Wall Rims Black 36h
Populo Sport 46 Tooth Chainring
Populo Sport Electric Bike

Summary

  • An affordable, fairly stylish, surprisingly peppy single speed electric bike that would be great for urban riding, available in five frame sizes and four colors
  • Very affordable at just under $1k, especially considering the wires are internally routed through the frame, the torque sensor is so compact and there are two USB charging ports
  • Nice looking battery, locks securely to the frame but can be removed for charging or reduced weight... the bike only weighs ~37 lbs with everything attached!
  • Wish the display was removable for protection, no suspension and all-Aluminum frame with narrow tires can be a little stiff, no rack or fender mounts, basic brakes

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Populo

Model:

Sport

Price:

$999

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Pedal Assist (Class 1)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Years Electronics, 3 Year Frame

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

37 lbs (16.78 kg)

Frame Material:

Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

19.29 in (48.99 cm)20.47 in (51.99 cm)21.65 in (54.99 cm)22.83 in (57.98 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

30.5" Standover Height

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Matte Black, Silver Polish, Satin Orange, Gloss Blue

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid Aluminum Alloy

Frame Rear Details:

12 mm Axle with Bolts

Attachment Points:

Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

1 Single Speed, 14T

Cranks:

YD 110 Alloy, 46T

Pedals:

HI Alloy Platform with Rubber Tread

Headset:

4.5 cm Riser Stack, 1-1/8"

Stem:

4" Length, 2° Rise

Handlebar:

Low-Rise Alloy, 23" Length

Brake Details:

Promax Linear Pull, Tektro Ebike Brake Levers with Rubber Edge and Motor Inhibitors

Grips:

Flat Rubber, Black

Saddle:

Velo Active

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy, Black

Seat Post Length:

300 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Alloy Double Wall, Mid Dish, 36 Hole

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 14G, Black

Tire Brand:

CST Super HP, 700 x 28c

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tube Details:

Presta Valve

Accessories:

Full Size USB Charger on Battery Pack and Display, Walk Mode (Hold + Button), Hold Set to Adjust Power Mode, Press Power Button for Backlight, Park Branded Kickstand

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, Plated Stainless Steel Horizontal Dropout with Torque Washers

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

HLGE

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Battery Brand:

Samsung

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

10.4 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

374.4 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

3 hours

Estimated Min Range:

20 miles (32 km)

Estimated Max Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Display Type:

H500 Fixed, Monochrome, Backlit LCD

Readouts:

Amperage Meter, Power Level (Eco, Normal, Power), Speedometer, Assist Level (0-8), Voltage, Battery Level (5 Bar), Time, Odometer, Trip Distance

Display Accessories:

Integrated Button Pad

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

I’ve been reviewing electric bikes now for several years and I got into it because my knee is a bit sensitive. I wanted to commute to work in Austin, Texas but struggled with pain towards the end of the week as I had several hills along the way. So, with a little Internet searching I discovered ebikes then quickly felt overwhelmed by the price and possibility of damage or theft. The Populo Sport addresses these two latter concerns perfectly by being affordable and super tough. Having only one gear, you don’t have to worry about adjusting a bent or broken derailleur or cracked shifter levers. This is key for crowded bike racks. Also, the frame looks simple which helps it blend in and the battery is removable so it’s easy to protect and recharge when you’re at work or school. Taking it off also means you’ve got portable energy because there’s a USB port built in (and they placed it well along the lower edge of the pack so you can still use it while riding without getting in the way of your feet or crank arms). Amazingly, there’s even a second charging port on the bike located just under the control pad / display panel. This is perfect for keeping a smart phone topped off if you’re using it for GPS directions or music. I guess it’s not really amazing to have two USB ports but it is kind of rare, especially at this price point :)

As much as I like the display, it’s easy to reach and large enough to see clearly when seated upright, I do wish it was removable and some of the settings are a bit more involved than other e-bikes. The display is really the one vulnerable spot on the bike, especially when parked outside at a public rack. It’s the one thing that might attract unwanted attention from a thief and given the size and nature of the LCD screen it could get worn down more by weather weather and other handle bars coming into contact over time than a simpler LED readout. This isn’t the only non-removable LCD display out there on the market and people make it work (some cover theirs with little cloth pouches or plastic bags), just an area for consideration and improvement by Populo. Frankly, given that this was the first time I’d even heard of the company, I thought they did a great job with most of the bike and I love having more readouts about battery capacity, how far I’ve ridden and how fast I’m going than with the simpler displays.

The battery pack on this bike resembles some other downtube styles and is curved and streamlined without being gaudy. It’s narrow enough that you don’t clip it with your shoes or legs and it has an integrated loop ledge at the top that works like a handle. You get a very average 36 volt 10.4 amp hour capacity but I was told the cells inside are made by Samsung… Upgrade! Unfortunately I didn’t get to see the charger to see how many amps it puts out or take the battery off to weigh it (feel free to chime in with comments about this below if you get the bike). The motor used here is a real superstar, it’s rated at just 250 watts but performs more like a zippy 350 and it compact and discrete, blending in with the black spokes and rims. It did produce a bit more noise than some others I’ve tested but it was mounted well with stainless hardware and a torque arm on the horizontal rear droput. This is another area that seems nice but could be improved with a screw tensioner. And I love that the bike has a kickstand but wish it was rear mounted vs. center to stay clear of the left crank arm.

At the end of the day, this thing is priced well, it performs and it looks good. In fact, it looks better than most of the other low-priced single speeds I’ve tried. I cannot understate the five frame sizes they offer or the four color options. Possibly the biggest win is just how light and well balanced the Populo Sport is. At just ~37 lbs it’s easy to lift and carry up stairs and that’s key if you live in an apartment. Sure, I wish it had fender bosses and rear rack bosses so I wouldn’t have to wear my backpack to carry gear but at least it has bottle cage bosses (or so I was told it would by the rep). Yeah, lights would be nice but many helmets now have them and in the city there are street lights. Please consider reflective clothing and the silver frame if you ride in the dark a lot because it will help keep you safe. I guess we’ll see how well this thing holds up as customers chime in but my experience was good and Populo has an entire line of ebikes now so I hope to review more soon. It’s neat that they are selling through shops too, so people can take test rides and get warranty coverage. I could hardly believe they offer two years comprehensive warranty for this thing at this price. Big thanks to Populo for partnering with me for this review.

Pros:

  • Extremely light weight at just ~37 lbs, this is the sort of electric bike you can easily lift up steps or mount on car and bus racks
  • Super simple and durable single speed drivetrain… much less likely to drop the chain when riding or get damage when parking at the bike rack
  • Low price point of $999 makes it hurt less if/when the bike gets damaged or stolen if you ride in the city but you still get a high quality battery with Samsung cells
  • Impressive torque and pep from the 250 watt geared hub motor, I wasn’t expecting it to feel as zippy as it does… hopefully it holds up over time as I’m not super familiar with HLGE motors?
  • Available in five frame sizes! So even though it’s a high-step, it should fit better than some other affordable city bike models
  • I like the color options, choose from four colors including timeless black or silver, the bright orange and blue look nice and the branding is minimal, I love that the cables and wires are all integrated (this is a purpose built electric bike)
  • Mid-frame battery keeps weight low and center, I like that it locks to the frame but is removable for reduced weight or charging separately (and protection)
  • Reinforced stainless steel horizontal dropout (for tighetining the chain) with a torque arm washer to improve strength and handle motor forces
  • Two full sized USB ports, one on the battery to use for portable power and the other on the display panel for use on the go (phone gps, music or lights)
  • Nice to have brake levers with motor inhibitors that override the motor… especially since this bike uses a cadence sensor for pedal assist that’s sort of average in terms of response time
  • Pretty impressive warranty considering the price, you get two years comprehensive and three years on the frame, being sold through shops so you can test ride and get support vs. online

Cons:

  • I wish the display panel was removable… everything else on the bike is tough and built for the city but that display is vulnerable to weather or getting scratched and broken at the rack
  • All-Aluminum frame and fork make for a stiff ride, especially given the narrower 700c road tires, consider a compact 27.2 mm suspension seat post like this but note that it will still raise the minimum seat height by about three inches (to be honest, the bike felt better than I expected during my ride test, more comfortable)
  • I like that it has a kickstand but prefer the rear-mount design vs. mid-mount because this one gets in the way and collides with the cranks if you walk the bike backwards
  • The brakes are kind of basic, given how light and cheap the bike is they work alright but I’d much prefer v-brakes for more power or disc brakes that stay cleaner
  • I love that it has bottle cage bosses but wish it also had rack and fender bosses for those who commute with gear or have to ride in the rain… lots of aftermarket fenders, racks and lights to choose from but it’s nice when they aren’t piling up on your seat post and mount stronger (note that Sam was wearing an LED Torch helmet which is a great way to be seen without the hassle of on-frame lights)
  • The three drive modes and eight levels of assist just seemed like a lot compared with most other ebikes I test (that only have for our five levels)… it almost seems like you could miss the modes entirely but I do see their purpose (less power use but still capable of higher speeds), hold set to enter the modes and change them with plus or minus for eco, normal and power)
  • In order to tighten the chain you have to manually pull the rear wheel backwards in the horizontal dropouts whereas other bikes with a similar setup often have a screw tightener tool that’s easier to work with, this just means extra screwing around and possibly a two person job if you have to take the wheel off to fix a flat
  • Narrow high pressure tires need to be checked and topped off a lot more regularly, it’s way easier to get a “snake bite” or “pinch” flat, no quick release so changing flats is more work
  • The motor makes a bit more noise than some of the other geared motors, especially in higher power modes
  • I’ve seen several comments recently about battery failure and frustration with low quality parts such as the wheels, hubs, and bottom bracket

Resources:

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bikerjohn
1 year ago

Nice review, Court! That Populo has a clean look. Hoping to see a review of the Populo Peak, soon.

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

Thanks! Yeah, I’m excited to check out some of their other models in the future and learn more about the company :)

Reply
Susan
1 year ago

This bike checks off everything on my list except for the stupid non-removable display. I have had countless parts stolen off my bikes when forced to lock up outside. Even if the thief couldn’t remove the display, there’s a good chance they would just smash it out of frustration- so then that leaves you with a non-operational motor. Wonder if Populo would replace it.

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

Hey Susan! Unfortunately part of my girlfriend’s bike rack was just stolen the other day… for no reason! Now she can only put one bike on it and I’m guessing that somewhere out there, possibly in a bush, is the extra bar. Sometimes people are lame… Anyway, I do think that Populo would be likely to have replacement parts for sale. They seem like a bigger company with their act together but you might want to reach out and ask first (and check the price). I’m guessing the displays will be $100 a pop. The other approach would be to actually unscrew the display and re-mount it with velcro then unplug at the end of each ride when parking. Hope this helps… None of the more affordable electric bicycles seem to have removable displays.

Reply
Susan
9 months ago

Hey Court, After several months of debating and a current order in to Electron wheel that I’m planning on cancelling, I think I’m going to get this bike. I agree with your DIY modification recommendation. It looks like they sell extra batteries and I’m thinking this one is designed in a way that you can upgrade and modify it on your own even if Populo decides to discontinue the model. My only problem is figuring out what to do with my 8 month old Fuji Feather.

Diego Carrington
1 year ago

Hi Court! I just left a message on the voltbike elegant and I thank you very much for your response and even going further getting a code for a better price, you are really awesome.

Your website is so detailed and extensive that when you think you found a great option, you come across to a different great review.

That made me come across this model, populo sport. As I mentioned before, my budget aims for a cheap and reliable option and from what I can read this one hits good points. It looks discrete enough to not get unwanted attention (hopefully saving it from robery) and I think that the accessories missing (fenders, rack and light) can be covered with around 100 bucks using the options you provided. Also… 2 year warranty!

I promise I won’t be jumping on any more reviews asking if they are “my new best option” but knowing that the voltbike elegant might be small for me (6’2, 200 lb), what do you think comparing this Populo Sport with the radcity and its $1450 price? (which the sweet 50$ off).

I’m just a little concerned about the 250w not being powerful enough for me and from my Ebike lack of experience I don’t know if the lack of throttle is a must when buying one.

I really thank you for your time and attention!
Diego

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

Hi Diego! The bikes each offer something unique and I find myself justifying each… whether based on price or the specific use case scenario. I find that shops and companies promote their own as “the best” and people often use power as a deciding factor but you’ve kept a really open mind and that shows a lot of wisdom. Professional long distance cyclists put out around 200 watts from what I’ve read so if you get an ebike that can offer up to 250… and usually beyond that with peak output, you’re going to have a good experience. In parts of Europe they limit ebikes to 250 watts and people like them just the same. That said, since you have option and are a taller and heavier rider who wants something that will last and work with accessories I’d still push you towards the RadCity. The rack is sturdy, the fenders fit and won’t rattle as much, the tires will provide some cushion (along with the suspension). The Populo and other bikes like E-Glide are awesome for being minimalist but that’s not what I hear you describing as the use case. I have been in the position of trying to save money and then disappointed later when the bike didn’t perform (and I hear that a lot about ebikes, buyer’s remorse for not going higher quality). If you’re in this for a tool, get the right tool. The Rad Power bikes are still very affordable value oriented products, saving $400 or even just $300 after you get fenders, rack, lights etc. might leave you feeling like the extra power and strength and size would have been worth it. But again… any of these bikes can be GREAT if you work with them and look on the bright side of the base technology :)

Reply
JW ZHANG
11 months ago

Hey Susan, You are right, you are not the only one mentioned about the removable LCD screen since we released the product two months ago. We started design process a week ago for removable version for future production, for the time being we will send free replacement to customers who got their screen stolen or smashed whatever reason until we have upgrade.

Reply
Court Rye
11 months ago

Wow, that’s a neat offer. Thanks for sharing the news JW! I’m excited to see your improvements on future reviews.

Reply
Benjie
10 months ago

Hi, I just want to thank you Court for the awesome reviews you do. I purchased the Populo sport Dec. Of 2016, i’m getting to know the ebike and still learning how I can apply it with my cycling hobby. I normally ride average of 15-25 miles for recreational and exercise proposes. Just wanna share a small feedback about the range from this ebike. Ridden it from Fullerton to Huntington beach and back on single charge. Approximately 50miles, on eco mode, averaged 18mph. From a bellow average cyclist, which I use to do with my single-speed none ebike 5 years ago. I’m just happy I’m able do this again.

Reply
Court Rye
10 months ago

That’s awesome Benjie! Sounds like you’re really enjoying the Populo Sport… I love hearing real-world stats on distance per charge so thanks for sharing that. Would you mind sharing your height and weight so others can approximate their own performance?

Reply
Rai
9 months ago

Do you ship to Niagara region, Canada? How much for shipping cost?

Reply
Susan
9 months ago

I noticed your stats on the battery are different than what is listed on Populo’s site. They state it is a Panasonic, not a Samsung, although both produce great batteries, and their site states 8.7ah instead of the 10.4ah. I don’t know if that makes an overall difference in the performance however I am curious why they would change battery companies only after a few short months. Do you have any info on that? I just purchased the bike today and will definitely report back on performance!

Reply
Court Rye
9 months ago

Hi Susan, thanks for the update… I’m actually visiting a shop right now and pulled a battery off one of the Populo Sport models. It says 36 volt 8.7 amp hours so yeah, I guess they changed it or I was given inaccurate information for the review. Thanks for pointing this out. Maybe the different battery size meant that they needed to change brands? Either way, I agree with you that both offer solid products that should last well. I’m excited to hear your updates after some ride time :D

Reply
Noel
9 months ago

Hey, I’m pretty confused and I don’t know if this is the bike that would meet my needs or not. I’m a student and I don’t have a lot OF money. Thing is I need to go about 20 miles to get to university and go all the way back home every day. I was wondering if this bike has that much range (40-50 miles) on power mode and if not, then what would be a good option for me ?? Thank you !!

Reply
Court Rye
9 months ago

Hi Noel! I like the Populo Sport but am not sure it would go as far as you’re talking about… The cool thing about the bike is that it’s relatively light and efficient so even if you run out of juice it’s still going to be easier to pedal than some others out there. Given the kind of daily use you’re talking about however, I’d consider a Bosch powered electric bike because they are super efficient, reliable and the batteries are higher capacity than Populo but still very compact and light (so you can bring them into class for protection or easy charging). There are more Bosch ebikes available now from a wide range of companies. I haven’t finished my review yet but the BULLS Cross E is going to be $2,499 and comes out later this year in a step-thru design. I realize that sounds like a lot more money but the bike will definitely go further and last longer based on my experience. Maybe look around for deals on last-season Bosch powered ebikes by using the sale section in the EBR forums here.

Reply
Susan
9 months ago

Ok, so I finally got around to un-boxing yesterday and it took me only an hour to assemble with my limited knowledge and confidence of assembling bikes-gotta make sure all the bolts are on tight and that you’ve put bike grease on the right parts as well as oiling the chain which they forgot to add in their video.

I rode it for the first time on my way to work straight through Boston and into Cambridge and from the first moment I began pedaling I could not stop laughing at what an incredible feeling it is!!! “Pedal-assist” should really be called “throttle pedal” because I only had to do a quarter of a rotation before the motor kicked in and zipped me off.

It is heavier than my steel single speed Fuji Feather but I was able to carry it down five flights out of my apartment building. Some minor adjustments I’ll make will be adding ESI bar grips for a more comfortable ride and possibly a shorter stem because even at 5’8″, the reach is a bit aggressive for my back.

I tried both normal and high mode but I didn’t really notice a difference as I think I was able to achieve 33kmh (20pmh) in both modes. I saw some youtubers get it up to 28mph so I’ll have to experiment.

As someone who has commuted to work nearly every day in Boston for the last 10 years on single speed bikes, this was a perfect transition into the electric bike world. I like the fact that I can just order another battery rather than say sending a Copenhagen or Electron wheel back to the factory when the battery dies. I love the simple design without permanent clunky racks or other items in order to keep the lightness of the bike. I also think because of its minimal design, it will be much easier for myself or a local bike shop to maintenance. I’m counting on Populo to stay committed to this model by offering upgrades and other accessories that will keep the bike running for years to come.

I’m in love with this bike after only one ride and can’t wait to fly around town this summer!

Reply
Court Rye
9 months ago

Hey Susan! I enjoyed reading your testimonial and tips about assembling and enjoying the Populo in Boston. You must be in great shape going up and down all of those stairs :P

Thanks for sharing your enthusiasm, I also hope Populo honors this bike by keeping parts available and offering good support. Feel free to chime in again anytime with updates and ride safe out there!

Reply
Schorschico
5 months ago

SUSAN,

just so you know, Ferris Wheels in JP has started carrying this bike in their store, so you have now a place to go and fix any issues.

I was pretty sad since I contacted them 6 months ago when I was looking for my first and they told me they didn’t carry any ebikes because they were too expensive and there was no market. So I went with the Eglide-ss (super-happy, but it’s great to have some local physical support). Glad that they have changed their minds. It looks like an awesome ride. They told me they plan to increase their list of ebikes to include multiple gears in the future.

Reply
Tim
8 months ago

When I saw upgrade referring to the Samsung battery, I had to laugh. Don’t let the 8.7 vs 10.4 amp-hours fool you. Panasonic cells are far superior and degrade VERY SLOWLY over time. Samsungs not so good after a short while. I work with laptops and have even made ebike batteries from their cells. I always prefer Panasonic and Samsung is not close. FYI Sanyo not that great either.

Reply
Court Rye
8 months ago

Interesting, thanks for sharing your experience with both brands Tim. I’ve heard that the cell density or quality level can matter as well and that the battery management systems make a difference… and having a fuse. It’s a bit misleading to just go by brand but I try to use it as an indicator for quality here and there. Where do you get your battery cells, pack designs, motor kits etc.? Sounds like you’re really into this :)

Reply
JimBo
8 months ago

I just picked up a barely used (100 miles), large frame Populo Sport (in matte black). It’s aesthetically sleek, its power delivery is smooth, and the LCD’s volt readings are a nice touch. The battery, however, rattles loudly in its mounts going over bumpier pavement.. I wish your review ride (and my *test* ride) wasn’t so brief. and only on smooth pavement. I might have offered a little less for it! Still, I got a great deal on what Court calls a “beater” in the review.

After getting it home and giving it the once-over, I put ten miles on it riding to and from the Post Office with the tires pumped to 100 psi. Sure enough, I hit a small pothole and got a flat, so I promptly ordered new 700x35c tires and self-sealing tubes from Nashbar. Meanwhile, I’m kind of worried about the battery – I’ve experienced 8-9 brands of ebikes from bike industry behemoths as well as crowdfunded startups, and this is the chintziest battery setup I’ve seen thus far.

The bottom battery mount was loose, but tightening it as much as I could did nothing to reduce the pronounced noise when riding over rougher stuff. When I removed the battery and shook it a little I could feel the cells moving around inside, almost liquid-like… should I be nervous? This shaking didn’t produce nearly as much noise as it makes on the bike, so clearly it’s just the mounting system. The Populo battery sure *looks* like a Bosch, but it’s clearly nowhere near the same quality.

I’m wondering if other Populo owners’ batteries rattle etc. I’m also curious if anyone else’s display has a constant full-battery reading, even as you watch the voltage readout and LED indicators on the battery itself drop to lower and lower levels. During Court’s review, I can see a voltage reading of 37.2, but the battery meter’s completely full. At full charge, my voltage reading was 40.3, so maybe it’s a common glitch?

Reply
Court Rye
8 months ago

Interesting… thanks for sharing all of these details JimBo. In the past, I have met people who used layers of duct tape to cushion and tighten their battery interface as the plastic mounting points wore down over time and the pack started to rattle but internal rattling is a whole different thing and very concerning. Damaged ebike batteries have been responsible for fires at shops (who are working to repair them) and even during rides on hot days like this. I’m wary of offering any kind of advice but would definitely start with a Populo dealer or even the company itself to see if an exchange / discount could be worked out for a new pack. I did not spend enough time with the Populo Sport to comment on battery readout but it sounds like you’ve identified an issue with their system.

Reply
JimBo
8 months ago

Thanks for the prompt response, Court! I applied Gorilla tape in the spaces of the battery mount where you can see rubbing had occurred, but now I’m especially nervous about the cell movement inside the battery so I doubt I’ll ride this bike again until its battery is replaced. I sent Populo an email over the weekend, and tried calling today at about 10am PST; hopefully they’ll call/write back soon. I’ll post an update if/when they do.

I also want to ask them whether the replacement batteries on their website are made with Panasonic or Samsung (it doesn’t specify but it does say they’re 10.4Ah and I believe the Panasonics were 8.8). I’m always wary of vague ebike specs (especially regarding electronics), but caught flak on the EBR Forum for calling another small ebike company out on their loosey-goosey approach to posting specs… I can understand the need for flexibility, but consumers deserve to know exactly what they’re buying, IMO!

Regardless of cell manufacturer, the Populo’s battery *builder* may be the culprit in the internal cell movement, or it could be that the loose mounts caused this issue over time. I have several other ebikes, however, including a few eMTBs that had seen much rougher terrain over longer periods, and none of them – including the crowdfunded startups – have batteries that did this. So I really hope they’ll replace it under warranty. They don’t specify “original owner” on their generous warranty, but they do limit their liability (understandable), and say, “If a defective part is found during the warranty period and the customer notifies us immediately, **the seller will repair or replace the part based on his sole discretion**.”

JimBo
8 months ago

Update: I got a replacement battery from Populo, but it also had an unsealed seam in the same spot the original had. Black 3M electrical tape blends right in with the matte black plastic battery case, so I taped the seam and you can barely tell it’s there. After two rides, the tape has held up and the internal cells do not move around inside like to original did. But there’s a small piece of something rattling around in there – I can only conclude that. they’re sourcing cheap batteries from a marginal supplier.

This brings me to Susan’s earlier comment/observation that Court’s review says the Sport’s batteries use Samsung cells while Populo’s specifications on their website say Panasonic. When I looked at their replacement battery offering for $329, I noticed it didn’t mention any brand at all. They have a little “live chat” function, however, so I asked “Panasoic or Samsung cells?” on two different visits a week apart. First time, they siad Samsung and asked where I was getting Panasonic from. I told them it’s specified that way on the Sport web page! The second time, however, they said Panasonic!

Something really sketchy’s going on there…

Susan
6 months ago

Jimbo’s battery experience is really alarming. I tried to purchase an extra one but at the moment they’re sold out. The frustrating part is they claim you can’t just find a similar shape and spec battery to use so what’s going to happen when this one dies? My bike dies with it? The fact they can’t truthfully reveal the manufacture is a red flag. I’ve been biking to work every day since I got it back 3 months ago in mid-March and the battery doesn’t quite seem as strong as it was in the beginning (the voltage goes down quickly). If I have trouble getting a replacement from them, I may just look into a whole new power supply for the motor if that is at all possible. I’ve been sealing the battery in saran wrap on rainy days as I don’t want to risk water damage.

The Populo web chat help person confirmed that a medium 55 would fit my 5’8″ height. Now, under the new specs for the sizes, they still have a 55 medium but it clearly states it is for those that are 5’10” and over- this would explain why the reach is just too far on mine.

Bottom line is it is still a great and powerful bike but because they needed to meet specific benchmarks for this price, they are not forthcoming about the specifics of the parts. I’m starting to worry that an electrical overhaul may come a lot sooner than I anticipated.

Reply
Court Rye
6 months ago

Hi Susan, that’s a frustrating experience but you’ve got a healthy constructive attitude. Your stem could be swapped for a shorter one or higher angle to reduce reach. I can’t speak for Populo batteries but you could reach out to Rechargeable Power Energy in Nevada for a replacement if/when you need a refill. I believe they repack almost any electric bicycle battery :)

Brucifus
6 months ago

I bought a Populo Sport in December and was really getting a lot of use out of it until it abruptly died on a morning commute. I had noticed significant internal rattling in the battery, as another commenter noted, even though my commute is over fairly smooth pavement the whole way. That first bike had about 600 miles on it.

Populo did not question my warranty, although they ignored my multiple requests to discuss it over the phone. They sent me a brand new replacement with a few included improvements to the new model (water bottle cage, rack bosses on the seat/chainstays) and covered return shipping costs. I thought I was back in business, until this second bike failed again during my morning commute. The replacement has less than 100 miles on it.

At this point, they’ve lost any future business from me. If I’m going to use something for my commute, I need reliability.

Reply
Court Rye
6 months ago

Wow, thanks for sharing your experience with the Populo Sport here Brucifus, I hope this helps others who might need a sturdier or more reliable mode of transport. I do my best to dig in with the videos and writeup but I cannot communicate longer term use the way you have here. I’m glad Populo at least tried to help you with a replacement but understand why you might need to move on now. The good news is, more and more high-end drive systems are coming down in price. You can get Yamaha, Shimano, Brose, and Bosch for a lot less in 2017 than you used to be able to and I hear good things in terms of reliability from dealers.

Reply
Dewey
4 months ago

Populo recently posted on the Reddit ebikes forum about the battery issues reported with their ebikes. This is the response from Populo’s representative Estaban, reposted here with his permission:

  • Batteries shifting around: when we investigated the “rattle” issue, we found that the mount on the battery was where most of the noise was coming from. The current mount is a metal on metal slide. We are in the process of designing an injection molded mount that will reduce the noise significantly in the next release. From our research, the current mount does not affect the durability or performance of the Sport.
  • Battery cells – In our first production, we had some battery cells that were Samsung and some that were Panasonic. All batteries in our current production are now Panasonic ONLY.
  • Quality Assurance – We have an extensive quality check at our factory and we distribute from our warehouses nationally.
  • Battery availability – At the moment, we have a reserved supply of batteries for warranty replacement. If you need to replace a battery under warranty, contact us at our website or go to your local dealer. If you’re looking for a spare battery to buy as an extra, we have a shipment coming now! Spare batteries should be available at the end of this month.
Reply
Court Rye
4 months ago

This is great information Dewey, thank you so much for reposting here… and getting permission! You’re awesome, I hope Populo keeps EBR and the forums in mind for future updates like this. It makes me excited to check out their newer models and I respect that they are in touch with their user base like this, offering an explanation for questions and concerns.

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bob armani
2 weeks ago

I was accepted to go Study Abroad for Spring 2018 in South Korea. I travel by car to my home university and either walk or use a golf-cart service to my classes. The golf-cart service is provided for those with different disabilities. I have a very mild form of muscular deficiency. I am perfectly capable of walking and performing normal physical activities, but compared to an average human being, I perform these activities at a slower rate. I am perfectly capable of riding a bike as well :).

While abroad, I will not have a car with me and even though South Korea has a good transportation system, I would like to invest in an e-bike. The university I will be attending is known to be in a 'hilly' location. The e-bike will give me a little boost for those hills and at the same time, I will have a way of transportation. I plan to use the e-bike as a normal bike and use assistance for hills or longer travels.

I am looking for an e-bike that is not too heavy, but my main goal is to find an e-bike that can get me up those steep hills. I have been looking at models such as:

- Populo Sport Electric Bicycle V3
- Faraday Cortland
- Gazelle NL C7 HMB

I understand that all of these models are quite different, but I am new at this and not sure where to start. Please keep in mind that I am a university student and these e-bikes are not cheap. However, I am open to any suggestions! I am open to ALL recommendations :)

How about the Rubbee compact portable electric drive system reviewed on this forum: https://electricbikereview.com/rubbee/drive-2-0/

There is also a newer version coming soon also on this forum https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/rubbee-x-introduction.15247/#post-121643

Gaby
2 weeks ago

I was accepted to go Study Abroad for Spring 2018 in South Korea. I travel by car to my home university and either walk or use a golf-cart service to my classes. The golf-cart service is provided for those with different disabilities. I have a very mild form of muscular deficiency. I am perfectly capable of walking and performing normal physical activities, but compared to an average human being, I perform these activities at a slower rate. I am perfectly capable of riding a bike as well :).

While abroad, I will not have a car with me and even though South Korea has a good transportation system, I would like to invest in an e-bike. The university I will be attending is known to be in a 'hilly' location. The e-bike will give me a little boost for those hills and at the same time, I will have a way of transportation. I plan to use the e-bike as a normal bike and use assistance for hills or longer travels.

I am looking for an e-bike that is not too heavy, but my main goal is to find an e-bike that can get me up those steep hills. I have been looking at models such as:

- Populo Sport Electric Bicycle V3
- Faraday Cortland
- Gazelle NL C7 HMB

I understand that all of these models are quite different, but I am new at this and not sure where to start. Please keep in mind that I am a university student and these e-bikes are not cheap. However, I am open to any suggestions! I am open to ALL recommendations :)

BigDaddyRider
2 weeks ago

Thank you for the help. I went with the Hollwood racks “Sport Rider SE for electric bikes”. Has the extra weight limit and can expand to 4 bikes if needed. Will support 200lbs worth of bikes as a 4 bike rack. Bought online today and will be at my door tomorrow.

D1G1T4L3CH0
2 months ago

That's probably an accurate translation. It's a long version of the old Szechuan proverb, "ride far into the night, watch out for bugs" .

I've never used SLA on ebikes, but have heard they're not long lived. A 12 AH battery is probably enough. For cost of ownership one $200 lithium could last longer than two or three sets of SLA. Depends on how hard you run the bike.

There may be a low voltage cut-off in the motor controller. Controllers intended for use with lithium will usually shut off a 35V battery at 30 volts. I have no experience with something intended for lead, but maybe 30V is also used.
heh. Yeah it seems that it does cut off after a certain low voltage. I tried 24 volts first and the motor didn't even try to turn on.

What does the charger port look like @D1G1T4L3CH0 ? You can find the appropriate SLA batteries at any local battery store, they're 12V 12ah lead acid cells. Go to Amazon and order a 36V 1.5 or 2amp SLA charger with the end that matches your bike's. Also check the polarity on the battery pack charger port and make sure your charger matches that or it won't do anything :D. Most of those chargers have a little picture on the back indicating which spot is positive and which is negative.

This is a much older, heavier ebike with SLA batteries, so I wouldn't spend a lot of $$ on it. Also, see if you can put together a 36V test pack first to see if this bike even runs. The RMartins are notorious for controller failures & other issues. We've worked on a number of them at the shop.
It's a pc plug type. The same one that goes into the back of a computer power supply. The polarity is negative left and positive right. Also it's internally connected with the middle pin to a piezo buzzer for alert sounds. It also does have the indicators embossed on the plug which is good to know. I noticed a lot of chargers I found don't even indicate polarity. But that's not a huge concern for me since I could just reverse it myself. But I rather not have to. I'll just have to look some more, I haven't found a decent one yet that comes from the states. I rather have to sooner than later. Most come from china as to be expected. Yep the bike works, well the wheel turned anyway, not very fast but the power supply I used really wasn't cut out for such high current anyway.

Your rationale for biking is one I believe many of us have in using bikes rather than even small cars. The real plus is in one's overall fitness that accrues from regularly using a bicycle and actively contributing by pedaling with some vigor. Some argue that no assist is better and that is likely true in many cases. I firmly feel that in many cases and for many varied reasons, numero riders do need some level of assist to get to work, do other commutes, bring home groceries, and other cargo, etc. And doing it that way is so much more efficient than even very efficient small electric cars.

I commuted for many years on a Giant Lafree Sport that ran a seatpost SLA battery setup like your new project bike. It is quite a good location for a heavy battery on a bike in terms of center of gravity and balance. My Lafree Sport also used the twelve volt, twelve amp hour batteries, but only two of them instead of your three. You seem quite knowledgeable on batteries, but I will just emphasize here that reasonably good SLA batteries will hold up to several years of daily commutes if one remembers the important key factors of dealing with the SLA chemistry. ALWAYS charge as soon as possible after each ride. This is far more important when dealing with SLA than it is with most other batteries in common use today. And longevity of the SLA pack also benefits greatly by not routinely running them down to near automatic cutoff. I suspect this bike of yours has that, as my Giant Lafree Sport and most other SLA ebikes of the day did. My Sport had a five light battery charge remaining indicator and I also added a good Cycle Analyst. By rarely using the last 25 to 30% of the pack's amp hours, my SLA batteries always survived years of daily commuting that was highly rewarding on many levels and also reliable and efficient. Good luck, and keep us posted.
Over the years of biking without a motor, I do stay in shape mostly, but mostly on the bottom half. I'm not overweight, but I'm a little out of shape on my upper body, bikes just really can't do a lot there in my experience. I do feel a little conflicted about using a motor instead of pedaling because I do like the benefit of staying in shape and keeping a healthy heart. I feel like I may start to get lazy and not actually pedal anymore. This electric bike don't even have different gears so it will be slow riding if I want to pedal. But still can get some exercise from it I guess, especially up hills. It is a very heavy bike. When I first got it I was pretty certain right away just judging from the weight, of it's battery chemistry. And on that; those are some really good tips to follow on taking care of an SLA. This one also looks like it has five lights to show charge level. Though in my limited testing I only got it up to 3. Cars use the same kind of batteries and they last years too when taken care of, even when they aren't, so it stands to reason these should too. However car batteries are used for cranking, not deep cycle, though I don't believe that's much of a factor. These however did sit for an unknown amount of time (maybe years) at less than 5 volt per battery. They do seem to hold a charge though. But I have yet to fully charge them.

- - - -

I'll look more for a good charger to buy, cheap, I don't want to spend much money on this thing. Maybe later I will invest in a lithium one or build my own from 18650s. Still unanswered though; does anyone have a clue of the wattage of the motor and do you have the google-fu skills to find an old spec sheet online for this bike? I don't have a clue what model it is so that makes it harder for sure. I did find something very similar but with different colors and branding.

Anyway I think as someone pointed out already, this is just a project bike. A first foray into the e-bike world and to get some experience with it before I decide to commit to throwing down some real cash.

EDIT: This is the one that is similar. https://www.bukalapak.com/p/sepeda/fullbike/city-bike/a8jmot-jual-sepeda-listrik-betrix-ice

1/1
rich c
2 months ago

As one of my two hobbies...the one I do in the winter I Always wondered why these bikes were so expensive, always thought it was the battery. Unfortunately most people just cant drop 5k or 6k on a bike that has absolutely no resale value. I am trying to sell a lectric bike now to move up....its not even worth trying, I would be giving it away.

Now my second hobby, the one I do in the summer...jetsking. "Far superior stx15f"...lol...dude stick with bikes you know nothing about ski's. That ski has not changed in over a decade and still uses a darn lever for reverse, there is no technology on that thing, and it shows kawi has 10% of the PWC market! The "rinky dink spark" was the number one (Trixx) and two seller (3UP) last year. The 2017 Trixx can be picked up for 6800, the fact that electric bikes are even in the neighborhood is why this hobby is struggling growing in the states. The Trixx also has much more technology on it then any electric bike and the resale value is through the roof..

Which gets me back to my point I love my electric biking but the up front cost is way to much and the resale value is non existent hindering the growth of the sport. Skis like the Spark are also good for a family day, really tough to have a family day on one electric bike. Which unfortunately leaves the electric bike market for the wealth or for someone replacing an auto.

Based on a 5 year expected life, and what I paid for them, owning my Haibikes is about the same price each year as a health club membership. No resale on that membership either. I go longer and faster on my eBike now at 65 than I can on a traditional bike. It's pure pleasure for me to be outside, compared to working out with other old people in a gym. I just got home from a 10 mile ride in 37 degree weather. Loved it. As has been mentioned, I paid far less than MSRP by purchasing a 150 mile demo in November, and another old model year in March. I have $5400 in two 28mph version XDURO Haibikes. I don't consider resale value for this kind of pleasure.

mid drive merv
2 months ago

Your rationale for biking is one I believe many of us have in using bikes rather than even small cars. The real plus is in one's overall fitness that accrues from regularly using a bicycle and actively contributing by pedaling with some vigor. Some argue that no assist is better and that is likely true in many cases. I firmly feel that in many cases and for many varied reasons, numero riders do need some level of assist to get to work, do other commutes, bring home groceries, and other cargo, etc. And doing it that way is so much more efficient than even very efficient small electric cars.

I commuted for many years on a Giant Lafree Sport that ran a seatpost SLA battery setup like your new project bike. It is quite a good location for a heavy battery on a bike in terms of center of gravity and balance. My Lafree Sport also used the twelve volt, twelve amp hour batteries, but only two of them instead of your three. You seem quite knowledgeable on batteries, but I will just emphasize here that reasonably good SLA batteries will hold up to several years of daily commutes if one remembers the important key factors of dealing with the SLA chemistry. ALWAYS charge as soon as possible after each ride. This is far more important when dealing with SLA than it is with most other batteries in common use today. And longevity of the SLA pack also benefits greatly by not routinely running them down to near automatic cutoff. I suspect this bike of yours has that, as my Giant Lafree Sport and most other SLA ebikes of the day did. My Sport had a five light battery charge remaining indicator and I also added a good Cycle Analyst. By rarely using the last 25 to 30% of the pack's amp hours, my SLA batteries always survived years of daily commuting that was highly rewarding on many levels and also reliable and efficient. Good luck, and keep us posted.

Earl44
2 months ago

Try riding that rinky dink spark down the road with minimal pedal effort.
Or, better yet, start making ebikes.
or, a full size REAL sea doo cost more than any ebike made, a lot more.
or, who would buy a cheesy spark when a far superior stx15f only cost a few bucks more.
or, on a ebike you're breezing down the street going somewhere, even the best personal watercraft is nothing more than a jet propelled cork, dodging boat wakes, probably bored.
I've had more pleasure from my overpriced stromers than any harley or dirt bike I've ever had.
Not sure I can put a dollar amount on pleasure.
Old guy with a couple stromers and a 2015 stx15f. :)

As one of my two hobbies...the one I do in the winter I Always wondered why these bikes were so expensive, always thought it was the battery. Unfortunately most people just cant drop 5k or 6k on a bike that has absolutely no resale value. I am trying to sell a lectric bike now to move up....its not even worth trying, I would be giving it away.

Now my second hobby, the one I do in the summer...jetsking. "Far superior stx15f"...lol...dude stick with bikes you know nothing about ski's. That ski has not changed in over a decade and still uses a darn lever for reverse, there is no technology on that thing, and it shows kawi has 10% of the PWC market! The "rinky dink spark" was the number one (Trixx) and two seller (3UP) last year. The 2017 Trixx can be picked up for 6800, the fact that electric bikes are even in the neighborhood is why this hobby is struggling growing in the states. The Trixx also has much more technology on it then any electric bike and the resale value is through the roof..

Which gets me back to my point I love my electric biking but the up front cost is way to much and the resale value is non existent hindering the growth of the sport. Skis like the Spark are also good for a family day, really tough to have a family day on one electric bike. Which unfortunately leaves the electric bike market for the wealth or for someone replacing an auto.

John from Connecticut
2 months ago

Hello all - I need some help. I am getting the below 4x4 Sprinter Van that has a bed that raises. I want to put two bikes under the bed that fit when it is lowered - which will require taking the front wheel off.

What my requirements are:

A fun - want to ride every day - ride.
Suspension (through forks / tires) that will allow us to ride on easy to medium trails. I assume the full suspension bikes can't take a bike rack.....
Must have a bike rack as we will be taking camping stuff at least 10 miles down the trail... or getting groceries.
Long lasting battery.
Tough as we will be banging this thing around.
Unique - I love having cool things that spark conversations. Not to show off - but to start a conversation... I like to talk....
Weight - In my experience the lighter the bike the better the carve. But... I understand the electric bike is a lot heavier which is fine - expected - but 70+ pounds I wonder if that is too heavy for some of these??

We will be peddling a lot - I have a Carbon Fiber DaVinci (which is over my head in capabilities) so I want a bike that I can peddle a lot of the time.... maybe 50% on assist 1 or 2.. At least that is my vision - might change as I've never had an electric bike! I'm 48 and still want to go to places that others people aren't.

The bikes (I need two - one for me / one for my girl -- 5' 10" / 5' 6") that I'm kind of excited about are:

Haibike SDURO Trekking 9.5 - a little expensive and unsure about the off road capability. Looks like it is well put together - well thought out bike. Looks mad cool. A take down from this bike might be the M2S XC Sport?? Half the price.

M2S R750 Looks like a nice bike for the price. Looks like it is mad fun and has decent options. Unsure if that is an actual 750 Watt motor or the peak? Wish the battery was 52v. 62 pounds.

RadRover Man I love this company - flew from Key Largo up to Seattle to tested the bike. My only problem with the RadRover is that it seems that it hasn't been updated that much. I wish it had an option for a better battery and forks.

Volt Yukon Limited Looks like a real nice bike - possibly a step above the Rad but that is more like a Ford / Chevy argument.... they are too close to call so go with the one that looks the best. And the Volt guy is a little aggressive replying to comments anywhere the Volt is talked about. If I had to pick between the two - I think I would go Volt but would choose the R750 over both.

Teo S Another well priced bike and it seems to be a pretty nice one with a 750W motor . I am unsure how it compares the other Rad / Volt. Looks like the people who bought this bike really like it. But that is all relative -

Bulls / Specialized / Trek / and many other high end brands that make amazing bikes... but they seem to be a lot more expensive. I'm sure super nice rides - but is the price justified?

HaiBike
https://www.haibike.com/en-US/US/bikes/672/2018-sduro-trekking-9-5?variant=3840272848
M2S XC Sport
https://shop.m2sbikes.com/collections/frontpage/products/xc-mid-drive-electric-commuter?variant=38435959432
M2S R750
https://shop.m2sbikes.com/collections/frontpage/products/all-terrain-electric-fat-bike
RadRover
https://www.radpowerbikes.com/products/radrover-electric-fat-bike?variant=1121017965
Volt Yukon Limited
http://www.voltbike.ca/voltbike-yukon/voltbike-yukon-750-limited.html
Teo S
https://teofatbike.com/boutique/en/teo-s/teo-s-medium-noir-750w-p111c83/

Hello SV Moving On,
Looking for opinions on e-Bikes. I purchased a Trek XM700+ this past July and I absolutely love it ! My average daily ride is 20-ish miles and I hate to stop.

The Bosch Performance Motor is silky smooth, but very powerful, the Intuvia Controller is simple to use. My XM700+ glides along bringing me great joy....Hills, 'there are none' : ) I never thought cycling could be so much fun !... I made one change and added the Cirrus Bodyfloat seat post which I consider and absolute must. For me the frame stiffness was more then my back would tolerate, but the Bodyfloat is a marvelous piece of engineering, now my Trek is so comfortable...

The disk brakes are strong, extremely smooth and boy do they work. The swept back handlebars and the ergonomic grips make for a very comfortable ride.... The bike feels rock solid and is very well built. I've put on a little over 1000 miles in 3 months.

I'm sure there are many fine e-bikes out there, and I'm sure a few that are 'not so fine', but to me the Trek XM700+ plus is worth every penny and I'd do it all over again...

In fact I'm sort of doing that. I just ordered a Trek Powerfly 7 Mountain Bike based on my 700+ experience. I want to ride gravel/stone dust trails and I don't feel stable enough on the 7oo. The bike is fine, the issue is me, my 71 year old agility isn't what it used to be.

One last thing...A bike rack. I bought a Sirrus Freedom SuperClamp 2. It is great, once the hitch is installed, the rack is simple to install and remove from your vehicle. The rack is well built. Sirrus is a US company ( Madison Wisconsin ) . They've been in Wisconsin for 40 years, long before the catch phrase "Make America great again" . : ) I hope this was helpful.
All the best, John

SV Moving On
2 months ago

Hello all - I need some help. I am getting the below 4x4 Sprinter Van that has a bed that raises. I want to put two bikes under the bed that fit when it is lowered - which will require taking the front wheel off.

What my requirements are:

A fun - want to ride every day - ride.
Suspension (through forks / tires) that will allow us to ride on easy to medium trails. I assume the full suspension bikes can't take a bike rack.....
Must have a bike rack as we will be taking camping stuff at least 10 miles down the trail... or getting groceries.
Long lasting battery.
Tough as we will be banging this thing around.
Unique - I love having cool things that spark conversations. Not to show off - but to start a conversation... I like to talk....
Weight - In my experience the lighter the bike the better the carve. But... I understand the electric bike is a lot heavier which is fine - expected - but 70+ pounds I wonder if that is too heavy for some of these??

We will be peddling a lot - I have a Carbon Fiber DaVinci (which is over my head in capabilities) so I want a bike that I can peddle a lot of the time.... maybe 50% on assist 1 or 2.. At least that is my vision - might change as I've never had an electric bike! I'm 48 and still want to go to places that others people aren't.

The bikes (I need two - one for me / one for my girl -- 5' 10" / 5' 6") that I'm kind of excited about are:

Haibike SDURO Trekking 9.5 - a little expensive and unsure about the off road capability. Looks like it is well put together - well thought out bike. Looks mad cool. A take down from this bike might be the M2S XC Sport?? Half the price.

M2S R750 Looks like a nice bike for the price. Looks like it is mad fun and has decent options. Unsure if that is an actual 750 Watt motor or the peak? Wish the battery was 52v. 62 pounds.

RadRover Man I love this company - flew from Key Largo up to Seattle to tested the bike. My only problem with the RadRover is that it seems that it hasn't been updated that much. I wish it had an option for a better battery and forks.

Volt Yukon Limited Looks like a real nice bike - possibly a step above the Rad but that is more like a Ford / Chevy argument.... they are too close to call so go with the one that looks the best. And the Volt guy is a little aggressive replying to comments anywhere the Volt is talked about. If I had to pick between the two - I think I would go Volt but would choose the R750 over both.

Teo S Another well priced bike and it seems to be a pretty nice one with a 750W motor . I am unsure how it compares the other Rad / Volt. Looks like the people who bought this bike really like it. But that is all relative -

Bulls / Specialized / Trek / and many other high end brands that make amazing bikes... but they seem to be a lot more expensive. I'm sure super nice rides - but is the price justified?

HaiBike
https://www.haibike.com/en-US/US/bikes/672/2018-sduro-trekking-9-5?variant=3840272848
M2S XC Sport
https://shop.m2sbikes.com/collections/frontpage/products/xc-mid-drive-electric-commuter?variant=38435959432
M2S R750
https://shop.m2sbikes.com/collections/frontpage/products/all-terrain-electric-fat-bike
RadRover
https://www.radpowerbikes.com/products/radrover-electric-fat-bike?variant=1121017965
Volt Yukon Limited
http://www.voltbike.ca/voltbike-yukon/voltbike-yukon-750-limited.html
Teo S
https://teofatbike.com/boutique/en/teo-s/teo-s-medium-noir-750w-p111c83/

Paul H
3 months ago

We are looking to purchase our first pedal assisted e-bikes. We are an active retired couple each about 70 years old, about 5 ft 7 in, and normal weight. We travel roughly 10,000 miles per year in our motorhome and will carry the bikes on a rack on the back of the motorhome. The cost of the e-bikes is not a major concern. The e-bikes will be primarily used on paved bike trails. The e-bike we are leaning to at the moment is the Electra Townie Commute Go because: Electra is the only brand of e-bike sold by the bicycle shops in our local area, we think the front and back racks on the Commute would help us lift the e-bikes onto the bike rack, and we are thinking the internal gear hub would be preferable given the e-bikes will be carried many miles on a rack. The bike rack we are leaning to is the Hollywood Sport Rider for electric bikes. Our current bicycles are the Day 6 Journey which we bought about 6 years ago. We welcome any suggestions/advice on choosing an e-bike and rack that would be suitable for us. Thanks.

Rgrtitan
3 months ago

All right! I got the bicycle today!

I usually make my purchases online. After visiting several LBS in Seattle, they didn't seem to know much about their Stromer, Specialized and Trek e-bikes, which is very disconcerting since your spending several $k.

After stopping by Seattle Electric Bicycles, I met the owner, Stefan and his store staff. Stefan and the staff were extremely polite, knowledgeable and not pushy. I took a lot of their time w/ questions and test rides. After my experience there, I knew I was going to purchase my e-bike there and not online. They also happened to have a lot of great sales going on.

I decided on the Bulls Six50 E2 Street in 51 with a 20 cog (from 15) chainring upgraded on the front and a Body Float. The bike wasn't in stock and was special ordered.

The bicycle handles and rides great, especially with the Body Float. It's pretty zippy, even in the "tour mode", which is #2 of the 4 modes (eco, tour, sport, turbo). I'll have a better idea of the range later this week. As far as handling, it was great.

I'd strongly recommend anyone in the Seattle and surrounding areas check out Seattle Electric Bikes. They have really good selection of mid-drive and rear-drive bicycles.

Court
3 months ago

Here's another press release update that Bosch sent out the other day in preparation for Interbike. The summary is: the new Active Line Plus, Active Line and eMTB mode. With zero resistance, Active Line Plus will produce new eBikes that finally feel like riding a natural bicycle. Plus, the motors are much smaller, lighter, quieter and smoother than before. The eMTB Mode is also like an iOS update for your bike – riders unlock it just by updating their bike’s software. Active Line is similar to Active Line Plus, but smaller and lighter. You’ll find all the details in the attached, and here’s a few accompanying photos.

Bosch introducing two new systems and eMTB mode at Interbike
Reutlingen, Germany / Irvine, CA – Bosch eBike Systems North America (www.bosch-ebike.us) is highlighting two new systems and the new eMTB mode for the North American market for Model Year 2018. These innovations and more will be on display at Bosch’s Interbike 2017 booth (#17177) and available for experiencing first hand at the Interbike indoor test track “The Circuit” (#C11).

Active Line Plus: Quieter with zero resistance

From the days of launching our very first eBike system in Europe in 2010, Bosch’s goal has always been to make an eBike retain the natural feel of a traditional bicycle. The earliest generation of our product came close and quickly jump-started the “pedal-assist” eBike market in Europe. Our 2nd generation system came even closer and has been a big factor in the rise of pedal-assist eBikes in the US since 2014. Through non-stop innovation at our Stuttgart headquarters, our latest drive unit generation, dubbed Active Line Plus (ALP), closes the gap even further between an eBike and bicycle.

Key improvements:

Smaller: the drive unit is 20% smaller (volumetric) which enables bike designs with a cleaner / integrated look, to more closely resemble traditional bikes. With the ALP, the drive unit is one step closer to disappearing within the frame of the bike.

Lighter: the ALP drive unit weighs approximately 7.1 lbs, a weight reduction of 19% compared with last year’s Active and Performance Line drive units. Lighter eBikes handle better during the ride and are easier to transport after the ride – both key enablers to eBike market growth.

Whisper-quiet: the completely re-designed drive unit features a new quieter gear concept and electric motor. As you pedal on a quiet road, now you just hear the wind in your face.

Zero pedalling resistance: due to this new gear concept, when the motor is in “off” mode or the rider surpasses the drive’s cut-off speed, the rider feels no more resistance in the pedals than on a traditional bicycle.

Multiple front chain ring possible: previously, all Bosch drive units allowed only one chain ring. ALP now features the ability to offer multiple front chain rings, for bikes that need a wider range of gears.

Superior range: the ALP combined with the 500Wh battery achieves 51 miles range (mixed-modes, favorable conditions), and a max of 130 miles-plus range (Eco mode, ideal conditions). This is achieved through key features such as high motor efficiency and lower max torque (50 Nm), which is set deliberately lower than Performance Line to cater to commuters & more casual cyclists.

“The New Active Line Plus is our proudest achievement thus far for pavement-style eBikes,” said Claudia Wasko, General Manager of Bosch eBike Systems Americas. “Active Line Plus gives riders the fun of an eBike with the feel of a bicycle.”

Active Line: Lighter and smaller

The new Active Line has all the same key features as Active Line Plus with three key differences:

40 Nm of torque rather than 50 Nm.
Weight is even less at 6.4 lbs.
5% percent smaller than ALP.

eMTB Mode for Performance Line CX

A mode for eMountain bikers: eMTB mode replaces the previous Sport mode of the Performance Line CX and switches between the Tour and Turbo riding modes. Depending on the pedal pressure, the progressive motor support automatically adapts to the individual’s riding style. Without changing gear, the motor always provides support at the ideal power level, even at low cadences. eMTB mode is available to dealers in the form of a software update.

“Our new eMTB mode is going to be a game changer for the e-mountain biker,” said Claudia Wasko, General Manager of Bosch eBike Systems Americas. “It takes trail riding to another level.”

Demo the future

Interbike 2017 show attendees will be able to demo many eBikes from Bosch’s new and existing brands at Outdoor Demo Day on Sept 18th and 19th and at the Bosch-sponsored indoor test track (“The Circuit”) on Sept 20th – 21st to try out Bosch’s new MY18 innovations. Dealers are also invited to attend seminars on eBike market trends, policy, technology, and more at the Bosch-sponsored “Electric Theatre”, located close to “The Circuit” Test Track, open Sept 20th and 21st 10AM – 5PM.

Photo 1: Active Line Plus

Photo 2: eMTB mode

About Bosch eBike Systems

A new generation of bikes is taking town and country by storm and is already a part of everyday life. eBikes are a modern means of transport for modern people: people in a hurry and people who prefer to take it easy, the fit and the comfort lovers, commuters and pleasure cyclists and, of course, young and old. The tailwind of technology-leading eBikes made by what are already more than 60 leading brands in Europe is powered by components that Bosch is developing to perfection. The Bosch portfolio ranges from the highly efficient drive unit (motor and gearbox) and high-quality batteries to a smart on-board and cycle computer that can be used intuitively. Perfect coordination of components holds the key to typical Bosch performance in terms of both comfort and efficiency.

Like other Bosch products, the eBike systems benefit from the Bosch Group’s technology and production know-how. From conception and engineering to manufacturing, marketing and after-sales service, Bosch eBike Systems constantly set new standards for the eBike industry. The Bosch Group’s experience in the areas of electric motors, sensor technology, displays and lithium-ion batteries ensures that Bosch eBike systems use technology that is invented for life and that eBike users have their fun.

For more information please visit www.bosch-ebike.com

About Bosch

The Bosch Group is a leading global supplier of technology and services. It employs roughly 390,000 associates worldwide (as of December 31, 2016). According to preliminary figures, the company generated sales of 73.1 billion euros in 2016. Its operations are divided into four business sectors: Mobility Solutions, Industrial Technology, Consumer Goods, and Energy and Building Technology. As a leading IoT company, Bosch offers innovative solutions for smart homes, smart cities, connected mobility, and connected industry. It uses its expertise in sensor technology, software, and services, as well as its own IoT cloud, to offer its customers connected, cross-domain solutions from a single source. The Bosch Group’s strategic objective is to deliver innovations for a connected life. Bosch improves quality of life worldwide with products and services that are innovative and spark enthusiasm. In short, Bosch creates technology that is “Invented for life.” The Bosch Group comprises Robert Bosch GmbH and its roughly 450 subsidiaries and regional companies in some 60 countries. Including sales and service partners, Bosch’s global manufacturing, engineering, and sales network covers nearly every country in the world. The basis for the company’s future growth is its innovative strength. At 120 locations across the globe, Bosch employs 59,000 associates in research and development.

Additional information is available online at www.bosch.com , www.iot.bosch.com , www.bosch-press.com , www.twitter.com/BoschPresse .

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Garys_PDX
3 months ago

Hi @america94, we do stock both fat tires and inner tubes Kenda for both our Voltbike Yukon and Voltbike Mariner series. In fact we also offer either free helmet or free inner tube if you decide to purchase Voltbike Yukon or Voltbike Mariner.
I understand is hard to find in Canada, but I can assure you we have enough of those in-stock.
Here is the direct page of the Kenda Krusde 20x4" Tire.
http://www.voltbike.ca/replacement-parts/electric-bike-parts/kenda-krusade-sport-tire-20-x-4.html

Wish you had made that clearer when ordering as I would have gladly given up the helmet that I wont be using for a spare tube.

Nicknick
3 months ago

Received mine (standard battery, Schwalbe tire upgrade). These are my first impressions.

Building the bike

Putting it together was relatively easy using the videos on the juiced site. It's a heavy bike so having someone help while you put on the front tire is nice. Anyone who is comfortable with some basic tools can do this. Don’t forget to tighten the steering.
The front fender and headlight will be added later when Juiced ships the missing parts (in a few days). UPDATE: I put these on, was doable. Headlight is super bright, but does not have any "to the side" visibility like some other headlights do.
I expected this to have a battery operated rear light, but it seems to be a reflector. UPDATE: It has a tiny light in the box. I ordered the Sweethome rec instead which is about 500x more bright.

The good

First of all: this bike looks AWESOME. It is sooo cool. And it looks like a cool bike, not an eBike. The battery design and not having a mid-drive motor helps with that.
All parts you touch feel like high quality. Saddle, shifter, handles, rear rack, bike standard, it's super solid.
Size is perfect for me, so the Juiced size guide seems spot on.
Tires are super wide compared to my regular hybrid bike. They are comfortable, but not as "precise". Great for dealing with potholes, but it'd make me hesitant to get something like the Hyperfat which must have zero “cornering feel".
The brakes are INSANE. So powerful. I've never had disc brakes before, so maybe that's why, but it's easy to skid the tire even though the combined weight of me+bike is like 250lbs.
There is a lot of power. On a straight road I really doubt I’d go above level 2 (levels are ECO,1,2,3,sport). In sport mode I’m flying by everyone at 28mph before I know it. However, I went to find a super steep San Francisco hill (like 25%+) and even in sport mode I’m pedaling hard to help it get up to 10mph, and the throttle does nothing. These are kind of rare hills and on my regular bike I’d have to get off and walk, so I sort of doubt any eBike could do much there. Even electric scooters seem powerless against these hills. UPDATE: I took it up to Twin Peaks (SF tallest point), was doable, though I was still pretty sweaty when I got up there.
The throttle+pedal combo to get a boost when leaving a stoplight is nice. But generally I end up not using the throttle on its own, it just doesn’t give you enough to get that “wheeeeeeee!” feeling, its more fun to pedal and get the boost from that.
No regen, which is awesome. Regenerative braking ruins easy coasting, which the most fun part of biking. :)
You can easily ride this bike with a dead battery. I rode it for a bit while it was turned off, and even though its heavy it would be fine to ride this home for a few miles.

Things Juiced could do in future CrossCurrent S models to make it even better

Putting the battery in is kind of hard. You really need to push it hard while holding the key in "open" position and it feels like more of a hassle than it should be, especially since I’ll be having to do this multiple times a week to charge it. I might try to find a way to make this easier (maybe WD40?).

UPDATE: I think I was doing this wrong. I checked out the EBR review video which has come out since I wrote this review and it actually clicks in without using the key. It needs a bit of muscle but it's no longer a hassle.

I used “walk mode” to get my bike up the stairs. You have to hold the minus button for a while to enable it, which means you just have to stand there for a few seconds with the brakes on so it doesn’t roll back. You also have to hold that button to keep it active, which means that if you let it go, you need to wait a few seconds again to get going. It would have been better if walk mode just put a 5pmh limit on the throttle (which gives you direct power).
AFAIK there is no way to have the light (screen backlight+headlight) on by default. I wish it was “always on” when the bike is on, because there is only upside to more visibility, even during the day. Most new cars are this way too.
There is a short jerky feel in the pedals when you go from peddling to coasting and you move the pedals a bit backwards. It’s like the motor isn’t sure whether to help you or not. Not super bothersome though.
Bell, chain guard, integrated rear light would be nice.

Nice-to-have’s I’d pay extra for:

Frame lock (euro style) for quick stops at the store.
Rear rack strong enough to carry a person.
An anti-theft security code to turn on the bike (maybe have the motor lock the rear wheel without it).
For juiced to put on the Schwalbe tires for me (they did for me as I ordered early, but no longer do this, so you'll have to take it to a LBS to get them put on).

Summary

I'm no expert, so I don’t have a ton to compare this to, but I’ve tried a bunch of other eBikes. Short rides on a Haibike, Gazelle, Stromer ST1 and a longer ride on a Bulls Lacuba Evo 8. The Bulls is the only bike I would consider a similarly great commuting alternative (though its not a speed pedelec), which feels a bit more smooth and has some higher quality parts, but it is $4000, which makes this Juiced CCS a fantastic deal at well under 2k. It would still be a great deal at $2500+ actually.

This bike is great and I'd for Juiced to do well. Looking at the forum comments here they could probably do a bit more “underpromise and overdeliver”, i.e., tell your customers to expect the bike in October, so September comes as a nice surprise. But even then, some people will never be pleased. :)

I’ll update this review in a month or so when I get some more miles on it. But in the meanwhile I’ve ordered one for my wife as well.

UPDATE after 100+ miles: definitely love this bike. I'm excited to ride it every day on my commute. I'm surprised how often I go over 20mph. I didn't expect to care this much, but at this point I'd definitely not buy anything that is not a 28mph speed pedelec. I'm also totally happy with the amount of power. It's rare (few super steep hills) that I wish it had more.
The only thing that is bothersome to me at this point is the weight. With the added u-lock I mounted on, I'm guessing we're at 60lbs+. It's no problem at all when biking, but using any ceiling hook style bike racks, or hauling it up stairs, is a hassle. That said, I'm not sure how much less of a hassle it would be at 50lbs or even 40lbs. And with bikes below that weight you're getting into the Faraday style, which is super entry-level on power and battery. So maybe this is just part of eBike life. :)

TLDR: I love this thing. Would buy again in a heartbeat.

Esteban Raposo
4 months ago

Have you checked out Populo Bikes yet? The Populo Sport is $999 and great overall value. This bike is meant for riders that don't mind a sportier and less comfortable ride, but want an electric bike that is light and inexpensive.
Check out www.populo.com

bob armani
4 months ago

I have a Hilltopper 250W 24V front wheel on my 7-speed Schwinn. I don't use it for sport, just for day-to-day transportation. (I almost never use my car any more.) My terrain is flat city roads, and my typical trip is 2 to 4 miles one way.My kit has no throttle, just a push button to kick in the motor.

Most of the time I pedal in gear 5, and just use the motor for assist when I get below 10 MPH, and usually only goose myself until I'm back up to 12-14 MPH. Even pulling a bike trailer loaded with 20 pounds of groceries, I have no trouble cruising along at 12 MPH or so, although I do use the motor more when I'm fully loaded. (I'm only 150 lbs myself.) I don't need more speed than that since, at age 72, my reaction time isn't as quick as it used to be, and I find 15 MPH to be very comfortable, and 20 MPH to be a little on the "break-neck" side for me. hehe.

So as far as power is concerned, I seem to have all I need. What I'm wondering is, is there any efficiency advantage to a higher voltage, or higher power motor? Could I maybe get more range, or less battery wear by using a system that has more power than I really need, rather than pushing my 250W motor harder? I see that so many bikes use higher voltages and wattages, even when they are still topped out at 20MPH, so I assume there must be some advantage.

I'm also looking into these issues because I'm thinking about making a home-built trike just for fun, and as a better grocery-getter.

Gary-I agree with Mark's comment. You are only 150lbs and with a 250 watt motor, sounds like it is pushing you just fine. I asked the same question when purchasing my ebike. I am at 135lbs and my 350 watt motor on my ebike pushes me along at fast and furious speeds that are more than adequate. I can top out at 22.5 mph without a whole lot of exertion I asked about a 500 watt motor and they indicated it is too much power for someone in my weight class.

I like the concept of the Hilltopper. I was thinking on making one of my mtn bikes into an electric with the kit. Sounds like it is performing well! Ride safe!

EddieJ
4 months ago

I have long had a passion for hardtail mtb’s be them analogue or pedal assist, and have found the eMTB version through ownership of the superb KTM Macina Race, to make the perfect bike for wet weather/winter use.

With the Macina Race now sold, it is time to introduce the replacement bike, a KTM Fogo 271
Click to enlarge

I decided a long time ago that whatever the next bike was going to be, that it needed to be 27.5” Plus size, and just as the Macina Race, it also needed to have a good component specification. I was also keen to stay with both the KTM marque and Bosch drive unit system.

As things stand the KTM Fogo 271 exceeds my requirements by a significant margin, so I am more than happy with my choice.

The Magura Boltron T-20x110 front forks is an interesting one for me, as I have read so many reports both good and bad, which made me keen to own a bike that had them fitted, just so that I could come to my own conclusion about them. I have also previously been asked privately about the forks and what I knew about them, so at least I finally get to discover for myself, and can offer opinion accordingly, and not just based from hearsay. I shall post more about the front forks as time passes, but from handling them off the bike, and checking them over thoroughly, it is a promising start. Clearly performance in use and durability are key, so time will tell, but from research that I have completed, I have already worked out that poor set up from end users, plays a major role in reported seal failure.
Click to enlarge

My preferred choice of front mudguard has long been the Rapid Racer Neoguard, (thanks guys) but after discussion, there are currently no plans to introduce a guard for USD front forks. There is no way that I could bring myself to install a guard that utilizes the steerer tube, and with that in mind I already have my own neoprene design waiting to fit to the bike.

The full bike/component specifications are detailed below, but as things stand, there is very little that I intend to change. I shall be replacing Intuvia with Purion, fit a Ragley Tracker saddle, Ritchey Foam grips, a 70mm Easton stem, and change what I believe to be a KS LEV Integra dropper post, in favour of a Rockshox Reverb Stealth. These four listed items are just personal preference and nothing more. The dropper post is simply being changed as I have one that I removed from the Macina Race, so the rebadged KS can be squirreled away.

I have chosen 27.5” Plus for a very specific reason, but just as with the front forks, I shall detail how things work out, as time passes. Briefly though, as many will be aware, I ride throughout the year and in all conditions. I treat my bikes very much as tool to do a job, and to date KTM bikes have filled this role very well, but with slight limitation. I now want to go one stage further and 27.5” plus is going to enable this. The plus size will fulfill the role of providing superb low-pressure grip in respect of riding wooded knarly terrain and also over rocks etc, then come the winter months, I intend to drop the tyre size down to 2.25-2.3 to optimize rear chain stay clearance. Running 2.25 for example, will give me a full 27mm of clearance all round, so close to zero issue of potential mud/leaf build up.

Having received the bike today, I cannot yet add ride specific details and data, but as with any bike that I receive, the first job is to strip the bike down to the component stages, then re assemble studying parts and construction as I go. By doing so I gain a greater insight into the construction of a bike, and can see what if anything in my opinion could or should be changed. Also, if anything fails whilst riding, having already stripped and rebuilt the bike, I have a head start on how to repair things. I get as much pleasure from working on bikes, as I do riding them.
Click to enlarge

This is where it gets interesting for me, as after having pulled the bike down, I am already very impressed by the frame. The build quality and paint finish is superb, but it is what is behind all that, that I am interested in. The shape and tube sizing has been improved, and just turning the first screw to remove the motor covers, revealed the first thought out design feature. A small banana shaped cover which when removed, gives clear and easy access to main connectors of the Bosch CX drive unit. That in itself was a simple, but welcome change. KTM have also now chosen to use an additional two motor mounting points. This again impressed me, not because the standard three wasn’t enough, but more from the potential that it may prevent any motor creaking, as the loading on the mounts is now more equal.

Turning the frame upside down gave the biggest and most pleasant surprise from the point of view of working on a bike. KTM have chosen to redesign the cable routing and internal cast mounts to the frame. Routing cables, wiring, hydraulic brake and dropper post hose, is now effortlessly easy and simple to do. I’m very impressed that such R&D has been put into this side of things, but I guess that it must save valuable seconds during the factory assembly stage. Speaking of cable and hose routing, I was also pleased to note that the frame entry points for routing, are now fractionally larger as well. A lot of thought has gone into the production of this frame.

Removal of the two tyres was next on the list, and it was yet another pleasant surprise to see that the rims are tubeless ready, not just compatible. That’ll save a bit of time and money when setting them up to run tubeless. Once the wheel set has been returned from a friend’s bike shop, after giving them to him to check and adjust spoke tension should it be required, it’ll then just be a simple job to install Stans valves and Effetto Mariposa CaffeLatex sealant. A sealant that I have no hesitation in using or recommending.

Whilst in its knock down stage, I decided to take advantage of the situation, and fitted an AMS XL Honeycomb frame guard kit. It seemed silly to pass up the opportunity to test a kit, so time will tell as to how effective that it is. It was certainly easy enough to apply, although the frame colour doesn’t really mask any slight air bubbles very well. I have also added 3M clear film to several areas of the frame as well.

Finally, the lad that purchased the Macina Race hardtail has indicated that he wants to start to ride off road as well, so that being the case, I should be able to format some interesting bike comparisons.

As well as regular updates to this forum, further updates and photographs will be posted at the following places.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/313908402329634/permalink/451984891855317/

https://www.facebook.com/edwardpeterjefferies/posts/474559259568509

https://www.instagram.com/eddiejefferies/?hl=en

Thanks to KTM Bike Industries, The Little Bike Shop, Bikegoo, Effetto Mariposa, Fork Juice, and Magicshine UK.

Full component specification

2017 KTM Macina Fogo 271 8s EX1Frame

:- Macina MTB 27.5"+ BOOST, Alloy for Bosch, with semi-integrated battery
Frame sizes :- 43cm, 48cm and 53cm.
Bike colour :- Matt light grey, black + toxic orange.
Front fork :- MAGURA Boltron inverted, T-20x110 120mm travel, weight 2,200g
Headset :- KTM Team B303AM drop/in-tapered, +10
Headset bearing numbers :- MH-P28 and MH-P08M
Stem :- KTM Team KT-6 7° 95mm Weight 133g
Handlebar :- KTM Team HB-RB12L riser, rise 15°, Width 720mm
Handlebar grips :- KTM Team VLG--775-12D2 Diamond fin with end Clamps
Brake rotors :- Shimano RT86 6-bolt, 180mm front, 180mm rear. 260.4g pr
Brakes :- Shimano Deore XT M8000 Weight 554g pr including caliper/hose/lever assembly
Trigger shifter :- SRAM SL EX1 8speed Weight 122g
Rear derailleur :- SRAM RD EX1 8speed. Weight 289g
Front sprocket size as supplied 16T
Cassette :- SRAM XG899 11-48 ( 11, 13, 15, 18, 24, 32, 40, 48) Weight 360g
Chain :- SRAM EX1 Weight 273g
Pedal cranks :- SRAM EX1, ISIS for Bosch. Length 170mm. Weight 510g pr
Pedals :- VP components VP-539 black platform, with replaceable pins. Weight 370g pr
Wheel set :- KTM Line 27-5" plus B/B Tubeless ready
Wheel rims :- Ryder edge 35, 32 spoke hole, suitable for 2.3 to ‘plus’ size of 3.0. Weight 580g
Front hub :- 20mmThrough axle DT Swiss 350 classic-6-bolt 20/110/TA BOOST. Weight 239g
Rear hub :- 12mm Through axle DT Swiss 350 classic-6-bolt 12/148/TA BOOST. Weight 305g
Tyres :- Schwalbe Nobby Nic 70-584 TL-easy, Snake skin, Apex. Weight 910g per tyre.
Saddle :- Fizik Gobi M7 with Manganese rails. Weight 255g
Seat post :- KTM Comp JD-YSP12L hydraulic adjustable 100-370, diameter 30.9mm Weight 560g
Display :- Intuvia LCD, with Walk assist
Drive unit :- Bosch Performance Line CX 36V-250W, 25km/h 75NM of torque, four assist levels,
Eco giving 50% Tour giving 120% Sport giving 210% Turbo 300% Maximum torque available
per assist level, Eco 40Nm Tour 50Nm Sport 60Nm Turbo 75Nm
Battery :- Bosch Powerpack 13.8Ah - 500WH
Motor weight :- 4kg
Battery weight :- 2.6kg, dimensions 325mm x 92mm x 90mm
Overall Bike weight :- 21.4kg

https://www.instagram.com/eddiejefferies/

And now 'Electric Mountain Bike Collective' on Facebook.

.

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Roxlimn
4 months ago

I've put 3000 miles on a Dirt-E with a Yamaha motor. On largely flat-ish terrain, it does 50 miles in normal traffic. Have about 3 significant bridges with climbs to cross, and the terrain rolls mildly rather than being absolutely flat. Feels flat on a car and on the ebike, but you definitely feel the slight gradients on a push-bike. Maybe 2%? Same terrain, 30 miles on flat-out full-abuse Sport mode. On Eco Mode, it'd probably do 70. Aside from your weight, it really depends on how long you're pedaling without any assist from the motor at all, which is likely enough for me since the terrain is forgiving and I am strong enough to pedal the bike past the electric assist while still being comfortable.

Bike_On
5 months ago

I found this to be motivating....

Optibike Celebrates Ten Years

Dear Dan

It is official, Optibike has now been building and selling electric bikes for 10 years! It seems like yesterday when we loaded our first Optibike 400 into the waiting truck for its trip to South Africa.

Optibike is now the oldest manufacturer of electric bikes in America! Today we still focus on quality and performance first. We strive to be the best, not the biggest and results show it.

Now we have sold bikes old over the world from Russia to Indonesia to Brazil. In all, people in over 28 countries have bought an Optibike.

While Optibike set the standard for the electric bike industry of what performance and quality meant, what always was most fulfilling to me was how we changed peoples lives.

We have had people lose 80 pounds, end their use of prescription drugs, rekindle their relationships and have the time of their life as they remembered what is was like to be a a kid again and feel completely free and energized. This is amazing.

Over the years, Optibike has been featured on ESPN, CNN, The Today Show, National Geographic Adventurer, and in The NY Times.

Optibike has always been ahead of its time. In fact, or first model, the 400 in 2007 has higher performance than the popular European systems today. But we didn't sit still, as the R15 has 3.8 times the power of the 2007 model!

Our Electric Bikes are custom built with artisan quality one at a time, and they are the worlds fastest and longest range High Performance Electric bikes available

Over the years our product line has expanded and we currently offers electric bikes for commuters, performance enthusiasts, and off roaders. We are the only company to offer a diverse line of bikes in different power, performance and price categories.

I feel proud when many of our customers are ordering their 4th and 5th Optibike. They started with the first Optibike released and are now on the latest R15. This says a lot about Optibike quality and performance.

I just spoke with a customer who has the original 2007 400 with Nickel Metal Hydride battery and it is still running strong after 10 years.

Some of the highlights of the last ten years are below. I hope you enjoy reading them. They have brought back some good memories to me.

Jim Turner

Optibike Inventor.

1998
Jim Turner finishes his 1st Optibike prototype.
After first investigating hub motors in 1996, Optibike developed this first mid drive unit in 1997.

This unit featured 24 volts with a 15 amp-hr lead acid battery and about 350 watts of power.

The motor was off board on the crank axle and drove through the final drive chain (other companies still use variations of this design today). Optibike did not file any patents on this design as it did not meet the final design objectives of high power in a small efficient package.

This prototype validated the superior performance of the mid-drive and led to the development of Optibike MBB and several patents. The MBB design integrated the mid drive into a small compact package that it is today.

The MBB has evolved since then, with now over 3X the power of the first units and superior reliability. All Optibike MBB's are still made in the USA.

The first prototype pictured here, without suspension, also convinced us of the need for suspension.

2006
First Production Optibike Built
After almost a decade of development the first production Optibike was finished in late 2006 for shipment to South Africa.

2007
First Optibike being Loaded for Shipment to South Africa
After 10 years of development, we were finally in production!

The Model 400 had 400 watts of continuous power, 90 Newton Meters of torque and a 37 volt 13 Amp Hour nickel metal Hydride battery that weighed 17 pounds.

Check out the R15 at the end of this email to see how Optibike performance has increased four times in the last ten years.

2007
Jeff Baum buys an Optibike R8 to ride his breathtaking 10 mile commute through the snow from Frisco to Breckenridge.
He goes up and down snow covered winding roads in the Rockies - to his job as the executive director of the Breckenridge Music Festival.

For most of his 10 years at the Festival, he had driven a standard gasoline -powered sport utility vehicle. Then he found the freedom of the Optibike.

It takes him a little longer to get to work, but the bike is more dependable, more nimble, more invigorating and just more fun than the S.U.V., he said. (and yes, he does take his skis with him)

2007
The New York Times names Optibike - 'The Ferrari of Electric Bikes'
The New York times wrote an article on electric bikes featuring Jeff Baum and sales took off. In a matter of a few weeks, Optibike sold out its next 15 months of production. In the article, the Optibike was referred to as the Ferrari of Electric Bikes.

2007
Jim Turner is awarded 'Inventor of the Year'
At the Colorado Inventor Showcase - In recognition of exceptional ingenuity, creative genius, and product development skills, Jim Turner and the Optibike were awarded the "Inventor of the Year".

The Colorado Inventor Showcase was Sponsored by the DaVinci Institute.

2008
Optibike featured at California Academy of Sciences
In 2008, the Optibike OB1 was featured in the "Future of Transportation Display" at the brand new California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. Originally scheduled for one year, it was kept for over 2 years as one of the most popular attractions.

2008
Optibike Releases First Lithium Ion Battery in E bike
Optibike pioneered the use of Lithium Ion batteries in E bikes. Back in 2008 we released the first 37 volt 20 Amp Hour Lithium Ion battery. This is the technology that Tesla uses today. Many of these batteries are still running strong today.

2009
DeMarcus Ware of the Denver Broncos (then of the Dallas Cowboys) buys an Optibike to use as of part of his training as a lineman
DeMarcus says: “I’ve been riding my Optibike OB1 for over a month, and I can’t stay away - I absolutely love the bike. I ride it every single day as part of my training regimen. In the suburbs or on the hills at training camp, this bike will be with me. It is the perfect cross-training tool for me because it allows me to get a great workout yet still enjoy what I’m doing. I would recommend an Optibike to anyone who has those same goals.”

-DeMarcus Ware

2011
Optibike Wins Pikes Peak Hill Climbing Event
In 2011 a group of Optibikes took 1st to 7th places in the Pikes Peak Hill Climb Event, climbing over 7,500 feet in 24.5 miles from Manitou Springs to the 14,100-foot summit.

1st place was John Sagebiel with a time of 1:06.45. The 1st 'other' brand of e-bike took over 3 times as long as John. As of this date, no one has beaten Johns time.

2011
Velodrome Pacer uses an Optibike to lead the packs
Optibike, the world’s leading high performance electric bike, is circling Boulder’s velodrome and stirring much excitement.

Optibike has found its place as a coaching and pacing tool in Boulder’s renowned velodrome.

“The Optibike has been really useful to us" Tim Kyer said “Our track here (in Boulder) is small and makes for a unique dynamic ride. Optibike is helping riders learn the smooth pedal stroke and a consistent speed in and out of turns”

“We are using the 1100R model and are seeing a lot of ways that Optibike is used for a training tool. We can get through multiple workouts and groups on one battery charge.”

In other indoor cycling centers, electric and gas scooters are used. However, there is exhaust and emissions from gas machines.

The Optibike is the first electric bike powerful enough to lead a pack of very powerful cyclists and replace the scooter/motorcycle derny.

2011
Optibikes have been sold to customers in 28 countries
By 2011 Optibike had delivered bikes to riders in 28 countries. The riders were from all walks of like, with a common interest to have a high performance bike that changed their lives. They all ordered their bikes direct from Optibike and each one was hand built one at a time, just like today.

2012
Rock and Roll Hall of Famer, Steve Winwood (Traffic, Blind Faith) invites Jim Turner to a Denver concert after buying an Optibike for his band manager James in England
Band Manager, James received his Optibike as a birthday present from Steve and uses it to commute the 16 miles to the studio each day with 2000 feet of climbing. Lots of days of rain and drizzle as it is England.

Velome
5 months ago

I thought I would give my ST1x review as it has been around a month and 200 miles since I received it in the mail. Sorry for the long post, but I hope someone will find all the information useful.

ORDER:
I decided to place an order with an E-bike shop instead of buying from my local shop because of the massive savings I received. I ordered the Sport (high bar) in 22" and charcoal. The shop upgraded me to the ST2 battery (814wh) and provided a body float seat post for a small charge. I got an email from Stromer the day after I placed the order to setup my account/app as the shop tied my bike to my phone number before it was shipped. It took about 12 days in total to get the bike, but there was a holiday weekend that increased that time. 7-10 days is probably reasonable expectation. Saving the 10% Seattle sales tax was also a contributing factor as they included shipping for free. All said and done very happy with the price and the shop I ordered from and would not have done it different.

RECEIVING:
The bike is in a large box that weights over 60 lbs. Because of this there was a local delivery company that did the final transit. Due to this it took an extra weekend to get to me because I had to schedule the delivery. They showed up in a 18-wheeler which caused the driver to have some issues blocking traffic on a busy road to hand truck the bike to my door. But all arrived safely and he wheeled it into my garage.

The bike came nearly fully assembled. I needed to straighten the handle bars (mm allen wrench) which was pretty easy (they are shipped at 90 degrees so the box is flatter). The peddles also needed to be screwed on - the right side goes on traditionally, the left is reverse threaded. I swapped out the seat post (cannot remember if the seat was on the bike or not when shipped), and I was all ready to go. Wheel reflectors, the charger were also in the box with manuals. The first charge took about 2-3 hours to be fully charged.

INITIAL IMPRESSIONS:
So much fun. I had tried out electric bikes before, but this was my first Speed Pedelec and really glad I went that direction, it is addicting. Some people say you work just as hard on an e-bike, but it is hard to explain why. I don't burn as many calories, but your muscles are still sore. You want to work hard just to maintain the speed and always feel the boost. So you work as hard, but over a shorter period of time because you are going so much faster.

The ST1x has a boost/throttle - kind of. If you hold the [+] button it will move you without peddling. But I have yet to have a situation where I could not peddle faster than the boost. On a flat it will get you to about 10-12 mph, on a decent hill you are lucky to get half that. In all cases I can get the bike to go at least 20%-100% faster by peddling at a moderate rate. The brakes squeak a bit (see the EBR videos, sounds the exact same) but they are solid. I am 6'3" 220lbs. The frame size is pretty good for me, but if you are 6'5" I think you might find it a bit too small - and they don't make it any bigger.

I have had several friends take it for a spin, they're all in love with it.

200 MILE REVIEW:
I have had a few issues so lets get those out of the way. About 20 miles in the right peddle was wobbling considerably. I took the peddle off and the aluminum threads were stripped. I put the peddle on so it is possible it was something I did, but I am pretty good with tools and am pretty sure it was a factory defect. I called the bike shop I ordered from and they shipped an entirely new bottom bracket and crankset. It took around 7 days to get that and another 2-3 for a bike shop to do the work (I did not have the right tools). It is working perfectly now. It was all done under warranty through the bike shop I purchased from - I d not call Stromer. All I had to do was send in photos and provide a write up. I think this was more to make sure they sent the right part than not trusting me.

At 100 miles I got a rear flat. Of course I didn't have a spare, pump or tools with me (Murphy!) so my wife picked me up and I swapped the tube with the same kind that came with the bike. I now have a trunk bag with a spare tube, tools and a pump. All of which I had, just not with me at the time.

I have a few complaints as well. The bike creeks a lot. Not sure what exactly is making the sound, but it sounds like tapping on a carbon frame (there is no Carbon), and it bothers me, but does not seem to an issue. Could be that I am too fat. The drivetrain is a little bit clunky. It does not shift as crisp as I would hope. Again, not an issue, but it bothers me. I have learned that if I am not in the right gear it will either not shift right away or will shift really hard. So as I come to a stop I move up a few sprockets to a larger one, and then gradually down shift as I pick up speed. I rarely ever use the largest cogs as with the motor it is rarely needed (even in 10-12% grade)

Absolutely love riding this bike. I rarely take it out of assist level 3 just because it is so much fun. I ride about 14 miles round trip to work and it takes me about 20-25 minutes each way - my commute is across a valley so steep hills going each way with some flat in the middle and a hand full of signals that have a long rotation. I average about 16-20mph. During peak traffic I can easily make the trip quicker than I could in a car. If I took it really easy I could probably get away without showering at work, but the way I ride I always sweat a bit. I charge it every other day and usually have about 50% battery left after the 28 miles. I have not rode it outside of commuting yet, so I have yet to test the range.

OMNI is alright. Signal strength is terrible and does not work from my house. I have a secure bike cage at work so I have only used the electric lock once. I don't really like the screens they have to choose from. I find myself switching between them on a regular basis. I think they could improve this quite a bit - perhaps ill get an update. Stromer - If you are reading this, reach out to me and I'll provide a bunch of feedback.

I added a mirror and upgraded the handle grips.

SUMMARY:
I would buy it again in a heartbeat. 28mph is a must - glad I got that 35 mph would be even better. Get a body float - my bumpy broken asphalt paths would have killed me without it.

Happy to answer questions if anyone has them - I probably could have written twice as much. I plan to do some videos as there is not a lot of info on the ST1x and I can walk through some of the above in more detail.
What kind of impact do you have from the front fork? I see one person mentioned the Redshift Shockstop to lessen feedback from the road. I think I'll add that to my Trek XM700+.

smitty
5 months ago

I thought I would give my ST1x review as it has been around a month and 200 miles since I received it in the mail. Sorry for the long post, but I hope someone will find all the information useful.

ORDER:
I decided to place an order with an E-bike shop instead of buying from my local shop because of the massive savings I received. I ordered the Sport (high bar) in 22" and charcoal. The shop upgraded me to the ST2 battery (814wh) and provided a body float seat post for a small charge. I got an email from Stromer the day after I placed the order to setup my account/app as the shop tied my bike to my phone number before it was shipped. It took about 12 days in total to get the bike, but there was a holiday weekend that increased that time. 7-10 days is probably reasonable expectation. Saving the 10% Seattle sales tax was also a contributing factor as they included shipping for free. All said and done very happy with the price and the shop I ordered from and would not have done it different.

RECEIVING:
The bike is in a large box that weights over 60 lbs. Because of this there was a local delivery company that did the final transit. Due to this it took an extra weekend to get to me because I had to schedule the delivery. They showed up in a 18-wheeler which caused the driver to have some issues blocking traffic on a busy road to hand truck the bike to my door. But all arrived safely and he wheeled it into my garage.

The bike came nearly fully assembled. I needed to straighten the handle bars (mm allen wrench) which was pretty easy (they are shipped at 90 degrees so the box is flatter). The peddles also needed to be screwed on - the right side goes on traditionally, the left is reverse threaded. I swapped out the seat post (cannot remember if the seat was on the bike or not when shipped), and I was all ready to go. Wheel reflectors, the charger were also in the box with manuals. The first charge took about 2-3 hours to be fully charged.

INITIAL IMPRESSIONS:
So much fun. I had tried out electric bikes before, but this was my first Speed Pedelec and really glad I went that direction, it is addicting. Some people say you work just as hard on an e-bike, but it is hard to explain why. I don't burn as many calories, but your muscles are still sore. You want to work hard just to maintain the speed and always feel the boost. So you work as hard, but over a shorter period of time because you are going so much faster.

The ST1x has a boost/throttle - kind of. If you hold the [+] button it will move you without peddling. But I have yet to have a situation where I could not peddle faster than the boost. On a flat it will get you to about 10-12 mph, on a decent hill you are lucky to get half that. In all cases I can get the bike to go at least 20%-100% faster by peddling at a moderate rate. The brakes squeak a bit (see the EBR videos, sounds the exact same) but they are solid. I am 6'3" 220lbs. The frame size is pretty good for me, but if you are 6'5" I think you might find it a bit too small - and they don't make it any bigger.

I have had several friends take it for a spin, they're all in love with it.

200 MILE REVIEW:
I have had a few issues so lets get those out of the way. About 20 miles in the right peddle was wobbling considerably. I took the peddle off and the aluminum threads were stripped. I put the peddle on so it is possible it was something I did, but I am pretty good with tools and am pretty sure it was a factory defect. I called the bike shop I ordered from and they shipped an entirely new bottom bracket and crankset. It took around 7 days to get that and another 2-3 for a bike shop to do the work (I did not have the right tools). It is working perfectly now. It was all done under warranty through the bike shop I purchased from - I d not call Stromer. All I had to do was send in photos and provide a write up. I think this was more to make sure they sent the right part than not trusting me.

At 100 miles I got a rear flat. Of course I didn't have a spare, pump or tools with me (Murphy!) so my wife picked me up and I swapped the tube with the same kind that came with the bike. I now have a trunk bag with a spare tube, tools and a pump. All of which I had, just not with me at the time.

I have a few complaints as well. The bike creeks a lot. Not sure what exactly is making the sound, but it sounds like tapping on a carbon frame (there is no Carbon), and it bothers me, but does not seem to an issue. Could be that I am too fat. The drivetrain is a little bit clunky. It does not shift as crisp as I would hope. Again, not an issue, but it bothers me. I have learned that if I am not in the right gear it will either not shift right away or will shift really hard. So as I come to a stop I move up a few sprockets to a larger one, and then gradually down shift as I pick up speed. I rarely ever use the largest cogs as with the motor it is rarely needed (even in 10-12% grade)

Absolutely love riding this bike. I rarely take it out of assist level 3 just because it is so much fun. I ride about 14 miles round trip to work and it takes me about 20-25 minutes each way - my commute is across a valley so steep hills going each way with some flat in the middle and a hand full of signals that have a long rotation. I average about 16-20mph. During peak traffic I can easily make the trip quicker than I could in a car. If I took it really easy I could probably get away without showering at work, but the way I ride I always sweat a bit. I charge it every other day and usually have about 50% battery left after the 28 miles. I have not rode it outside of commuting yet, so I have yet to test the range.

OMNI is alright. Signal strength is terrible and does not work from my house. I have a secure bike cage at work so I have only used the electric lock once. I don't really like the screens they have to choose from. I find myself switching between them on a regular basis. I think they could improve this quite a bit - perhaps ill get an update. Stromer - If you are reading this, reach out to me and I'll provide a bunch of feedback.

I added a mirror and upgraded the handle grips.

SUMMARY:
I would buy it again in a heartbeat. 28mph is a must - glad I got that 35 mph would be even better. Get a body float - my bumpy broken asphalt paths would have killed me without it.

Happy to answer questions if anyone has them - I probably could have written twice as much. I plan to do some videos as there is not a lot of info on the ST1x and I can walk through some of the above in more detail.

"86 and still kicking has got it right"...good advice and well worth the money. I made arrangements with our local bike dealer to service the mechanicals on the bike before purchasing (ST-2), as I too bought on the internet because of my distance from anyone selling the Stromer bikes. One has way too much money invested in the machine to not have it serviced as needed. Stromer has been great with any of the problems I have run into (as in replacing my OMNI unit). They sent a new unit along with instructions on how to install it correctly. I communicate with them whenever I fell the need and their service is way above par in my experience.
In regard to shifting, I had to reteach myself to let up on the pedaling pressure before making gear changes, finding that I was exerting more pressure because of the electric assist on keeping a steady cadence. I still miss a decent shift once in awhile, but it is much improved. I have carbon fork on my bike but am looking into a handlebar stem that has elastomer properties similar to the BodyFloat which I have installed on my seat post at https://redshiftsports.com/shockstop- suspension-stem. Check it out, especially so if you have some rough riding patches on your commute. Best of luck with your new purchase and I hope that you enjoy it as much as I have mine...it is a great bike! I enjoyed your post...

nwroller
5 months ago

I thought I would give my ST1x review as it has been around a month and 200 miles since I received it in the mail. Sorry for the long post, but I hope someone will find all the information useful.

ORDER:
I decided to place an order with an E-bike shop instead of buying from my local shop because of the massive savings I received. I ordered the Sport (high bar) in 22" and charcoal. The shop upgraded me to the ST2 battery (814wh) and provided a body float seat post for a small charge. I got an email from Stromer the day after I placed the order to setup my account/app as the shop tied my bike to my phone number before it was shipped. It took about 12 days in total to get the bike, but there was a holiday weekend that increased that time. 7-10 days is probably reasonable expectation. Saving the 10% Seattle sales tax was also a contributing factor as they included shipping for free. All said and done very happy with the price and the shop I ordered from and would not have done it different.

RECEIVING:
The bike is in a large box that weights over 60 lbs. Because of this there was a local delivery company that did the final transit. Due to this it took an extra weekend to get to me because I had to schedule the delivery. They showed up in a 18-wheeler which caused the driver to have some issues blocking traffic on a busy road to hand truck the bike to my door. But all arrived safely and he wheeled it into my garage.

The bike came nearly fully assembled. I needed to straighten the handle bars (mm allen wrench) which was pretty easy (they are shipped at 90 degrees so the box is flatter). The peddles also needed to be screwed on - the right side goes on traditionally, the left is reverse threaded. I swapped out the seat post (cannot remember if the seat was on the bike or not when shipped), and I was all ready to go. Wheel reflectors, the charger were also in the box with manuals. The first charge took about 2-3 hours to be fully charged.

INITIAL IMPRESSIONS:
So much fun. I had tried out electric bikes before, but this was my first Speed Pedelec and really glad I went that direction, it is addicting. Some people say you work just as hard on an e-bike, but it is hard to explain why. I don't burn as many calories, but your muscles are still sore. You want to work hard just to maintain the speed and always feel the boost. So you work as hard, but over a shorter period of time because you are going so much faster.

The ST1x has a boost/throttle - kind of. If you hold the [+] button it will move you without peddling. But I have yet to have a situation where I could not peddle faster than the boost. On a flat it will get you to about 10-12 mph, on a decent hill you are lucky to get half that. In all cases I can get the bike to go at least 20%-100% faster by peddling at a moderate rate. The brakes squeak a bit (see the EBR videos, sounds the exact same) but they are solid. I am 6'3" 220lbs. The frame size is pretty good for me, but if you are 6'5" I think you might find it a bit too small - and they don't make it any bigger.

I have had several friends take it for a spin, they're all in love with it.

200 MILE REVIEW:
I have had a few issues so lets get those out of the way. About 20 miles in the right peddle was wobbling considerably. I took the peddle off and the aluminum threads were stripped. I put the peddle on so it is possible it was something I did, but I am pretty good with tools and am pretty sure it was a factory defect. I called the bike shop I ordered from and they shipped an entirely new bottom bracket and crankset. It took around 7 days to get that and another 2-3 for a bike shop to do the work (I did not have the right tools). It is working perfectly now. It was all done under warranty through the bike shop I purchased from - I d not call Stromer. All I had to do was send in photos and provide a write up. I think this was more to make sure they sent the right part than not trusting me.

At 100 miles I got a rear flat. Of course I didn't have a spare, pump or tools with me (Murphy!) so my wife picked me up and I swapped the tube with the same kind that came with the bike. I now have a trunk bag with a spare tube, tools and a pump. All of which I had, just not with me at the time.

I have a few complaints as well. The bike creeks a lot. Not sure what exactly is making the sound, but it sounds like tapping on a carbon frame (there is no Carbon), and it bothers me, but does not seem to an issue. Could be that I am too fat. The drivetrain is a little bit clunky. It does not shift as crisp as I would hope. Again, not an issue, but it bothers me. I have learned that if I am not in the right gear it will either not shift right away or will shift really hard. So as I come to a stop I move up a few sprockets to a larger one, and then gradually down shift as I pick up speed. I rarely ever use the largest cogs as with the motor it is rarely needed (even in 10-12% grade)

Absolutely love riding this bike. I rarely take it out of assist level 3 just because it is so much fun. I ride about 14 miles round trip to work and it takes me about 20-25 minutes each way - my commute is across a valley so steep hills going each way with some flat in the middle and a hand full of signals that have a long rotation. I average about 16-20mph. During peak traffic I can easily make the trip quicker than I could in a car. If I took it really easy I could probably get away without showering at work, but the way I ride I always sweat a bit. I charge it every other day and usually have about 50% battery left after the 28 miles. I have not rode it outside of commuting yet, so I have yet to test the range.

OMNI is alright. Signal strength is terrible and does not work from my house. I have a secure bike cage at work so I have only used the electric lock once. I don't really like the screens they have to choose from. I find myself switching between them on a regular basis. I think they could improve this quite a bit - perhaps ill get an update. Stromer - If you are reading this, reach out to me and I'll provide a bunch of feedback.

I added a mirror and upgraded the handle grips.

SUMMARY:
I would buy it again in a heartbeat. 28mph is a must - glad I got that 35 mph would be even better. Get a body float - my bumpy broken asphalt paths would have killed me without it.

Happy to answer questions if anyone has them - I probably could have written twice as much. I plan to do some videos as there is not a lot of info on the ST1x and I can walk through some of the above in more detail.

Steve2014
5 months ago

Yes, I purchased the larger frame. Although right at 6'0, either the medium or large frame will work perfectly well. It sorta comes down to personal preference. I almost wish I had gotten the medium frame instead, but that's only because my previous non-electric bike was more like the medium-sized Juiced frame, and that's what I was used to riding. The large frame felt a little too big for me at first, but now that I've put some miles on it I've become adjusted to it and like it.

As for the throttle, I've found that I hardly ever use it. Which actually surprised me. I had an electric bike in the past and used the throttle frequently, so I figured it would be the same with my Juiced bike. But I've found that the CrossCurrent Air with torque sensor has enough power such that I never really need to use the throttle. In the highest gear from a dead stop (and in Sport mode), once you start pedaling the power immediately kicks in...and quite strongly at that. I actually accelerate faster by peddling than I do with the throttle, which is a very different experience - in a good way - than with my previous bike. I'm not kidding...this bike really does have a surprising amount of power for only having a 350 watt motor. At least, compared to my old e-bike it does. Juiced uses batteries with a 3C discharge rate, and I've read that this higher discharge rate helps with the power.

Like you, I did a ton of research before choosing a bike. I wanted to keep it under $1,500 if possible. My choices finally came down to the GenZe Sport, RadCity or Juiced CrossCurrent Air. I was able to more quickly eliminate the GenZe bike because it only had a 36v battery and 250 watt motor (although they recently added a 350 watt option for an extra $100). The big attraction of the GenZe was that it mostly looked like a "normal" bike, and GenZe has its own dealership in my city. Ergo, it would have been a very easy purchase. But I determined the other two bikes simply had better overall specs for the money. The RadCity was my #2 choice, and I suspect I probably would have been happy with it too. But I chose the Juiced bike instead, primarily for these six reasons:

1. Speed was the most important factor to me, and the CrossCurrent Air is a legit 28mph bike (Class 3) while the RadCity is a 20mph (Class 2) bike;
2. I wanted a geared hub motor rather than a direct drive hub motor. My last bike was a direct drive, and it had NO torque whatsoever. (Although keep in mind, hub motors in general don't have a great deal of torque...geared or not.)
3. I wanted a torque sensor. While it's a subjective thing, I think torque sensors are superior to cadence sensors. I don't know of any other bike in this price range with a torque sensor.
4. I liked the Juiced design better. IMO, the Juiced bike looks more like a "normal" bike than the RadCity. Especially with its smaller, geared hub motor.
5. The Juiced bike was a couple hundred dollars less than the RadCity, and there is a Juiced Bikes dealer in my city (important if I ever need any warranty work.)
6. Juiced has a fantastic reputation. Although in fairness, I suspect Radbikes probably does too. I honestly don't know.

That said, the RadCity has some of its own advantages. For example, it comes with a better stock battery (11.6AH Panasonic). And I suspect the RadCity is a perfectly good bike in its own right. But after doing a comparison and deciding what factors were most important to me, I went with the Juiced CrossCurrent Air. And I'm glad I did!

jharlow77
5 months ago

I have the CrossCurrent Air, and so far I’m very happy with it.

I paid the extra $199 for the torque sensor, and another $99 for the throttle. Bad move on the throttle, since they decided to offer it for free only three weeks after I paid $99 for it :( Oh well, Juiced Bikes also upgraded the standard battery from 7.8AH to 8.8AH at no extra charge, so there’s that.

Anyway, like I said, I’m very happy with the purchase. I bought this bike for a four mile (each way) commute to work, and for that purpose it works beautifully. I typically ride it in “Overboost” or “Sport” mode all the time, as that setting provides the type of power I’m usually looking for. In all honesty, when you lower it back to levels 1 – 4, the bike almost feels like it’s “dragging”. It isn’t dragging of course…it just feels like it when you get used to riding in Sport mode all the time.

The bike has plenty of power. In Sport mode it really does launch you up to 25+mph pretty fast. I’m 6’0 and 175lbs, and I do get to about 25mph before I have to start working harder to maintain speed. Otherwise, holding steady at 25mph is a breeze. You still have to exert some effort, but not enough to break a sweat. I opted for the torque sensor and am glad I did. IMO, riding an electric bike with a torque sensor makes it feel more like riding a “real” bike. It’s kind of hard to explain, but if you’ve ever ridden both cadence sensor bikes and torque sensor bikes you’ll understand what I mean.

The bike will climb small-to-mid-size hills and inclines perfectly fine. It’s all a matter of properly using your gears. But as with most bikes that use a standard hub motor, you won’t get much help climbing the steepest of hills. Then again, if a person will regularly need to climb steep hills, I’d advise that person to buy a bike with a mid-drive motor anyway. Gotta use the right tool for the right job. My commute is mostly flat road, with just a few small inclines. The CrossCurrent Air handles those inclines with no problems at all.

While I realize that an 8.8AH battery won’t provide enough juice for some people, for me and my short commute it’s perfectly fine. When I get to work I still have what feels like full power. I did do one ride of about 15 miles, where I was in Sport mode the entire way. I pretty much used every bit of available battery on that trip. So, if a person will regularly need to ride that distance and they want to be in Sport mode, that person should consider a larger battery (unless they can charge the battery in-between trips). I’m noticing that with a fast electric bike, it’s very easy to ride 15 miles without even realizing you’ve ridden that far. So yeah…I can totally understand why many people opt for a larger battery pack. I suspect that when it comes time to replace this battery, I’ll probably opt for a larger pack myself. But for now the 8.8AH battery I have is perfectly fine, as it gets the job done.

In all other regards the bike appears to be of high quality. No problems so far. I had my bike assembled and tuned at a bike shop because this was my first modern electric bike, and I didn’t want to mess around with it (or mess it up) myself. Turns out this was a good idea, because the bike shop said that the handlebar ring included with the bike didn’t fit. (Sorry, I forget what this part is called…it’s the little plastic ring that you put on the stem before installing the handlebars.) The shop put on a different ring at no charge. They also adjusted the brakes properly and made sure everything was as it should be. If you’re at all mechanically inclined, the bike is very easy to set-up yourself. But I’m sort of an idiot when it comes to anything mechanical, so I was happy to have the bike shop put it together and give it the once over.

Oh, I did buy a Thudbuster suspension seat post in an effort to better support my rear end. I’m a thin guy, and my rear end has absolutely NO fat cushioning on it. I bought the ST (short travel) Thudbuster rather than the LT (long travel), and unfortunately now wish I had bought the LT model instead. With the #5 elastomer in it, the ST Thudbuster model really doesn’t provide much extra cushioning in my opinion. In fact, I barely notice any difference at all. I hadn’t purchased the LT model because I was afraid it would sit too high on the bike. Turns out that wouldn’t have been a problem, and from everything I read the LT model provides much more actual suspension than the ST model. Oh well…live and learn.

Overall I’m glad I bought this bike, and I would have no reservations recommending it to others. I only have about 150 miles on it so far, so it’s still very much a new bike. But so far so good! Juiced Bikes does a fantastic job of offering a quality product at a low price (compared to the competition). I’m already salivating over some of the new bikes Juiced has in its pipeline. In another year or two I might have to buy another bike from Juiced!
Thanks so much for this review! It sounds like I am in almost exactly the same situation as you with a 4 mile commute to work (though a few more hills) and I am exactly the same height and weight as you so it's good to hear that this bike works well for that. I assume you got the larger frame? I was lucky enough to order mine after they started including the throttle but unlucky enough to miss the first batch so now I have to wait until mid August when they get their next batch in. I probably could have gotten it sooner if I had ordered directly from the company but I ordered through a local bike shop because my city offers a $200 rebate which minus tax is enough to buy a few more accessories or a decent lock. This waiting period has given me more time to shop around and look at other bikes but I still have not found another bike in the same price range that gives you as much as this bike seems to. The second best options all seem to have cheap cadence sensors for pedal assist.

De Cnijf Kris
4 weeks ago

very cool.to be prrsented on Brussels bike fair next February.

carolcheny
2 months ago

wow. Bicycle Eunich. sounds like the balls fell off. I think I'll go for electric dirty bikes.

Dario Milardovic
2 months ago

Still overpriced. For that think I will pay $450

.
3 weeks ago

get a kit for 600$

Zhang Simen
2 months ago

Nakto 26" 300W Fat Tire Electric Bicycle 6-Speed Beach Snow 36V10AH Lithium battery

Nakto ebike is best price with quality, this will be a nice choose!

http://www.ebay.com/itm/26-300W-Fat-Tire-Electric-Bicycle-6-Speed-Beach-Snow-36V10AH-Lithium-battery-/253108949477?epid=10002922721&hash=item3aee7811e5:g:p5cAAOSw259Z3axi

Jon Neet
3 months ago

I am a 63 year old retired dude. I had been riding a cheap bike, a Thruster Fixie. It had a reversable hub, so it could be a "true" fixie, or with the hub as it came stock, it was a single speed, and the pedals could freewheel backwards. Then, Last August 2016, I took a fall and blew out my right knee. I often walk with a cane as the right knee has not much strength. I sold the bike to my daughter, as no way could I ride it back then. I've been thinking lately about getting an electric bike with the thought that, in power assist mode, I could get by with one weak knee. I would plan on riding it in a lower power pedal assist setting to maximize the range. I would want to run into Hilo and back, which would be at least 30 miles. This Populo and the Everly 202 seem like a good way to get into ebikes for me. Not many hills at all on the roads I would ride on. I know you mention in several reviews that you have a weak knee also. Maybe riding one of these bikes might help my knee. My Doctor said, when I did the injury, it didn't look like I'd need surgery. Does my thinking seem plausible? These two bikes seem like they might be light enough for riding some even without the electrics. I'd rather have the bars from the Everly, but the extra range of the Populo.

Aayush Parmar
4 months ago

You can import giant road E+ from Amazon India at very cheap price like 300dollars

Saqi S
5 months ago

i just bought this today. its amazing. i live and work in the city

F T
5 months ago

Nice price point. Nice and good looking design. But the 20 mph cap is not so nice.

Richard Roscoe
5 months ago

It looks like a painted Schwinn Stites. Add the same Chinese components and you have yourself the same exact bike for around $600.

Richard Roscoe
5 months ago

The frame looks 100% identical to the 6KU fixie, though.

Refuso Againo
6 months ago

The kid speaking is well versed but why do all the interviewers seem to think that we want to listen to them? They're supposed to ask questions of the Expert, who is responsible for the bike. Run off at the mouth syndrome dominates this otherwise very informative video.
Bill Maher does that too. Great guest, doesn't allow him to speak.

Kurtwell
6 months ago

How fast can it go?

VideoNOLA
6 months ago

Try it out on New Orleans roads if you wanna see a bike destroyed instantly!

metamorphicorder
7 months ago

its not as loud as you would expect. its probably so zippy because its prettt light. my old ezip had a 350 watt external geared hub motor and it was sluggish but the bike was heavy. my first was a sealed lead acid battery and the frame was just huge and over built. with regard to the 14 ga spokes, the purchaser should definitely take road contidions, total weight and riding style into account, the ezips had 14 ga spokes and i broke them until i just parked the bike. the wheel was custom with a right side sprocket (special sprocket too reverse threaded freewheel sprocket 11 tooth ), threaded on, so you couldn't just replace the wheel and retain the motor use. so thats a big deal even at 1000$, if the rear wheel is damaged or spokes break, people not in areas where ebikes are common might be able ro easily fix the issue. nice bike though.

metamorphicorder
7 months ago

cort do you know if you might be able to add on a throttle either as an option or user mod? i have a coworker who is looking for a cheap ride and this is perfect other than not having a throttle.

Michael smith
8 months ago

I'm looking for my first ebike would be better to go with this one or the juiced?

hiber nate
8 months ago

I'm gonna buy this bike soon..I'm just waiting for my local dealer to get the medium black version...hopefully next week.

Enrique Reyes
6 months ago

hiber nate at what assist number?

hiber nate
8 months ago

finally got the bike..I can do about 40miles on eco mode..which is usually enough.

ALL EYEZ ON ME
8 months ago

Nice review, I'm loving this bike, beautiful, getting it asap, and that torch helmet!! Off the chain!!

Karl Fonner
9 months ago

Bring a magnet and check those forks they have to be steel this is the second review that you said their aluminum forks there's no such thing as aluminum forks

R D
9 months ago

This is one of the coolest looking bike 👍🏻🇨🇦 and the price is value for money .

xstickyricex
11 months ago

Where can I get one if those cool helmets?