Raleigh Detour iE Review

2017 Raleigh Detour Ie Electric Bike Review
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie Shimano Steps Mid Drive Motor
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie Removable Battery Pack In Rear Rack
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie Control Pad Shimano Display
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie Rubber Ergonomic Grips
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie Shimano M355 Hydraulic Disc Brakes 160 Mm
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie Shimano Acera 9 Speed
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie 36 Volt Shimano Steps Battery Removable
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie 3 1 Amp Battery Charger
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie Ebike
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie Black High Step
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie High Step Mens
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie Electric Bike Review
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie Shimano Steps Mid Drive Motor
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie Removable Battery Pack In Rear Rack
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie Control Pad Shimano Display
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie Rubber Ergonomic Grips
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie Shimano M355 Hydraulic Disc Brakes 160 Mm
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie Shimano Acera 9 Speed
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie 36 Volt Shimano Steps Battery Removable
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie 3 1 Amp Battery Charger
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie Ebike
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie Black High Step
2017 Raleigh Detour Ie High Step Mens


  • A classy, comfortable, lightweight city ebike available in high-step and step-thru frame styles, choose from light blue or black, and three sizes
  • Swept-back handlebar, ergonomic grips, comfort saddle, fenders, and a combination chain guide plus cover offer a lot of utility for commuters
  • The Shimano STePs mid-drive is efficient, compact, and well balanced, it uses an advanced sensor for smooth starts and stops and is easier on the drivetrain
  • You get nine speeds for comfortable pedaling (climbing or cruising up to 20 mph), removable battery, and a removable display panel, the charger is relatively fast but uses an adapter which can be misplaced and lost more easily

Search EBR

Video Review

Trusted Advertisers





Detour iE



Body Position:


Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Urban, Commuting

Electric Bike Class:

Pedal Assist (Class 1), Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes


2 Year Comprehensive, Lifetime Frame


United States

Model Year:


Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

48.2 lbs (21.86 kg)

Battery Weight:

5.6 lbs (2.54 kg)

Motor Weight:

7.05 lbs (3.19 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

16 in (40.64 cm)18 in (45.72 cm)20 in (50.8 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Step-Thru: 19" Stand Over Height, 21" Reach, High-Step: 29" Stand Over Height, 21.5" Reach, 72" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step, Step-Thru

Frame Colors:

Light Blue with White Accents, Black with Grey Accents

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid Aluminum Alloy, 9 mm Quick Release Skewer

Frame Rear Details:

10 mm Quick Release Skewer

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

9 Speed 1x9 Shimano Acera, 11-34T

Shifter Details:

Shimano Acera Mega Lite Triggers on Right


Shimano 170 mm Alloy Crank Arms, 44T Chainring with Plastic Guide


Alloy and Plastic with Rubber Tread


Alloy Ahead 1-1/8", Five 5 mm Risers


80 mm Length, 15° Rise


Promax 25.4 mm Diameter, 630 mm x 55 mm Rise

Brake Details:

Shimano M355 Hydraulic Disc with 160 mm Rotors, Shimano Three-Finger Levers with Adjustable Reach


Raleigh, Rubber, Ergonomic


Velo Commuter with Integrated Handle

Seat Post:

Promax Aluminum Alloy with Quick Release Collar

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

30.9 mm


Weinmann XTB26 Double Wall, Aluminum Alloy, 36 Hole, Black


Stainless Steel, 14 Gauge, Black with Nipples

Tire Brand:

Kenda Kourier, 700 x 35c (28" x 1-5/8")

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

K-Shield Puncture Resistant Tire Casing, 50 to 85 PSI

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve


Full Length Plastic Fenders, Aluminum Alloy Chain Cover


Locking Removable Battery Pack, 1.6 Pound 3.1 Amp Charger

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Shimano STePs

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Motor Peak Output:

500 watts

Motor Torque:

50 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Shimano STePs

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11.6 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

417.6 wh

Battery Chemistry:


Charge Time:

4 hours

Estimated Min Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Estimated Max Range:

50 miles (80 km)

Display Type:

Shimano STePs, Removable, Adjustable Angle, Monochrome, Backlit LCD


Speed (mph or km/h), Average Speed, Max Speed, Odometer, Trip Meter, Range, Battery Level (5 Bars), Assist Mode (Off, Eco, Normal, High), Time Clock

Display Accessories:

Independent Control Switch near Left Grip, Hold Up and Down for Settings Menu

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (Measures Wheel Speed, Pedal Cadence and Pedal Torque, Power Output Relative to Pedal Input: Eco 50%, Normal 100%, High 200%)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

Trusted Advertisers

Written Review

The Raleigh Detour iE is a pedal-assisted version of the traditional unpowered Detour model. It offers efficiency and utility, well-suited to urban commuters who want help scaling hills, fighting wind, or just going further. The 700c wheels coast smoothly and an all-Aluminum frame and fork keep it lightweight… but trade a bit of comfort in the process. Balancing these characteristics are swept-back handlebars, ergonomic grips, and a slightly larger comfort saddle. Notice that the rear portion is wide but the nose is still narrow, so you don’t chaffe your thighs when pedaling. This is an active electric bike, one that requires pedaling in order to activate the motor, and it’s one of the smoother products I have tested. By positioning the motor at the center of the bike, Raleigh has achieved better stability and made the wheels and drivetrain easier to service. The battery is positioned high and towards the rear (surrounded and protected by the cargo rack) but it’s relatively light at ~5.6 lbs so you don’t get as much frame flex as some competing models. Plastic fenders and a paint-matched alloy chain cover paired with a plastic chain guide keep you clean and snag-free, you can wear pants or a dress and still enjoy this bike. And the biggest highlight for me is the choice of two frames, a high-step and comfortable low-step.

Driving this bike is an efficient 250-watt centerdrive from Shimano, the same company that produces the 9-speed drivetrain, and hydraulic disc brakes. The motor peaks out around 500 watts and offers a solid 50 Newton meters of torque, a step below the more expensive Bosch centerdrive which produces up to 63 Nm. And this may be why the range estimates on the bike are so high. It’s an excellent choice for city riding. I like how compact the motor is and noticed instantly how it responded to my pedaling. I never felt like it was surprising me or jerking me forward. Rather than rely on a torque or cadence sensor alone, this motor relies on a combination of both along with the rear wheel speed. This advanced approach tends to reduce wear on the chain, sprockets, and rear derailleur but will still put more stress on them than a hub motor. The benefits are that it pulls the same chain you do and can operate more easily when climbing or cruising up to the top assisted speed of 20 mph if you simply shift gears. There was one part in the video review where I stopped the bike but neglected to shift down to a lower gear… and I could definitely notice the bike struggling a bit to start again (as was I). And to me, that’s a perfect example for the pros and the cons of any drivetrain operating mid-drive. It’s efficient, but only if you use it properly.

Powering the motor and backlit display is a healthy sized 36 volt 11.6 amp hour battery pack. I’d call 36 volt 10 amp hour standard, so you get a slightly higher capacity here and it should help you to go further and extend the life of the pack. While I do wish that the Raleigh Detour iE had integrated LED lights running off of the battery, I can understand that it would add complexity and possibly raise the price. Considering the human-powered Raleigh Detour models are in the $400 range, it’s interesting to think that the motor, battery, and display are adding nearly $2k of cost here. To me, the bike seems a little expensive, but then again, battery packs like this can cost $800+ to replace, so that’s nearly half the cost right there. Inside are energy dense Lithium-ion cells that are known for reliability and long life. You can optimize that life by storing the pack in a cool, dry location. I tend to store it at ~80% full and check in every month or two to refill if necessary. Lithium-ion packs don’t develop the same “memory” as some older battery types and given that this pack is produced at scale by Shimano vs. being a custom Raleigh design, it should be easier to replace when it eventually wears down. Expect 1,000+ full cycles, years of regular use. I do like that the battery is removable and that you can opt to charge it on or off the frame but was disappointed to find that the charging ports are different. This means you’ll have to keep track of an extra wire adapter dongle, and there’s no included leash for this part. If you set it down at work or in the garage and forget where you last left it, you will only be able to charge the pack off the bike, which requires more time to unlock and presents more opportunities for dropping the pack. I like how easily the pack unlocked from the rack, the fact that you don’t need to leave the key in while riding, and that there’s a built-in handle near the back.

And speaking of built-in handles, the saddle also has a plastic grip on the bottom. This allows you to more easily maneuver the bike when parking but could twist the seat tube if the collar is not tight. Given the rigid frame design, I would consider purchasing a 30.9 mm seat post suspension to smooth out the ride, but if you lift the bike with that seat handle and have one of the cheaper seat post suspension products, it could get damaged. Check out the Thudbuster Short Travel (ST) which is lighter than the LT and won’t push the saddle up so high when completely lowered. The step-thru frame is ideal for petite riders who want the ability to mount and stabilize the bike and sit on the saddle without being so high and precarious… but with a seat post suspension, the minimum saddle height is higher, and if you use a trunk bag on the rear rack, that could block the seat from going all the way down. As it is, you may have to slide the saddle all the way forward in order to lower it completely.

Operating the bike is a one step process, but it’s not as intuitive as I was expecting. You have to press a power button on the battery pack vs. one on the control pad or display. This requires some foresight because if you hop onto the bike and have not yet activated it, you might have to turn and reach way down or completely dismount. Thankfully, once it’s on, the control pad is easy to reach from the left grip and the display panel is highly adjustable so you can get the perfect angle reading it. I love that the display is removable, so you can reduce tampering and weather exposure at bike racks. It’s fairly compact but doesn’t overload the space with stats, just the important stuff like speed, battery capacity, and range. You can cycle through trip stats using the black button at the top of the control pad and arrow up or down through Eco, Normal, and High pedal assist levels. The button pad clicks, the motor delivers a noticeable increase in power and perhaps a bit more noise is produced. The Shimano STePs motor isn’t silent, nor is the rear fender on this bike, but it’s not the loudest either, and with a bit of traffic or wind you hardly notice it. I love that the display gives you easy access to a settings menu where you can change the units from kilometers to miles, turn off backlighting, and even mute the annoying beep that chimes whenever you interact with the button pad. Some people may appreciate this affirmative beep, but I don’t :)

A the end of the day, this is a great mid-level electric bike that’s approachable and comfortable. You get three frame size choice, the possibility of test riding it at a dealer, and an excellent warranty from one of the oldest bicycle brands around. Raleigh offers a range of ebike models but the Detour iE performs at a higher level because of the advanced motor sensors and upgraded drivetrain. Both colorways look beautiful and I appreciate the extra attention to detail with the paint-matched chain cover. You shouldn’t ever drop the chain thanks to the plastic guide and you should be able to go a bit further than a lot of other similarly specced electric bikes between charges because the tires are rated for higher PSI and there’s no bobbing from suspension. At ~48 lbs, this is an impressively light ebike given the rack and fenders… it’s going to be easier to load onto cars or repair with those quick release wheels, battery, and display. And when it is time for a charge, you’ll be back up and ready to ride again faster because the charger offers 3.1 Amp output vs. the standard 2 Amp. Big thanks to the Raleigh team for inviting me to their headquarters in North America to see and review the entire 2017 line. It’s wonderful to test products back to back in order to really eek out the differences. As always, I welcome feedback and input from those who have owned this bike or the prior 2016 model.


  • Available in two frame styles, high-step and step-thru, three sizes, and two classy colors with clean integrated cables
  • Relaxed, swept-back handlebar supports a more upright body position, ergonomic grips ease hand fatigue
  • Both frames have bottle cage bosses! You can bring along fluids without using a trunk bag or panniers or use this mounting point for a folding lock
  • Fenders, a paint-matched chain cover, and plastic chain guide keep you clean and snag-free, especially if you’re wearing pants or a skirt
  • Hydraulic disc brakes offer great stopping power and don’t require as much hand strength or endurance to use, the adjustable-reach levers are nice for people with small hands
  • The 9-speed Shimano Acera drivetrain is two steps up from the base and offers a comfortable range for pedaling up to 20 mph
  • Mid-drive motors are nice because they position weight low and center on the frame while also de-cluttering the wheels and making maintenance easier vs. hub motors
  • Both the battery pack and display panel are removable, this is nice for people who commute to work and have to leave the bike outside during the day (reduce tampering, scratches, and weather wear)
  • I was really impressed by how light these bikes were considering that they have fenders and a rack, at ~48.2 lbs they are lighter than comparable models in the ~52 lb range
  • Both wheels have quick release which makes maintenance and flat fixes easier but take care to lock the wheels with a cable if you park at a rack
  • The Shimano STePs motor controller senses more than just cadence or torque, this lets it operate smoothly and reduces drivetrain wear, it also feels less jerky or abrupt than TranzX and other entry-level systems
  • Having a kickstand on a bike like this really makes sense and I think Raleigh chose well, the stand is positioned out of the way towards the back and has adjustable length so you can keep the bike stable on varied terrain
  • The rack is rated for up to 55 lbs and only 5.6 lbs are used by the battery pack so you get a lot of capacity, there are spots to clip a bungee cable on both sides as well as multiple bars for hanging panniers
  • The battery has a handle built in which makes removal and transport easy and safe, you don’t want to drop the pack because it is delicate and expensive
  • The charger is relatively compact and only weighs 1.7 lbs, I like that it puts out up to 3.1 Amps vs. 2 Amps on most others because that means it will fill the battery faster
  • The saddle has a plastic handle indentation on the bottom back side which is useful for moving the bike and positioning for a ride, just make sure the seat post collar is tight so you don’t turn it accidentally, you could also damage a cheap seat post suspension this way if you add one aftermarket
  • The Shimano STePs drive system is extremely efficient, it offers incredible range and the display dynamically estimates how far you can go based on the chosen level of pedal assist so you can plan your ride without running the battery dry
  • I love how easy it is to adjust the display settings, including turning the backlight off and silencing the beep noise! just hold the up and down arrow keys on the control pad for a few seconds to launch settings
  • The motor is extremely responsive, as soon as you pedal, or stop pedaling, it responds so you feel in control and can ride safely no matter the situation


  • The plastic fenders provide good coverage in wet conditions but did rattle a bit, especially the rear fender which does not have a mid support strut or rack connection point
  • I’m not a huge fan of rack-mounted batteries because they position weight up high and create a rear-heavy bike with more frame flex but at least the rack offers good storage potential and the battery isn’t too heavy at ~5.6 lbs
  • Given the skinny hybrid tires and the rigid all-Aluminum frame, this bike doesn’t absorb bumps and vibration as well as it could, the ergo grips, swept back handle bar, and comfort saddle help but you might want to swap the seat post with a 30.9 mm suspension post to really maximize comfort or ride a bit slower
  • It’s great to be able to charge the battery on or off the bike but I wish it used the same plug interface, instead, you have to use (and keep track of) a dongle adapter
  • You power the bike on using a button at the battery pack, not the display or control pad, if you forget to do this before mounting the bike you might have to get off or reach backward which can be time-consuming or uncomfortable
  • It would be nice to have integrated LED lights on this bike, especially considering the mid-level price point,
    instead, you will have to use your own independently powered lights that could be stolen easier


More Raleigh Reviews

Raleigh Tristar iE Review

  • MSRP: $2,599
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A purpose-built electric trike with integrated cables, a low mounted battery with a secondary slot to double your range, and a mid-drive motor that's powerful and efficient. Beautiful chrome fenders and a paint-matched chain cover keep you clean and dry, a large…...

Raleigh Sprite iE Review

  • MSRP: $1,899
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A comfortable neighborhood style electric bike with smaller wheels to lower the frame and slightly wider tires to improve comfort and stability. Available in four frame sizes and two styles (high-step and step-thru), the paint jobs are…...

Raleigh Retroglide iE Review

  • MSRP: $1,999
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A classically styled electric cruiser with efficient and powerful mid-drive motor system, available in cantilever high-step and step-thru frame designs (two sizes), metallic blue or pink. Sturdy rear rack protects the battery and offers standard gauge rails for clip-on panniers, paint-matched…...

Raleigh Superbe iE Review

  • MSRP: $1,799
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A vintage-styled electric bicycle with beautiful alloy paint-matched fenders, rack and chain cover, you get several frame size choices and two styles (high-step and step-thru). Lots of little upgrades and accessories like an alloy chain guide to keep the chain…...

Raleigh Redux iE Review

  • MSRP: $3,199
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A sleek, quiet, all-black, speed-pedelec with excellent weight distribution and smooth quiet power transfer, 10-speed drivetrain and powerful hydraulic disc brakes to match. Stiff thru-axles and a rigid Aluminum alloy fork are balanced out by fatter 2.0" Schwalbe…...

Raleigh Sprint iE Review

  • MSRP: $2,999
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A stealthy, fully-integrated speed pedelec (capable of hitting ~28 mph in pedal assist) with bosses for adding fenders, a rack or wiring in 6 volt lights to build a capable commuter. The M25GTS mid-drive motor from TranzX is smooth, relatively quiet and relies on a combination…...

Raleigh Tekoa iE Review

  • MSRP: $2,799
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A hardtail 29er electric mountain bike with powerful mid-drive motor (offering 73 Nm of torque and relatively quiet operation) driving a 10 speed Shimano Deore XT drivetrain. Light weight RockShox XC32 Air suspension fork with 100 mm travel, lockout and preload adjust,…...

Raleigh Route iE Review

  • MSRP: $2,599
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A high-speed urban electric bike with thru-axles for strength and a suspension for with lockout for improved comfort or efficiency. Larger wheelset and tires balance efficiency with comfort, three frame sizes deliver a range of…...

Raleigh Misceo Sport iE Review

  • MSRP: $2,599
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A feature complete, light weight commuter style electric bike (aluminum frame, carbon fiber fork) with great power transfer and an efficient, smooth mid-drive motor. Shimano hydraulic disc brakes with two-finger levers for nimble operation, quick wheels for easier transport,…...

Raleigh Misceo iE Review

  • MSRP: $2,699
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A sporty, light weight electric bicycle with automatic electronic shifting, improved geometry and motor mount since 2015, carbon fiber fork. Shimano hydraulic disc brakes with two-finger levers for nimble operation, quick release front wheel for…...

2016 Raleigh Detour iE Review

  • MSRP: $2,299
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

An efficient, light weight commuter electric bike available in two frame sizes and high-step or low-step styles, the swept back bars and ergonomic grips support an active upright body position. Narrower tires, firm saddle and all-Aluminum frame and fork provide great power transfer when pedaling…...

2016 Raleigh Sprite iE Review

  • MSRP: $2,099
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

An approachable electric bike with deep low-step frame, adjustable stem, swept back handle bars and a large comfortable saddle. Simple linear pull brakes work well and are easy to adjust, quick release skewers on…...

2015 Raleigh Misceo iE Review

  • MSRP: $3,200
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015

A light weight, super efficient, city style electric bike with electronic shifting in addition to motorized pedal assist. Available in four frame sizes (small through extra large), fairly comfortable to ride given the…...

2015 Raleigh Tekoa iE Review

  • MSRP: $3,300
  • MODEL YEAR: 2014, 2015

Well-balanced 29er style electric mountain bike capable of 28 mph in speed pedal assist mode. Quick release front and rear wheels, hydraulic 180 mm disc brakes, air suspension with lockout...

Raleigh Venture iE Review

  • MSRP: $2,400
  • MODEL YEAR: 2014, 2015

A comfortable, quiet city cruiser available in high-step and low-step frame configurations as well as multiple sizes for improved fit. Swept back handlebars, ergonomic grips and pedals, suspension fork and suspension seat post with oversized…...

2015 Raleigh Detour iE Review

  • MSRP: $2,500
  • MODEL YEAR: 2014, 2015

Urban style electric bike with functional rear rack and fenders available in high-step and step-thru. Two frame sizes for better fit, swept-back handlebars and sprung saddle for comfortable upright position...

John Sullivan
7 months ago

We were in Amsterdam last year and saw a city full of bikes. It got me thinking about living in a similar size city and maybe commuting with a bike. I did a ton of research on-line (Electricbikereview.com was most helpful) and finally jumped into the market and bought this bike for my wife about 6 weeks ago. I got the I Zip Path Plus, which is the same bike with different handle bars. These were our first electric bikes and our first introduction into biking.

We live in downtown Nashville and use this for our daily commute – about 5 miles each way. The trip is mostly flat but here are some hills to contend with. Here’s our comments:

  • We LOVE this bike! Step through frame makes it easy to get on and off. It weighs about 50 lbs which makes it easier to load into our bike rack at our building. Still somewhat hefty but manageable
  • The battery gives us about 25 miles on a charge and takes about 3 hours to re-charge. Plenty for us.
  • The pedal assist is awesome!! It makes the hills super easy and is very seamless. It helps make pedaling easier, but you do have to pedal. It’s not a motorcycle!
  • Plenty of power. I take my 85 lb dog with me some days , being towed behind in her cart (Solvit HoundAbout) , Our combined weight is 310 lbs, with me being 225 ( hence the need for a bike…). This bike pulls us both- no problem. There are a few steep hills and simply down shifting makes them easy to climb!
  • Great city bike- comfy seat and we like to ride more upright

Only con would be the lights are not integrated and you have to remember to turn on and off. Besides having to buy them as an accessory in the first place….

Really a sweet ride– we could not be happier with this bike!

7 months ago

Hi John, I checked out the dog trailer and thought that looked really fun! Thanks for sharing your experience with the Raleigh Detour iE and complimenting the site. I’m doing my best and it’s always motivating to hear from real live customers out there! Keep having fun :)


Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

2 days ago

"...still some models"
XM700 is listed on Trek website as 2018 ; has it been discontinued ?
I think new model line up is announced late summer ?
I'd like to see the XM700 develop into something similar to the Bulls Urban EVO ; 500 Wh battery , 700c x50 tires , Suntour fork .

3 days ago

I always liked the XM700 and there are still some models in the Raleigh area in stores. I like the Commuter and the crossfit too.

I'm waiting to see what models are going to be for 2019.

bob armani
3 days ago

whannah-Are we on the same page? Livermore is a city in Alameda County, California, correct? Strange that you are a resident and you have not seen this. I'll have to find out exactly what area of town he is referring to.

3 days ago

Roadside fires? I don't think there have been many of those here.

I imagine this place would seem nicer if you are coming from the midwest. Before we moved here we lived in Colorado, Miami FL, and Raleigh NC. Miami wasn't great, but Raleigh was a bike commuters paradise.

5 days ago

Since you mentioned the Raleigh Redux iE Step Thru , it's on sale on Raleigh's web site , $3k , MSRP $3750
Doesn't look like it's set up for light off road .

5 days ago

Hello EBR forum members! I am Alan from east central Iowa and a newbie on e-bikes. I just traded in my conventional Giant 24-speed bike for a Gazelle Arroyo step thru. I am 71 and ride for leisure and exercise on streets and paved or packed limestone trails. I was finding myself avoiding longer rides and hills so I am hoping the e-bike will give me more confidence and more exercise in the long run. My wife has a Blix Aveny that she bought last summer, so the Arroyo should make it possible for me to keep pace with her.

I was looking at the Raleigh Detour, but my local cycle shop had this 2017 Arroyo at a special close-out price. After checking the EBR reviews and looking at both bikes, I just couldn't pass up the comfort and elegance of the Arroyo :). It is still a little chilly in Iowa to do much riding (for me anyway), but I hope to get the Arroyo out on the trail in the next couple of weeks.

1 week ago

I don’t think it’s possible to gear/wind a hub motor for high speed without sacrificing low speed torque. If a hub motor is geared/wound for torque it can be a decent climber. So yes, if the manufacturer specs the right motor the bike can climb well. On the other hand, virtually all mid-drives are going to climb well. I rode a fairly low power mid-drive Raleigh bike two years ago that climbed a steep kicker of a hill with ease.

1 week ago

I have 2 Raleigh detour ie's luv them.

1 week ago

Really good explanation from Tora on the advantages of having a throttle in stop start urban riding. For the past 18 months I have been using a bafang BBS01 kit as a pedelec motor without the throttle, but I've experienced issues Tora mentioned a couple of times I've struck my derailleur or my right pedal against a curbstone at low speed passing cars curbside, or found myself in the wrong gear at a stop light facing uphill, so I'm swapping out my derailleur for an IGH so I can shift down when stationary and fitting the throttle so I can coast without pedalling when necessary. I appreciate the versatility of a kit motor that lets me switch over from a Class 1 to a Class 2 by simply adding a throttle, the optional boost button on Raleigh and Izip ebikes does the same thing.

I also find walk assist useful when pushing my heavy ebike up ramps when towing a trailer or up the 3 steps into my backyard. Trek and other manufacturers are wrong not to activate walk assist on Bosch powered ebikes in the US. I know it's not legal in New York state at present to have a throttle but walk assist is capped to like 3mph so this is just stupid corporate BS. On the bright side I'm encouraged the People for Bikes model ebike legislation is being adopted by more and more states that legalizes both Class 1 and 2 riding on bike paths and sidewalks.

2 weeks ago

Very Curious why a Nexus hub isn't being utilized more on e-bikes. The EG Zurich has a Nexus 7 speed hub which compliments the 36v 350 watt front hub nicely. It is my understanding that the Nexus 8 speed can handle the torque output of a crank motor set-up.

Nova Haibike
2 weeks ago

Maybe never? Raleigh USA and Raleigh UK offer completely different bikes.

2 weeks ago

When Will The Raleigh Motus With The Nexus 8 Speed Hub Become Available In The USA?

1 week ago

I have 2 2016 detour ie's. I live in south/central pa(a lot of hills) the shim amp steps has worked well for me.

12 months ago

I purchased 2 detour ie's a small for the wife and a large for me. I am disabled and needed the step-thru model. I did two identical as this gives me multiple batteries and chargers to play with. I will not fully retire for another year so I only managed to put on about 600 miles on my bike and she did 200 on hers. Normally I have a trailer with 1 or 2 grandkids be hind. Central pa has lots of steep hills and these bikes Work!! I can't believe the enjoyment of this ride. Ienjoy this as much or more than my Greg lemond that I rode prior to my disability.

1 year ago

I rode the Trek XM700+, the Raleigh Misceo iE with the Alfine hub, and the Raleigh Detour IE. I liked them in that order, although none of them were an XL frame. Hoping to ride a Juiced Cross Current next week.

1 year ago

Recently switched over to electric, ditching my mountain bike for a https://electricbikereview.com/raleigh/2015-detour-ie/ ("new"), and bought a Thule Easyfold that can handle it. My wife has a Specialized Sirrus which she loves, and we're thinking about throwing a conversion kit onto it so that we can keep pace with each other. Both are set up as city commuters. Fenders, racks, hybrid tires.

Intention is to use them for little day treks like farm circle tours, waterfronts, paved trails, both within our city and on vacation, and of course fair-weather commutes. We also live on a hill, and the engine takes the pain out of the return trip.

I should also say that we're really mechanically ignorant. We can scarcely unclog a toilet, and don't intend to do anything but the absolute simplest maintenance on our bikes. We're pretty sure we'll take our stuff in to a shop to have anything installed or serviced.

We don't want to give up the disc brakes she has, so those sexy part-time conversion kits like Copenhagen Wheel or Geo Orbital, so beloved on social media, are out of the question.

I hear good things about BionX and Hi-Power.

What's good quality and good value in conversion kits? What are the meaningful differences among them? What do I need to know?

1 year ago

I finally rode an bike today!

I started at Gears on Lake shore in my hometown on an Easy Motion Evo Street. I really liked the torque sensor, and hated the throttle being on level 0 only. It took some getting used to as I needed to lower the PAS before moving from standstill at a stop sign, as it was too zippy (what a problem lol) and made the steering control iffy. My test had a 76% battery and only lasted about 15minutes. Being on a side street was terrifying, I will definitely appreciate bike lanes in my own neighborhood. It got up to speed quickly and I liked the foot feel of the power whenever I tried to get the torque sensor to work harder by applying more force in pedalling.

I hem decided to check out my local surface dealer, Bike Zone They had a PAS Raleigh detour Ie. I liked the reach on he size I tested, but could've used a seat post adjustment which this shop didn't do.

Gears did a quick check and adjustment of the bike I tested, and even checked my seat. They showed me how the quick adjustments worked too.

Anyways, no big deal, the PAS without throttle wasn't as zippy but I wasn't able to go far on my test ride either. it didn't feel as powerful, but I also didn't notice much rear heaviness like I expected either. I imagine that would change when she was loaded up.

They can order in the rook for me, at he same prize I can which I suppose is fair. my understanding is they don't have much experience with surface despite being a dealer which is a bit worrisome.

Conclusions: While I liked the 500w ride at gears, plus their thoughtfulness, I am not sure that will translate to the 250w Street from easy go. They have one on it's way to the shop, so maybe I'll return to test. $1999 cdn is painful, matching scooteretti.com sale price. That's the reality apparently due to import difference which sounds a bit fishy.

The rook is a better deal, but both are beginning to breech my Max budget. yikes.

It was good to try them, no regrets there. I'm wondering if I should order online and see if that works out cheaper.

Douglas Wever
2 years ago

Yes! Nancy is my SO to say the least - we had our first date in 1975 the Summer of 9th grade (Mainland HS, Daytona Beach)! Thanks for asking! Yes, she's still looking for her ebike. She drops my seat and rides my Ridge Rider or rents in the mean time.

First time I ever rode an ebike was by accident, the 2015 Raleigh when it was on clearance this year when I dropped by a Trek dealer, I bought the ebike on the spot (first decent traditional bike was a Motobecane in 1979, later toured on a Trek 720). Then I discovered the Ridge Rider via your review, and yes you're right, rode their rental fleet three times, and bought shortly after.

2 years ago

Nice! Sounds like you've rented Ridge Riders, eventually bought one of your own and ALSO got a Raleigh Detour iE? I'm going out on a limb here guessing that Nancy is your SO? Did she get an ebike too or is she still searching for the perfect one ;)

Douglas Wever
2 years ago

Picture 1: Store Demo/rental on the right, what would eventually be my Pedego Ridge Rider July '16 on the left.
Picture 2: My first ride on my new bike went for 24.2 miles on full assistance (levels 4 and 5) and a lot of throttle. I was shocked to have 52% battery left (I haven't even removed the wrapper from the display yet in the picture)
Picture 3: Nancy and the Green Pedego Interceptor
Picture 4: The 2015 Raleigh Detour iE - my first ebike.
Picture 5: Pedego Ridge Rider Accessorized with a rack, BodyFloat, and riser to give me another 4" at the handlebars as I am 6'1". (First 48 mile attempt 16 July that was rained out but got in 31 miles).

2 years ago

For decades now I've been wanting to bike more and drive less....to work, to the store, etc. All those short and mid-range little jaunts that could be done with a bike, but for whatever reason, aren't. An ebike is my personal intervention into getting rid of the excuses (too far, will arrive sweaty, up-hill all the way, etc).

I'm choosing the https://electricbikereview.com/raleigh/2015-detour-ie/, mostly because my local bike shop has them for only $1700 brand new. The complaints I've seen about it are that it has some frame shifting due to the weight being on what is essentially a regular bike frame. The other complaint is being back-heavy.

I'm looking for experiences from others who own bikes with similar configurations (heavy motor and battery in the rear). How are they for lifting? I'm guessing the front is easy to lift. Can you walk them up steps without having to elevate the back end? Ever lifted one on a city bus bike rack (something I would probably do from time to time)? How does it affect turning/stability? Are bumps in the back significantly worse than the front?

Do you regret it?

Thanks in advance.

2 years ago

This makes perfect sense, but the issue is that adding suspension will also add significant weight at least I suspect it would. So with the Specialized Turbo, http://mikesbikes.com/product/raleigh-detour-ie-255528-1.htm and http://mikesbikes.com/product/raleigh-detour-ie-220199-1.htm regardless which gear I was in I could never reach 20 miles per hour. On the Pedego's I easily reached 20 miles per hour. Was that due to the Motor Size? If so what minimum motor size do I need to get my 245 lbs body easily up to 20 miles per hour.

Douglas Wever
2 years ago

Wow Tom. I own a 2015 Raleigh Detour iE and a 2016 Pedego Ridge Rider and I agree with everything you said. But then I bought the Raleigh at just about half the price of the Pedego on close-out for $1,699. I added a BodyFloat to the Raleigh and it improved the bump absorption dramatically and I still use that bike satisfactorily. I took it for a six mile dash tonight, but you're right, cobblestone is no place for that road bike.

Here are some thoughts. If you end up going with either the Interceptor or City Commuter you can't go wrong (Ridge Rider and Interceptor in the picture from a Nashville ride and my Detour iE). If you need the range the upgraded 15 ah battery is worth it, the range is tremendous.

While there's great stuff out there, like you I did a ton of research and I happened to end up purchasing the Ridge Rider and I'll just mention briefly why, and suggest you try one.

First, I decided whatever I bought next I would try to have the battery integrated in to the down tube. The Ridge Rider had that (in picture 3 those two bikes have different ah batteries in their downtubes, 14 and 11.6, but undetectable from the outside) and it is a stout mountain bike; but, to my amazement on a 28 mile road loop in Franklin, TN, it is a premiere road bike too. Between the wide tires and an adjustable air front suspension with 100mm of travel the ride on the road is amazing, I would think the air suspension on the Ridge Rider would smooth out cobblestone very nicely.

You'll also find four torque sensored assist levels that taken together with the 20 available gears are great for any level of work-out you want, one cadence sensor level if you just want to fly using the bike's muscle but still pedaling, then there's throttle only level, and throttle over-ride throughout. While the bike's max is 20 mph, there is a pretty easy to access software setting that ups that to 25 mph (I'll not activate that as you up the chances of a pretty good hospital stay if you eat it).

On the Pedego sub-forum you can see my range test where a buddy went 24.2 miles with 66% battery remaining with the 11 ah battery, there is an out-of-production 14 ah out there (which I have), and an upcoming 17 ah. And of course being a mountain bike the build is very stout. The bike is already set up for a rear rack and I'll get another BodyFloat. At 5'9" it would fit you perfect. At 6'1" I am having to raise the handlebars 4". There's a lot of great bikes out there, just giving my narrative of why I landed where I did. Oh yes, I bought from a Pedego only dealer and the customer service was just amazing.

matt wade
8 months ago

Hi. Great channel! What is your view on pros and cons of battery in the back tech versus on or built into the down tube? Thanks.

Lori-Ann Leavitt
10 months ago

I added a Bionx S350RL system to my mountain bike. NO NOISE at all. It also has a throttle, LOVE THAT. I love the look of this black Raleigh, but holy noisy!

yoma measureacher
10 months ago

dont forget get off keys from accum lock while riding
you may loose them

10 months ago

Yeah, I should have taken the keys out because they rattled a bit during the review as well, sorry about that :/

Michigan Mister
10 months ago

just another fine review. nice design here, but a lot of clunking going on as well as motor whine. I wouldn't be surprised if Shimano doesn't rule with their component's soon. Court, looks like you'll have to do another Pedego review soon with the Airstream? I'd really like to see an updated review on their (mine) Boomerang as well? thanks buddy.

Michigan Mister
10 months ago

with 'ya. my buddy is ready for one, I'll send him this link. I'll be glad, no more puppy eyes from him asking for ride time w/ mine, lol...

10 months ago

Just reached out to Pedgo and learned that the Airstream is just "the polished aluminum Interceptor" so the name corresponds to a color choice, polished Aluminum alloy. Here's my review on the Interceptor if you're interested in more info: https://electricbikereview.com/pedego/classic-interceptor/ though it's a bit older than the Platinum Interceptor review :)

Michigan Mister
10 months ago

talked to my dealer after I wrote you. don't bother. it is an Interceptor with just a different front badge and the chain guard that both say "Airstream". no new components, BUT, the same price. (promotional deal, unusual for them?) still like to see a more in-depth review of the Pedego Boomerang Plus? (black)thanks as always, Court.

10 months ago

Hmm, I hadn't seen that one yet... thanks! I wonder what's different about it, kind of looks like the Platinum Interceptor

10 months ago

Did I hear correctly that the step-through weighs about seven pounds more than the diamond frame? Looking forward to written review.

10 months ago

Not sure about that... I believe they are less than 0.5 lbs different if you look at the same frame size. I measured it at 48.2 lbs which is fairly light :) also just fixed the link... sorry I forgot to update that when posting!