Biktrix Juggernaut Review

Biktrix Juggernaut Electric Bike Review 1
Biktrix Juggernaut
Biktrix Juggernaut 8fun Bafang Bbs02 Mid Drive Motor
Biktrix Juggernaut 48 Volt Downtube Battery Pack
Biktrix Juggernaut Bafang Lcd Display Panel
Biktrix Juggernaut Battery Led Indicator And On Off Switch
Biktrix Juggernaut Large Wellgo Platform Pedals
Biktrix Juggernaut Tektro Novella 180 Disc Brake
Biktrix Juggernaut Shimano Alivio Derailleur
Biktrix Juggernaut Upgraded Tektro Levers Integrated Bell
Biktrix Juggernaut Electric Bike Review 1
Biktrix Juggernaut
Biktrix Juggernaut 8fun Bafang Bbs02 Mid Drive Motor
Biktrix Juggernaut 48 Volt Downtube Battery Pack
Biktrix Juggernaut Bafang Lcd Display Panel
Biktrix Juggernaut Battery Led Indicator And On Off Switch
Biktrix Juggernaut Large Wellgo Platform Pedals
Biktrix Juggernaut Tektro Novella 180 Disc Brake
Biktrix Juggernaut Shimano Alivio Derailleur
Biktrix Juggernaut Upgraded Tektro Levers Integrated Bell

Summary

  • An affordable fat tire electric bike delivered through Kickstarter 2014-2015, now available for direct purchase
  • Powerful BBS02 mid-drive motor system keeps weight low and center for improved balance, also makes maintenance and transport easier (quick release on both wheels)
  • Upgraded drivetrain, sturdy aluminum fenders, integrated LED headlight, optional suspension fork on the 2016 model, only available in one size and sold online (difficult to test-ride or service directly)

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Biktrix

Model:

Juggernaut

Price:

$1,999 (Optional Battery and Brake Upgrade for $2,499)

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Urban, Trail, Sand and Snow

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive, 800 Charge Cycles on Battery

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

20152016

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

55 lbs (24.94 kg)

Battery Weight:

7.2 lbs (3.26 kg)

Motor Weight:

8.5 lbs (3.85 kg)

Frame Material:

T6 6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

19 in (48.26 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Seat Tube: 19

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Black with Red and Orange Accents

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid Aluminum Alloy, Optional RockShox Bluto Suspension

Attachment Points:

Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Alivio

Shifter Details:

SIS Thumb Shifter

Cranks:

Aluminum Alloy, 60T Chainring

Pedals:

Wellgo Aluminum Alloy Platform

Headset:

Neco

Stem:

Ritchey Adjustable Angle

Handlebar:

Aluminum Aloy, Low Rise

Brake Details:

Tektro Novella Mechanical Disc with 180 mm Rotors, Tektro Levers with Integrated Bell and Motor Inhibitor (Optional Hydraulic Disc Brake Upgrade)

Grips:

Black, Flat Rubber

Saddle:

Velo Comfort

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Rims:

Double Walled Aluminum, CNC Sidewall

Spokes:

Black, Stainless Steel, 13 Gauge

Tire Brand:

Kenda Juggernaut Sport, 26" x 4"

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)

Tire Details:

K-Shield Puncture Resistant

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Side-Mounted Aluminum Alloy Kickstand, Front and Rear Short-Length Aluminum Fenders, Plastic Chain Guide, Bell, Integrated LED Headlight and Stand-Alone LED Backlight

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, KMC High-Strength Rust Resistant Chain, Custom Motor Firmware, Smart Charger 100-240V 50-60Hz 2A, Load Capacity 275 lbs (125 kg)

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bafang, BBS02

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Motor Peak Output:

750 watts

Battery Brand:

Samsung (Sony Cells on Upgraded Battery)

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11.6 ah (Optional 10.4 Ah)

Battery Watt Hours:

556.8 wh (Optional 499.2 Wh)

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

20 miles (32 km)

Estimated Max Range:

50 miles (80 km)

Display Type:

Bafang C961, Fixed Backlit Monochrome LCD

Readouts:

Battery Level (5 Bars), Speedometer, Assist Level (0-5), Trip Distance, Odometer, Average Speed, Max Speed, Clock

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad Near Left Grip

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Twist Throttle

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

The Biktrix Juggernaut made its debut on Kickstarter in November 2014 and was successfully delivered to all backers by July 2015. It’s a fat electric bike that’s a step up in terms of components and features but still aiming at that value market. For ~$2k you can get the base model which uses a more standard sized battery with good Samsung cells and Tektro mechanical disc brakes… or for ~$500 more you can get the larger battery with higher quality Sony cells and hydraulic disc brakes. Both models use the 8Fun BBS02 mid-drive motor that keeps weight low and center, offers great torque for climbing and enables quick release and easier tune-ups on both wheels. The motor is using custom firmware but does not offer shift sensing which means the chain, cassette and derailleur will endure more force when riding. You could get this same motor and battery with shift sensing from E-RAD but the kit alone would cost ~$1,700. Thankfully, the Biktrix Juggernaut offers an upgraded KMC chain (emphasizing strength and rust resistance) and a Shimano Alivio derailleur which is two steps up from most other value-priced electric fat bikes I’ve reviewed recently includign the RadRover and Voltbike Yukon which both use Tourney TX. For me, the centerdrive motor is really the star of the show here but the included fenders, lights and adjustable stem all add value.

Driving the Juggernaut is a 500 watt nominal, 750 watt peak mid-drive motor from 8Fun. I’ve reviewed this motor on its own here but some improvements have been made since then including better power activation and durability. As mentioned earlier, Biktrix worked with the firmware a bit to optimize it for their fat ebike and it felt very smooth and responsive during my test ride. Instead of powering the wheel directly like hub motors, this centerdrive pulls the same chain that you do as you pedal. In so doing, it leverages the seven speed cassette in the rear allowing it to operate more efficiently. Basically, this motor will climb better and go further than an equivalent hub motor and it keeps weight low and center on the frame instead of at the rear. This is a huge benefit when going in for tuneups, changing tubes on the trail or simply transporting the bike. Both the front and back wheel offer quick release, this benefit cannot be overstated on a fat bike platform which traditionally tend to take up more space and often do not fit in the back of cars or as easily in garages. The Juggernaut is easier to manage in this sense and it handles well.

Powering this electric bike is one of two battery options (both offering higher quality Lithium-ion cells). The base model is a 48 volt 10.4 amp hour design with Samsung cells… It should get you 20 to 40 miles per charge and offer a good sense of power. The upgrade is a 48 volt 11.6 amp hour design with premium Sony cells that offer a higher C-Rating. This pack will get you 20 to 50 miles and might feel zippier. Energy can flow into and out of this pack more quickly and with a higher capacity, it lets the bike ride longer. The caveat here is that if you accelerate faster and ride at higher speeds longer on the larger pack it will drain quicker and that’s why I estimate both will get 20 miles per charge at the highest level of assist or using the twist throttle. Also, depending on which version of this ebike you get, the battery pack itself may look different. The Kickstarter and 2015 model use a nice downtube mounted pack that has an integrated LCD and on/off switch. This pack has to be activated before you can turn on the display. I’m told that the newer pack does not have to be switched on independently and for me that’s a nice improvement because it means you’ll be less likely to forget to de-activate the battery once your ride is over.

Operating the Biktrix Juggernaut is fairly simple and very standard. I’ve seen similar Bafang LCD displays on other electric bikes and they tend to hold up well. Once the battery pack is charged, mounted to the frame and switched on (if you’ve got a first generation build of this ebike) you can switch on the display by pressing a rubber power button on the remote button pad. This pad is easy to reach, even when you’re hand is on the left grip while riding. Once activated, the display console comes to life showing battery level, speed, assist level and a few more readouts. You can cycle through max speed, average speed, odometer, clock and trip distance by pressing the power button again (and hold it to turn the bike off). You can also go into the settings and choose from either 3, 5 or 9 levels of assist. The additional levels don’t offer more power, they are more like finer increments offering more choices so you can find a perfect speed instead of going from low, medium and then high with the three level configuration. Physically speaking, the display can swivel forward to back to reduce glare if not overtightened but it is not removable. Because the bike is predominantly sold online you’ll have the opportunity to set things up just how you like them (or work with a local shop to do so upon arrival) and the handlebars may be adjusted forward or back to change reach and ride position. The adjustable stem used is fairly short which will reduce the strain it endures when riding off-road but I’m guessing that it may still begin to rattle over time if not tightened… that’s just what happens with this style of stem. I tend to prefer a more upright ride and sometimes go for cruiser bars which you could add on but the low-risers that are provided work well enough. One final and important note here… when ordering the Juggernaut from Biketrix you can request that they “unlock the throttle” meaning that you will be able to twist and go at pedal assist level zero and override all other levels beyond their default setting. The bike will still only go up to 15.5 mph or 20 mph (depending on your geography) but the throttle will be active at all times when the system is powered on. I personally prefer this type of riding but it does increase the risk of accidental activation and because a twist throttle was used vs. a trigger throttle, if you accidentally bear down on the right grip during a tense moment you could accelerate when you really intended to stabilize or even prepare for braking. Keep this option and its potential consequences in mind when ordering.

I really enjoyed the Juggernaut and was impressed with the custom frame work that was done to accommodate the BBS02 mid-drive motor system. They had to bend the chainstays in to accommodate a standard sized 73 mm bottom bracket here but reinforced the tubing by creating dimples and gusseted the top tube near the seat tube as well. It felt solid, weighed less than comparable options, has an upgrade path for increased power and range and just looks really good. The black frame, spokes, motor and battery and other accessories work together nicely and most wires are internally routed to reduce snags. For 2016 you’ll also get a tapered head tube which is stronger and can accommodate a RockShox Bluto suspension fork for improved comfort. While this electric fat bike is only available in one color, it looks pretty good. It’s also limited to just one frame size but you can adjust that stem, swap out the handlebars, quick release the seat post and that all contributes to better fit. Keep in mind the $150+ shipping cost and on-site assembly you’ll need to do. I’ve rated this bike based on the MSRP but it appears they offer sales and you can get it even cheaper than ~$2k which is exciting. It’s a great platform for fun neighborhood riding if you like the fat style but it’s actually quite capable on light trails or in sand and snow due to the increased torque of the mid-drive.

Pros:

  • Great aesthetic… the spokes, kickstand and pedals are black, the motor and battery are black, the frame and fenders are black… everything matches and the integrated wires blend right in
  • Higher end drivetrain, the derailleur is Alivio which is two steps up from Tourney TX which most other value priced ebikes use, should last longer and stay in tune
  • The 2016 model will offer an oversized tapered headtube so you can add a RockShox Bluto suspension fork (and Biktrix will offer this as an upgrade for ~$700), the battery pack on this newer model will also not require independent activation
  • You can request that Biktrix unlock the throttle so you can use it in level zero and override assist, the stock setup only lets you use throttle power when in pedal assist mode and only up to the level of pedal assist you’re currently in
  • I like the optional hydraulic disc brake and battery size upgrades… the mechanical brakes work fine and 180 mm is a good size for the rotors but hydraulic are easier to pull and for people who want to go further these upgrades are nice at ~$500
  • The included fenders are pretty cool… aluminum alloy is solid and since they aren’t full-length you don’t kick the front fender as easily or get the same rattling as some other options (though there is still some ratting if they aren’t adjusted properly)
  • Front and rear lights are included with the bike, the front is nicer because it’s integrated (meaning it runs right off the main battery pack) the rear light is more standard (using AA batteries) but definitely good to have vs. not
  • Pedal assist is smooth and responsive (the cadence sensor is built right into the bottom bracket/motor area)

Cons:

  • The adjustable stem helps different sized riders fit the bike (since the frame only comes in one size) but it can get loose over time, especially if riding off-road, keep an eye on it and tighten it if it becomes loose
  • Only available in one standard ~19″ frame size but the top tube is sloped making it easier to stand over
  • In order to power on the Kickstarter and 2015 version of the Juggernaut you first have to activate the battery pack and then press power again on the button pad, this adds time and makes it easier to forget to de-activate the battery after a ride
  • The battery pack takes up most of the space where a bottle cage might mount… consider a saddle rail adapter or something like a Camelbak
  • I noticed that there wasn’t a slap guard on the right chain stay, this means the chain could bounce into the frame and chip it if you’re riding on rough terrain, consider adding one like this yourself, also I noticed that the rims aren’t punched out like a lot of fat bikes (holes are not cut into the rim to reduce weight) but this bike still weighs less than many bikes that do have the punchouts
  • There is no shift sensing built into the mid-drive motor on this ebike which means the chain and gears can experience more force and wear if you don’t shift smoothly and carefully (ideally when you are not activating the motor) the upgraded KMC chain and Shimano Alivio drivetrain should hold up better than lower level parts

Resources:

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Gary Gibbens
1 year ago

Comparing the Sand Viper, the Volt, and several other fat tires bikes, this one seems to have more features. How does this one compare to the other lower end fat tire bikes?

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

Hi Gary, I liked it! The mid-drive makes a difference if you shift properly… you’ll get better range and climb more easily but could also wear the chain and sprockets. I like how the Biktrix Juggernaut looks and I believe they’ve continued refining it in recent years. Compared with the early Sand Viper that had the front hub motor I’d definitely go for the Biktrix but now there are 500 watt motors in the rear and other bikes with suspension like the RadRover… I think it has become very popular recently.

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Fred
4 days ago

I've only had a brief time with mine in an urban setting but no complaint other than the tire noise, which will be probably less with your tire choice.
It feels much lighter than I expected and the tires really cushion you from rough streets. Needless to say, the power is always there. I have no need for the throttle in town. Good luck !
These are the tires I changed to on my Juggernaut.

https://www.veetireco.com/listings/fat-speedster/

They are much smoother and quieter. These are good for hard surfaces or gravel, but probably not for offroad or snow (neither of which I do).

daniel58
1 week ago

[QUOhttps://www.radpowerbikes.com/products/radrover-electric-fat-bike?variant=1121017969TE="Rooster, post: 120185, member: 15666"]Yes but this ocean current already has vee tire co. Speedster 2.80x26 fat tires and looks the roll[/QUOTE]

I actually got the idea from watching youtube video's of actual e-bike product demonstrations that featured bikes with both front and rear wheel electric hub motor drives; now with both front and rear wheel electric hub motor drives engaged with the ground all the time one can actually ride on the beach even thru dry and/or wet sand without getting potentially stuck; while at the same time being also able to go directly thru muddy trails without getting potentially stuck; to be able to actually have a powered e-bike that is actually capable of powering as if one had the equivalent of all terrain 4wd for a bicycle is something that can be realized with a relatively modest additional investment in ones existing e-bike purchase;

for example consider the Radrover E-Bike Fat Tire Bike for $1499(link below); just imagine the actual potential possibilities of having an all terrain 4wd fat tire E-Bike with a powered front wheel electric hub motor drive; yes one can go on amazon and literally add a 750 watt powered front wheel electric hub motor for a relatively modest e-bike upgrade cost; that would give even the Juiced Bikes Hyperfat E-Bike that is currently still in product development; some rather serious no nonsense E-Bike fat tire ultra performance potential market competition at a very competitive price point offering to boot easily under $2,000;

which is still a very easy modest doable post purchase e-biker end user upgrade project that can actually be purchased right now as we speak(all component parts needed); and yes it would be a turbocharged version of Juiced Bikes Hyperfat with 500 watts in your case combined with 750 watts from front powered front wheel electric hub motor drive; for a combined 1250 watts or 1.25Kw of pure 4wd turbocharged performance one could literally in fact go up a truly massive 25 degree hilly incline if actually needed or if the need ever potentially arose; heck I might just go looking for a 25 degree incline to actually see how it does performance wise to witness and experience the e-bike performance wow factor before and after the turbocharging of the Hyperfat Ebike;

now one of course might have to contact Court and have him do a performance test evaluation review of ones end user post purchase modified E-Bike whether its a CCS, OceanCurrent, or even a custom modified RadRover E-Bike; especially if one also added a Cycling Analyst 3.0(by Grin Technologies) to actually control and customize the end user actual output power levels going to the motor controller that would be delivering the actual adjustable variable output power to the front wheel electric hub motor drive; all to deliver a end user totally customizable 4wd turbocharged surrealistic terra firma ground gripping engaging 4wd E-Biking experience;

as that is truly something that may not have been done before or be directly customized and/or adjusted by the end user in "real time" on the fly; one could for example easily adjust for more or less desired end user target objective needed customized power going to the forward front wheel electric hub motor drive in relative comparison to the actual power going to the rear wheel electric hub motor drive; now the end user might be able to actually go into the Cycling Analyst and set up a custom power level preset to deliver an end user defined custom output power level going to the motor controller that would be effectively delivering and transferring a certain amount of end user pre-defined usable output power to the front wheel on demand.

One can literally turn it into a super cool urban assault commuter bike; by swapping out the default tires for the higher end Kenda Juggernaut Fat Bike tires; just imagine for a moment riding up intense mountain trails being a breeze to pedal and having the time of ones lives cycling enjoying the great outdoors e-biking; now the dual forward and rear electric hub motor pedal assist experience would be nothing short of amazing to realize in real life; by being able to take on mountain trails terrain with the kind of aggressive dual traction being provided from both ones electric powered wheels that one really needs on typical mountain trails;

one can literally be suddenly able to selectively carefully climb and pick ones way through potential sand, snow, loose rock, loose gravel, grass, rough fields and even climb some steep boulders also as well; for at least 25 miles to 30 miles and for about at least 3 to 3.5 hours time worry free with a decent generously sized lithium ion battery pack; now this dual purpose urban and mountain trails assault e-bike would be an absolute blast to experience riding indeed and one could definitely see how much fun it could actually be to get out on some rather grueling mountain trails that I have hiked on before previously to look forward revisiting once again using this very powerful e-biking mountain trail touring tool;

now the Easy Motion Evo Big Bud Pro has the dual wheel electric hub motor setup for $3,600; with 350 watts for the rear wheel electric hub motor and 250 watts for the front wheel electric hub motor; while the Rad Rover has its fat e-biking setup for $1,500; the Rad rover has a 750 watts for the rear wheel electric hub motor and one can rather easily as another add on optional front wheel driven 750 watts for the front wheel electric hub; for a total potential combined total power output of up to 1,500 watts in 4wd mode if needed;

so for the Rad Rover fat bike setup for $1,500 that comes with its included 750 watts rear wheel electric hub motor and let's say about $300 conservatively for the option to add the 750 watt front wheel electric hub motor from Amazon along with a Cycling Analyst 3.0; and even adding $500 for another 11.4 lithium ion battery pack mounted to a front rack mount; that is still only about $2,300 in total costs as compared to the $3,600 Easy Motion Evo Big Bud Pro; that is still a major savings in cost of just over $1,300;

now the other major thing to consider of course is the Easy Motion Evo Big Bud Pro for $3,600 is only 600 watts total combined power output for both the front and rear electric hub drive motors; while the Rad Rover fat bike setup has for just about $2,300 only has just over 1,500 watts total continuous combined power output for both the front and rear electric hub drive motors and that is not even considering what the total peak power output might actually turn out to be;

now guys the actual total cost for the modified dual drive all wheel drive customized fat e-bike setup for the Rad Rover is only $2,300(as described previously above); while still able to deliver at least 1,500 watts of total potential continuous output power to ones dual wheels on the ground thru its dual all wheel drive fat e-bike specific top quality Kenda Juggernaut tires; now with the customized fat e-bike setup described Rad Rover described above that is actually just a bit over two and a half times the total combined power output of the Easy Motion Evo Big Bud Pro dual drive all wheel drive fat e-bike setup and yet it still somehow manages to cost basically still somehow less than $1,300; holy cow that is basically a "steal of a deal";

now that is definitely a fat e-bike project that is practically basically begging to be built just for the upgrade performance cost in parts in terms relative to the cost of the basic core $1,500(about 1.5x) Rad Rover fat e-bike itself versus about 2.4x the cost of a core Rad Rover $1,500 fat e-bike; for the Easy Motion Evo Big Bud Pro turn key fat e-bike configuration; while it basically costs just about only $800 additional to performance upgrade ones Rad Rover fat e-bike with some additional upgrade parts($300 for the 750 watt front wheel hub electric motor drive and $500 for the second lithium ion battery pack); and we are not even talking about the potential doubling of the power that the Rad Rover is going to be definitely experiencing going from 750 watts on the rear wheel electric drive hub motor to another 750 watts on the front wheel drive hub motor; for heavens sake, that is another whole additional 900 watts of pure total watts of potential unmitigated continuous output power that can be potentially applied "in real life" to ones dual wheel Rad Rover fat e-bike tires and any terra firma that may yet lay beneath them to be explored on mountain trails and the like hopefully;

and yet another point for potential contention and mutual consideration; exactly how many dual wheel all wheel drive capable fat tire e-bike configuartion does one know of; that can actually provide 1,500 watts of total combined output power thru its massive dual fat e-bike tires for not more than $2,300? Tora Harris(founder of Juiced Bikes) eat your heart out we just may have in fact just taken out his very own Hyperfat fat tire e-bike still in actual product development currently having ongoing problems still trying to be developed and built successfully in their asian chinese factories; and their is a very strong distinct chance and actual "real world reality" probability possibility that this dual wheel all wheel drive customized Rad Rover fat tire e-bike design can easily beat not only the Hyperfat fat tire e-bike and but also perhaps even the original "all wheel drive" flagship design by Easy Motion Evo Big Bud Pro($3,600) quite badly on a performance specification wise basis at least also as well; and one can actually build it actually right now without any further waiting and also build it at a significant anticipated project cost savings over the projected cost of the actual HyperFat fat tire e-bike when it does actually come out and easily beat the cost of the Easy Motion Evo Big Bud Pro($3,600) also quite handily by a huge cost factor and absolutely ridiculous cost savings margin; at the same time also as well.

https://www.radpowerbikes.com/products/radrover-electric-fat-bike?variant=1121017969

One horsepower equals 745.7 watts; 1,500 watts divided by 745.7 watts equals 2.01 horsepower; and guys that is only the defined rated continuous output power; as the actual peak output power is actually not 750 watts but actually 1095 watts maximum peak output power; or

1095 watts peak maximum output power times two wheels equals 2,190 watts peak maximum output power; 2190 watts divided by 745.7 watts equals 2.94hp actual total maximum peak output power in terms of rated equivalent horsepower; holy cow guys that is almost 3 horsepower peak total maximum power output in terms of rated equivalent horsepower; that would seem like more than enough to potentially beat the HyperFat fat tire e-bike at least on a paper technical specification basis; for not much more money to boot also as well(no brainer-build it and find out; no worries Cycling Analyst 3.0(Grin Technologies-they also actually sell pairs of massively heavily reinforced hardened steel(think lawn mower blade hardened reinforced tempered steel) torque arms for ones front fork-cannot be to safe they say its actually true in real life) will confirm ones actual power output is all genuine, authentic and real for "real world" confirmation and proof of actual power output in terms of maximum continuous power and maximum peak power total actual power output figures-so their will be no doubt at all if one actually somehow beats the HyperFat fat tire e-bike and/or the Easy Motion Evo Big Bud Pro fat tire e-bike; then one can go on youtube and actually go viral after proving one has beat any of the other fat tire e-bike potential competition hopefully and then go on to hopefully even extensively document this do it yourself (DIY) fat tire e-bike upgrade project on Youtube to also enable other potential hardcore fellow fat tire e-bikers to be able to put their very own custom dual wheel all wheel drive fat tire e-bike together for themselves also as well); now this fat tire e-bike would also make for the ultimate all terrain vehicle snow bike(with both ice and snow hardened steel studded equipped fat bike tires-same kind they use on bmx enduro downhill motocross snow racing tires) thanks to its highly variable customizable adjustable power output dual wheel all wheel drive fat tire e-bike drive power transmission system;

yes guys one can actually do a do-it-yourself(DIY) Rad Rover end user customized fat tire e-bike build for just about $2,300 that will definitely result in at least 1,500 watt or at least two horsepower of total potential continuous output power(2.94hp actual total maximum peak output power in terms of rated equivalent horsepower-see above actual derived calculation) being directly applied to ones dual wheels on the ground thru its dual all wheel drive fat e-bike specific top quality Kenda Juggernaut tires; now if that is actually worth $2,300 to any hard core fat tire e-biking individuals out their; please report back if anyone has built anything remotely like this previously in the past or even considering also building something along the lines of a dual wheel all wheel drive fat tire e-bike as previously extensively described and discussed above.

P.S. to Andy in Ca; it need not be a lithium ion battery pack hog; that is what the Cycling Analyst 3.0 is for; as it is being used as a programmable cycling computer, where it can supposedly set up a end user defined customized power output profile to drive ones front wheel electric hub motor drive; so one can very precisely and accurately dial in the exact end user defined power output going to the motor controller that is driving the front wheel electric hub drive motor; and yes it can actually be both varied and also adjusted on the fly in "real time" to fit ones "real world" and "real time" conditions on an as needed "user defined on demand" basis; naturally of course one can also do the same with setting up another Cycling Analyst 3.0 programmable cycling computer to also actually customize and control the actual amount of power going to the motor controller for the rear wheel electric hub drive motor also as well similar to what is going to be done in conjunction with the front wheel electric hub drive motor; also Andy the Cycling Analyst 3.0 can also if needed to conserve both power and range on ones lithium ion battery pack if needed by also being able to put a optimal end user defined maximum speed velocity threshold cutoff value if actually needed and/or also be able to additionally put a optimal end user defined maximum current threshold cutoff value if also actually needed and/or necessary to still make it to home base without potentially running out of critical potential needed power on ones lithium ion battery pack also as well in an potential unexpected emergency for example of course.

TForan
1 week ago

That's good to hear! My dad's quite settled on a fat bike with a throttle, and the Juggernaut looks to be the one to get!

It has so much power , he might find out that he really doesn't need the throttle. Even at assist one, it takes right off.

comradecasey
1 week ago

I have a Juggernaut Ultra and love it. Don't listen to the naysayers that say it's jerky. Pre-production might have been but not production bikes.

That's good to hear! My dad's quite settled on a fat bike with a throttle, and the Juggernaut looks to be the one to get!

TForan
1 week ago

Done :)

This is more or less how it currently sits as I use it for commuting to work. I swapped the 180mm Tektros to Shimano RT86 203mm and 180mm front and rears respectively (just a personal preference, had the same rotors on my Sondors). Then I threw on some Schwalbe Marathons, Planet Bike fenders, an Ibera rack, some Ergon grips, and an Ergon SC4M saddle. The bike already had a kickstand when I picked it up which was nice!

It's actually quite muddy right now though as I took the commuting stuff off and used the original Nobby Nics to ride my old dirtbike track at my dad's house. Now that was insanely fun.

Oh, and @roshan, I may or may not have talked my dad into one of your new Juggernauts with the Bafang Ultra. He's set on a fat bike, so we'll all keep our fingers crossed :D

I have a Juggernaut Ultra and love it. Don't listen to the naysayers that say it's jerky. Pre-production might have been but not production bikes.

PCDoctorUSA
2 weeks ago

Ping me, we can work something out. We have a few riders in Hawaii. Are you on the big island?
The Juggernaut 2017 is a beautiful bike and I really appreciate the offer but I've decided to stick with a geared rear hub for my first ebike. And while the fat tire bikes really interest me, I may stick with something more stealthy like the E-Glide ST. BTW, I'm on O'ahu and not the Big Island, but my work sends me over there a couple times a year. The best of the Islands IMO.

roshan
2 weeks ago

I hadn't checked them out. Unfortunately, Biktrix is charging $400 shipping to Hawaii just like Rad Bikes. This puts the Juggernaut at $2399 for me ($1999 sale price for 750w model + shipping). My budget is $2k with wiggle room already included. @HunterNott , definitely worth looking at if you're in the contiguous 48 or Canada.
Ping me, we can work something out. We have a few riders in Hawaii. Are you on the big island?

PCDoctorUSA
3 weeks ago

Biktrix might have a better shipping cost (typically free), their bikes are nicer than Voltbike too!

Juggernaut vs Yukon: bigger motor options on Juggernaut, bigger battery options (the short Dorado on Yukon is 14Ah max, Juggernaut can take a 20Ah pack).

Biktrix bikes typically come with both pedal assist, and a throttle as well. Torque sense is an option on the MX/Ultra versions.
I hadn't checked them out. Unfortunately, Biktrix is charging $400 shipping to Hawaii just like Rad Bikes. This puts the Juggernaut at $2399 for me ($1999 sale price for 750w model + shipping). My budget is $2k with wiggle room already included. @HunterNott , definitely worth looking at if you're in the contiguous 48 or Canada.

Deafcat
3 weeks ago

Biktrix might have a better shipping cost (typically free), their bikes are nicer than Voltbike too!

Juggernaut vs Yukon: bigger motor options on Juggernaut, bigger battery options (the short Dorado on Yukon is 14Ah max, Juggernaut can take a 20Ah pack).

Biktrix bikes typically come with both pedal assist, and a throttle as well. Torque sense is an option on the MX/Ultra versions.

TForan
4 weeks ago

I don't plan on upgrading to the 56T though it's tempting. I'm afraid that it'll make the trail riding a little less me pedaling and more throttle ;). What I'd love to see though is a Hyper with a 250 watt high torque front drive wheel as well. The idea of two wheel drive on the trails makes a lot of sense.

It seems to have similar power to a Biktrix Juggernaut Ultra, which I own and it sure doesn't need any more power on the steep hills I've ridden. And I never use the throttle. I think you'll be fine.

Rooster
1 month ago

It would be fun to have a shootout between the Hyperfat and the Biktrix Juggernaut Ultra.
Your also talking about $800 difference for the 17 amp version of the ultra. And I don't know if you can get the 52t crankset.

Rooster
1 month ago

It would be fun to have a shootout between the Hyperfat and the Biktrix Juggernaut Ultra.
The ultra with a 52t front sprocket would do well above 35 mph at 48v depending on the controller of course. With a 30 amp controller on the ultra the Hyperfat May have a chance if it could catch it. Depending on the rider. But I think the Hyperfat would have it on maintenance. That's on flat ground of course. On trails it would be a whole different bag of beans.

TForan
1 month ago

It would be fun to have a shootout between the Hyperfat and the Biktrix Juggernaut Ultra.

roshan
1 month ago

Try a Biktrix Juggernaut Ultra :) 1000W with torque sensor. It'll kill all the other mid motors with a torque sensor.

CoachDennisGreen
1 month ago

These are the ones I put on my Juggernaut:
https://www.niagaracycle.com/categories/vee-rubber-speedster-fat-bike-tire-26x3-5-120tpi-folding-bead-black

I am quite happy with them, very quiet and smooth - but mind you, I ride mainly on paved roads or hard packed dirt.

Actually, these look good. Maybe I'll go 26x3.5 instead of 26x3. Great - more research to do......

Fred
1 month ago

These are the ones I put on my Juggernaut:
https://www.niagaracycle.com/categories/vee-rubber-speedster-fat-bike-tire-26x3-5-120tpi-folding-bead-black

I am quite happy with them, very quiet and smooth - but mind you, I ride mainly on paved roads or hard packed dirt.

jazz
1 month ago

I have the Kenda’s on my bike they are loud but I ran them at 25 psi today and I seemed to get way better mileage out of my battery . But wondering what tire would be better . I want to get something that would be maybe quieter on the road but still work on dry trails and dirt roads . Would love recommendations about tires . Thanks
https://www.bicyclerollingresistance.com/fat-bike-reviews/kenda-juggernaut-pro-2016

Unfortuantely, good fat tires can be price. I like the Mission Vee tires for budget conscious people or if you want really good tires and don't care about price the Maxxis Mammoths are good https://www.amazon.com/Maxxis-Mammoth-120TPI-Folding-26-Inch/dp/B00PDHRQZW/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1508118207&sr=8-2&keywords=maxxis%2Bmammoth

jazz
1 month ago

Replace tires. Those Kenda's are crap: thin, puncture easily, noisy and have a lot of rolling resistance. https://www.bicyclerollingresistance.com/fat-bike-reviews/kenda-juggernaut-pro-2016

TForan
1 month ago

it seems like a fat bike might be the way to go in the Winter. I wouldn't particularly enjoy exposing my ST-2 to the salty sluice we get to make winter driving safer?? With that in mind I recently acquired a Specialized HT Comp Fattie for Winter riding. It is a decent mid-drive bike with a pretty good front shock. Fun to ride but no match for my Stromer. The price was right as Specialized appears to be getting out of the HT business?

Fortunately, they don't use salt where I live. I decided on a Bixtrix Juggernaut Ultra. It has a 1000wh battery and I like the more "bike like " mid drive after trying a hub drive. I also have some pretty big hills that favor the mid drive from what I've read.

roshan
1 month ago

Yes, it can be dialed down to 750W.
I felt the drive wasn't as smooth Bosch or Brose. Although the torque kicked in better than the BBS-HD, it did not cutoff exactly when I stopped pedaling and it was a little harsh on the cassettes.
I could tell you that it was quite powerful and with a bit more tuning at the firmware level, it could be made into a powerhouse of an E-bike engine.
The first iteration is always going to be quite buggy. I hope by mid-2017, all the kinks would be ironed out.

That Ultra is super smooth. Anyone who says it's harsh have only ridden an earlier version. We have these on production bikes and here's a customer's review:
https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/first-impressions-juggernaut-ultra.14661/

roshan
1 month ago

Nice specs:

http://www.szbaf.com/en/components/component/motor/mm-g33250cb.html

Now I am confused. The Bafang page lists this drive as a subset of the Max drive, and it doesn't look like a bolt on, bottom bracket type drive, at all. I mention this only because the upgrade of the BBS series, the 02 and HD, to a TS is kind of the most wanted addition. The rated power is 1000 watts.

Don't get me wrong, but I'm assuming this is not a DIY drive (like the HD) and that it is basically for someone like Roshan who is a manufacturer, but not in the Haibike league? It's for someone who can contract for frames that match the specs.

Bafang says, in the listing, it is 'off-road'. This may be getting a little old. The problem is that the people making high power 'off-road' bikes are moving to the 3,000 watt mid-drive that Luna sells, high power hubs, and the stuff Karl Gesslein writes about.

So why isn't Bafang puting torque sensors in their DIY drives? Can they put it in their hub drives, or the BBS drives?

Already did! Check it out here: https://www.biktrix.com/collections/bikes/products/juggernaut-mx?variant=43607281429

JimE
1 month ago

Does anyone know exactly what batteries are used with the Ultra battery packs?

According to the following article long term storage should be at 48% capacity and never lower than 20%. For safety suppliers ship at 25% to 30% capacity. Also 18650 batteries should never be stored fully charged.

https://batterybro.com/blogs/18650-wholesale-battery-reviews/32496579-comparing-panasonic-18650-bd-vs-panasonic-18650-be

Anyone have any different information about the Biktrix batteries?

Deafcat
1 month ago

Biktrix Juggernaut Classic with the 1000Wh (48V 20Ah) battery will get you 50 miles no problem: https://www.biktrix.com/collections/bikes/products/biktrix-juggernaut-classic-2017?variant=53478014933

You could swap the tires out for a 26x3" street tire and increase range even more!

I bet the Monte 1000 w/ 20Ah would be another good Biktrix long-range option, if there's any of those left :D

Deafcat
1 month ago

I really like those Stunner LTs. I almost bought one but decided on the Juggernaut Ultra.

I feel the same way, that's why I got the LT and ordered the Ultra :D

gattsu glory
3 months ago

great job, but do you give scores out of 10 or 5 for all the bikes reviewed?

thegaminlegend
2 years ago

Keep up the good work! :D

thegaminlegend
2 years ago

+ElectricBikeReview.com budget e-bikes please :)

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+thegaminlegend Doing my best, thanks! Open to feedback anytime as well ;)

Gardener Rob
2 years ago

Great Vid, these fat bikes are certainly becoming more popular I can see why. Commute to work on weekdays then on the weekend do some fun of road rides.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Gardener Rob Yeah! I really like fat bikes, the wider tires feel stable and offer some cushion but the weight and friction are a drag without the motor. I feel like fat bikes plus ebikes is a perfect combination :D

ForbinColossus
2 years ago

Court, I can't get over the similarity btw this biktrix frame and the several years old Optibike Pinoneer Allroad frame - they appaear identical from toptube to the angle of the seat stays where they meet the chain stays. Have a look and tell me I'm not seeing things:
https://optibike.com/pioneer-allroad/
BTW, did Optibike have anything new at Interbike?

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+ForbinColossus Good eye! Yeah, they look very similar... I reviewed the Allroad a while back http://electricbikereview.com/optibike/pioneer-allroad/ but it didn't have the wide rear axle or fork. Maybe the main part of the frame did come from the same design or something? To answer your other question, no, Optibike wasn't at Interbike and I'm not sure I've ever seen them at a show before. I usually drive to their headquarters in Boulder Colorado to do reviews :)

Mathieu Bouvier
2 years ago

that rear fender is pretty pointless lol, thx for sharing

Mathieu Bouvier
2 years ago

+ElectricBikeReview.com I have first hand experience on this because my rear fender slide in and out, trust me your back will be covered with water in the current fender position, its more of a cosmetic thing i guess lol

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+GiantEnemyCrab I'll try to test that next time, I figured at half length it would stop the flecks that would fly up and forward unless you slammed on the brakes :D

GiantEnemyCrab
2 years ago

+Mathieu Bouvier haha, yeah! This rear fender looks like a half fender, but with that length, liquid will be splashing to the back for sure.....

Mathieu Bouvier
2 years ago

+ElectricBikeReview.com i dont see how that fender would keep mud off your back though, the water/mud leaves the tire at the top of the tire and that spot isnt covered :( nice fat bike for sure)

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Mathieu Bouvier I wasn't able to test in mud or water but my guess is that it just keeps the splatter marks off your back. The front fender doesn't look long enough to protect your shins but it would keep mud and water out of your eyes. I see a lot of these shorter fenders/mudguards on mountain bikes vs. full length on city bikes :)