e-Joe Epic Swan 350 Review

E Joe Epik Swan 350 Electric Bike Review
E Joe Epik Swan 350
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Folded Side View
E Joe Epik Swan 350 48v 10 5ah Battery
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Cockpit View
E Joe Epik Swan 350 20 Inch Wheels Mono Shcok
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Cast Rims Disc Brake
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Integrated Headlight
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Shimano Tourney System
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Kick Stand Rear Rack Saddle
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Rear Rack Rear Light
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Folded Front View
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Folding Cart Style
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Battery Charger
E Joe Epik Swan 350 2amp Charger
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Removed Seat Battery Others
E Joe Epik Swan 500
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Stock Folding Blue
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Electric Bike Review
E Joe Epik Swan 350
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Folded Side View
E Joe Epik Swan 350 48v 10 5ah Battery
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Cockpit View
E Joe Epik Swan 350 20 Inch Wheels Mono Shcok
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Cast Rims Disc Brake
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Integrated Headlight
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Shimano Tourney System
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Kick Stand Rear Rack Saddle
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Rear Rack Rear Light
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Folded Front View
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Folding Cart Style
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Battery Charger
E Joe Epik Swan 350 2amp Charger
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Removed Seat Battery Others
E Joe Epik Swan 500
E Joe Epik Swan 350 Stock Folding Blue

Summary

  • A value priced and approachable step through electric folding bike with a ton of features and fun, comes in a 350 watt ($1,499) version and a 500 watt ($1,699) version as well
  • Features battery integrated lights in the front and rear, mono shock up front, locking ergonomic grips, Velo saddle, folding pedals, rear rack, plastic fenders with mud flaps, and more
  • Powered by a 350 watt hub drive with a sealed 12 magnet cadence based pedal assist, thumb throttle, 7 speed Shimano Tourney system, and 160mm mechanical disc brakes with motor inhibitors
  • Keep key out when folding so it doesn’t scratch, no clasps or magnets to keep it folded, and the throttle is tied to the level of pedal assist

Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

e-Joe

Model:

Epik Swan 350

Price:

$1,499

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Urban, Commuting, Travel

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States, Canada

Model Year:

2019

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

56.9 lbs (25.8 kg)

Battery Weight:

5.9 lbs (2.67 kg)

Motor Weight:

8 lbs (3.62 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

14.5 in (36.83 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Unfolded Dimensions: 14.5" Seat Tube, 23.5" Reach, 12.25" Stand Over Height, 28" Minimum Saddle Height, 24.25" Width, 64" Length, Folded Dimensions: 39.5" Length, 22.5" Width, 27" Height

Frame Types:

Step-Thru, Folding

Frame Colors:

Glossy Blue with Silver Accents

Frame Fork Details:

Mono-Shock Suspension with Steel Lowers, 40mm Travel, 100mm Hub Spacing, 9mm Axle with Quick Release Skewer

Frame Rear Details:

135mm Hub Spacing, 12mm Threaded Axle with 18mm Nuts

Attachment Points:

Fender Bosses, Rear Rack Bosses

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Tourney Derailleur, Shimano MF-TZ500-7 14-28 Tooth Cassette

Shifter Details:

Shimano SIS Index Thumb Shifter on Right

Cranks:

Forged Aluminum Alloy, 170mm Length, Square Tapered Spindle, 48 Tooth Chainring with Plastic Guide

Pedals:

Wellgo K20410 Plastic Platform, Folding

Headset:

Threadless, Internal Cups, Straight 1-1/8"

Stem:

Aluminum Alloy, Folding, 280mm Base Height, 130mm Telescoping Height, 25.4mm Clamp Diameter

Handlebar:

Aluminum Alloy, Low-Rise, 610mm Length

Brake Details:

Tektro Mechanical Disc with 160mm Rotors, Tektro Four-Finger Levers with Integrated Bell on Left and Motor Inhibitors

Grips:

Rubber, Ergonomic, Locking

Saddle:

Velo, Comfort

Seat Post:

Promax, Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

33.9 mm

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy, Double Wall, 40mm Outer Width, Six Cast Support Arms

Tire Brand:

Kenda Kwest, 20" x 2.125" (57-406)

Wheel Sizes:

20 in (50.8cm)

Tire Details:

40 to 65 PSI, 2.8 to 4.6 BAR, Reflective Stripes, Nylon

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Plastic Fenders with Mud Flaps (50mm Width), Aluminum Alloy Rear Rack (15kg 33lb Max Weight), Integrated Spanninga Kendo+ LED Headlight, Integrated Blaze-Lite RL1900 Rear Light, Rear-Mount Adjustable Kickstand (40mm Tab), Metal Bottom Bracket Protection Bar

Other:

Locking Removable Downtube-Integrated Battery Pack, 1.5lb 2 Amp Charger

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bafang

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

350 watts

Motor Peak Output:

500 watts

Motor Torque:

45 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung 18650

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

10.5 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

504 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

6 hours

Estimated Min Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Estimated Max Range:

50 miles (80 km)

Display Type:

Fixed, Backlit, Grayscale LCD, Buttons: Up, Power, Down, (Lights: Hold Up, Walk Mode: Hold Down, Settings: Hold Up and Down)

Readouts:

Battery Level (4 Bars), Time, Trip Time, Assist Level (0-5), Current Speed, Average Speed, Max Speed, Trip Distance, Odometer, Voltage

Display Accessories:

LED Charge Level Indicator on Top of Battery (Green, Yellow, Red)

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle (Sealed 12-Magnet Sensor)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

To run the forums, host the website, and travel, I charge a universal service fee for my reviews. This review was sponsored by e-Joe. My goal is to be transparent and unbiased, this video and written review are not meant to be an endorsement of e-Joe products.

The e-Joe Epik Swan 350 is a value priced and approachable step through electric folding bike with a lot of features and fun. As you might imagine, the bike has a 350 watt rear hub motor, however, it does come in a 500 watt as well. The 350 watt is $1,499 while the 500 watt costs $1,699. Besides motor size and cost, there are a few small differences here and there between the two, (so you may see me call those out as we go along) but today we will be focusing mostly on the 350. The bike comes in 1 color (glossy blue, black for the 500) and 1 frame size, but it pretty configurable and extremely approachable. It can fit a lot of riders due to the low seat height configuration and telescoping stem. The frame weighs 56lbs with the battery, seat, and everything attached. As with most folding bikes, you get a smaller tire size, these are 20” x 2.15” Kenda tires and I love that they include a reflective sidewall for safety. Note the cast rims here on the 350, (unavailable on the 500) it really makes the ride sturdy and the spokes never need to be trued. There are some nice plastic fenders here with these rubberized mud flaps. Not only do these add an additional element to keep you clean, but it can help alleviate toe strikes to the fender if you are making a tight turn. And check out this mono shock up front! The shock offers just 40mm of travel, so it is a little limited, but I am still glad it’s here, it really makes the ride more comfortable regardless. Other comfort touch points would be the Velo saddle, locking ergonomic grips, and the plastic chain guide. I love the battery integrated lights here, they have them both in the front and the rear. Safety has always been a priority for myself and other cyclists, so it’s nice to see that more and more companies are including these on ebikes. There is so much stuff to cover on this bike, it really is fully featured… I can’t forget about this rear rack, it has standard gage tubing to fit most panniers and has a max weight limit of 33lbs. Other features include a rear kickstand to eliminate annoying pedal lock when reversing, plastic folding pedals, a bell, and internally routed cables.

Driving the bike is a 350 watt rear hub-drive motor. As mentioned before, the bike also comes in a 500 watt version. I found the 350 to work just fine for me, I enjoyed the trigger throttle as well as the sealed 12 magnet cadence sensor for the pedal assist. Check out the ride test in the video to see more. Mechanically, the bike is operated by a Shimano Tourney 7 speed system with a 14-28 tooth cassette. Not the largest range for climbing, but it works just fine for riding around the neighborhood or city. It is using an SIS index style thumb shifter for the gears, which is not my favorite, but it does work really well if you are wearing gloves and such. Stopping the bike is a set of 160mm mechanical disc brakes in the front and rear. Mechanical brakes take a little more hand actuation as opposed to hydraulic brakes, but they are easier to maintain and adjust. I should also mention these come with motor inhibitors to cut power to the motor when pulling on the brake levers. I love that more and more bikes are including these.

Powering the display, electrical system, and front and rear lights is this 48v 10.5ah battery. The battery had an LED charge level light for readout and can be charged on and off the bike. One thing I love about this battery pack is that it is sharable. Imagine you are a couple looking to get his and hers bikes, maybe one person gets a 350 and another gets the 500… either way, the batteries are interchangeable which I think is great. Charging here is done with this 1.5lb 2amp portable charger. I love that it is lightweight, but the 2amp rating coupled with this larger size battery means it could take a bit to charge from all the way dead. The charging port is nice and high when the battery is placed on the bike, so that means it is away from the crank arms and less likely to get snagged or tangled when charging on the bike. To really care for this and other lithium-ion packs, I have heard that storing in a cool dry location vs. extreme heat or cold will extend the life and try to keep it about 50% full when not using for long periods so you won’t stress the cells. Try not to let it run down to zero, because that’s really hard on the cell chemistry.

Controlling the Epik Swan 350 is done though this plastic display mounted on the left. It is backlit, but is not removable as far as I can tell and doesn’t seem to swivel either. The controls feature a Power button as well as an Up and Down button for scrolling. Along with the speed here in MPH, it shows a 4 bar battery info graphic, with the outline of the battery logo itself acting as a 5th bar. So basically, it reads out in 20% increments. It also has readings for a timer, distance, and what level of assist you are in. Assist levels range from 0-5, but I did notice that 0 also locks out the throttle, so if you want to use that throttle, make sure to push the assist into 1-5. If you press Power lightly again, you can cycle through current speed, average speed, max speed, voltage, and odometer. Holding down the Up button will get the display to turn on its backlight. This also activates the integrated headlight too. Hold the Down button will active a walk mode. Finally, if you turn the display off, then back on, begin to hold down Up and Down together and you get a deep menu that lets you configure things like top speed, wheel diameter, and MPH to KMH. I did notice that the throttle is limited by the pedal assist level, meaning that lower levels of pedal assist, such as 1, will have a slower throttle response and top speed. Make sure to put it in 5 if you want to take full advantage of that throttle.

I really like the Epik Swan 350, and the approachability, features, and value price point of $1,499 make it that much more tempting for anyone considering it. But, it is time to go over the tradeoffs, so lets get some of those out of the way. When folding, I left the keys in once and it has a potential to scratch the frame, so do be careful of that. Also, there is no folding clasp or magnet or anything to keep it compacted. Other folding bikes are starting to add these and they really can make a difference, so it is sad that it is not here. I also noticed that if you mount certain style bags in the rear, it can get in the way of pedaling, so be mindful. But even with all the tradeoffs, I think this is a great little folding bike. It is very tight when folded and can even be carted around easily like luggage with wheels. I would recommend checking out the video review for a demonstration. This is a cool new bike from e-Joe and I want to thank them for letting me check it out!

As always, I welcome questions and feedback in the comment section below. Whether you own the bike, have taken a test ride, or are brand new to the space, my goal is to provide an objective and honest resource. You can also join the e-Joe ebike forums and share your own photos, videos, and review updates to help others! Have fun out there, and ride safe :)

Pros:

  • A value priced and approachable step through electric folding bike with a ton of features and fun, comes in a 350 watt ($1,499) version and a 500 watt ($1,699) version as well
  • The bike comes in 1 color (glossy blue, black for the 500) and 1 frame size, but it pretty configurable and extremely approachable, due to the low seat height configuration and telescoping stem
  • 20” x 2.15” Kenda tires that include a reflective sidewall for safety, these smaller wheels mean a mechanical advantage for breaking, pedaling, and even electric assist
  • Note the cast rims here on the 350, (unavailable on the 500) it really makes the ride sturdy and the spokes never need to be trued
  • Plastic fenders with mud flaps are always great, these help keep you clean and dry, and I even like how the mud flap can alleviate toe strikes when turning tightly, should your toe hit the fender for a moment
  • Has a sleek looking mono shock up front, this has 40mm of travel, this combined with the steel fork (which also has vibration dampening qualities), makes for a pretty comfortable ride
  • Battery integrated lights in both the front and rear, I am a big fan of safety for cyclists, so I am happy to see that more and more bikes are including these
  • You get a nice rear rack, it has standard gage tubing to fit most panniers and has a max weight limit of 33lbs
  • Powered by a 350 watt hub drive with a sealed 12 magnet cadence based pedal assist, thumb throttle, 7 speed Shimano Tourney system, and 160mm mechanical disc brakes with motor inhibitors
  • A fairly high capacity 48v 10.5ah battery that is interchangeable with other Epik bikes, has a battery readout level, and a charging port away from the crank arms so it doesn’t get snagged or tangled
  • Display is compact yet easy to read thanks to its backlight and simple operation
  • It is very tight when folded and can even be carted around easily like luggage with wheels, I would recommend checking out the video review for a demonstration

Cons:

  • When folding, I left the keys in once and it has a potential to scratch the frame, so keep an eye out and make sure to be mindful of that
  • There is no folding clasp or magnet or anything to keep it compacted, other folding bikes are starting to add these and they really can make a difference, so it is sad that it is not here
  • I also noticed that if you mount certain style bags in the rear, it can get in the way of pedaling as your heel can rub up against it, so do be aware of what bags you choose and how you load it
  • One of my larger complaints is that the throttle is tied to the pedal assist level, for me, I like to have that full throttle power at all times in case I need to get out of the way of something, luckily, the e-Joe company listens to their riders and I think this is something we could possibly see updated in the future

Resources:

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Comments (6) YouTube Comments

Kenneth Maruska
2 months ago

These “etility” ebikes are going to be a popular segment because they are compact yet powerful enough to be light service cargo capable and good reasonable distance commuters. I like the fact that some hub motor manufacturers are integrating their geared hubs into these 20″ magnesium wheels to eliminate spokes and make the wheels more moped-like in style and durability. If the integrated hub motors get into that 80-100nM torque range expect these to be very serious competition with the mini-retro racers / scramblers / super 73s becuase the riding geometry and utility value is better. Personally I’d like to see the tire widths to be in the 3-4″ range for improved handling and comfort but the 2″ range probably provides a bit better efficiency. Nice design overall!

  Reply
Court
2 months ago

Hey Kenneth, great observations. I agree with you, these bikes are more comfortable and versatile than some of the retro racer / scramblers. It sounds like you’re describing a hybrid of the two models where comfort is considered but you get some of the style and wider tires. Have you seen the new RadRunner? It’s completely unique and has a seat with adjustable height. Could be perfect for you.

  Reply
John
2 weeks ago

Hi Court, Great review. Just curious if you’re planning to review the Epik Carbon or if you have any experiences with it. Thanks!

  Reply
Court
2 weeks ago

Hey John! Yeah, I filmed it and do plan on releasing but am a bit behind schedule on doing so… Keep an eye out in the coming week, it’s a good review ;)

  Reply
John
1 week ago

Thanks Court! Looking forward to it. I have a question about the Swan. On E-Joe’s site, they state the net weight is 45-50lbs depending on the battery configuration. I assume the 350w was 45lbs in their estimate. Do the fenders, racks, other accessories really add another 11lbs on your model?

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