Evelo Galaxy ST Review

Evelo Galaxy St Electric Bike Review
Evelo Galaxy St
Evelo Galaxy St Bafang 350 Watt Max Drive Gates Carbon Belt
Evelo Galaxy St Rear Rack 36 Volt Ebike Battery
Evelo Galaxy St King Meter Lcd Display Padded Grips Trigger Throttle
Evelo Galaxy St Plastic Fenders With Mud Flaps Hydraulic Disc Brakes
Evelo Galaxy St Rigid Alloy Fork Blizzard Blue Color
Evelo Galaxy St Step Thru Frame Bottle Cage Bosses Wellgo C235 Pedals
Evelo Galaxy St Nuvinci N380 Cvt Harmony Electronic Shifting
Evelo Galaxy St Selle Royale Ondina Sprung Faux Leather Saddle
Evelo Galaxy St Compact 2 Amp Electric Bike Charger
Evelo Galaxy St Electric Bike Review
Evelo Galaxy St
Evelo Galaxy St Bafang 350 Watt Max Drive Gates Carbon Belt
Evelo Galaxy St Rear Rack 36 Volt Ebike Battery
Evelo Galaxy St King Meter Lcd Display Padded Grips Trigger Throttle
Evelo Galaxy St Plastic Fenders With Mud Flaps Hydraulic Disc Brakes
Evelo Galaxy St Rigid Alloy Fork Blizzard Blue Color
Evelo Galaxy St Step Thru Frame Bottle Cage Bosses Wellgo C235 Pedals
Evelo Galaxy St Nuvinci N380 Cvt Harmony Electronic Shifting
Evelo Galaxy St Selle Royale Ondina Sprung Faux Leather Saddle
Evelo Galaxy St Compact 2 Amp Electric Bike Charger

Summary

  • A powerful cruiser style electric bike with smooth, responsive, multi-sensing pedal assist and trigger throttle operation, throttle only works above 6 mph and is limited by assist level
  • Optional hydraulic disc brakes and automatic electric shifting would be great for riders with limited hand strength or sensitive wrists, all brakes have motor inhibitors for safety
  • Available in two beautiful colors (kind of a his and hers setup), full length plastic fenders, independent lights for safety, and a clean, quiet belt drive system that won't fall off or mash
  • The bike is expensive and fairly heavy, the battery weight is positioned up high and towards the back which contributes to frame flex and speed wobble if you take your hands off the bar

Search EBR

Video Review

Trusted Advertisers

Introduction

Make:

Evelo

Model:

Galaxy ST

Price:

$3,499 ($3,899 Fully Loaded)

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Urban, Commuting

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Comprehensive, 4 Year (20,000 mile) Frame, Battery, Motor, Controller

Availability:

United States, Canada

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

57.9 lbs (26.26 kg)

Battery Weight:

7.4 lbs (3.35 kg) (Larger Pack 9 lbs)

Motor Weight:

8.8 lbs (3.99 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

18.5 in (46.99 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

19.5" Seat Tube, 23.5" Reach, 18" Stand Over Height, 27.25" Width, 73.5" Length

Frame Types:

Step-Thru

Frame Colors:

Blizzard Blue, Toasted Almond

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid Aluminum Alloy, 100 mm Hub, 9 mm Skewer with Quick Release

Frame Rear Details:

135 mm Hub, 10 mm Axle with Nuts

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

1 Speed 1x∞ NuVinci N380 Mechanical Continuously Variable Transmission, Optional NuVinci N380 Harmony HI8 (Fully Automatic Electronic Shifting System), 22T Rear Sprocket

Shifter Details:

C8s or H8 Grip Twist on Right Bar (Optional NuVinci Grip Twist on Right Bar)

Cranks:

8Fun AC08-2 Alloy Crank Arms, 170 mm Length, 50T Chainring

Pedals:

Wellgo C235 Aluminum Alloy Platform with Rubber Tread

Headset:

1-1/8" Threadless Internal Cups, One 10 mm Headset Spacer, One 5 mm Headset Spacer

Stem:

Tonaro TDS-C215, Adjustable Angle, 90 mm Length, 15° Angle

Handlebar:

Swept Back, Aluminum Alloy, 50 mm Rise, 35° Back Sweep, 680 mm Length

Brake Details:

Shimano BR-M375 Mechanical Disc with 180 mm Rotors, Tektro Levers with Motor Inhibitor, Optional Tektro Auriga E-Comp Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Rotors, Tektro 3-Finger Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Grips:

Padded, Stitched, Faux Leather, Brown

Saddle:

Selle Royale Ondina, Sprung, Faux Leather, Brown (Optional Upgrade Program)

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy, Double Wall, 36 Hole, Reinforcement Eyelets

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 13 Gauge, Silver with Adjustable Brass Nipples

Tire Brand:

CST Caldera, 27.5" x 2.0"

Wheel Sizes:

27.5 in (69.85cm)

Tire Details:

40 to 65 PSI

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Double Leg Kickstand, Aluminum Alloy Rear Rack with Spring (25 kg 55 lb Max Weight), Stand Alone Dosun SF300 USB-Rechargeable, Stand Alone Infini Back Light, Plastic Fenders with Mud Flaps, Optional Comfort Package (Ergon GP2-L Ergonomic Locking Grips, Suspension Seat Post, Extra Large Saddle for $200), Optional Safety Package (High Powered Lights, Bar-End Mirror, Bell, Reflective Light Band for Pants $99), Optional Commuter Package (Teflon Lubricant, Tire Levers, Patch Kit, Mini-Pump, Hex Key Wrench Set $99), Optional Security Package (Heavy Duty Chain Lock, Pinhead Security Hardware System $199)

Other:

Locking Removable Rear Rack Mounted Battery, 1.1 lb 2 Amp Battery Charger, 300 lb Max Weight Rating, Gates Carbon Belt Drive with CDX:EXP

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bafang Max Drive

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

350 watts

Motor Peak Output:

750 watts

Motor Torque:

80 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung (A, B Rated Cells) (Optional Panasonic)

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

13 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

468 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

6 hours (Up to 6 With Larger Pack)

Estimated Min Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Estimated Max Range:

55 miles (89 km)

Display Type:

Evelo Branded King Meter, Fixed, Monochrome, Backlit LCD

Readouts:

Battery Level (5 Bars), Odometer, Trip Meter, Speed, Average Speed, Max Speed, Mode (None, Eco, Standard, Power, Speed), Watt Output

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad on Left, Backlight (Hold Up Arrow), Walk Mode (Hold Down Arrow), Trip to Odometer (Press M Button), Speed to Avg Speed to Max Speed (Hold Up and M Button), Settings Menu (Hold Up and Down)

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle (8 Pole Cadence Sensor, Torque Sensor)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

Trusted Advertisers



Written Review

The Evelo Galaxy is a mixed bag because it delivers a unique belt drive and continuously variable transmission that works seamlessly with the quiet Bafang Max Drive motor… it gives you lights, fenders, a sturdy rear rack, and even comes in two colors for a his/hers setup. But, the lights are independent vs. wired in, the fenders rattle a bit despite having extra support struts, the step-thru frame flexes a bit (especially because the battery pack is mounted high up and in the rear vs. low and center), and it just costs a lot. The base model is $3,499 which gets you everything but hydraulic disc brakes and fancy electronic shifting. For people with wrist sensitivity or limited hand strength, the “Fully Loaded” upgrades are worth it. Stopping is easier, the brake levers are adjustable so you can bring them in a bit, and the grip shifter is sending electrical signals vs. pulling a wire. In addition to the Fully Loaded option, Evelo also sells a range of accessories like bags and locks. This is a company that really stands out for their customer support and post-purchase service, especially for an online-mostly business model. Yes, they do have a physical store in Seattle, Washington (which I visited for this review) but most of their sales happen online. You get a comprehensive two year warranty along with four years of extended coverage and a special battery replacement plan where you pay based on a sliding scale for how long you’ve had the bike vs. full MSRP. I was amazed to see some of the earliest Evelo electric bicycle models still being supported when I visited the shop, even being refurbished and sold at a discount. This behavior is inspiring, and full of effort at times I am sure, but they keep on going. The company has been around since what I would consider the early days in the US, around 2012.

Driving the Evelo Galaxy Step-Thru is a Bafang Max Drive, one of my favorite new motors to hit the ebike space… sort of. Just like the bike, this motor comes with a strong list of likes as well as a couple of missed opportunities. It’s powerful, putting out 350 to 750 watts, and it can definitely climb, with peak torque rated at 80 Newton meters. For those who are new to the space, that’s in the upper range, what you would normally see on electric mountain bikes. It’s also very compact, quiet, and responsive. I never felt like the motor was running longer than expected or delaying to start (which can cause muscle and knee pain if you’re sensitive like me). The motor is right there when you need it, measuring a combination of rear wheel speed and pedal torque. But stopping is important too, so it’s great that Evelo has opted for the fancier brake levers with integrated switches that cut power to the motor whenever they are pulled. This results in a bit of clutter near the front of the bike (brake lines, motor inhibitor lines, shifter lines, display lines, throttle lines) but almost immediately after, they are channeled through the frame and hidden from view. So what are the misses? The biggest one for me is actually how the throttle performs. Instead of being active all the time, you need to have the assist in levels 1-5 and the amount of power you have access to is related to which level you choose. This is frustrating considering that the throttle offers a variable signal output, like you push it further and get more power… just not all of the power you might without first arrowing up to the highest level of assist. And, once you do arrow up in assist, your pedaling experience is going to be a lot different. I frequently use the throttle system on other e-bikes to add power for hills, catch up to friends, or zip across a street… and then return to my lower assist level to save power or slow down to a more comfortable pace. This is still possible with the Evelo Galaxy, it just takes more clicks on the button pad. The other frustrating thing about the throttle is that it will not engage unless the bike is already going 6+ miles per hour. This means that there are times when riding in a low gear and climbing, that the bike just won’t go fast enough to use the throttle… and yet, if you shift to a higher gear, it could strain the motor. I wish the limit was more like 2 miles per hour vs. 6 mph as that is the setting on most other systems that opt for a speed limitation.

Powering the bike and backlight display panel, but not the lights, is a rack mounted Lithium-ion battery pack. It offers slightly higher than average capacity at 36 volts 13 amp hours, and can be charged on or off the bike with the basic 2 Amp charger. When you mount the battery to the rack, you have to use the key to lock it in place. I noticed that during some of my ride tests, on very bumpy streets, the battery and plastic fenders made some rattling noise. Not a whole lot, but more than some Aluminum fenders and mid-mounted or downtube-integrated battery packs I have seen on other products. The battery position is not ideal for handling, and I did notice some speed wobble when riding with no hands during part of the test. Speed wobble happens in some cases based on weight distribution, frame stiffness, and headtube angle. Basically, the front wheel can start to shake a bit from side to side and become unstable, but this doesn’t seem to be an issue at slower speeds and if you hold the handlebar like a responsible rider ;) The best part of the battery for me, is that it is covered by that great warranty and is positioned out of the way so mounting and standing over the frame is a cinch. This e-bike is very approachable, but it only comes in one frame size, so I guess the approachability is dependent on your body size. An adjustable-angle stem or even a shorter stem could make a big difference in fit and would be relatively affordable. The saddle height is very easy to adjust up and down, and I love the faux leather sprung saddle and padded grips.

Powering on and controlling the electric drive systems is pretty easy with this bike and the display is large and crisp. Once the battery pack is charged and mounted, simply press the M button at the base of the control pad and the LCD will blink to life, showing your current speed, assist level, odometer and other stats. The control ring also has an up and down arrow, which let you navigate from 0 to 5 for different levels of assist and throttle power. The throttle does not work at level zero, and as mentioned earlier, you need to be going at least six miles per hour for it to function at all in levels 1-5. A few quick tips for using this control system: hold up and M to switch from average speed to max speed readouts, hold up on its own to activate the display backlight, and hold the down arrow to initiate walk mode. This last one can be useful if the bike is loaded up with groceries or you’re in grass or a hill but preferring to walk vs. ride. Note that the display panel can be swiveled forward and back to reduce glare, but is not removable. So there could be some weather exposure and scratches from parking outside and at bike racks. Also note, the throttle and control ring are both mounted to the left part of the handle bar, and reaching the buttons requires that you reach over the throttle mount which can be a stretch for smaller hands. Some people prefer having the throttle on the right side, but that isn’t possible due to the grip shifter for the NuVinci N380. All in all, the cockpit works well enough and the swept-back handlebar is comfortable and relaxed.

Even though I’ve expressed some complaints here, the Evelo Galaxy ST is still one of the more approachable, powerful, and dynamic cruiser style electric bikes I have seen. The belt drive is clean, quiet, and more reliable than a chain. The continuously variable transmission is not as vulnerable to the forces of a mid-drive motor as an internally geared hub or traditional cassette+derailleur would be, especially because the Bafang Max Drive motor does not have shift detection. The addition of bottle cage bosses, a sturdy double-leg kickstand, thicker spokes and rims with eyelets, and a max weight rating of 300+ lbs makes this a great platform for many uses and types of people. And, because it comes in light blue or light brown, it can fit your personality better while enabling you to be comfortable. Big thanks to Evelo for partnering with me on this review and taking me to such a cool spot to film in Seattle! There were people swimming, the day was beautiful, and we really got to stress test the bikes on some steep hills. It was incredible just how strong the bikes were when climbing, and I was relatively comfortable on the sprung saddle despite there being no suspension fork or seat post suspension. The tires, swept back bar, padded grips, and saddle provide good enough comfort while keeping weight and flex down.

Pros:

  • Evelo has been in business selling electric bikes in the United States longer than most of the other brands I have reviewed for, since 2012, they offer one of the best warranties and proactive customer service that I would rank close to the top
  • I really like the motor they chose for the Galaxy line of electric bikes, the Bafang Max Drive unit is powerful, efficient, and super quiet, if you opt for the belt drive and continuously variable transmission (shown in the images and video above) it performs near perfectly because you don’t have to worry about mashing gears or the chain falling off
  • The frame and wheelset on this bike felt very solid, considering it is built around a deep wave “step-thru” design, it’s rated to 300+ lbs, the benefit is that it’s approachable; easier to mount and stand over
  • The faux leather saddle and matching grips look nice but are also soft and comfortable, the swept back bar and spring design on the saddle offer just enough cushion to help smooth out vibration and bumps, note that this e-bike does not have a suspension fork… you could further smooth out the ride by swapping the rigid seat post with a 27.2 mm suspension post like this but keep in mind, it will raise the minimum saddle height by ~3 inches
  • Even though this electric bicycle only comes in one frame size for the step-thru setup, you can get a slightly larger high-step frame called the Galaxy TT, I like that at least you get two colors here which reflect a sort of his and hers setup (light blue or light brown)
  • It’s really expensive to develop a frame that can work with belt drives, so that’s a big deal and something that really sets the Evelo Galaxy models apart, they had to engineer a cutout on the rear right seat stay for the belt to go through since it cannot be unlinked like a chain
  • The motor is very capable, offering up to 80 Newton meters of peak torque, it should be able to climb anything as long as you shift down to a lower gear, I like that both brake levers have motor inhibitors that cut power instantly when pulled so you don’t feel overwhelmed by the power of the bike
  • Stable double-leg kickstand makes the bike easy to load up (like the rack at the rear) if you’re someone who commutes or would ride this to the store for groceries etc.
  • Minor pro, they bike has bottle cage bosses on the main tube! This could get in the way and possibly kicked because there is no tubing over them, but you could always use this for a folding lock or mini-pump which wouldn’t stick out as far
  • It’s cool that Evelo has some “guaranteed to fit” accessory options like the quicklock chain and the trunk bag with zip-out panniers, I like the bag a lot because it’s reflective and has some Evelo branding on it
  • I was told that Evelo uses A and B rated high-quality cells and I like that their battery pack can be charged on or off the bike because that means you can store it inside away from the cold or heat to help protect it and last longer
  • Very few electric bikes offer the Harmony electronic shifting and I noticed that the grip shifter was so easy to turn with this option, it didn’t require the same hand strength to use and that could be a big win for someone with sensitive wrists or strength limitations

Cons:

  • The frame only comes in one size and the stem is a bit long and forward, I think this electric bike would be a good candidate for a quality adjustable angle stem (or you could just replace the stem with a shorter one if you’re a smaller person with shorter reach)
  • Priced at $3,899 for the “fully loaded” model, this is definitely one of the more expensive electric bikes that isn’t from one of the big brands like Trek or Specialized, but it does really pack in the features (electronic shifting, belt drive, continuously variable transmission) so I think it’s actually worth it
  • Evelo has done the right thing by adding motor inhibitors on both brake levers, but the extra wires up front can get a bit cluttered and messy looking, thankfully, once they curve back towards the frame they are mostly internally routed
  • I wish the throttle would activate at 2 mph instead of 6 mph because in the lower gears for climbing, the bike just isn’t going to go as fast and the throttle might not work… so you’ll have to pedal
  • The Galaxy models are definitely on the heavy side, this one weighing in at about 58 pounds, and some of that is due to the reinforced frame, fenders, and rack, as well as the continuously variable transmission hub, note also that some of the weight is high up and towards the back (in that battery pack) which is not ideal for handling and stability, I did experience some speed wobble when riding with no hands because of the weight distribution, but at least it opens up the main section of frame for easier mounting
  • I like that the bike has LED lights, but I wish they were running off of the main rechargeable battery vs. being independent battery powered because this requires more time to turn on/off and disposable cells
  • The kickstand hangs down a bit low, I didn’t have and issue with it dragging at all when I turned sharp, it just made me wonder if there would be times when it bangs on curbs or other obstacles
  • I don’t know a lot about the tires on this bike but it appears they do not have puncture protection lining or reflective sidewall stripes, considering how expensive this electric bike is, that sort of bums me out… fixing a flat tire on an electric bike is no fun, especially with the fancy NuVinci CVT and belt drive, consider upgrading to something like this from Schwalbe
  • The throttle power is limited by whatever pedal assist level you choose, in some ways, this bothers me because I often use the throttle to get extra help up a hill or pass a slow rider… but this system would require me to arrow up to a higher level and then use the throttle even though the throttle has a full range of motion built in, I wish I could just push further for more power

Resources:

Trusted Advertisers

More EVELO Reviews

Evelo Quest One Review

  • MSRP: $1,999
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A folding electric bike that's fairly lightweight at ~41 lbs, clean and simple thanks to a Gates Carbon belt drive, and still feature rich with fenders and integrated lights. Available in two color choices, offers pedal assist and throttle on demand, highly adjustable extra-long…...

Evelo Delta Review

  • MSRP: $3,499
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

One of the more powerful purpose-built electric mountain bikes I have tested to date, possibly the only setup like this with a trigger throttle that overrides assist 1-5, unlockable higher speeds. Unique combination of trail capable and urban oriented features such as rear rack bosses and…...

Evelo Galaxy TT Review

  • MSRP: $3,499
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A comfortable but sturdy cruiser style electric bike with premium aesthetic, the mid-drive motor is powerful but quiet and offers responsive pedal assist plus throttle. EVELO has always offered great customer service and even has a trade-in program, the Galaxy…...

Evelo Aries Review

  • MSRP: $2,079
  • MODEL YEAR: 2014

Full suspension city bike with basic mid-drive system (upgradable motor, battery and drivetrain options). Nice accessories including USB charger, front and rear LED lights, mechanical disc brakes and a…...

Evelo Aurora Review

  • MSRP: $2,079
  • MODEL YEAR: 2014

Value driven but well rounded mid-drive ebike with upgradable motor, battery and drivetrain options. Great features include backlit LCD display with built in USB charger, front and rear LED…...

2013 Evelo Aries Review

  • MSRP: $1,995
  • MODEL YEAR: 2013

Affordable full suspension electric bike with mid-grade Lithium polymer battery. Decent strength (36 Volts of power) and range (10 amp hour capacity)...

2013 Evelo Aurora Review

  • MSRP: $1,995
  • MODEL YEAR: 2013

Offers lots of features but isn't particularly strong or fast as an electric bike. Entry level components get the job done and keep the price lower, unique frame flexes...


Mike H
4 days ago

Why is the battery so high? Why is there so much space betweeen the fenders and battery/rack? I thought a lower center of gravity would be desirable. I understand the explanation why it is above the rear wheel but it appears that the battery is higher than it needs to be. Was the rack/battery holder chosen before the wheel size?

Reply
Court Rye
4 days ago

Those are all good observations Mike, perhaps the rack could be optimized a bit more than what was shown in these photos and video… do you see the two holes on the lower support arm for the rack, near the rear wheel mount? It seems like the rack could slide down and use one of those two lower holes to bring weight down. I’m assuming they would have done this already if not for some other reason? And my guess is that yeah, they are just using an aftermarket rack (a decent one with nice pannier blockers and bungee attachment with battery bay) but still a generic part. Other reasons for this rack might be that it works with that rear light or maybe they had to raise the rack to fit the light there? Optimally, the battery bay would connect directly to the fender for extra support and reduced noise, and the light would be built into the back of the battery pack. This e-bike from Gazelle does a better job with the rear rack design in my opinion, incorporating the frame tubing for extra strength and using a light that can still fit above the fender and make room for the pack to slide out.

Reply

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Dfstarman
6 hours ago

I have a Eflow E3 Nitro which I love it has regen braking, throttle, torque sensor .
Unfortunately I developed arthritis in my hip and I can no longer swing my leg over the bike so I am selling it with only ~900 miles on it.

So I am looking at an a stepthru .

My possible's that I have narrowed down to are the Evelo Galaxy ST(has a throttle and torque sensor. Disadvantage rear battery , speed wobble., has Nuvinci and Belt drive.
Reise and Muller also has Nuvinvi and Belt drive and Kalkhoff again belt drive and internally geared .

I am also considering the old St1 Platinum step thru as I really like the ride on those but they have the older chain drives.

Non but the Evelo have a throttle which admittedly I use very infrequently.

Any advice would be appreciated

PCDoctorUSA
13 hours ago

I have a Eflow E3 Nitro which I love it has regen braking, throttle, torque sensor .
Unfortunately I developed arthritis in my hip and I can no longer swing my leg over the bike so I am selling it with only ~900 miles on it.

So I am looking at an a stepthru .

My possible's that I have narrowed down to are the Evelo Galaxy ST(has a throttle and torque sensor. Disadvantage rear battery , speed wobble., has Nuvinci and Belt drive.
Reise and Muller also has Nuvinvi and Belt drive and Kalkhoff again belt drive and internally geared .

I am also considering the old St1 Platinum step thru as I really like the ride on those but they have the older chain drives.

Non but the Evelo have a throttle which admittedly I use very infrequently.

Any advice would be appreciated
How about the E3 Zuma from IZIP?

Dfstarman
14 hours ago

I have a Eflow E3 Nitro which I love it has regen braking, throttle, torque sensor .
Unfortunately I developed arthritis in my hip and I can no longer swing my leg over the bike so I am selling it with only ~900 miles on it.

So I am looking at an a stepthru .

My possible's that I have narrowed down to are the Evelo Galaxy ST(has a throttle and torque sensor. Disadvantage rear battery , speed wobble., has Nuvinci and Belt drive.
Reise and Muller also has Nuvinvi and Belt drive and Kalkhoff again belt drive and internally geared .

I am also considering the old St1 Platinum step thru as I really like the ride on those but they have the older chain drives.

Non but the Evelo have a throttle which admittedly I use very infrequently.

Any advice would be appreciated

fredi
1 week ago

Seriously considering purchasing one of these myself. fredi, any updates on how yours is going after another couple of months' use?
I still love her! The torque sensor and the the NuVinci Harmony Automatic Transmission makes riding the Galaxy so natural and the battery life is amazing. I don't think I would have been happy with any thing else.

pjtait
1 week ago

This weekend I took her out to the steep hill that got me serious about getting an ebike. According to my GPS the hill had a max grade of 13%. Riding the Galaxy up the hill was no problem and I easily maintained 10 mph. Kind of made me wonder what all the fuss was about.

Seriously considering purchasing one of these myself. fredi, any updates on how yours is going after another couple of months' use?

scrambler
2 months ago

If she wants and internal gear hub with electronic shifting, you may also want to test / consider one with the NuVinci N380 + Harmony system. It is a continuously variable transmission ( no actual gears), and automatic shifting of the gear ratio.
There are a few bikes with that configuration available like:
EVELO Galaxy ST
http://www.evelo.com/electric-bicycles/galaxy-st/
FELT Verza E 10
http://www.feltbicycles.com/International/2016/Bikes/electric/road/verzae-10.aspx

scrambler
2 months ago

Personally I think I would prefer a Harmony hub interface with the H8 controller rather than the H|sync. The H8 gives you a quick way to use the NuVinci either in Manual mode (still electronic shifting) or automatic cadence mode.
It seems like it would gives more/easier flexibility than the fully integrated H|sync system.
But I do not have experience with both, so this is just a theoretical preference :)

Keep us posted on your test ride experiences.

FYI: Evelo has a NuVinci with Harmony automated system and a Gates Carbon belt called the Galaxy, check them out too.
They have two models TT and ST depending if you need a step through or not
http://www.evelo.com/electric-bicycles/galaxy-st/

Over50
2 months ago

Thanks for the photos. I have a Galaxy S7 Edge as my note was recalled twice (can't wait for the Note 8). So far, it doesn't look like they can find another one. Did the case come with the stem cap fixture to clip the bag on?
Yes, the Serfas came with the stem cap/receiver for the bag (attachment shown in my pictures). My LBS put it on for me when they were installing my fenders (Portland Design Works).

fredi
2 months ago

You can’t use a detailer with a belt drive so you either go with a hub gear or single speed. My Evelo Galaxy TT has the Gates carbon belt drive and combined with the NuVinci Harmony automatic transmission they provide a smooth and quiet riding experience. It probably helps that the Bafang motor doesn’t have the annoying high pitched wine of the Bosch.

86 and still kicking
2 months ago

Thanks for the photos. I have a Galaxy S7 Edge as my note was recalled twice (can't wait for the Note 8). So far, it doesn't look like they can find another one. Did the case come with the stem cap fixture to clip the bag on?

Over50
2 months ago

Correction. Head of product at Serfas called me and said this is an old old product as it does not show up in inventory or catalogs. They believe they may have one or two lounging somewhere in the warehouse and are looking for them. Leave it to me to like a totally discontinued product....

Glad they found it but nevertheless I attached a couple of photos for you. It is just slightly short for my Galaxy 8. Prior I had the Galaxy Note and no way that would fit. It is handy for my wallet and keys but if I want to bring my phone and I am traveling light I use a sling bag (Patagonia Atom 8 I think). I can often go without my phone as I have a Samsung watch from which I can make or receive calls and texts. Overall this bag has been handy but still is pretty limited in use due to its small size.

1/3
86 and still kicking
2 months ago

Stem bag is a Serfas found at my Trek shop. A little small for my phone (Samsung Galaxy). Wallet, keys and maybe a couple of individual hex wrenches is about all I can carry there.
Serfas has never seen or heard about the stem case. Can you give me the contact info for the trek store and I can follow up with them for further info. Many thanks

fredi
2 months ago

My Evelo Galaxy has a Bafang motor with the NuVinci Harmony Automatic hub and I absolutely love it.

fredi
2 months ago

This weekend I took her out to the steep hill that got me serious about getting an ebike. According to my GPS the hill had a max grade of 13%. Riding the Galaxy up the hill was no problem and I easily maintained 10 mph. Kind of made me wonder what all the fuss was about.

Over50
2 months ago

Where did you get your stem bag?
Stem bag is a Serfas found at my Trek shop. A little small for my phone (Samsung Galaxy). Wallet, keys and maybe a couple of individual hex wrenches is about all I can carry there.

fredi
2 months ago

This is my first ebike and my decision to buy her was based on getting the best ebike for me at the best price. First a little about me, I’m 60 years old, 6’1” and 230 lbs. A have a 34” Class-A RV and travel the east coast. On long trips I normally tow a Jeep Wrangler with a tray-style bike rack loaded with two or three mountain bike from a big box store. On short trips I leave the Jeep at home and mount the bike rack to the RV. Typical use of the bikes is for recreational riding in National and State parks. I thought it was time for a better bike and was intrigued with the idea of using ebikes and leaving the Jeep at home more.

I originally looked at Evelo because of their mid-drive with the NuVinci hub. They didn’t offer any local sales but work with local bike shops to provide service in conjunction with their 4-year/20,000-mile warranty. I was drawn to the Delta with the 750 watt mid-drive since all I’ve ever owned was mountain bikes and I wanted to make sure that it would get me up the hills. I soon discovered that where I live they only allow 500 watts and mid-drives are more efficient using the power, so while a 750 watt hub drive may struggle to get me up the hill, a 350 watt mid-drive should have less problems because they have higher performance, more torque and use less battery power. I also have always hated not being in the right gear at the right time and gnashing the gears and an Internally Geared Hub (IGH) like the NuVinci would solve those problems. Since I was planning on adding lots of comfort accessories like a plush seat, road tires, rear rack, fenders, lights, etc. and the Galaxy comes with all of those so I felt it was a better fit for me.

The Galaxy is billed as a comfort cruiser with an upright riding position, 27.5″ wheels and 2” tires on a ridge frame. Evelo makes two models the Galaxy, the GT with a step-through frame and the TT a traditional top tube frame. Each model comes in two versions, Premium or Fully Loaded. The Fully Loaded version upgrades the NuVinci N380 transmission to the Harmony fully automatic transmission and adds hydraulic brakes. So I ordered the Fully Loaded Galaxy TT version with a list price of $3899.

The bike came in about a week. She was double boxed and very well packed. The hardest part was getting the bike out of the box. I recommend having a little help here. Evelo isn’t kidding when they say the bike come almost fully assembled. Install the brake caliper, front wheel and fender, handlebars, headlight, and you’re done. They recommend charging the battery for 12 hours before the first use, so I plugged it in to charge overnight and then set about the process of assembling the bike which took about 30 minutes. They provided several allen wrenches, a couple of “real” boxed end wrenches and armed with the step by step instructions it was much easier to assemble than any bike I’ve ever bought from a big box store. My recommendation is that you put the fender on before you install the front wheel and then attach the brake caliper. The front wheel comes with a “Quick Release” so it’s really not a big deal.

The Galaxy is one of a small number of electric bikes that offer the NuVinci Harmony Automatic Transmission which allows me to enjoy the ride while it takes care of the shifting. In automatic it finds the proper gear while I dial in a comfortable cadence and set the assist level for my perfect ride. No more gnashing the gears and getting stuck on a hill because I was in the wrong gear. A simple button press changes the hub to manual mode, but I mostly I keep it in automatic on the lowest setting. The brushless motor combined with the Gates belt drive and the Harmony makes the ride smooth and virtually silent. I set the tire pressure to 50 lbs for a softer ride.

She comes with a 350 watt Bafang Max mid-drive motor (peak 600 watts) and uses a torque sensor (internal to the motor) and speed to determine how much power is drawn from the battery. The torque sensor uses a strain gauge inside the motor to measure pressure on the pedals. This allows for quick engagement and better sensitivity. I was concerned about the Galaxy’s uphill performance but found that she can easily climb hills at 8-12 mph that would normally bring me to a crawl. On level roads I can quickly reach the 20+ mph limit. At those speeds it’s nice to have the Tektro 180mm hydraulic disc brakes that provide great stopping power and simultaneously cut power to the motor. Once you stop there is a double fork kickstand to keep her upright.

The large backlit LCD display panel (made by King) is mounted center of the handlebars and can swivel forward or back to reduce glare. It’s easy to read and offers information about speed, distance, pedal assist, watts and a five segment battery charge level indicator. The control pad is located near the left grip, from there you can turn the bike on/off and select the level of assist. I really liked that holding the UP button turns on/off the backlight and holding the DOWN button activates “Walk” mode which moves the bike forward at about two mph. Pressing both the UP and DOWN buttons for 3 seconds puts you in the settings menu where you can increase the maximum speed to 25 mph, set the backlight level, and miles or kilometers. I set the wheel diameter to 27.5 inches since it defaulted to 26.

The bike has a thumb throttle but as a safety feature it doesn't engage unless the bike is moving. I originally thought I would need the throttle to get across an intersection or when starting up a hill, but the bike's torque sensor measures pressure on the pedals, so it quickly engages. It is so responsive and natural feeling that I haven't used the throttle much but I certainly have used “walk” mode several times.

The rear tail light is mounted directly beneath the battery rack so it isn’t blocked by my pannier and is powered by a couple of AA batteries. The LED Head Light has five modes and is USB rechargeable. It quickly installs on the handlebars with a rubber strap and the single large button on top makes it easy to turn on and change modes while riding.

Powering the bike is a 36 volt, 13 amp (468 wh) battery pack with an advertised 50 miles of range. I rode for over twenty miles before the charge indicator dropped from five to four bars. The battery weighs 8 lbs, can be charged on or off the bike and has its own level indicator. The small rubber cap protecting the charge terminal opens easily and stays closed. The battery is nicely protected in the full-size cargo rack and has a key lock which keeps it there and provides anti-theft security. You don’t need to leave the key in while riding and there’s a built-in handle to help remove the battery and carry it. Removing the battery makes it easier to lift the 46 lb bike onto my tray style carrier. The battery placement in the rack makes the bike a little heavy in the back, but frees up space for bottle cage bosses on the seat tube and allowed me to mount my folding lock on the down tube. All I did was add my Cloud-9 seat, bottle cage, pannier and a suspension seat post and I was ready to go.

After about a week of riding I took her to a local dealer for a full checkup. They did a minor adjustment to the brakes and gave her a clean bill of health, no charge. They were impressed at how well “I” put the bike together (LOL) and they loved the belt and throttle. I’ll be sure to make the checkup an annual event and return to that dealer.

Let me know if you have any questions

1/1
scrambler
2 months ago

I saw this Flyer bike, it is very similar to the Evelo Galaxy, and it does have a front suspension fork which is a plus.
Unfortunately they do not have any dealers here in the US of A :)

fredi
3 months ago

The Galaxy TT motor uses a torque sensor (internal to the motor) and speed to determine how much power is drawn from the battery. This allows for quick engagement and better sensitivity. The torque sensor uses a strain gauge inside the motor to measure pressure on the pedals.

When I’m riding it feels like the Harmony uses the torque sensor more when the NuVinci is in manual and uses the speed sensor in automatic, but the drive and shifting systems aren't integrated to the point that the motor changes its behavior intentionally. It's probably more likely that as I pedal harder, my crank speed increases. The automatic shifting works is to maintain crank speed and as my crank speed increases, the Harmony will shift, which affects the amount of torque I am putting on the pedals.

We have hills but not really steep hills. I found that she can easily climb our hills at 8-12 mph that would normally bring me to a crawl. On level roads I can quickly reach the 20 mph limit.

I did take her to dealer today for a full checkup. They did a minor adjustment to the brakes and gave her a clean bill of health, no charge. They were impressed at how well “I” put the bike together (LOL) and they loved the belt and throttle. I’ll be sure make the checkup an annual event and to return to that dealer.

I’ve only had the bike for two weeks, well over twenty miles but mostly in PAS 1. The battery gauge still shows full (5 bars) but I’m headed out for a little camping this weekend and some serious riding so I should know more next week when I get back.

fredi
3 months ago

...
Harmony has some glitches and that is why manufacturers are not using them extensively.

EVELO Galaxy won't ship until late October and there is no guarantee of the reliability of the system...

The Galaxy TT is available and I am loving mine! It came with a 4 year warranty and their support has been great so far. What kind of "glitches" should I be watching for with my Harmony?

Ravi Kempaiah
3 months ago

Thank you for the quick answer, I will contact the newwheel to see what they could do and at what price.

I actually have the Tempo on a secondary list, but they only offer the 250W Bosch on that bike, and the fork is not a real suspension fork.
So for cheaper, the Evelo Galaxy looks like a better fit with a more powerful motor.
But other than that it is a great contender too.
The Atom also has a 250W motor and an IGH versus the Harmony, so also on the secondary list :)

Thanks again for your input

Most of the Bosch motors are 250W anyway. Even the speed motors. The US version is spec'd 350W but the hardware is absolutely same.
Going by Watts is the sure fire of completely misjudging a bike's capability. I suggest you visit a bike shop and ride it actually.
Harmony has some glitches and that is why manufacturers are not using them extensively.

EVELO Galaxy won't ship until late October and there is no guarantee of the reliability of the system.

Just like the ATOM Wave, most of the Specialized Levo bikes use the Brose system but most motors whether it is Bosch or Brose or Yamah put out significantly more.

You can't just take the FLX blade and add a NuVinci to it. The chainline won't work and the Bafang system will rip the Gates carbon drive in no time.
You can get the exact same BLADE model for $2000 here but I suggest you to stay away from products like that because down the line, you will end up struggling to find parts.

scrambler
3 months ago

Thank you for the quick answer, I will contact the newwheel to see what they could do and at what price.

I actually have the Tempo on a secondary list, but they only offer the 250W Bosch on that bike, and the fork is not a real suspension fork.
So for cheaper, the Evelo Galaxy looks like a better fit with a more powerful motor.
But other than that it is a great contender too.
The Atom also has a 250W motor and an IGH versus the Harmony, so also on the secondary list :)

Thanks again for your input

scrambler
3 months ago

Hi, new here, but long time lurker :)

I am looking into an E-bike for my wife that would ideally have the following characteristics

Integrated Torque / speed / cadence sensor for best of breed PAS
IGH, Ideally a NuVinci CVT, ideally with Harmony
Gates carbon drive belt system
Mid drive with as much power as possible for the steep hills of the SF Bay Area... The Bosch 350W would be a minimum, the new Bafang Max looks interesting with more torque, and the Bafang Max Ultra sounds exciting with 1000W...
Front suspension, plus suspension seat post for light trail riding.

I have a few on my radar (see below), none of which of course fit the complete bill, so I am looking at what it would take to customize one of the almost perfect ones to fit the bill.
One of these customization, would be to replace the rear derailleur and cassette by a NuVinci.

Hence my Question / post title.
Does anyone know of a bike shop in the San Francisco Bay Area that can source and install the NuVinci system on an electric bike?

Thank you for any insights.

PS: For those sharing the same specs interest, here is my current shortlist.
EVELO new Galaxy model (closest to spec at lowest price): Would need to add a suspension fork and seat posts.
FLX Blade (more exciting motor): Would need to Add the new NuVinci 380x, and a Belt drive system
RIESE &MUELLER Nevo (expensive, no throttle ): Would need to add the harmony controller
Other expensive contenders:
FELT versa E10; Cube SUV Hybrid pro 500; BULL Lacuba Evo E8 Wave

LugNet
3 months ago

I also wanted bicycle-to-bicycle communications for my wife and I. As few wires as possible. Not push-to-talk. She much prefers keeping her hands on the handlebars.
I looked at the smart bicycle helmets and helmet add-ons like Vertix Velo and Terrano-X.
What I've ended up with so far: smartphones, Intercom app, Aftershokz Trekz Titanium headsets, and Cat-Ears AirStreamz (wind blockers) on helmets.
The Intercom app supports bluetooth headsets, VOX, and interconnect over bluetooth or wifi. We find the range and response better using wifi to link the smartphones. We could just call each other when there is cell service but the VOX feature helps with not hearing all the background noise the other rider is hearing.
The Aftershokz Trekz Titanium headsets are bone conducting: nothing blocking our ears so it is easy to hear the environment while still clearly hearing each other (or music/podcasts). No wires, these pair with the phones using bluetooth.
The Cat-Ears AirStreamz block the wind. Without them the Trekz microphones pick up wind noise instead of voice.

The smartphone-to-smartphone wifi ranges varies greatly. If my Galaxy S4 is the wifi hotspot, range is ~40 feet. If my wife's Galaxy S5 Active is the hotspot, line of sight range is over 150 feet (we have tested further)

Nothing is perfect and that goes for this solution. Trekz battery life is 6 hours. The phones would go dead sooner but we have ebikes and plug into them to keep the phones going. I wish the range was much better. Using VOX with Intercom adds a big delay between when a person starts talking after a break and hearing what was said.

Advantages over the dedicated solutions including using without wearing helmets. Yes, I mean only when off the bikes! Cost for the two pairs of Trekz and AirStreamz was less than $250. We like the comfort and enjoy the audio of the Trekz so they get used for other things all the time (which makes the 6 hour life a problem when, ahem, someone forgets to plug hers in).

J.R.
3 months ago

I think I see if I can swap out for a Galaxy TT, I don't wanna be that guy
I think you were correct, in that the Bafang drive can be set to the required specs for Maryland law. Then if MD falls in line with most other states, you could have the bike reprogrammed to the higher limits.

Blue Monkey Bicycles
4 days ago

Lot of cool components put together. Its got it all!

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 days ago

Yeah, it's a huge improvement over some of the early EVELO models in my opinion, still some minor areas for improvement but good overall :)

minnie saab
4 days ago

❤❤❤❤

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 days ago

This is a beautiful one yeah?

Christopher George
4 days ago

Anyone notice the screaming kid in the background

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 days ago

Yeah... like when I was editing the video, kept wondering if the kid was alright but I think they were just having fun :P

Darr Whyask
4 days ago

Classy AF to tell us when the test starts - every channel should be so subscriber focused. Nice job!

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 days ago

Thanks Darr, I just don't want to waste anyone's time, this is why I also only run one opening ad vs. several. Thankfully, I am able to make a living at this without having to worry too much about things that might be annoying to people. Your words and feedback mean a lot to me, thanks

roko 2147
4 days ago

Could you please review Rainbow's Rusty fold-able bikes? I'm considering buying them...

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 days ago

I'll keep an eye out for them, thanks Roko!

Dreamer 111
4 days ago

Totally unrelated... but I have that same Burton backpack as Alex. You can lift it by the zippers even if completely packed. I used and abused it but it is still in perfect condition after 20!!! years.

Regarding these bikes... except the battery placement, they are a dream setup.
They may cost more than others, but if you buy quality, you will be happy a LONG time. Totally worth it.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 days ago

Great feedback, thanks for sharing Dreamer! Sounds like you might be a happy owner? And yeah, the backpack testimonial is welcome too, lol :P

Steve Donovan
4 days ago

I appreciate that common more minor points of critique appear with less emphasis and more balance to practical usage. That's all ;)

Constance Lovejoy
5 days ago

Are there any self-diving ebikes? Would like to see ebike manufacturers go autonomous 😊

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 days ago

Sweet! Maybe a self driving car with a VR bicycle game inside that maps your ride to the real world turns and performance of the physics in the car?!

Andrew
5 days ago

Nice to see companies using the Bafang Max drive. these are easily modifiable compaired to the other motor builders.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 days ago

I really like the Bafang Max Drive, it's quiet, powerful, and fairly compact

Matt Walls
5 days ago

Too expensive for a bike, electric bikes should not exceed 2K. how do you justify the value... you could by a decent used car for 3.5K, the intent should be to manufacture affordable alternatives to cars. Not to mention bikes are much more likely to be stolen than cars, so why the hell would I buy an ebike for the same damn price as a used car?

Mike B
1 day ago

RIGHT, it'd be like people paying more than 25k for a new car. Who would want to pay more for quality or features??

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 days ago

Yeah, those are fair perspectives but there are lots of other electric bikes that cost less... so I'm not sure what the point is? For those who want a belt drive, a custom frame, a specific color or brand etc. the higher price is justifiable. Ebikes let you ride away from cars but make it to work without being sweaty, they don't require licensing or insurance, they are less expensive to repair on average, and they improve fitness and general well being. It's just different than a car, but here's a similarly designed affordable model for those who are more price sensitive https://electricbikereview.com/voltbike/elegant/

mikldude
4 days ago

Matt Walls it seems to me you are getting more for your dollar with this bike than a comparable 2k bike , belt drive , cvt gears , 300 lb rated frame , pack rack , inbuilt lights , and an inbuilt into the frame motor instead of having one just bolted on to frame like a back yarders kit job .
As for a 3.5k second hand car you mentioned , generally you get what you pay for mate .
Have a nice day .

Reid Welch
4 days ago

Hi Matt, It's a diverse market and some can afford the best, and others like us want the best price point value. It's all good. Were I wealthy I'd buy the costly stuff. It's generally worth it if you can afford it. Money does not cost much if you are rich ; )

eBikeaholic
5 days ago

Matt Walls it's actually a pretty fair price considering the belt drive, igh, cvt components. Regular bikes with these are generally around $1.5-$2k. Unfortunately Gates belts have a bit of a monopoly in this segment so they can charge a premium for now. eBike prices should also come down as battery cell tech improves. eBikes are safer, more efficient, and more reliable than cheap beater used cars. Most people would avoid buying a used car under $5k unless they enjoy maintaining it themselves.

eBikeaholic
5 days ago

Love the belt drive, can't wait to try Nuvinci h sync. How's the cadence/gearing feel at max PAS in top gear, any ghost pedaling at max speed? What did you think about the handlebar control buttons? ...I have the same button control on my bafang commuter and feel like it doesn't give good feedback and tends to skip through PAS levels too quickly. It would be great if Evelo could add display/button accessory options. Also I really like their Galaxy TT model, hopefully they'll consider relocating the battery pack to the downtube next year.

Honky Tonk
5 days ago

it just makes logical sense that belt drive has more drag and resistance than chain drive. i'll never get a belt drive system.

Honky Tonk
4 days ago

Reid Welch . the rep in the video said the belt is rated to last at least 10,000 miles. in another of Court's video, a german guy rides his chain drive tour bike 1,000 miles a month. If the german guy ride this belt drive bike, the bike would only last for 10 months before the belt fails.

Reid Welch
4 days ago

Belts for power transmission are a 200 year old technology still more widely used in the sum total of various machines than are chain drives. Belts are long lasting, cleanly and silent and maintenance free.

Honky Tonk
5 days ago

eBikeaholic . theres a reason ball bearings are made of metal and not rubber.

eBikeaholic
5 days ago

Honky Tonk I've been running a belt drive on my latest build for about 6 months. Empirically I can't feel any drag difference from my chain drive bbshd build and they get similar max/avg speeds. They both have friction but if anything the belt just feels smoother. Eventually I'll try to do a study comparing the two drives on the same bike/motor setup.

Jon R.
6 days ago

Bellingham? Or did you mean to say Bellevue? Looks like the video starts out behind the Spectrum Dance Theater at Madrona Beach on Lake Washington.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 days ago

Yeah, I think you're correct and I just had no idea what I was talking about or misunderstood when asking where we were before the filming started :P

Reid Welch
6 days ago

That said, it is so good to see an ebike with Nuvinci transmission and Gates drive! What a classy, ideal ebike combination! Kudos.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 days ago

Yeah, it's a sweet combination for sure :D