Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Review

Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Electric Bike Review
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Custom Bafang Geared Hub Motor
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Vintage Double Top Tube Style Chromoly Frame
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Bullmoose Steel Handlebar
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition E Ink Mode Selector
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Ebike Controller Charge Port Rear Led Light On Off Switch
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Shimano Revoshift Grip Shifter
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition 160 Mm Mechanical Disc Brakes
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Front
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Portland Design Works Alexander Graham Bell
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition 8 Speed Shimano Altus Drivetrain
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Compass Rat Trap Pass Tires
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Nuvo Kickstand
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Class 1 Electric Bike
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Torque And Cadence Sensing Bottom Bracket
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Lightweight Electric Bicycle
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Mini 2 Amp Charger
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Electric Bike Review
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Custom Bafang Geared Hub Motor
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Vintage Double Top Tube Style Chromoly Frame
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Bullmoose Steel Handlebar
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition E Ink Mode Selector
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Ebike Controller Charge Port Rear Led Light On Off Switch
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Shimano Revoshift Grip Shifter
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition 160 Mm Mechanical Disc Brakes
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Front
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Portland Design Works Alexander Graham Bell
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition 8 Speed Shimano Altus Drivetrain
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Compass Rat Trap Pass Tires
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Nuvo Kickstand
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Class 1 Electric Bike
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Torque And Cadence Sensing Bottom Bracket
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Lightweight Electric Bicycle
Faraday Porteur S Civic Edition Mini 2 Amp Charger

Summary

  • A limited edition Faraday Porteur ebike with upgraded NITTO bullmoose handlebar, Paul Components CNC disc brakes, Compass gravel tires, Brooks saddle, and PDW bell
  • Lightweight, quiet, efficient, and responsive motor system, custom Bafang geared hub motor with two planetary gear reductions for increased zip, 35 Nm of torque climbs well
  • Beautifully integrated front and rear LED lights, concealed wires, great optional accessories including Yepp compatible rear rack and sturdy porteur style front rack, three frame sizes and three color options
  • Minimalist E-Ink display doesn't show your current speed or range estimate just battery capacity, cannot remove battery pack for independent charging, Civic Edition doesn't come with fenders, significantly more expensive than other Portland S models

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Faraday

Model:

Porteur S Civic Edition

Price:

$3,499

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Pedal Assist (Class 1)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Comprehensive, Lifetime Frame

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2018

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

40.8 lbs (18.5 kg)

Battery Weight:

3.19 lbs (1.44 kg)

Motor Weight:

4.79 lbs (2.17 kg)

Frame Material:

Chromoly Steel

Frame Sizes:

20.47 in (51.99 cm)22.04 in (55.98 cm)23.62 in (59.99 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Medium 56 cm Measurements: 22.5" Seat Tube, 22.25" Reach, 31.25" Standover Height, 35.5" Minimum Saddle Height, 28.5" Width, 69.5" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step (Traditional Dutch Twin Top Tube)

Frame Colors:

Midnight Run Blue, Classic White, Slate Grey

Frame Fork Details:

Chromoly Steel, Rigid, 100 mm Hub Spacing, 10 mm Slotted Axle with Anti-Rotation Washers, Nuts

Frame Rear Details:

135 mm Hub Spacing, 9 mm Hollow Axle with Bolt-on Skewer, Nuts, 5 mm Allen Key

Attachment Points:

Fender Bosses, Rear Rack Bosses, Cafe Lock Bosses

Gearing Details:

8 Speed 1x8, Shimano Altus, Sunrace Cassette 11-32T

Shifter Details:

Shimano RevoShift on Right Bar

Cranks:

Faraday Forged Alloy with Chain Guard, 42 Tooth Chainring

Pedals:

VP Touring, Alloy Platform

Headset:

Prestine Sealed Bearing, Threadless, Straight 1-1/8"

Stem:

Steel, Bullmoose, Integrated, Seven 10 mm Spacers

Handlebar:

NITTO Bullmoose, Steel, Curved Back, 710 mm Length

Brake Details:

Paul Components Klamper Mechanical Disc with 160 mm Rotors, Three-Finger Paul Components Love Lever Long Pull, Gold or Silver

Grips:

Brooks Cambium Comfort, Flat, Rubber, Locking

Saddle:

Brooks Cambium All Weather C17

Seat Post:

Faraday Forged Aluminum, Forged Head

Seat Post Length:

300 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

25.4 mm

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy, 16.75 mm Inner Width, Double-Wall, 18 Hole, Black

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 13 Gauge Spokes in Front, 14 Gauge Spokes in Rear, Silver with Nipples

Tire Brand:

Compass Rat Trap Pass, 26" x 2.3"

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)

Tire Details:

55 PSI, 3.8 BAR, Tire Liners Added for Puncture Protection

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Integrated Custom 4 Watt LED Headlight, Integrated Custom 6 LED Tail Light, Nuvo Alloy Single Leg Kickstand, Clear Plastic Sticker Slap Guard, Portland Design Works Alexander Graham Bell, Optional Stem Extender Handlebar Raiser $44, Optional Porteur Rack $225 (20 kg Max Load), Optional Rear Rack Yepp Compatible $125 (25 kg Max Load), Optional Leather Pouch $69, Optional Spurcycle Bell $39, Additional Charger $49, Additional Pouch Mounted Battery $499

Other:

NCTE Torque Sensing Bottom Bracket, Setup for Wireless Firmware Updates, Automatic Bike Shut Off After 10 Minutes, KMC Chain, Max Weight 275 lbs (Rider + Gear), 1.2 lb 2 Amp Charger

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bafang (Custom Tuned 43 Volt)

Motor Type:

Front-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Motor Peak Output:

350 watts

Motor Torque:

35 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Panasonic 18650 GA 3.5 AH

Battery Voltage:

43.2 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

6.9 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

298 wh (24 18650-PF Cells)

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

3 hours

Estimated Min Range:

20 miles (32 km)

Estimated Max Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Display Type:

E-Ink Mode Selector, Fixed, Persistent Display

Readouts:

Battery Level (14 Bars), Assist Level (Off, Standard, Boost)

Display Accessories:

Bluetooth Compatible, Eventual iOS and Android App (Range, Lights, Map, GPS Recovery, Speed Adjust, Motor Power Adjust)

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (German Engineered NCTE Torque and Cadence Sensing Bottom Bracket)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

The Faraday Porteur is a seamless, vintage styled (resembling older Dutch and Swedish bicycles), Class 1 electric assist product. There’s no throttle here, it uses a German engineered NCTE torque and cadence sensing bottom bracket that measures spindle force. As you pedal along, the rear wheel is powered by your leg force through eight gears and the front wheel is powered by a high-torque planetary geared hub motor. I’ve reviewed the high-step Porteur, with its iconic double top-tube, on several occasions. For this video, I spoke directly with the founder of the company, Adam Vollmer, who launched Faraday in 2012… around the time that EBR began. You can see what Adam looked like with hair and get his backstory, being an employee of IDEO in Silicon Valley, with the original Faraday Porteur review here. Over the years, we’ve become friends and I have seen the product evolve and improve. While you can get the high-step Porteur in three frame sizes, Faraday also offers a step-thru model called the Cortland. Both bikes come in a standard or S configuration, with the latter being less expensive because it uses mechanical disc brakes and a cassette vs. hydraulic disc brakes and an internally geared hub. The S Civic Edition is a limited run model that pays tribute to the Taylor Stitch Civic clothing line, another San Francisco based friend company. It offers an upgraded NITTO Bullmoose handlebar that’s more aggressive than the stock swept-back bars, custom CNC’d Paul Components mechanical disc brakes (that feel super smooth to me, almost like hydraulic brakes), Brooks weatherproof saddle and grips, a Portland Design Works Alexander Graham Bell, and larger 26″ x 2.3″ Compass Rat Trap Pass gravel grinder tires. You’re paying $1k for these upgrades over a standard Porteur S, which is actually less than you’d pay to add them yourself, but you don’t get the steel fenders that are usually stock because they wouldn’t fit with the larger tires. I also noticed that the headlight has been moved from the stem to a head tube position, which means it won’t point where you steer, and the kickstand is being changed from double-leg to single-side (even though that wasn’t the case for our demo model). These decisions all make sense… the NITTO handlebar has an integrated stem, so they couldn’t easily mount the light there. And, even though the frame is still compatible with Faraday’s custom front and rear racks, this is more of a sporty build that might not need the vertical kickstand for loading and unloading. You’ll save weight and have an easier time deploying the single side stand. While body position is slightly more aggressive on this model, I found it to be surprisingly comfortable and still very upright. There are seven, yes seven!, 10 mm spacers that raise the handlebar position, so you don’t have to lean very far forward and down if you don’t want to. The increased air volume and lower PSI range of the tires provides a lot of vibration dampening, stability, and traction on packed trails. The frame, fork, and handlebars are all steel. My experience has been that steel is often more comfortable to ride than aluminum alloy. If you get any scratches, they could develop rust over time, but each bike comes with a jar of touch up paint. Three frame sizes ensure a comfortable fit and three beautiful colors will make it your own. I was test riding a size medium 56 centimeter frame for the video review and photos above.

Driving the bike is a custom programmed Bafang planetary geared hub motor. Adam pointed out that they chose this specific motor configuration because it offers high torque but doesn’t weight a lot. It’s rated from 250 to 350 watts and offers 35 newton meters of peak torque. Indeed, we climbed some of San Francisco’s steepest hills during the ride test, and I was able to stay seated the entire time. Yes, I had to switch gears frequently in order to keep my leg muscles and sensitive knees happy, but it worked just fine. The motor uses an 11 to 1 gear reduction with two planetary reductions inside vs. just one on many other motors. This allows it to perform incredibly well at the low end, making hard starts and longer climbs possible and sustainable. The maximum assisted speed is 20 mph, unless you live in parts of Europe where regulations require a 15.5 mph top speed for Class 1. In those cases, you can expect to get a slightly better range per charge. Part of what makes this motor and the pedal drivetrain capable on hills is the smaller 26″ wheel diameter. Many other city bikes utilize 2.75″ or 28″ 700c wheels that don’t offer the same mechanical advantage or slightly lower stand-over height. Yes, even though the bike is clearly a high-step, it isn’t quite as tall as many others. Faraday specs an 8-speed cassette with standard 11-32 tooth cassette. The derailleur is a step or two up from entry on the Shimano mountain bike lineup, it’s called Altus and performed very well during my rides. Rather than triggers, you shift using a RevoShift grip twister merging with the right grip. For people who aren’t as familiar with gear shifting, this is a comfortable and often more intuitive shifting mechanism. I discovered that because of the torque and cadence sensor setup here, it really doesn’t take long for the motor to kick in, even if you’re pedaling slowly. For flat and moderate hills, you could remain in a mid-level or even high-level pedaling gear and get along just fine because the motor operates independently. The harder you push on the pedals, the more power the motor will give back, even if you aren’t actually moving the bike much because you’re not in an optimal gear :)

Powering all current generation Faraday electric bicycles is a custom designed downtube-integrated Lithium-ion battery pack. That’s right, the Panasonic 18650 cells are actually lined up inside the downtube, completely hidden from view. This is what makes the bike so beautiful and balanced. So many other e-bikes use plastic boxes mounted to a rear rack or on top of the downtube. Yes, those batteries are often removable, for easier charging and storage, but they don’t look as clean. The Faraday battery is made up of AG cells, which offer high capacity for the same 18650 size. The entire array of cells weighs just 3.19 lbs! The bike itself (with motor and battery) weighed just 40 .8 lbs when I measured for this review. Keep in mind, the bike did not have a headlight, but it also had a double-leg kickstand vs. the planned single leg. It’s just super liftable, and I love how most of the cables and wires have been internally routed for aesthetic and durability reasons. It doesn’t matter which Faraday electric bike you choose, they all look beautiful and are so quiet that most people won’t even know they are electric. For those who want more than ~300 watt hours of capacity (which should offer 20 to 30 miles per charge depending on conditions, rider weight, and assist level) the company is planning a saddle mounted external battery pack with another 300 watt hours. This will effectively double range and allow for off-bike charging. That’s the one big drawback to the current design, you need to bring the bike near a power outlet to charge it. That could mean lifting up stairs or running extension cords. Extreme heat and cold can degrade Lithium-ion batteries and it’s best to keep them filled above 20% at all times to avoid stressing the chemistry. This could be difficult to do if you can’t bring the bike inside your office or apartment.

Operating a Faraday electric bike is about as simple as it gets… without sacrificing too much control and feedback. It’s a system that is very unique unique in the ebike industry, completely custom designed from day one. Starting out, the charger that comes with each bike is a compact, offers an average fill rate with two amp output, and is lightweight at just 1.2 pounds. Instead of using plastic or a narrow metal plug, Faraday recycled the plug design from a microphone plug and positioned the charging port up high on the controller box vs. down low near the crank arms like so many competing products. Just above the charging port is a red six-LED tail light, and above that is a circular metal button with blue LED ring. You can tell how full the battery is on the bike by looking at the little E-Ink stripe on the Mode Selector paddle near the left grip. The E-Ink display is persistent, meaning that it stays fixed at all times without drawing any energy. You might be familiar with E-Ink from the Kindle e-books of yesteryear. I found that it was easy to read in bright light and lowlight but not so much in the dark. When you’re ready to activate the bike, press that metal circle button at the top of the control box and wait a second or two for the red LED lights to come on. From here, press the mode selector down from off to either Standard or Boost. I did almost all of my filming in Boost mode to gauge motor noise, but it was almost inaudible in the city and very faint in quiet neighborhoods. One of the neat parts about having a lightweight e-bike with a geared hub motor is that it freewheels efficiently and is actually fun to ride without any assist. During the review ride, after filming the walkaround, Adam and I metup with a couple of friends (Thomas and Chris) to ride from the headquarters near Civic Center all the way up to a lookout called Bernal Heights. It was over four miles to get there and yet, we only used two of the 14 battery bars. Riding home consisted mostly of coasting or pedaling gently. As much as I like the simplicity of the control interface, it does lack feedback on speed, trip distance and odometer, there’s no range estimate feature, and there’s no USB port to charge a smartphone. I asked Adam about this and was told that they may introduce a splitter at some point, so you can run your phone for GPS and use their iOS and Android App. I cannot say when that will be introduced, but it’s cool that they are thinking about it and working hard on some other features, like the external battery.

Since my last review in late 2016, the Faraday family of products have seen improvements in battery technology and software. Some of the oldest models had little issues that required controller replacement and if you’ve got a 2016 or 2017 model that hasn’t had its firmware updated, I’d highly recommend working with your local dealer to do that. It sounds like it may have addressed some inconsistencies that people talked about in the comments here and in the Faraday forums. It’s cool that even though a smartphone app has yet to be released, all current models have Bluetooth chips in the Mode Selector housing. Adam told me that his original Faraday Porteur (that he uses to ride to work and complete errands around San Francisco) is still going strong and had a battery replacement after four years of daily use. It’s wonderful to know that the company can and does provide replacement batteries, and the cost is somewhere around $500. Adam also told me that their controller is designed to protect the battery from extreme temperatures, if you do have to park the bike outside occasionally… though I would probably still let it warm up or cool down before plugging in (as with any electric bike or Lithium-ion battery). The optional front porteur rack does not turn when you steer, so it won’t impact steering or dump as easily from side to side. I didn’t test it on this trip, but the rack is designed to fit two bags of groceries or a case of beverages. While the original Dutch and Sweedish bikes required a double top tube design for strength, especially in the cases of taller riders who needed a longer reach, modern steel has solved this and very few bicycles use the double tube design. I think it looks cool and makes lifting and carrying the bike a bit easier. There’s tons of room in the main triangle for adding bottle adapters, but no bosses were welded to the frame because the battery cells and wires inside would be vulnerable to piercing and water. Having tried a couple of models back to back during this trip, the fatter gravel grinders on the Civic Edition really won me over for their float, traction, and stability. I saw Adam cornering on the bike with ease, it’s just a fun bike to ride, and he also talked about riding a customized Porteur in the Grinduro ride (put on by Giro) a year or two back, which is testament to the durability of the frame and ride quality of these tires. Big thanks to Faraday and their parent company Pon Group for partnering with me on this review. I welcome questions and feedback in the comments below, where I’ll do my best to respond and get answers or clarification, or in the Faraday forums where you can connect directly with other owners and share pictures etc. During my Faraday visit, we took a ride around San Francisco to get a view and visit friends at the SF Bike Coalition and the New Wheel which you can watch here.

Pros:

  • The battery is extremely lightweight at just 3.19 lbs, it offers incredibly high energy density and some of the best cells on the market (Panasonic 18650 AG) known for high cycle count
  • Faraday offers one of the lightest, most compact, and most durable electric bike chargers I have seen, it’s very easy to toss into a backpack or purse and bring alone for quick top-offs at a friends house or coffee shop
  • In addition to rear rack bosses, the latest generation of Faraday e-bikes come with cafe lock bosses, so you could add a frame lock like this AXA Defender for quick security without the need for a bike rack
  • Despite the lack of suspension fork and seat post, all of the Faraday bikes that I have demoed feel very comfortable, they offer a nice upright body position, plush grips, premium saddles, and the Civic Edition has wider 2.3″ tires with more air volume to absorb bumps, you could always add a 25.4 mm seat post suspension if you wanted, but it will raise the minimum saddle height by a few inches
  • The pedal assist sensor measures cadence speed as well as pedal force so it won’t accidentally activate the motor if you’re stopped and simply resting your foot on the pedal, it’s very responsive and natural feeling
  • The control switch has a Bluetooth chip that will allow the bike to sync with a smartphone app that is in the works, it will be iOS and Android compatible showing your location, control your lights (you can turn the lights completely off) and power with two profiles to match the two physical switch positions, along with current speed and other trip stats
  • Good drivetrain components from Shimano with eight speeds to choose from for climbing or hitting higher speeds while commuting, the half-grip RevoShifter from Shimano is very intuitive and easy to use
  • Available in three frame sizes to fit a wider range of riders, the handlebar is sporty but still very comfortable with seven 10 mm spacers bringing it up so you don’t have to lean far forward
  • Mechanical disc brakes offer good stopping power and tend to stay cleaner in wet conditions, plenty of strength with 160 mm rotors for one rider plus cargo or a child, with the upgraded brake levers they feel even easier to pull – almost like hydraulic brakes
  • Faraday makes high quality paint-matched racks that work perfectly with their products, you can pay extra for a frame-mounted porteur front rack or a Yepp compatible rear rack
  • I love the clean, smart aesthetic… wires are integrated but all tubes are round vs. having welded-on covers, the three frame colors are beautiful and unique (blue, white, grey)
  • The bike comes with a sturdy, bright, integrated headlight as well as a six-led backlight that’s positioned well below the saddle so it won’t get blocked by a jacket or long shirt hanging down, I do wish that the tires had reflective sidewalls (like the other Porteur and Porteur S models) but at least you still have lights
  • This is one of the lightest, best balanced electric bikes I’ve tested and it functions well even if you’re not using the motor (if you run out of juice or just want exercise), it’s easy to lift and carry up stairs
  • Faraday is working on an optional seat-mounted battery pack upgrade will double your range and make charging in-office easier because it clicks on and off the frame so quickly, I have seen the near-finished design and it’s awesome!
  • Most of the other Faraday models come with fenders, but without them I wonder if debris could get into the charging port over time because it doesn’t seem to come with a plug protector? This point was raised by an individual calling himself Darryl Bryant in the YouTube comments and I thought he made an excellent observation, I welcome further discussion and feedback here

Cons:

  • Because the Civic Edition will have a headtube mounted headlight (since it uses custom handlebars with an integrated stem), the light won’t point in different directions as you steer, it just points straight all the time which is also the case for all Faraday models using the optional porteur front rack
  • Faraday offers a beautiful product, great customer support, and a very natural ride experience but they do come at a higher price point, the Civic Edition is ~$1k more than a standard Porteur S model and the differences are really just the brakes and levers, handlebar, saddle, and grips (though it would cost you more to upgrade these on your own aftermarket)
  • In 2016 and 2017, it sounds like some Faraday products had suffered from software and controller glitches with some controllers needing to be replaced, be sure to visit your dealer and have the firmware updated if you own one of the older models, it seems that Faraday has resolved the issues in 2017/2018 as their team has grown
  • The frame, fork, and handlebar are all made from steel vs. aluminum alloy, this offers great strength to weight and vibration dampening but can also rust if scratched up over time, thankfully the bikes all come with touch-up paint
  • I love how stealthy these e-bikes are, you can hardly tell they are electric, but the downtube-mounted battery pack is not easily removable… if you have to park outside or in a garage the battery cells could take more extreme cold and heat exposure which will degrade them faster
  • Charging requires you to bring the entire bike near an outlet since the battery cannot be removed, this could be inconvenient if you have to park outside at a rack during work hours (most racks I have seen do not have electrical outlets nearby)
  • I have never experienced a chain drop on a Faraday, but there isn’t a full chain guide to keep it from falling off inward, just an alloy guard on the outside to protect your pants
  • The Faraday Civic Edition only comes in one frame style, high step, and it’s pretty tall… the company sells a model called the Cortland but not with the upgrades found here
  • The bell is really nice, positioned out of the way and it feels durable, but it’s not easy to reach when steering the bike, you have to take a hand off to ring it which just isn’t convenient or safe
  • By mounting the hub motor in the front wheel, a bit more weight has been added to the steering feel, I also noticed that the front tire could occasionally spin if I was climbing a steep hill and my body weight was shifted towards the back of the bike, not a huge issue but worth noting compared to a rear motor design
  • It seems like there is plenty of room on the downtube, seat tube, and below the top tubes for a pair of bottle cage bosses… I asked about this and was told that there are wires running through the frame and they didn’t want to interfere with them, consider an SKS Anywhere Adapter like this to mount your folding lock, mini-pump, or bottle cage or just get a handlebar mount cup holder like these
  • No throttle mode here, you have to pedal in order to make all of the Faraday electric bikes go but their torque and cadence sensing bottom bracket is smooth and responsive, a smartphone app is in the works that will allow you to dial it in to your preferences
  • The thumb switch control module is easy to use while riding but limited on what is shown (an e-ink display shows approximate battery charge level with 14 bars) to get speed, estimated range and other information you’ll need a smart phone with the app someday plus a mount and that could drain your phone battery (no USB charging ports on this e-bike), the E-Ink works well in bright and low lights but is unreadable at night because it’s not backlit
  • No quick release systems on the wheels or seat tube but this is really a city bike designed to be theft-resistant (you can even get special locking bolt kits from Faraday)
  • This particular model doesn’t come with fenders, it looks like the larger tires take up too much room, this could be a deal killer for people who live in wet conditions…

Resources:

More Faraday Reviews

Faraday Cortland S Review

  • MSRP: $2,499
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016, 2017

A light weight city style electric bike that draws on classic styles and geometry but delivers good comfort and handling. Efficient 250 watt motor, responsive torque and speed sensing pedal assist with two power modes…...

Faraday Cortland Review

  • MSRP: $3,499
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016, 2017

One of the most beautiful, well balanced electric bikes I've ever tested, silent belt drive with internally geared eight speed Shimano Alfine hub. Modest 250 watt front hub motor (custom tuned), perfectly integrated downtube battery and new optional…...

Faraday Porteur S Review

  • MSRP: $2,499
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015

A light weight "minimalist" city style ebike with two levels of pedal assist, full length steel fenders and integrated LED lights. Optional front and rear cargo racks add utility, extremely well balanced motor, battery and five…...

Faraday Porteur Review

  • MSRP: $3,499
  • MODEL YEAR: 2014, 2015

One of the smoothest (steel frame), quietest (belt drive, internally geared), lightest weight (~40lb) ebikes around. Excellent weight distribution with 250 watt geared 8Fun SYX hub motor in the front, 8…...

(Prototype) Faraday Porteur Review

  • MSRP: $3,800
  • MODEL YEAR: 2013

Meticulous build crafted over two years of development, beautiful vintage style (reminiscent of 1940's and 50's bikes). Ultra lightweight, less than 40 pounds perfectly distributed across a unique double-top tubed frame...


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Bruce Arnold
2 weeks ago

@Citycrosser is giving you some good advice. A speed pedelec (Class 3) with a 28mph top end is the way to go.

If you get a bike with at least 500 watt hours on the battery, you will be able to get to work and back with some battery to spare. That's based on a conservative estimate of 20 watt hours per mile on a 20 mile round trip (400 watt hours total.)

Many of us on this forum will say, get the biggest battery you can afford. There are three reasons for this. One is that a larger battery will retain higher voltage longer, and that translates into peppier performance for more miles. Not that a smaller battery won't get you home, but you will notice a decrease in performance on the way home. The second reason is that you are going to want to ride more, because these things are such fun. So having a bigger battery means you can take the longer way home, or go back out for a ride, or whatever. The third reason is that the bigger the battery, the less often you have to recharge, which contributes to battery longevity. Batteries are the single most expensive component and you don't want to replace one very often. You should be able to get several years of satisfactory performance out of a good battery that you've taken care of.

So in making a choice, look hard at how big a battery you can get. A Faraday Porteur is a really good-looking bike with good components, but a tiny battery that might not get you all the way to work and back. I just mention this for comparison, not that you are considering the Porteur. I'm going out on a limb, and someone will chime in and disagree and probably with good reason, but for a commuter bike, the battery is the most important factor. (OK, yeah, the frame has got to fit you, fenders and lights are essential, yada yada.)

If you can already average 15-19 mph, then you will have no problem hitting top speed on a speed pedelec, without even having to use the highest level of pedal assist. That means that if you want to just wear your work clothes and not get so sweaty, you could put it in a higher level of assist and work a lot less hard. Like you say, that will save you some time, not having to change clothes. Higher mph and less prep time = ~15 minutes saved on both ends of your commute.

There's not a speed pedelec made that can't handle your hills like a dream. Non-factor.

EBR has categories for different bike review. You can look at all the speed pedelecs https://electricbikereview.com/category/speed/ Have fun doing your research. Narrow it down to a few, then go into the model-specific sub-forums to read what people are saying.

I own a Juiced Bikes CrossCurrent S. It's an awesome bike. I've yet to see a post from anyone with a CCS that doesn't rave about it. Demand has outstripped supply so it would be (educated guess) 3 months before you got one. If that doesn't fit your needs, definitely look elsewhere. If price is a factor, then it's perhaps the best deal on the market right now. Absolutely worth the wait, if you can wait. But there are many other bikes that are nearly as good for the same price, or equally good for more $$$, that would ship sooner, or might even be available at a nearby bike shop.

My wife commutes on a Pedego City Commuter. Good bike! Not as fast as the CCS, and much more expensive, but she gets great service from the nearby Pedego shop and that means a lot to her. I like her bike, but really glad I got the CCS.

Bicyclista
3 weeks ago

The Faraday Porteur is a good bike, although my experience is limited to test-riding one. It's best feature, I think, is that it looks like a conventional high-end bike with its double top tube, like some of the (non electric) Rivendell frames.

Given that it has a small, front-hub 250W motor, it was a surprisingly capable climber. I rode up a half-mile, 10% slope easily. But, as others have pointed out, it has a small battery, limiting its range. On the other hand, the Faraday Porteur is probably easier to pedal without electric power assist than most other e-bikes!

I am going to be a contrarian and recommend that you get a new battery at a cost of $800. After all, you cannot get a good new ebike for $800!

Perhaps it's because I like to keep things a long time. I still have vinyl records and a turntable. I still have two film cameras and many manual lenses. I still have 3 non-electric bikes, one of them dating to the 1980's!

Mark Peralta
3 weeks ago

Speaking of batteries, I would be concerned of the low 300 wh battery capacity of the Faraday. That would only provide a real world 15 miles range (unless you want to completely drain it and compromise the battery life).

Replacing the battery is also not that easy. I don't know if this is something you want.

MisterM
3 weeks ago

What struck me was the high prices being asked for used bikes. I'd be happy if I could sell a bike for 50% of my cost.

Tempting or not, if you're mostly satisfied with a new battery would provide on your existing bike, why not save the $3200? You'd still have the old battery as a spare.

And rather than buying a new battery, have you looked at replacing the cells in the existing battery? I suspect newer batteries might offer a low cost performance/range upgrade.https://ebikemarketplace.com/

Court discussed that company in this post https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/how-to-replace-an-electric-bike-battery-if-the-model-is-discontinued-or-the-company-is-out-of-business.22737/

drmorison
3 weeks ago

i really do appreciate the response. The bicycle that I am interested in is the Faraday Porteur. It is light-weight and beautiful. Extremely tempting!

Ravi Kempaiah
3 weeks ago

Look at the link below.
http://newwheel.net/products/used-electric-bikes

You could get a Kalkhoff for $800 or even better bikes for less.

MisterM
3 weeks ago

Save the $3200.

drmorison
3 weeks ago

I currently ride a 2009 Kalkhoff Tasman. It has a 250 watt Panasonic mid-drive and a Shimano Alfine 8-speed rear hub. It was imported from Europe, so the top speed is only 15mph. It's a great bike, and a real workhorse. My one complaint is that my pedaling cadence often exceeds the maximum cadence recognized by the bike, so if I am in a low gear going up a hill and I am pedaling too fast, I lose some of the assist. I currently need a new battery, and a replacement runs about $800-

The only e-bike currently on the market that really interests me is the Faraday Porteur. It is lightweight, beautiful, and will assist up to 20mph. The negative is that it is a 250watt front hub motor, so it might actually be weaker than my current ride. Oh, and it's also $4,000.

I am trying to decide whether to buy myself a new battery, or buy a beautiful new bike.

What do you all think?

Chuck E. Cheese
4 weeks ago

It's a great looking bike, but current technology allows for either a bike that doesn't look like an ebike, or an obviously electricity-powered bike with significant power and range. Electric motors have been around for over a hundred years, and while new materials and technologies have shrunk them considerably, I don't foresee them getting a whole lot smaller while still offering the power of today's motors. Magnets and coils aren't going to shrink a whole lot. I am looking forward to smaller, more powerful batteries in the near future, but for now I'm happy with an ebike that looks like a well designed ebike.

Bicyclista
1 month ago

My understading (please correct me if I'm wrong) is that a champion cyclist, such as those who compete on the Tour de France, is capable of 250W output. Given that you are experienced cyclist, if you think that a champion cyclist can climb that 22% hill of yours, then an ebike will almost certainly help you up that hill.

I remember test riding a Faraday ebike with a small 250W front hub motor (perhaps the least desirable configuration for climbing). I went up Texas Street in San Diego, a long hill climb, easily. I was impressed, and so was a truck driver who, at the top of the hill, gave me thumbs up

Those of you who know how to do it, please look up the slope of Texas Street from Mission Valley to Adams Avenue in San Diego. I doubt it's as much as 22%, but it would be a substantial effort in a standard bike, specially for us old folks!

My Haibike has a 250W (nominal, much higher in spurts) Yamaha, mid-drive, motor. I have yet to find a street on a hill I can't climb (off-road is another story). We have many canyons and hills, but I don't know whether we have anything approaching 22%. I'll have to check out a short sidewalk leading up to Balboa Park that is very steep with my handy Angle Finder.

Court
2 months ago

Following are some of the original comments that were made on that post:

WARP
I understand that you’re only showing bikes that you reviewed, but so I would like to add a few suggestions of my own.
The reason is that I have been looking for a e-assist bike for my wife. The options are quite limited for extra short people. My wife is 5′ and her inseam is around 28 inches. She likes to have a bit of clearance when straddling the bike.
A lot of the e-bikes that come in only one size are non starters. In the regular bicycle world, many bikes come in at least 3, often more. That’s why it’s frustrating to shop for e-bikes, they usually start at a men’s medium or large. For my wife, she needs a bike made for petite women, and even then she needs XS or XXS to enable her to comfortably straddle the top bar (top tube). Although the folding models would probably work, we want to go with a full sized wheel for more stability
And it’s not just matter of standover clearance, a low step over frame doesn’t mean a great fit either….for example, we tried out the Easy Motion Evo Easy Street, and she was way stretched out on that frame, even though she can easily straddle the frame. She looked a bit lost sitting on that bike….coming from her 44cm road bike frame, the one size fits all Easy Motion looked like a tank.
The companies that are real bike companies often the best range of sizing. Examples that would probably work for her:
Raleigh Detour iE Step-Through – comes in a small size in a low step frame.
Trek Conduit+ – Small size would fit somebody who’s around 155cm (or just over 5′)
Trek Lift+ – has a men’s and also a low stepover model and comes in small size
Devinci Newton S Bionx – comes in three sizes. The WF is a women’s model and comes in a Small (which is smaller than the men’s Small)
In the end, I’m probably going to build my own bike for my wife around a Bionx kit, we can choose an XS frame and use the rack mount Bionx kit. Ideally we would have liked to buy a complete e-bike, but this way gives us the best option for getting a fit she’s comfortable with.

COURT
Hi warp, I can understand your frustration… It’s uplifting to hear how much energy and time you’ve spent trying to find a perfect fit for your wife and I think the BionX option is a good one. Kits definitely have their place but I can understand the desire to have a more turnkey solution as well. The good news is that more and more electric bikes are being produced each year and a wider variety of sizes and shapes have come to market. Companies https://electricbikereview.com/pedego/24-step-thru-comfort-cruiser/ have started selling more models with 24″ wheels and the step-thru frame. I realize reach may still be an issue but with a bit of effort adjusting the bars (or even a replacement bar) the bikes can become more accessible to petite riders.

WARP
Yes, we’re looking for a “regular looking” fitness style hybrid, and even though some of those cruiser designs would fit, we’d prefer a design that is geared toward sporty riding. e.g. she’d riding with me when I’m on my full carbon road bike, for both speed and giving her a boost on the hilly parts.

RALPH LINIADO
Warp, I just read this thread. My wife is petite at 5′ just like your wife. We stopped into Small Planet Bikes in Dallas last season, the day after Court was there doing some tests. I was excited that they had the Evo Street as I had heard it was just what a small framed women would like, but my wife hated the bike. It didn’t fit. We tried everything he had and nothing worked. The salesman than suggested the Easy Pedelar T350, and inexpensive bike that is the heart of their rental fleet. My wife rode the bike and loved it. It was under $2,000 and we bought one on the spot to be shipped to us in Florida. I had never heard of the brand, yet I bought it without any research. Turns out https://electricbikereview.com/ez-pedaler/t350/ just the day before as I came to find out when he posted his review.
This is a small step thru bike. It has lights, a rack, a bell, and it is built like a tank. My wife thinks it is beautiful. Obviously the reason why they have a rental fleet of them at Small Planet, which is a great shop and all electric bikes. They had everything you could imagine on the floor. Fantastic. My wife loves it because it fits her small frame. It’s not as elegant as some of the other big name bikes, but it fits and it works great. I had it shipped to my local LBS who charged me $25 to put the handle bars on it and away we went. Hope this helps.

COURT
Awesome advice Ralph, thanks for taking the time to help and share your experience :)

RAY T
thanks for the comment….the bike you bought seems like a decent value for under $2K. Looks pretty comfy and it seems like a great choice for a small rider with its downsized wheels and low step frame.
I went ahead with my original plan to build my own. So I took a 13″ Trek 7.4 FX Womens, and added a Bionx rear mount kit. This is pretty much the smallest adult bike that Trek makes (and smaller than many other brands offer). I would have much preferred the battery to be on the frame but the bike frame is so small it wouldn’t fit. The rear battery rack makes the bike very rear heavy but that’s the tradeoff to get a bike that fits. here is https://flic.kr/p/H9C2Lu.
It ended up costing about $3K, which is higher than I wanted to spend, but at least we got a bike that fits right with a good e-assist system from a proven manufacturer. Now we’re itching to put some miles on it

JOHN HESLIN
Hi – really enjoy your reviews! Wondering if I can ask for your opinion. Are 20″ folding bikes too cramped for the average rider? I saw your E joe video and I think I can probably “fit” but at 5′ 10″ / 220 lbs. I’m not really sure. I’m a recreational user and ride mostly for exercise so pedaling is important. The key issue for me is whether the typical 20″ folding bike be pedaled normally with full leg extention? Thanks.

COURT
Great question John, folding bicycles tend to have longer seat posts to reduce that cramped leg feeling… My knees get sore and feel sensitive if they aren’t extending fully so I can relate to your concern (I’m 5’9″ by the way). On of the folding ebikes that felt lager to me was the https://electricbikereview.com/pedego/latch/ (notice the first photograph shows the seat fully extended). The downside here is that the Latch is heavier and has a rear-mounted battery, but at least it’s removable for easier transport. The founderf of Pedego are larger guys who weigh a bit more and I feel like the motor power and overall strength of the frame are designed to accommodate them. https://electricbikereview.com/gocycle/g2/ also felt large and had suspension to soften the bumps and the https://electricbikereview.com/tern/node-d8-with-bionx/ is also a bit larger with 24″ wheels vs. the standard 20″ that lifts the frame up higher and improves ride quality a bit given the narrower tires. I hope these ideas help you find a good product that will work well for your intended use, folding bikes usually present a compromise but there is a nice variety to choose from these days :)

ALASTAIR CAMPBELL
These are good reviews but none of them focus in on my requirements. Are there any ebikes with the following attributes: Pedal assist only, top speed on hills of 10 kms (6mph), 100 km. range (60 Miles), panier. puncture proof tires, small frame, minimum bike weight up to 45 pounds, can fit on a standard bike rack. This bike will be needed on bike trips with ordinary pedal bikes so no need to go fast up hills. Price up to $3,000 US. Want financial stability of manufacturer and a ‘vast’ dealer network in North America. Reasonable quality of components not made in China.

COURT
Hi Alastair! Thanks for sharing your detailed list of “must haves”. No ebikes I know of even come close to what you’re asking here because they are mostly all produced from parts made in China… especially in the sub $5,000 range. Most weigh at least 45 lbs and the vast majority are 50+ lbs and the speed up hills is so dependent on rider weight, cargo and environment (like wind) that I cannot say for sure. My first thought for you was the https://electricbikereview.com/kalkhoff/sahel-compact-impulse-8/ but it’s heavier than you want. A light weight ebike that isn’t as powerful but fits your other requirements (besides price) is the https://electricbikereview.com/faraday/cortland-s/. Hope this helps! You can use the advanced search tool on the right rail of each page here to narrow down by price, weight etc.

MARK
GOOD JOB COURT !!!

COURT
Hey mark, glad you enjoyed this article! Thanks for the props :D

FRED
Old thread but I thought I’d share. I have the same challenge for my wife. She’s 4’11”. We went with an XS Specialized Vita paired with a Bionx system with the battery mounted on the down tube. They had to drill a hole in the batter bracket mount given the odd position of the bottle cage mounts, but it fits great and balances the weight out nicely. Call the https://hostelshoppe.com/ and ask for big Scott. They are a dealer for both specialized and bionx.
If your wife has a 28″ inseam without shoes, she might fit on a Specialized Turbo for women. Standover is about 29″ in the Small. I’m going to beg them to make an XS and also ask if they have plans to motorize the fat boys. The Helga has a 26″ standover height and should be able to fit the bionx as well if the down tube triangle is at least as big as the Vita.

COURT
Hey Fred! Sounds like you and your wife got set up at the Hostel Shoppe, thanks for sharing your tips and ESPECIALLY the measurements around the small Turbo for women. I’ve been really impressed with the Specialized lineup of ebikes in different styles and sizes so far… maybe we will see an XS and a motorized fat boy someday :)

FRED
That would be sweet! You’re welcome for the info. The guys at the hostel shoppe are top notch. People come from all over the Midwest to go there.

GIL
I want my wife to be able to ride with me – at least 20 miles with light hills. She’s 5’2 about 250 lbs and has a bad knee. We’ve been looking at ebikes and understand we’ll probably need a small frame (15 inch?). She wants to look at options and try them out in the Chicago area – or southwest Michigan. Want pedal assist for physical therapy but also full throttle to coast. What models do you recommend we check out? Can you recommend a store(s) to try them out? Also, I want to be able to transport the ebike on my car. I only have a trunk mount bike rack – no hitch. Other option to consider is a folding bike that could fit inside the trunk or back seat. What recommendations do you have for such bike carrying capability?

COURT
Hi Gil, thanks for explaining your goals so well… I think I understand and can relate given that my own girlfriend is about 5’2″ and has had some struggles with mid-step models (even women’s frames) that we’ve tried. Since you’re in the Chicago area, one brand that comes to mind is https://electricbikereview.com/brand/volton/, they’re based there and the founder Joe is really cool. I just reviewed their latest model which is a mid-drive step-thru but they sell a very similar one with a hub motor that’s less expensive and has throttle on demand. I’d recommend going to their website and calling him. To carry this model or many of the step-thru ebikes out there with your trunk mount bike rack you’ll probably need a crossbar adapter https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000ELSSZE/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=elecbikerevi-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B000ELSSZE&linkId=7b2e5668a19575e25cca7cd87df72a46 and I’d recommend taking the battery off the bike before loading to reduce weight… and always mount it close to the car so it’s not hanging way out since even the frames tend to be heavier than normal bicycles. A couple other low-step models with assist and throttle that might be worth exploring are the [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/e-joe/gadis/']e-Joe Gadis[/URL], and the [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/easy-motion/evo-city-wave/']Easy Motion Evo City Wave[/URL] which looks beautiful but costs a bit more… given that they are a larger company (with a great warranty) and were sold in 2015 and 2016 you might be able to get a deal on “last year” inventory at your local ebike shop :)
As far as folding bikes go, they do tend to be smaller but not always lighter. Here’s [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/category/folding/']the full list[/URL] of models I’ve reviewed recently and you can also use the advanced search to look for compact models that don’t fold but are smaller and lighter. One consideration with folding is that they tend to be less comfortable due to the smaller wheels. If you can get a regular bike with 24″ or 26″ with the deep step-thru design that would probably be more enjoyable for your wife. I hope this helps! I realize there are a lot of options out there… Consider asking in the forums, there’s a section called “[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/forum/forums/choosing/']help choosing an electric bike[/URL]” I made for this exact sort of situation :D

GIL
Thanks for your thorough reply. Most helpful was the recommendation for a crossbar adapter.
I think I may have the choice down to the final 2: X-treme Malibu Beach Cruiser or Prodecotech Stride 300. The Malibu front wheel can easily be removed so I can put the bike in the back seat. The Stride comes in a fold-able model so I could put it in the trunk. The challenge remains that there’s no place close to home for my wife to try out either one prior to a purchase.
One other thing suggested by the guy at FarBike.com is that I wait til early Spring to make a purchase as riding in Chicago’s winter is unlikely. Purchasing closer to the time of use means a fresher battery.

COURT
Hey Gil, glad my tips helped you a bit. The Spring will bring all new models to bear and give you some time to think. In the mean time, feel free to poke around [URL='http://electricbikereview.com/forum/']the EBR Forums[/URL] and share your experience or ask more questions. I’ve made a few real life friends there and it’s fun to geek out about bikes and consider different options :)

ANNETTE NELSON
I am 4’9″ and 67 yrs old and trying get out of my house a little more. LOST MY HUSBAND 2 1/2 yrs ago and have suffered from depression and need sunshine. I thought an electric bike would be a good way to do it and guarantee my ability to get home should I go a little too far..I HAVE HAD 11 back surgeries and still have some back pain.
I bought a PRODECO MARINER 500. online and received it the day after Thanksgiving. Thank goodness my sons were here to help me put it together and watch me ride it. THE SALESMAN ON THE PHONE TOLD ME THAT I should have no problems riding it even hough I TOLD HIM MY HEIGHT AND THE concerns I had being able to lift my leg over the tall center bar. WELL! THERE WAS NO WAY I could lift my leg that high to get onto the bike. MY SONS HELD THE BIKE WHILE I lifted my leg using my hands and rode it down the block. Then to get off of the bike. I stopped, then my sons each grabbed the bike while I used my hands to lift my leg…when I STARTED FALLING BECAUSE I couldn’t get my leg over. One of my sons grabbed me and his fingers broke my ribs. I CONTACTED THE STORE AND THEY RECOMMENDED A STEP TROUGH BIKE? What can you recommend

COURT
Hi Annette, sounds like you’ve had a rough experience with electric bikes so far… they do tend to be heavier and many of the cheaper models only come in one frame size and style. ProdecoTech has a range of options but it sounds like you would do better with a true step-thru like the [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/pedego/boomerang/']Pedego Boomerang[/URL]. This particular brand has a bunch of dealers across the US so you can actually try the bike before deciding to buy. Also, the rest of my tips and suggestions on this page still stand. You can get further suggestions by connecting with others [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/forum/forums/choosing/']in the forums[/URL] or using the advanced search tools here on the site. I Hope this helps!

TRISH
Hi, I am an older(50+) rider. I don’t feel as comfortable on my 26″ wheel bike anymore as sometimes my sense of balance just feels a bit off. I also have some problems with arthritis etc. But I still want to go on adventures for as long as I can! So I am looking for an ebike that can go on trails, (there are some very cool rail trails here in BC, but sometimes there are portions that are a bit rough.) so probably a fat bike style for comfort. I am thinking a 350W motor should be plenty? I need a rack for my camping gear. My issue is that I am only 5′ and want a bike I can comfortably put my feet down if I feel wobbly. Even the 20″ tire bikes seem to have quite a high seat. I am not rolling in cash LOL, so don’t want to spend more than 1500.00 CAN. I was thinking of cobbling together some bikes we have around and putting a hub motor on it. But it looks like hub kits plus battery is going to cost me over 1000.00 CAN anyways? Seems its the batteries that cost the most by far. Any ideas? Thanks!

COURT
Hey Trish! I was thinking the Pedego 20″ Trail Tracker would be a good fit in terms of lower stand-over height and having those fat tires… but it is priced a bit higher. I can’t think of too many kits that work with small fat tires but I’ll keep my mind on it and perhaps you can ask [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/forum/']in the forums[/URL] to see if anyone else has an idea for you :)

MAE
I’m interested in going to an ebike, but I don’t want to jump into a large investment until I know that I like them. So I’m thinking about starting off by purchasing an ebike conversion kit to put on my current bike. I am only interested in pedal assist. Does anyone know of a conversion kit that offers pedal assist? Thanks in advance for any help you can offer. Mae

COURT
Hi Mae! There are many kits out there to choose from but I’ve reviewed a few [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/category/kits/']here[/URL]. I realize it can seem like a big investment but purpose built ebikes tend to just work better… I know a few people who tried to get a deal the first time around and had buyer’s remorse pretty quickly then upgraded to a more well-built ebike. This is part of the reason I don’t review kits as much these days. If you have a local ebike shop, I’d highly recommend visiting and doing some test rides before pulling the trigger on anything. In any case, good luck and please share your experiences :D

MAE
Hi Court. Thanks for the advice on purpose built ebikes. Wondering if you have ever reviewed the x-treme Sedona step through ebike. It is quite affordable at $1100, but I don’t see where it has been reviewed or has any buyer comments. I’m also considering these ebikes: Izip Vibe plus, Raleigh Sprite iE, Prodecotech stride series, Genze recreational e102, Tidal Wave, and Magnum ui5. Any helpful information you can offer about any of these bikes – good or bad – would be appreciated. I love your reviews and your love of this sport.

COURT
Hi Mae! I had a pretty good experience with the GenZe and Magnum products. Raleigh Sprite iE is also a good product from a larger company (with more dealers and a good warranty). I haven’t seen as much ProdecoTech stuff lately and have never seen X-Treme products… They caught my interest of course, people ask occasionally but I just don’t see them in shops and don’t know anyone who has bought one. Here’s [URL='https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u188uF4Pt9w']an interesting video[/URL] interview I did with the President of Raleigh Electric talking about the value of more expensive ebike products as I realize the trade off in cost can raise some questions.

DEWEY
Regarding converting a pedal bicycle, an interesting source of ideas for donor frames for shorter riders is [URL='https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1j3f51td6emppjuBaTNjZXgtVPK923HtOudacuyt-g0Y/']this spreadsheet[/URL] on the City Bike subReddit – a list of step through pedal bikes available in North America with links to the manufacturer websites then you can check what frame sizes are available and where your nearest dealer is located.

COURT
Cool, thanks for the tip Dewey! Did you create a conversion ebike for yourself or find one that fit straight away that was already electric?

DEWEY
My thinking before converting my pedal bicycle was to make it easier for my local bike shop to help with the conversion and maintenance. I experimented with a [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/clean-republic/hill-topper/']24V hill topper kit[/URL] but I found it didn’t help me up the hills I climb so I bought a [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/8fun/bbs01/']36V BBS01 crank motor kit[/URL]. I would like the more torquey [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/8fun/bbs02/']48V BBS02 kit[/URL] but I need to stay under the [URL='https://www.markelinsurance.com/bicycle/resources/electric-bikes']750W 20mph[/URL] limit for e-bike liability insurance purposes.

ANDREJA
I am overweight, tend to feel unstabile on bikes, often am too short for various models (164cm and 100kg). Sometimes, because of the size of my belly, I can’t fully lift my leg. Can you suggest something for me? Regards from Croatia! :)

COURT
Hi Andreja, I think the first step would be to search for any electric bike dealers in Croatia. If you aren’t able to find one where you can go in for a test ride then it makes sense to look online. Unfortunately, I don’t think many brands will ship around the world and I’m based in the USA… so? who knows. But! One shop that has told me they will ship internationally is Motostrano in California. [URL='http://www.motostrano.com/']Here is their website[/URL], they have lots of ebikes and surely sell one that might work for you but they tend to be expensive. Another option is to see if [URL='https://sondors.com/']Sondors[/URL] will ship to your location, they have a cheaper folding model that might fit you and feel stable because it has fat tires.

ANDREJA
Thank you for your promt answer. Let’s say I have an option of buying suitable product whereever, hence I would be very interested in a model you can suggest, regarding the detals I described earlier. My problem is I can’t find right model that is suitable for overweight people. If you can suggest few, I would be grateful. :)

COURT
Hmm, I think the [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/pedego/24-step-thru-interceptor/']step-thru Pedego with the smaller 24″ wheels[/URL] is a great option. You can get it with pedal assist and throttle and it will be easier to mount and stronger for added weight. Beyond that, I like the [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/eprodigy/banff/']eProdigy Banff[/URL] and depending on how tall you are, the [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/corratec/lifebike/']Corratec Lifebike[/URL].

DAYRATE
How are the RadMini and Voltbike Mariner looked upon for rider height suitability? At 5’9″, like you, I figure either would be great for me, however, at 5’3″, I wonder about my wife fitting on one of these bikes. We are very interested in the Mariner. The frame geometry specs I have read don’t seem out of line with her height, what’s your opinion? Thanks for your well written and produced bike reviews!

COURT
Yeah, [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/voltbike/mariner/']the Mariner[/URL] is a pretty good ebike for petite riders, my girlfriend is similar in height to your wife and she had a blast riding it on the beach. She also tried [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/rad-power-bikes/radmini/']the RadMini[/URL] but I think the clamp design bumped her knee and thigh more easily. That one seems to have a higher stand over design as well. The cool thing about both products is that they use fat tires which are very stable and add some comfort when riding over bumps :)

BROCK HARVEY
Wow, what a fantastic article, and there’s even more information in the comments. You guys are all incredible!
I recently found [URL='http://www.ireviews.com/comparisons/5-best-smart-bikes-2017']this article[/URL], but I’m looking for some validity to their claims from people much more experienced than I.
Any info would be incredibly beneficial, so I’d really appreciate it! I’m looking to really change my life around in terms of my fitness. I’m 29, have a bit of expendable cash, live in a very cycle friendly city, so I think this could be a life changing purchase for me :)
Pretty excited, to say the least. Thanks heaps!

COURT
Hi Brock, thanks for sharing that article! More and more technology is coming to the ebike space and the models in their “five best smart bikes 2017” leaned more towards road and city. Drop bars are still pretty rare but I’ve seen a few from Bosch in recent years. Try exploring here by using the category drop down up top, it might guide you towards the high tech speed models if that’s what you’re into or you can ask around in the forums. My goal is to keep the space open and honest, people are pretty friendly and it’s exciting to share the latest tech but I have also seen that sometimes it never becomes publicly available… more like concept prototypes. All of the ebikes you see here have videos and are actually for sale (or were for sale at one point). If you have any specific questions, feel free to ask.

KERIN
**I am 5’1″ tall, about 140 pounds, and am in my mid 70’s and in good health. I am looking for a small ebike to ride on city streets and easy trails. I would prefer both throttle and pedal assist with a price of no more than $1,500. I live in a small town where there are no ebike dealers within several hundred miles where I can try out a bike to see if it fits. Anything out there that might meet these requirements?**

COURT
Hi Kerin, I speak with a lot of petite riders who choose folding ebikes because they tend to have smaller 20″ wheels that lower the frame and also have step-thru frame designs. I just reviewed [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/velomini/plus/']the VeloMini Plus[/URL] which could work and fits your budget. I like how lightweight it is too.

KERIN
Thank you. The Velomini Plus sounds good. Will the small wheels work successfully on trails that that have a gravel surface rather than being paved? How much assembly is required?

COURT
Hi Kerin! The 1.5″ wide tires aren’t going to be great for gravel, you might want to consider one of the fat folding ebikes for that such as the [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/rad-power-bikes/radmini/']RadMini[/URL] and [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/voltbike/mariner/']Mariner[/URL]. Most mail-order electric bikes require minimal assembly, the VeloMini Plus is especially easy and straightforward, you basically just unfold it :)

LUCY
Anyone have thoughts/advice How is the tern vektron for 5′ 2″ person with a short-ish reach? Ride Brompton now with M handlebars and the reach is a teeny tiny bit too far.
Deciding between Vektron and an Ohm 2017. Love folders ’cause I can take it anywhere….and Ohm is just amazing, too.
LUCY
And now I just rode the trek super commuter. So nice. So many great bikes.

COURT
Yeah, Trek is really doing great this year, lots of ebikes to choose from and the Super Commuter is awesome :D

COURT
Hi Lucy! The Vektron is a great bike one of the highest quality around right now (in large part because it uses Bosch). I’ll be reviewing some new OHM models soon and will record all of the measurements like reach and stand over height to help you decide. If you want light and compact, I think the [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/velomini/plus/']VeloMini Plus[/URL] is pretty cool.

LUCY
Looking forward to that review! I did, however, already purchase the Trek Super Commuter. I know! The most money I could spend in one place, like, ever. It was a good fit in the 45cm frame and I have great local bike shop support. I went to the Electric Bike Expo and road a Tern, Ohm didn’t bring their smallest frame, so didn’t get to try that bike. The range on the Trek/Bosch combo (long commute to work) and the excellent local support sold me on Trek. Shout out to Freewheel Bike!

BIKING WITH A LITTLE E-HELP
Hi, I’m looking for an e-bike with good e-power assistance as I am getting older and slower at normal biking especially up inclines… I am 170 cm tall and longish legs so am looking for a medium sized frame but still the space for my legs so that I can reach the ground easily when stopping yet have a good leg extension when pedalling and am not all squished up. Any suggestions of models to look for? TIA

COURT
Do you think you’d want a medium step-thru [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/bulls/cross-lite-e-step-thru/']like this[/URL] for easy mounting or prefer a higher stiffer frame? I just reviewed the [URL='https://electricbikereview.com/ohm/urban-ebike/']OHM Urban[/URL] which has a powerful motor and throttle operation (most mid-drive ebikes do not). They sell it in four sizes so you could dial in fit and the stand over height is reasonable because of the top tube design.

BIKING WITH A LITTLE E-HELP
I’m afraid it really needs to be a much lower instep. She has such the above items asked for on her current e-bike, however the e part is designed for long country rides and has not so much support/power for the city riding that she wishes to have such as being able to take off at the lights with the rest of the riders and keep up speed around the city on short journeys.

Court
2 months ago

Hi guys! I'm moving some content off of the main site and into the most relevant categories of the forum. This post was originally made on January 23rd 2017:

Bicycles can be a wonderful tool for saving money, staying in shape and connecting with your community but you need one that fits properly to be safe and that can be a challenge for smaller riders. Electric bikes can make pedaling easier which reduces the need for a “perfect” ergonomic fit but they also add weight which makes transporting difficult. I’m an average sized guy but not especially strong or heavy… After testing dozens of ebikes over the years I’ve realized that finding the right bike means more than just frame size, but of course that plays a role too!

Petite cyclists confront a unique set of challenges that not every manufacturer is aware of… I’ve talked with people who want slower, less powerful electric bikes while the mainstream seems fixated on more power and speed. Other individuals simply cannot deal with the added weight of large motors and batteries. My goal with this guide is to point out some of the best products I’ve seen and tested for small people. Whether you’re physically weak or stronger with short legs I hope there’s something here to get you pointed in the right direction.

Good Electric Bikes for Short Riders
These models are specifically designed to work well for short people, the smaller wheel size keeps the center of balance low and the step-thru or mid-step frame makes mounting and standing over much easier.
https://electricbikereview.com/easy-motion/evo-street/
May 12, 2015
https://electricbikereview.com/easy-motion/evo-street/

[*]MSRP: $2,999
[*]MODEL YEAR: 2015

[*]https://electricbikereview.com/brand/easy-motion/
[*]https://electricbikereview.com/category/city/

A feature complete city style electric bike that's well balanced, beautifully designed and easy to mount and ride. Comes with dynamo powered lights, fenders, a rear carry rack, suspension fork and tool-free adjustable…...
https://electricbikereview.com/easy-motion/evo-street/
https://electricbikereview.com/pedego/24-step-thru-interceptor/
July 7, 2015
https://electricbikereview.com/pedego/24-step-thru-interceptor/

[*]MSRP: $2,995
[*]MODEL YEAR: 2015

[*]https://electricbikereview.com/brand/pedego/
[*]https://electricbikereview.com/category/cruiser/

A smaller version of the Interceptor that's easier to mount, it offers great power thanks to its smaller wheels paired with a 500 watt geared hub motor and 48 volt battery. Offers twist throttle and five levels of assist for increased range, throttle override puts you…...
https://electricbikereview.com/pedego/24-step-thru-interceptor/
https://electricbikereview.com/besv/panther-ps1/
October 19, 2014
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/besv/panther-ps1/']BESV Panther PS1 Review[/URL]

[*]MSRP: $3,250
[*]MODEL YEAR: 2015

[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/brand/besv/']BESV REVIEWS[/URL]
[*]https://electricbikereview.com/category/city/
[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/category/full-suspension/']FULL SUSPENSION ELECTRIC BIKE REVIEWS[/URL]
[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/category/light/']LIGHTWEIGHT ELECTRIC BIKE REVIEWS[/URL]

Compact form factor is easy to mount and stand over, extremely light weight frame (carbon fiber and aluminum build). Responsive torque sensing pedal assist offers three levels of smooth power, 250 watt motor is…...
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/besv/panther-ps1/']READ REVIEW[/URL]
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/kalkhoff/sahel-compact-i8/']

[/URL]
February 10, 2014
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/kalkhoff/sahel-compact-i8/']Kalkhoff Sahel Compact i8 Review[/URL]

[*]MSRP: $3,699
[*]MODEL YEAR: 2014

[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/brand/kalkhoff/']KALKHOFF REVIEWS[/URL]
[*]https://electricbikereview.com/category/city/
[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/category/folding/']FOLDING ELECTRIC BIKE REVIEWS[/URL]
[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/category/mid-drive/']MID-DRIVE ELECTRIC BIKE REVIEWS[/URL]

While not officially a folding bike, the stem does pivot and pedals do fold to create a slim profile. Rigid frame paired with oversized Schwalbe Big Ben ballon tires creates a solid but comfortable…...
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/kalkhoff/sahel-compact-i8/']READ REVIEW[/URL]

Smaller Folding Electric Bikes
I hear from many shorter riders that folding electric bikes offer the small form factor and light weight that works well for them, this can be especially true for transporting the bike on busses or trains and each model listed here has a removable to make it even lighter
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/e-joe/2015-epik-se/']

[/URL]
December 6, 2014
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/e-joe/2015-epik-se/']2015 e-Joe Epik SE Review[/URL]

[*]MSRP: $1,599
[*]MODEL YEAR: 2015, 2016

[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/brand/e-joe/']E-JOE REVIEWS[/URL]
[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/category/folding/']FOLDING ELECTRIC BIKE REVIEWS[/URL]

Folding electric bike offering a great combination of utility (fenders, rack, lights, suspension fork) at a low price. Relatively powerful geared motor combined with an impressive battery capacity for good climbing and range...
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/e-joe/2015-epik-se/']READ REVIEW[/URL]
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/eg/vienna-250-ex/']

[/URL]
April 27, 2014
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/eg/vienna-250-ex/']EG Vienna 250 EX Review[/URL]

[*]MSRP: $1,399
[*]MODEL YEAR: 2014

[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/brand/eg/']EG REVIEWS[/URL]
[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/category/affordable/']AFFORDABLE ELECTRIC BIKE REVIEWS[/URL]
[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/category/folding/']FOLDING ELECTRIC BIKE REVIEWS[/URL]
[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/category/full-suspension/']FULL SUSPENSION ELECTRIC BIKE REVIEWS[/URL]

Full suspension folding electric bike with four levels of pedal assist and throttle mode. Rear heavy design with geared hub motor and battery pack in the back...
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/eg/vienna-250-ex/']READ REVIEW[/URL]
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/gocycle/g2/']

[/URL]
September 29, 2015
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/gocycle/g2/']Gocycle G2 Review[/URL]

[*]MSRP: $4,999
[*]MODEL YEAR: 2015, 2016

[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/brand/gocycle/']GOCYCLE REVIEWS[/URL]
[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/category/folding/']FOLDING ELECTRIC BIKE REVIEWS[/URL]
[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/category/full-suspension/']FULL SUSPENSION ELECTRIC BIKE REVIEWS[/URL]
[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/category/light/']LIGHTWEIGHT ELECTRIC BIKE REVIEWS[/URL]

A premium folding electric bike with an internally geared three speed hub in the rear and a 500 watt geared hub motor in the front for "all wheel drive" pedaling + motor support. Extremely light weight at ~36 lbs, unique quick-release wheels, lots of upgrade options for added…...
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/gocycle/g2/']READ REVIEW[/URL]
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/green-world-bike/e-trolley/']

[/URL]
August 4, 2015
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/green-world-bike/e-trolley/']Green World Bike E-Trolley Review[/URL]

[*]MSRP: $1,299
[*]MODEL YEAR: 2015

[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/brand/green-world-bike/']GREEN WORLD BIKE REVIEWS[/URL]
[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/category/affordable/']AFFORDABLE ELECTRIC BIKE REVIEWS[/URL]
[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/category/folding/']FOLDING ELECTRIC BIKE REVIEWS[/URL]

A compact folding electric bike available in two trim styles (Standard and Pro) for increased power and range, and easier folding. Fairly comfortable to ride thanks to 2.125" diameter tires, padded comfort saddle, padded grips and…...
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/green-world-bike/e-trolley/']READ REVIEW[/URL]

>>>

Light Weight Electric Bikes
These models might not come in the smaller sizes or have step-thru frames but they are super light weight making them much easier to handle and lift. This is the type of electric bike I prefer even though my body type is more average in terms of height
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/freway/vr-01/']

[/URL]
January 25, 2016
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/freway/vr-01/']Freway VR-01 Review[/URL]

[*]MSRP: $1,199
[*]MODEL YEAR: 2016

[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/brand/freway/']FREWAY REVIEWS[/URL]
[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/category/affordable/']AFFORDABLE ELECTRIC BIKE REVIEWS[/URL]
[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/category/mountain/']ELECTRIC MOUNTAIN BIKE REVIEWS[/URL]

A light weight, super affordable electric mountain bike launched on Kickstarter in 2015, available on Amazon and Newegg now. Available in two frame sizes, a 19" diamond in black or a 17" mid-step in…...
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/freway/vr-01/']READ REVIEW[/URL]
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/faraday/porteur-s/']

[/URL]
June 14, 2015
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/faraday/porteur-s/']Faraday Porteur S Review[/URL]

[*]MSRP: $2,499
[*]MODEL YEAR: 2015

[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/brand/faraday/']FARADAY REVIEWS[/URL]
[*]https://electricbikereview.com/category/city/
[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/category/cargo/']ELECTRIC CARGO BIKE REVIEWS[/URL]

A light weight "minimalist" city style ebike with two levels of pedal assist, full length steel fenders and integrated LED lights. Optional front and rear cargo racks add utility, extremely well balanced motor, battery and five…...
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/faraday/porteur-s/']READ REVIEW[/URL]
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/raleigh/2015-misceo-ie/']

[/URL]
April 10, 2015
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/raleigh/2015-misceo-ie/']2015 Raleigh Misceo iE Review[/URL]

[*]MSRP: $3,200
[*]MODEL YEAR: 2015

[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/brand/raleigh/']RALEIGH REVIEWS[/URL]
[*]https://electricbikereview.com/category/city/
[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/category/mid-drive/']MID-DRIVE ELECTRIC BIKE REVIEWS[/URL]

A light weight, super efficient, city style electric bike with electronic shifting in addition to motorized pedal assist. Available in four frame sizes (small through extra large), fairly comfortable to ride given the…...
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/raleigh/2015-misceo-ie/']READ REVIEW[/URL]
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/genze/recreational-e102/']

[/URL]
November 5, 2014
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/genze/recreational-e102/']GenZe Recreational e102 Review[/URL]

[*]MSRP: $1,499
[*]MODEL YEAR: 2014, 2015

[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/brand/genze/']GENZE REVIEWS[/URL]
[*][URL='https://electricbikereview.com/category/affordable/']AFFORDABLE ELECTRIC BIKE REVIEWS[/URL]
[*]https://electricbikereview.com/category/city/
[*]https://electricbikereview.com/category/cruiser/

A good balance of affordable options (weaker motor, entry level parts and one color) with a thoughtful custom design (mid-mounted battery, multiple frame sizes, integrated wires). Large display panel is easy to read but not removable, independent button pad is convenient…...
[URL='https://electricbikereview.com/genze/recreational-e102/']READ REVIEW[/URL]

>>>

This guide isn’t comprehensive and new models come out every year but I hope it serves as a starting point and guides you towards brands that make e-bikes that work well for small people. One of the best ways to relax, connect with your community and stay healthy (either by reducing stress or getting a cardiovascular workout) is cycling. You can do it almost anywhere and work it in to a busy schedule by making it part of your transportation routine… even if that’s just running to the local store or riding to a friend’s house. I spoke with my Uncle about his experience riding to work and back every day [URL='https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RuSKCSFuxdY']in this video interview[/URL] and it was really inspiring to hear how his health had improved and how he has saved some money since he started (and how much he enjoys it).

El Mission
2 weeks ago

I rode this bike at an e-bike 'fair' in Larkspur, California (basically Marin). The ride is shit. It's as good as any of the other ebikes, which, frankly were WAY MORE EXPENSIVE than this one but had a much better, more aggressive ride. The only thing this bike had over others is the pretty design. It's precious and designed for a ridiculous city like San Francisco, which, btw has a tremendous bike theft issue. This bike is an anachrohism -- it feels like it's something that belongs in an ultra safe suburb where you can leave it outside and no one will steal it. It's ridiculous that Farraday has two stores in San Francisco and they're putting out an expensive piece of shit like this. So...the ride is pedal assist only (no throttle for $3.5K), it's as smooth as any of the other bikes I rode that day (Riese & Müller, Brompton, Stromer & others) but definitely NOT BETTER, the solid design with no shock absorption is annoying -- definitely not something you can take off-road. The founder in the vid is an annoying, post-yuppie prick typical of the shitheads in San Francisco that do this elitist shit. I listened with interest as he talked about the style aspects of the bike ('bling it out') and little about functionality. Also...wtf is up with the non removable batteries. So...what happens when you run out juice because of the memory effect? I don't remember Faraday doing something for this for free. So...this bike is all about the yuppie thing. NOT WORTH $3.5K. This shit is for collectors who care more about how it looks than function. Like I said, I rode it. Not worth $3.5K USD.

MatRdmCooper
2 weeks ago

still wish I could get one of these in Australia
My dream bike would be the Porteur S (regular) with the internal gear hub and belt drive but the dark silver with the steel fenders :D
(wonder how much a special order would set me back :D

Les Hsu
2 weeks ago

Way overpriced!

Mike S
2 weeks ago

love those wheels and tires . . beautiful commuter

MeepMoto
2 weeks ago

Would it be possible for you to review the ONYX CTY/RCR? Seems like it would be interesting

Shadow Girl
2 weeks ago

"With that 43v setup which is pretty unique to us you get this nice combination of frankly a little more torque and power then you would expect in a bike of this size."
Somehow I am very doubtful... You're telling me that with one of the weakest batteries in the e-bike industry, that we get "more torque and power".

Shadow Girl
2 weeks ago

43v 6.8ah battery?! Wow that's pretty bad... especially with the energy needed to go up the hills in the bay area.
(And that's WITH them making the battery larger x.x)

David Davidson
2 weeks ago

Love the bike, wish more range

Lance McGrew
2 weeks ago

If Apple designed an ebike, this is what it would look like however the price would be double.

Electric Vehicle Hub
2 weeks ago

The design of the Faraday Porteur is very, very nice. The bike looks great in my opinion.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Me too, I've always loved their products. You can watch this bike on a longer ride around SF in this video if you're interested. We rode from the headquarters up to Bernal Heights https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BI4DOgGzKrY

Christopher Wain
2 weeks ago

Just a great video!! A review which we wouldn't get anywhere else,,,,, great job 😀

Christopher Wain
2 weeks ago

The boss of company ought to donate that bike as a prize for you to do a competition... Bet nobody would moan about price then lol

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Thanks Christopher! I'm always open to feedback, just doing my best to show what's out there and connect with the designers. Faraday makes some inspiring products :D

Darryl Bryant
2 weeks ago

Does that battery charge port have a cover, with no fenders it will fill up real quick with road grit

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

That's an excellent point Darryl! Most of the models come with fenders, I think the Civic Edition did not because of how large the tires are. It does seem possible for more dirt to get in there as a result.

Shane Crowley
2 weeks ago

wwwwwwwwaaaaaaahhhhhhuaaaa!!!!

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

You sound like Mario :P

sweet dreams
2 weeks ago

Idk about these batteries in the frames, frames flex a lot when riding.

Shadow Girl
2 weeks ago

I agree Court, I think the double top-tube (and its made from steel) makes a huge difference and probably all but eliminates frame flex.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

I have seen the battery pack, it's a plastic housing that probably offers some flex and protection around the cells. Perhaps the double top-tube makes this particular model even stiffer. I haven't heard anyone discussing battery issues in the forums or comments for the other models so hopefully it's not an issue.

Lynn Recker
2 weeks ago

Has Faraday ever considered putting their hub motor on the rear wheel and then use a Pinion gear box with a Gates belt drive?

Lynn Recker
2 days ago

I understand that the Desiknio with the Pinion was a prototype and you might not want to jump the gun on its review. What if you recut that footage to concentrate on the drive train, the Pinion gearbox, Gates belt, and the rear hub motor? You could do some voice-overs giving your impressions of the drive-train only. Just a thought.

Lynn Recker
2 weeks ago

Go for it! I've been hoping to see that review since you teased it during the review of that brand's single-speed! Please! And thanks. LOL!

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

That's a cool idea Lynn! During my trip to London earlier this year, I saw another ebike that did use the Pinion gearbox and I might post it soon since you mentioned this ;)

Dennis Dowd
2 weeks ago

Yes, awesome review, thanks. That ride was something else. I love the look and that it doesn't really look like a ebike. Excited!

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Hey Dennis! Check out this ride, I haven't made it fully public yet because I like to mix brands and locations when publishing videos, but I think you'll really enjoy it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BI4DOgGzKrY

Andy Martinez
2 weeks ago

I’ll just buy a hub wheel ebike kit 1000watts at amazon or eBay they going for 200 hundred plus battery going for 300 to 500 hundred online , and they go 40 mph fast and better. Make any bike into ebike .

Shadow Girl
2 weeks ago

Andy Martinez I highly recommend a middrive motor like the bafang bbs02 if you need the extra torque. It’s 750 watts nominal and far more powerful then wheel hub motors.

Andy Martinez
2 weeks ago

Shadow Girl yea but I will not go that fast 💨 I need more torque for me as a adult and the kit is in my budget. 😎

Shadow Girl
2 weeks ago

Yeah and break the law, and possibly endanger your life or the life or someone else. 750watts is the max legal limit, and 27mph is the top legal motor speed here.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

That's definitely an option, you can find cheaper regular bikes and add a basic kit to approximate this sort of performance. I think the Porteurs get exceptional range because of their custom controller, programmed motor, and the battery cells being used, but I see how you could replace a cheaper kit several times for a similar price.

DiGiTaLGrAvEDiGGA
2 weeks ago

Wish they made a low buget model. love the whole USA theme.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Now that they are part of Pon Group, I suppose the prices could come down over time and they will continue innovating. I'll be in touch with them and try to review any new models that might come in the future :)

Figger0808 Figger0808
2 weeks ago

Hi Court, can you do a review on the city rover s5 carbon fibre scooter/ series 5 carbon fibre scooter. Thanks.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Thanks for the request! I'll keep an eye out for it, haven't come across one so far.

Gallardo6669
2 weeks ago

I don't watch the whole vidoe. I wonder,seems like bike is dying with the battery??? Not accessible?? If so, sorry, but how stupid is that? Even an i phone can be opened by a technician. And the bike? Cut the frame or what?? Do they wanna tell me bike is only good as the battery life and then i throw it away??? Redneck engineering???

Gallardo6669
2 weeks ago

Shadow Girl i didnt even know he has this "write ups". Very great. Yes you are absolutely right, if you wanna spend so much money you appreciate a long video. From my prospective i try to stay updated on the bike industry overall,i wanna find the Most valuable info quick.

Shadow Girl
2 weeks ago

Don't tell Court to do smaller videos. It's honestly best that he include as much info as possible about his impressions and what he notices so that potential serious buyers learn what they need to know. If you don't have the patience for it just read his writeups.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Sure thing! I always post a full writeup with all of the specs and information back at the full website. I put the link as the first thing in the description to help people, you can see the Porteur S Civic Edition writeup here: https://electricbikereview.com/faraday/porteur-s-civic-edition/ hope this helps! It doesn't answer the battery question straight on but I also try to reply to comments and help people. I understand that we get busy ;) have a wonderful weekend!

Gallardo6669
2 weeks ago

ElectricBikeReview.com hi, thank you for your reply. I like you and what you are doing. Please be aware that some of your videos are long (which is ok) BUT it takes time to watch it 100% to get all of the most important information and some people dont want or cant spend the time to watch it 100%. Thats why i suggested to you in the past to mention in the video upfront all the essential info- OR to write in the video description. Thank you again.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

The battery can be removed through the bottom bracket for service or replacement, they are also working on a separate pack that will mount behind the saddle if you want to go further or charge separately :)