FLX Blade Review

Flx Blade Review
Flx Blade Profile Right
Flx Blade Bafang Ultra 1000 Watt Mid Drive Motor
Flx Blade Spank Handlebars Bafang Control Center Shimano Ex1 Shifters
Flx Blade Spank Handelbars Magura Mtx Brake Levers
Flx Blade Bafang Control Center
Flx Blade Button Pad Throttle
Flx Blade Shimano Ex1 Trigger Shifters
Flx Blade 17.5ah Battery Rock Shox Fs Pike Rct3 Suspension
Flx Blade Rock Shox Fs Pike Rct3 Suspension Maxxis Tires
Flx Blade Funn Saddle Angled
Flx Blade Funn Saddle Seat Post
Flx Blade Cranks Funn Pedals
Flx Blade Shimano Ex1 Derailleur
Flx Blade Front 100mm Hub
Flx Blade Rear 135mm Hub
Flx Blade Profile Left
Flx Blade Sans 5ah Battery Charger
Flx Blade Review
Flx Blade Profile Right
Flx Blade Bafang Ultra 1000 Watt Mid Drive Motor
Flx Blade Spank Handlebars Bafang Control Center Shimano Ex1 Shifters
Flx Blade Spank Handelbars Magura Mtx Brake Levers
Flx Blade Bafang Control Center
Flx Blade Button Pad Throttle
Flx Blade Shimano Ex1 Trigger Shifters
Flx Blade 17.5ah Battery Rock Shox Fs Pike Rct3 Suspension
Flx Blade Rock Shox Fs Pike Rct3 Suspension Maxxis Tires
Flx Blade Funn Saddle Angled
Flx Blade Funn Saddle Seat Post
Flx Blade Cranks Funn Pedals
Flx Blade Shimano Ex1 Derailleur
Flx Blade Front 100mm Hub
Flx Blade Rear 135mm Hub
Flx Blade Profile Left
Flx Blade Sans 5ah Battery Charger

Summary

  • Purpose-designed electric made for extreme off-road use with a 1000-watt mid-drive motor, 17.5 ah battery and top speed upwards of 40 mph, it looks like a bicycle but is classified more as a moped
  • Extra large 203 mm, quad piston, hydraulic disc brakes provide ample stopping power, which is great for an electric bike that goes as fast as this one, good weight distribution with the motor and battery mid-frame
  • The control center can be easily seen in direct sunlight and offers tons of pertinent information like speed, range, wattage output and more, with no rear suspension or seat post suspension it could get a little bumpy
  • Given the heavier weight and higher possible speeds here, plus sized tires and wider boost hub spacing would have been nice, but at least the thru-axles are made to be stiff and sturdy
Warning, in some configurations this electric bike is classified as a moped or motorcycle and may not be ridden on cycling trails or paths. It may require licensing, insurance and lights when used on public roads.

Search EBR

Video Review

Trusted Advertisers

Introduction

Make:

FLX Bike

Model:

Blade

Price:

$3,999 $4269 for Touring Edition

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Urban, Trail, Mountain

Electric Bike Class:

Moped or Motorcycle (Class 4)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States, Mexico, New Zealand, Australia, Canada, Europe, Japan, Singapore

Model Year:

2018

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

58.8 lbs (26.67 kg)

Battery Weight:

8.6 lbs (3.9 kg)

Motor Weight:

11.7 lbs (5.3 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

19 in (48.26 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

19" Seat Tube, 24" Reach, 29" Stand Over Height, 30" Width, 73" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Raw Metal, Gloss Black

Frame Fork Details:

Rock Shox FS Pike RCT3 with 160 mm Travel and Two-Position Compression Adjustment, Lockout, Rebound Adjustment, 15 mm Thru Axle with Quick Release

Frame Rear Details:

12 mm Thru Axle with Quick Release, 135 mm Hub Spacing

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses in Rear, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

8 Speed 1x8 Sram EX1, 11-48T

Shifter Details:

Sram EX1 Triggers

Cranks:

SAMCX, Aluminum Alloy, 170 mm Length, 44T Chainring with Narrow-Wide Tooth Pattern and Aluminum Alloy Guard and Frame-Mounted Guide

Pedals:

Funn, Plastic Platforms with Raised Teeth

Headset:

Threadless, Internal Cups, 1-1/8" to 1-1/2" Tapered

Stem:

Spank, Aluminum Alloy, 106 mm Length, 31.6 mm Clamp Diameter, One 10 mm Spacer, One 5 mm Spacer

Handlebar:

Spank, Low-Rise, 770 mm Width

Brake Details:

Magura MT5e 4-Piston Hydraulic Disc Brakes with 203 mm Rotors, Magura MT5 Adjustable Reach Levers with Integrated Motor Cutoff

Grips:

Spank Flat Rubber with Lockers

Saddle:

Cionlli Funn

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

31.6 mm

Rims:

Spank 345 Trail, Aluminum Alloy, Double Walled, 32 Hole

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 13G, Black with Nipples

Tire Brand:

Maxxis Minion DHF, 27.5" x 2.5" (650B)

Wheel Sizes:

27.5 in (69.85cm)

Tire Details:

35 to 5o PSI, 2.5 to 3.4 BAR, EXO Protection, Tubeless Ready

Tube Details:

Presta

Accessories:

USB Charging Port on Control Center, Optional Rear Cargo Rack ($55), Optional Front and Rear Fenders ($55), Optional Suspension Seatpost ($40), Optional Smartphone Mount ($20), Optional Integrated Headlight and Taillight ($100)

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack with USB Port, FLX Branded Bafang Control Center

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bafang

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

1000 watts

Motor Peak Output:

1350 watts

Motor Torque:

160 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

LG

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

17.5 ah Optional 21

Battery Watt Hours:

840 wh Optional 1008

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4 hours

Estimated Min Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Estimated Max Range:

90 miles (145 km)

Display Type:

FLX Branded Bafang DP C18, Fixed Backlit LCD, (Double Press i for Settings Menu and Password)

Readouts:

Current Speed, Max Speed, Average Speed, Odometer, Tripometer, Range, Calories, Trip Timer, Clock, Mode, Watts or Amps, Battery in Percentage or Bar, Assist Level (0-5)

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad

Drive Mode:

Torque Sensing Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle on Left

Top Speed:

40 mph (64 kph) (35 MPH with Throttle Only in Sport Mode, 20 MPH with Pedal Assist in Eco Mode with Limiter Enabled, 35 MPH with Throttle Override, Larger Gearing Required for 60 MPH)

Trusted Advertisers



Written Review

FLX is a relatively new electric bike company that sprung up late in 2016. They started with an Indiegogo campaign, offering three different electric bikes – the Roadster, Trail and Attack – with a funding goal of $50,000. They got $1.7 million! Now, FLX has a new model: the Blade. The Blade is a purpose-built electric mountain bike that was designed from the ground up with extreme riding in mind. The pricing starts at $3,999, which is definitely a pretty penny, and jumps up to to $4,269 for the Touring Edition, which features a rear rack, fenders, and integrated front and rear lights. This was an incredibly fun bike to test thanks to its top speed of around 40 mph and a 1,000 watt Bafang mid-drive motor. I had the opportunity to tear through some trails with this thing and needless to say, it has power to spare.

Now, the Blade only comes in one frame size, 19”, and while it does have a nice RockShox FS Pike RCT3 suspension in the front, it is a hardtail and there’s currently no option for a full-suspension setup. Thankfully, FLX does offer a seat post suspension upgrade, and of course you could always throw an aftermarket one on there yourself, as long as it offers 31.6 mm diameter like this. The frame itself is made of 6061 aluminum alloy, and the curb weight is a hefty 58.8 pounds. The single frame size could limit the range of rider heights that this bike is suitable for, but the geometry feels like it makes up for that a bit. The plus side of not having rear suspension is that the frame will likely be more rigid, but the vibration is transferred into your legs and back. The Blade also comes in two different colors: Raw Metal and Matte Black. The bike I was able to test came in the Raw Metal color and I personally really dug it. The unfinished looks makes for a very rugged and tough feel that might hide scratches better than a solid glossy color scheme. I did get a chance to see another model with in the Matte Black color and that looked nice as well.

It’s funny… at one point FLX mentioned on their website that the Blade is so dangerous it could kill you (It looks like they may have taken that part down now). But the truth is, because this electric bike is so powerful and fast, it does pose a unique risk to riders. Physically, one could get seriously hurt when pushing this thing to its limits. And there’s also the legal concern of riding this bike on mountain bike trails and public roads. It should be fine to ride the Blade in OHV parks and private property, but public roadways may be a different story and as an electric bicycle review site here, we want to be clear that this thing is neither a Class 1, 2, or 3 electric bike and is also not DOT approved to be licensed as a moped because it doesn’t have the appropriate lights and other safety certifications. All this to say, it’s probably a good idea to use this bike as intended to help minimize risk and maintain a good reputation for the emerging ebike space. Of course, there’s always a degree of inherent risk when riding any bicycle, but after a couple days on the Blade and seeing firsthand just how wild it is, I felt compelled to give you guys this little spiel. Okay, moving on :)

Driving the Blade to its top speed of around 40 mph is the Bafang Ultra geared mid-drive motor. This motor offers 1,000 watts of nominal power with up to 1,350 watts of peak power! But even more impressive is its 160 newton meters of torque. Yes… 160 Nm. It’s the torquiest motor I’ve personally tested and seems to fit the Blade’s philosophy of use quite well. Compared to most Class 1 ebikes which offer 50 to 90 Nm, the 160 here can feel exciting but might also put increased strain on the drivetrain and frame. Powering up moderate hills was a breeze (literally) and for all but the most extreme hills, I was able to rely solely on the throttle without pedaling at all. When tackling real hill climbs – ones where I actually had to get out of the saddle – I found the torque made the difference between me having to get off and walk up. One of the coolest things about this particular motor is that it’s Bafang newest version, which replaces some of the lower power designs that used nylon gears inside, this one uses all steel components. This upgrade in internal parts should help the motor handle the extreme torque being produced and improve its overall longevity. I was told that FLX is the first company to roll out purpose-built electric bikes with this new motor, so that’s pretty cool! They are on the cutting edge with this new Blade bike, yeah? Get it!

Now, I mentioned the top pedal-assist speed is around 40 mph, because technically the motor will continue providing pedal assist up to 60 mph (the throttle-only top speed is limited to 35 mph). Although I sincerely doubt 60 mph is even achievable, or safe for that matter, it is technically possible if you can keep up pedaling. In my testing, I was able to hit pretty close to 40 mph and I suspect stronger and more capable riders could manage to push it even further. And for those riders who are really looking to hit high speeds, FLX offers larger chainrings that do come with their custom CNC’d aluminum chain guards – a nice component that helps protect the chainring teeth and also keep your pants clean. I think it’s great that in addition to the guard plate, there is a guide accessory at the top to keep the chain from bouncing around and coming off at high speed as well as a narrow wide tooth pattern that locks onto the chain more securely. The torque sensor did a nice job of smoothly administering power equal to my output. So when I pushed lightly on the pedals, I got a little bit of assist; when I hammered down on them the motor unleashed all its power. The motor cutoff was also pretty quick, and cut power almost immediately after I stopped applying pressure on the pedals. I appreciate this aspect, especially with the high torque of the motor, as I’ve found that on some cadence sensor designs found on cheaper ebikes, the motor cutoff lags quite a bit, making navigating trails at slow speeds difficult and even a bit unstable and unpredictable.

Powering the motor is a 48 volt, 17.5 amp hour locking, removable battery pack. FLX estimates the range at up to 90 miles in the lowest pedal assist mode, but of course that depends on rider weight, ride style, and terrain being tackled. I’m a 200 pound rider and was able to tool around on this bike for a couple of hours in the highest pedal assist mode with plenty of battery to spare. I cannot say for sure what the range would be and it definitely depends a lot on how fast you ride and whether you rely on the throttle vs. lower levels of pedal assist. I dig that the battery is removable and also has a USB charging port. This means it power your portable electronic devices, whether it’s on or off the bike. You can easily charge it on or off the frame, and I’d suggest taking it off to reduce the weight of the bike if you’re going to put it on a car rack. The charger is a 5 ah charger, a step up from the normal 2 ah chargers I see on cheaper ebikes, and should help fill the massive 17.5 ah (or optional 21 ah) battery relatively quickly, but still expect 6+ hours. The first half of the battery will fill more quickly and then it will slow down in order to balance the cells.

Given the top speed of around 40 mph here, I was thankful that the Blade comes with massive 203 mm, quad-piston, hydraulic disc brakes. The stopping power on this bike is immense. I also dig the adjustable brake levers as I found that in their current position they crunched my fingers a bit when braking, so it’s cool I could let them out a little if I chose to. This is also something that could be fine tuned by a shop as you have the brakes bled and normalized. Having adjustable reach brake levers is also good for those riders with extra large or small hands, or when wearing gloves, which could be a good idea when riding fast on rough terrain or in cold conditions. Seriously, you might want to wear padding and a full face helmet here. The brakes also have built-in motor inhibitors which cut power to the drive system whenever the brake levers are depressed. I wasn’t able to actually test this aspect of the bike as Rob, one of FLX’s owners, had disconnected them. Still, I would imagine they work fine given that everything else on the bike worked as intended. To me, safety is always paramount, and having the motor inhibitors is a good feature to help ensure the rider isn’t fighting against the motor when braking. With a lot of electric bikes, it may not really be that big of a deal if the motor is still cranking out power while trying to brake, but with 1,350 watts of peak power and those 160 newton meters of torque, it’s definitely important here. The motor also cuts power when shifting gears thanks to the shift sensor. While this may not add a whole lot in the area of safety, it should prevent unnecessary strain on the components, which was a big concern of mine. And on that note, the SRAM EX1 trigger shifter and derailleur worked extremely well. The EX1 is designed specifically for e-bikes with a strong chain and sprockets, so it should be able to soak up extra stress compared to a normal setup. Shifting was incredibly crisp and quick with this system and the gear range is very wide with an 11 to 48 tooth spread. The jump between each sprocket is wider and the idea is that with motor assist, you don’t need as many gears, and those gears can be made from stronger heavier material. Normally on an electric mountain bike I would expect to see a 10 or 11 speed drivetrain but the 8 sprocket setup worked fine and is part of what boosts the price here. The EX1 is not cheap.

Another area worth mentioning here is the control center. I’m kind of a control center geek and I always love to see comprehensive stats while riding. The FLX branded Bafang control center on the Blade does just that. It displays pretty much everything, including current speed, top speed, average speed, range, battery level, pedal assist mode, wattage output and more. More importantly, I could read it in direct sunlight! The only downside to this display was that it’s not removable, so I might worry about it getting dinged up when the bike is being parked or transported and just taking more sun and rain damage over time. There’s less concern for scratches at the bike rack or theft because presumably, you wouldn’t be riding this in public places unless you live somewhere with no laws. On the plus side though, it does have the ability to enable a passcode, adding another layer of security to the bike which is a bigger deal if you have kids around or are just concerned about safety. I think of this thing as more of a motorcycle or car equivalent. If you damage property or hurt another person, you could be liable for operating an unregistered unlicensed vehicle. Please be safe!

The Blade is clearly designed to take a beating and deliver some spectacular performance with the purpose-built frame, good front suspension and overall build quality. One of my few gripes with the Blade however, is the hub spacing. With 100 mm in the front and 135 mm in the rear, I wonder if that’s going to be enough for some of the most extreme riders pushing this beast to its max. Wider hubs would allow for a stronger bracing angle and fatter tires that would absorb vibration and shock… which is a big deal considering there’s o rear suspension. Of course, this would add to the cost of the frame and accompanying components. Boost and plus sized tires are a newer trend and cost more. The hefty 15 mm thru axle in the front and a 12 mm thru axle in the rear are great and the 2.5″ wide tires do offer above average surface contact and traction. This was a seriously fun bike to test and I’d like to thank FLX and especially Rob for partnering with me on this review and for coming all the way out to California to hang out! As always, please post your questions and feedback below or connect with others in the FLX ebike forums.

Pros:

  • Incredibly powerful and torquey Bafang Ultra motor with 1000 watt nominal output and 160 newton meters of torque makes climbing even the steepest hills possible, it also drives the bike to speeds upwards of 40 mph
  • Sram EX1 trigger shifters and derailleur are specifically designed for e-bikes and should be able to handle the power and torque coming out of the motor, they also shift incredibly smoothly and have built in shift sensors to cut power to the motor when shifting, preventing the components from enduring unnecessary strain
  • Massive 203 mm, quad piston, hydraulic disc brakes provide ample stopping power, which is extremely important for an electric bike like this that can reach speeds upwards of 40 mph
  • Locking Spank grips should ensure the grips stay in place even when tackling the most extreme trails,
    a nice little feature that in my opinion falls under the category of safety
  • Motor inhibitors cut power to the motor whenever the brakes are the levers are depressed, ensuring the rider isn’t fighting agains the motor when trying to stop, another great safety feature
  • Control center is easily visible even in direct sunlight and offers a plethora of information including current speed, max speed, average speed, battery level, range, pedal assist mode, wattage output and more
  • Rock Shox FS Pike RCT3 front suspension does a great job of soaking up hard hits and making for an overall pretty smooth ride, they also have lockout and rebound and compression adjust
  • Frame is designed from the ground up with extreme mountain biking in mind, has virtually no frame flex and offers tons of rigidity
  • Funn plastic platform pedals are extra wide and grippy and help keep my feet in place even when hitting extra bumpy terrain
  • Torque sensor starts and stops power very quickly and accurately, matching the power output against my own, this is great for trying to ride slowly over tricky terrain
  • Battery has above average capacity of 17.5 ah, and FLX also offer a 21 ah battery, battery is locking and removable and even has a USB port to charge accessories while it’s on or off the bike
  • Gearing is good for high speed thanks to the 11-48 teeth cassette in the rear and 44 teeth chainring up front, FLX also has larger chainrings for riders who want to hit even higher speeds
  • Custom CNC’d chain guard protects the chainring from damage and looks cool, frame-mounted chain guide and narrow-wide teeth setup on the chainring helps ensure the chain stays locked in place
  • Overall beastly looking bike and the Raw Metal color looks especially good

Cons:

  • Normal hub spacing is underwhelming given the extremely high speeds the Blade can hit, having boost would be a good option to add even more strength and structural integrity as well be able to equip plus size tires
  • The optional 21 ah battery pack bulges out past the frame and could get in the way during pedaling, it also probably won’t look as clean as the flush 17.5 ah battery
  • Lack of full-suspension means riders only have the option of adding a seat post suspension, the hardtail setup also adds extra stress on the chain and motor
  • No kickstand included, and while riders can install an aftermarket one it appears it can only be mounted in the back
  • No fender bosses in the front so the only way to mount a fender is to find one that compression fits inside the stem, while FLX offers their own it could be difficult to find other aftermarket ones
  • Control center can’t be removed, leaving it vulnerable to theft and scratching when the Blade is left at a public bike rack
  • Only one frame size may limit the range of rider heights the Blade can accommodate
  • At $3,999 for the standard version and $4,269 for the Touring Edition, the Blade is definitely an expensive electric bike and might not offer the utility of around town commuting because of it’s unclassified power and performance

Resources:

Trusted Advertisers

More FLX Reviews

FLX Trail Review

  • MSRP: $1,899
  • MODEL YEAR: 2018

A hardtail cross country style electric mountain bike with quiet Bafang Max Drive 350-watt mid-drive motor, adjustable top speed upwards of 35 mph position it for private property or OHV use only. Three different colors to choose from - White Lightning, Carbon Black, and Gun Metal Gray…...

2016 FLX Trail Review

  • MSRP: $2,199
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A mid drive, hardtail electric mountain bike with pedal assist and throttle mode, capable of higher top speeds with assist ~25 mph. Funded through Indiegogo in March 2016 at a discounted price, available to ship worldwide with…...

Roy Gustaveson
1 week ago

You mention in the review that because of its speed it is illegal to ride on the street. If you were to set the max speed at 20-28 mph would that make it street legal?

Reply
Court Rye
5 days ago

Hi Roy! My understanding is that ebikes are rated by their motor nominal output. Anything under 750 watts could qualify as Class 1, 2, or 3 in the US and then they are sorted out by max speed and pedal assist vs. throttle so that 1 and 2 go up to 20 mph and 3 can reach ~28 with pedal assist only. I doesn’t seem like there’s a lot of enforcement going on with electric bicycles… but that doesn’t mean that a lawyer wouldn’t dig into the exact details of your bike and use that in a lawsuit if something unfortunate happened. I tend to stay on the very safe side (this is Court writing this comment) whereas Brent really likes the high speed stuff and enjoys the off-road private use. I hardly ever ride on OHV trails and very frequently commute on city streets so I would not feel comfortable buying this bike for myself. I just wouldn’t want to bend the rules and thus, would not use it very much.

Reply

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

hurricane56
6 days ago

My 2018 Bosch Performance Line CX motor does not match the pictures or videos and the guys at Bikespeed are asleep right now, so I thought I'd throw this out to you if anyone has encountered this config of plugs and can help?

The first one is obvious but there are 3 more identical plugs with only the Red & Black wires I need to choose from. Anyone know?

There are four plugs.

From left to right:

1. Headlight
2. Intuvia controller
3. Brake light
4. Rear wheel speed sensor

Bikespeed intercepts the Intuvia controller plug and the rear wheel sensor.

One thing that I noticed during the install is hay bikespeed’s molded plugs sometimes don’t fully match the receptacle. The 3D printing or the connectors might be off by a fraction of a millimeter causing it to not seat fully. Use a sharp razor blade, xacto, or Dremel to modify.

Theodore Deffenbaugh
1 week ago

here is something interesting from the "Grin Technologies" knowledgebase website and also from my cycling knowledge based from the Eugene Sloan's cycling primer book "Complete Bicycling"; as one can readily see this is an easily solvable problem at least according to: http://www.ebikes.ca/learn/wheel-build.html:

Seating at Bend

A common reason for spokes to fail on electric hub motors isn't because the motor puts extra strain on the spokes, or because the spokes aren't a thick enough gauge, it's because of fatigue failure from spokes that aren't held snug against the flange. If the spoke bend radius is too large or too far from the head, then it can flex up and down at the bend with each wheel rotation, eventually causing it to crack and fail.

This problem has been legendary with overseas built hub motors, and we had some Crystalyte shipments where about half the customers would experience spoke breakage on a recurring basis. Ideally the distance between the head and the bend in your spoke will match the thickness of the hub flange, and you won't have problems.

But if not, there are basically two rather effective cost effective ways to address the presented given case study situation as mentioned previously:

One is to basically insert a simple washer under the spoke head which is probably the simplest cost effective method;

The second way is to also lace the wheel in an over/under pattern, such that the spoke tension compresses the bend part of the spoke into the flange;

now using both of the two above basic commonly known wheelbuilding techniques in combination will go a long way towards helping to ensure that one is not likely to introduce unnatural and/or unknown undesireable torsional twisting forces about the "J" Spoke Bend radius at the hub flange; that will eventually directly cause and introduce premature metal fatigue failure at the "J" Spoke Bend radius at ones hub flange.

I have personally read from the excellent and comprehensive Sheldon Brown encyclopedic bicycle primer on everything about cycling must read "everything on cycling" primer, which includes "wheelbuilding" and according to him a properly hand built bicycle wheel built by an trained and experienced skilled wheelsmith's should easily be able to survive a direct crash into the back bumper of a car at twelve miles per hour(but not to exceed 12mpth); the resulting effects of that crash would "in fact" cause the bicycle fork to be bent and likely cause the immediate structural failure of the fork blade assembly itself;

but the properly expertly built bicycle wheel by the skilled wheelsmith builder will not only be able to survive but it will only be slightly bent but probably likely repairable with just "truing up the wheel"; that is the value of having a bicycle wheel built by a properly trained skilled wheelsmith with just standard rather ordinary average quality "DT Swiss Spokes" and just standard rather ordinary average quality double wall aluminum alloy "Alex Rims 700C sized rims"; so long as one follows the basic skills and principles used in typical wheelbuilding by skilled trained bicycle wheel wheel builders.

http://www.ebikes.ca/learn/wheel-build.html

As an alternative, Jobst Brandt--the late author of the Bicycle Wheel--never believed in spoke washers because it didn't make sense to him, and nobody could explain how it worked in detail. Jobst was a mechanical engineer, trained at Stanford and worked for HP, that wrote what many believe is the best description of how to building a sturdy wheel.

So what causes this breakage at the elbow? The short hand version of why elbows are so tricky is that the manufacturing process sets up the bend of the spoke so it is near it yield limits. When metal is near it's yield limits, it has a short fatigue life. (Metal fatigue was not understood when people first discovered it. It is actually microscopic cracks, but because people could not see the cracks, they assumed it somehow got "fatigued.")

So how to fix this issue? You do "stress relieving" when the wheel is newly built. Stress relieving consists of taking a heavy set of gloves, and squeezing parallel spokes so hard that the elbows deform as the spoke go above it yield limits. Now the spoke is nicely deformed around the spoke hole, and the section that had been close to the yield point has been stressed further than its yield point and deformed. When you release the spoke, this deformed section cannot spring back, and the stress is lowered as the other parts of the spoke do spring back and take some of the load off the stressed section.

This is nothing new as the early European bicycle mechanics supporting pro racing had stumbled on this but didn't understand why it worked so well. Their preferred way of doing stress relieving was walking on the side of the wheel! This could work if the wheel builder had an idea of what they were doing, but it could also permanent warp the rim. Jobst said to just squeeze hard for multiple cycles (hard enough that you'd need a pair of thick leather gloves.) The wheel may go a little out of true, but not enough to permanent hurt the wheel, and easy to true back to shape. I've been building wheels for 30 years, and Jobst's ideas always worked well for me, except when I got lazy and ignored his input.

Jobst said that >90% of wheels made by machines and low hour wheel builders were not tight enough. Why is this important? Because when you start having spokes break, it is tempting to say, "I'll just removed the stress by untwisting the spokes." Unfortunately, the stress is not there from the wheel tension (normal ranges for a wheel spoke tension that is properly built is only 30% of it's yield strength), but the aforementioned manufacturing process. Lowering the tension in the wheel makes it worse because the spoke can now move more setting up more metal fatigue, which means that the rest of the spoke heads will crack even sooner. If the bike shop "lowered the tension" without measuring the spoke tension, I would worry that they don't understand how a wheel works, so they need to measure the tension. Wheelsmith made a great tension spoke meter, but I don't think it is around anymore. The standard tool now is the Park TM-1. However, Jobst could basically just tell by the sound and feel. Unless there was a run away at the wheel subcontractor, the solution is not to lower the tension, but to stress relieve.

Unless your an ME with some history in metallurgy and/or material science, this may seem counter-intuitive, and indeed Jobst spent many a post on usenet (look it up kids) trying to explain this. While I'm an electrical engineer by training, his ideas seemed to be backed by my core engineering studies on mechanics, although I'm not a ME. However, I noticed that nobody that had a mechanical engineering degree ever objected to him on Usenet, but he had a ton of objectors who did not have a degree. I'll leave it to the reader to figure out if he was right, and I have no desire to restart a bunch of debates on how a spoked wheel works. Something so simple seems to be easily misunderstood.

Regardless, reading the Bicycle Wheel, still available on Amazon, will give you a much more detailed description. The trick is to realize that the metal is not failing due to lack of strength, but due to metal fatigue. The best solution Jobst would have suggested is not to find a stronger spoke, but to set up an alignment where metal fatigue is not the primary driver of the failure. Tora could have his subcontractors for the wheels add a stress relieving step into their process, and might help the reliability of the wheel.

Ravi Kempaiah
1 month ago

Hi Ravi, that's a very interesting post since I am excited to see a very efficient hub drive. I don't see the Maxon hub drive as one of the ebikes tested in the article.
https://www.ti.bfh.ch/fileadmin/data/aktuell/forschung/ebike/Elektro_Mountainbike_Spezial_BFH_Kassensturz.pdf
They were all mid drives and one hub drive which was the Diavelo. Extract of the performance were the following:
Wheeler rider HD, yamaha PWX, 500wh battery = 45 km or 11.0 wh/km
Cube reaction pro500, Bosch CX, 500 wh battery = 46 km or 10.8 wh/km
Bergamont Roxster, Bosch perf cruise, 500 wh battery = 49 km or 10.3 wh/km
Haibike Xduro hardnine, Bosch CX, 500 wh battery = 44 km or 11.3 wh/km
Flyer UPROC, Panasonic motor, 500 wh battery = 38 km or 11.3 wh/km
Specialized Levo, Brose, 460 wh battery =37 km or 12.6 wh/km
Giant Dirct E, Yamaha sync dr, 409 wh battery = 41 km or 10.1 wh/km
Scott Aspect, Bosch motor, 506 wh battery = 41 km or 12.3 wh/km
Stoke E-blade, Bosch perf CX, 400 wh battery = 38 km or 10.6 wh/km
Whistle B ware, Bosch perf CX, 510 wh battery = 40 km or 10.1 wh/km
Ghost Kato2, Shimano E6000, 418 wh battery = 44 km or 9.5 wh/km
Diavelo E9501, Diavelo hub drive, 420 wh battery = 28 km or 17.6 wh/km

On that comparison the mid drives consumption ranges from 9.5 wh/km to 12.6 wh/km. There was only one hub drive and it comsumed more energy at 17.6 wh/km.

Regardless, a hub drive is much easier to ride than a mid drive.

Here you go. Maxxon had the best efficiency but the other hub Diavelo had the worst efficiency. Goes to show that not all hubs are created equal and similarly, not all mid-drives are created equal.
https://www.maxonbikedrive.com/tl_files/content/Downloads/Messbericht_maxon_Bikedrive_BFH.pdf

it was also published in the velo journal: https://www.ti.bfh.ch/fileadmin/data/aktuell/forschung/ebike/Elektro_Mountainbike_Spezial_BFH_Kassensturz.pdf

the testing was done by a 3rd party. we can never be sure of the bias these facilities may have. But their data looks reasonable and they have used a pretty good testing platform with dyno, temperature profiler and standard conditions.

Heinrich Schwarzenbach
Prof. of Mechanics and Simulation
Technology Bern University of Applied Sciences

Institute for Energy and Mobility Research IEM
Laboratory | Electric machines and drive systems

Mark Peralta
1 month ago

Technology Bern University of Applied Sciences have conducted an efficiency test and concluded that geared hub drive (Maxxon for example) are most efficient compared to several Bosch and other mid-drive motors.

This should give a solid evidence to prove that mid-drives are not the most ideal in all cases. All this talk of efficiency is just pure talk. I also know from experience that my geared hubs gave me more range than mid-drives. Again, there are + and - to both but simply saying mid-drives are efficient is just BS. Please look at the detailed reports below. I still think a good geared hub motor coupled to a torque sensor gives the best power and range combo. [MAC, Easy motion 2018 geared hubs]

Here is a video:
https://www.srf.ch/play/tv/redirect/detail/bcb452ec-d249-4760-aabf-21a6d3cd5d9a

Summary of the test:
https://www.ti.bfh.ch/service/news/news_details/article/e-mountainbikes-im-test.html

Reports for each candidate bikes:

Specialzied levo: https://www.ti.bfh.ch/fileadmin/data/aktuell/forschung/ebike/Messbericht_Specialized_Levo.pdf

Cube Reaction pro: https://www.ti.bfh.ch/fileadmin/data/aktuell/forschung/ebike/Messbericht_Cube_Reaction_Pro.pdf

Bergamont E-roxter: https://www.ti.bfh.ch/fileadmin/data/aktuell/forschung/ebike/Messbericht_Bergamont_E-Roxter50plus.pdf

Haibike hardnine: https://www.ti.bfh.ch/fileadmin/data/aktuell/forschung/ebike/Messbericht_Haibike_HardNine_5.0_2run.pdf

Scott E-aspect: https://www.ti.bfh.ch/fileadmin/data/aktuell/forschung/ebike/Messbericht_Scott_E-aspect.pdf

Diavelo e650i: https://www.ti.bfh.ch/fileadmin/data/aktuell/forschung/ebike/Messbericht_Diavelo_e650i.pdf

Giant Dirt- E: https://www.ti.bfh.ch/fileadmin/data/aktuell/forschung/ebike/Messbericht_Giant_Dirt-E.pdf

Flyer uproc 2: https://www.ti.bfh.ch/fileadmin/data/aktuell/forschung/ebike/Messbericht_Flyer_uproc_2.pdf

Wheeler I-reader HD: https://www.ti.bfh.ch/fileadmin/data/aktuell/forschung/ebike/Messbericht_Wheeler_I-Reader_HD.pdf

Whistler Bware: https://www.ti.bfh.ch/fileadmin/data/aktuell/forschung/ebike/Messbericht_Whistle_Bware_2run.pdf

Ghost Kato: https://www.ti.bfh.ch/fileadmin/data/aktuell/forschung/ebike/Messbericht_Ghost.pdf

Hi Ravi, that's a very interesting post since I am excited to see a very efficient hub drive. I don't see the Maxon hub drive as one of the ebikes tested in the article.
https://www.ti.bfh.ch/fileadmin/data/aktuell/forschung/ebike/Elektro_Mountainbike_Spezial_BFH_Kassensturz.pdf
They were all mid drives and one hub drive which was the Diavelo. Extract of the article were the following:

Wheeler rider HD, yamaha PWX, 500wh battery = 45 km or 11.0 wh/km
Cube reaction pro500, Bosch CX, 500 wh battery = 46 km or 10.8 wh/km
Bergamont Roxster, Bosch perf cruise, 500 wh battery = 49 km or 10.3 wh/km
Haibike Xduro hardnine, Bosch CX, 500 wh battery = 44 km or 11.3 wh/km
Flyer UPROC, Panasonic motor, 500 wh battery = 38 km or 11.3 wh/km
Specialized Levo, Brose, 460 wh battery = 37 km or 12.6 wh/km
Giant Dirct E, Yamaha sync dr, 409 wh battery = 41 km or 10.1 wh/km
Scott Aspect, Bosch motor, 506 wh battery = 41 km or 12.3 wh/km
Stoke E-blade, Bosch perf CX, 400 wh battery = 38 km or 10.6 wh/km
Whistle B ware, Bosch perf CX, 510 wh battery = 40 km or 10.1 wh/km
Ghost Kato2, Shimano E6000, 418 wh battery = 44 km or 9.5 wh/km
Diavelo E9501, Diavelo hub drive, 420 wh battery = 28 km or 17.6 wh/km

On that comparison the mid drives consumption ranges from 9.5 wh/km to 12.6 wh/km. There was only one hub drive and it comsumed more energy at 17.6 wh/km.

The Maxon drive provides promise for high efficiency from it's claimed 10.0 wh/km.
However, I want to see the source if it was from in-house information or from an independent test. If you can send me the link, I would greatly appreciate it.

Where was the image above taken?
I don't see it from Maxon website.
https://www.maxonbikedrive.com/en/home.html
The hub drive can have a higher peak efficiency considering less energy is wasted from the mechanical transmission. But That's all theory, a third party side by side comparison would be very interesting and very exciting since Maxon claims it can attain 10.0 wh/km consumption.

Regardless, the difference in efficiency is minimal but a hub drive is much easier to ride than a mid drive and preserves the life of the drive train (more durable).

1/2
daniel58
1 month ago

Hi Tora,

Thanks for the reply. To your questions:

When I first received the bike, I got it looked at because I bought it online and assembled it myself. It was initially tensioned by Velofix (they come to your house). After the first breakage which happened on Monday, I took it to Electric Bike Attack in Santa Monica, which is a Juiced Bikes dealer, where they replaced one of the spokes.
I ride mostly flat paved beach path and street with some sand and some small hills.
The total payload is me + bike + the big battery + a small bag, so probably on the order of 260-270 lbs.
Speed probably averages 22-24 MPH (mode 2 most of the time).

I'll open a support ticket now.

here is something interesting from the "Grin Technologies" knowledgebase website and also from my cycling knowledge based from the Eugene Sloan's cycling primer book "Complete Bicycling"; as one can readily see this is an easily solvable problem at least according to: http://www.ebikes.ca/learn/wheel-build.html:

Seating at Bend

A common reason for spokes to fail on electric hub motors isn't because the motor puts extra strain on the spokes, or because the spokes aren't a thick enough gauge, it's because of fatigue failure from spokes that aren't held snug against the flange. If the spoke bend radius is too large or too far from the head, then it can flex up and down at the bend with each wheel rotation, eventually causing it to crack and fail.

This problem has been legendary with overseas built hub motors, and we had some Crystalyte shipments where about half the customers would experience spoke breakage on a recurring basis. Ideally the distance between the head and the bend in your spoke will match the thickness of the hub flange, and you won't have problems.

But if not, there are basically two rather effective cost effective ways to address the presented given case study situation as mentioned previously:

One is to basically insert a simple washer under the spoke head which is probably the simplest cost effective method;

The second way is to also lace the wheel in an over/under pattern, such that the spoke tension compresses the bend part of the spoke into the flange;

now using both of the two above basic commonly known wheelbuilding techniques in combination will go a long way towards helping to ensure that one is not likely to introduce unnatural and/or unknown undesireable torsional twisting forces about the "J" Spoke Bend radius at the hub flange; that will eventually directly cause and introduce premature metal fatigue failure at the "J" Spoke Bend radius at ones hub flange.

I have personally read from the excellent and comprehensive Sheldon Brown encyclopedic bicycle primer on everything about cycling must read "everything on cycling" primer, which includes "wheelbuilding" and according to him a properly hand built bicycle wheel built by an trained and experienced skilled wheelsmith's should easily be able to survive a direct crash into the back bumper of a car at twelve miles per hour(but not to exceed 12mpth); the resulting effects of that crash would "in fact" cause the bicycle fork to be bent and likely cause the immediate structural failure of the fork blade assembly itself;

but the properly expertly built bicycle wheel by the skilled wheelsmith builder will not only be able to survive but it will only be slightly bent but probably likely repairable with just "truing up the wheel"; that is the value of having a bicycle wheel built by a properly trained skilled wheelsmith with just standard rather ordinary average quality "DT Swiss Spokes" and just standard rather ordinary average quality double wall aluminum alloy "Alex Rims 700C sized rims"; so long as one follows the basic skills and principles used in typical wheelbuilding by skilled trained bicycle wheel wheel builders.

http://www.ebikes.ca/learn/wheel-build.html

scrambler
4 months ago

The only one I know so far is the FLX Blade
https://flx.bike/shop/blade/

Luna has announced the Apex, but has not provided recent news
https://electricbike.com/forum/forum/ask-lunacycle/luna-cycle-new-ebikes/41955-luna-apex-bike-ask-us-anything

Bona Fide
4 months ago

After several attempts of different methods, I finally got it done today. All you need is a 24 x 3 inch schrader valve tube (I got mine on Ebay) and 8 oz bottle of Orange Seal. (and ratchet strap to help tire be inflated)

Remove tire and existing tube, install 24 inch tube on rim and pump up so it is centered and seam is along the top.

Now use blade to start and scissors to cut around the top seam so it will open up and lay across the rim.

Clean off all the white powder.

Install tire back on, little trick getting the tube pulled back out as tire goes on.

Use a bit of soapy water or windex around tire to help it set the bead

Use a ratchet strap around the tire to make a tighter fit so it can be inflated with a regular tire pump.

Loosen ratchet strap as tire starts inflating.

If all went well, remove valve core, add half bottle (4 oz) of Orange seal (I has to use a smaller hose inside Orange Seal filler hose). Reinstall ratchet strap to aid in inflating again.

Shake tire back and forth and around to get sealer to fill and air leaks, go for a quick ride.

Use scissors to cut tube excess along the rim.

scrambler
5 months ago

Legal depends on your country and state laws.
In California, 750W is the max, so the FLX blade is only legal if you get it in the limited 750W configuration (the site has both 750W and 1000W). In the 1000W configuration, it is normally not legal.

Also in many countries, if a bike offers the possibility of an illegal setting (OFF road mode), it becomes illegal. This means that even if you ride in a Legal limited mode, you could be find guilty of operating an illegal e-bike.

Now beside the pure letter of the law (which again varies by country and state), the reality is that in many places, if you respect the riding limits of what is legal, and ride carefully and respectfully, you will not get stopped, and so no one will check if you bike is legal or not.
Of course even if that is so, one could argue that issues could arise if you end up in an accident and are being recognized as fully or partially at fault. The insurers would then possibly inspect your bike and could decide to find you liable if the bike was deemed illegal. Depending on the local laws, they could however have to prove that its illegality is the cause of the accident...

Timpo
5 months ago

https://flx.bike/shop/flx-blade/

I am so confused!!! FLX has 1000W bike and it's LEGAL!

It says "The motor on the BLADE is the most (legally) powerful and technologically advanced on the market." https://flx.bike/

dsvogel
5 months ago

It IS possible to make head/tail lights that are wired into the battery turn OFF and STAY OFF. I wanted to take some time before posting an update to make sure my assessment of the functioning of lights on the Raleigh Redux IE was accurate. I purchased a Light & Motion Nip 800 headlight and Tuck tail light, and wired them into the existing female blade connectors that come with the bike. The headlight connector is coming out of the top of the downtube, and the other was located on the left chainstay of my bike.

I had emailed Raleigh's electric bike division about this issue, eventually communicating with President Larry Pizzi, who was extremely helpful and interested in this problem. I also emailed Light&Motion support, Brose GmbH who couldn't help and suggested I contact BMZ GmbH (the battery manufacturer)... but got nowhere with them.

I ultimately discovered that my propensity to always turn the bike off at the battery was causing the erratic blinking light behavior. So to make this a quick explanation, here are the three things to know about turning off your lights on this particular bike:

The Light button on the computer doesn't work. Like you, I really wanted this to work. Larry indicated that they were following the European standard of having the lights always on for Class 3 eBikes, and therefore the Light button on the computer would not have any effect on the lights at all. There won't be a firmware update or any kind of "fix" to make this button work on the bike. I find it pretty easy to reach down and adjust the Nip 800 light directly without looking. I did let Larry know that the Brose manual that comes with the bike has a section about the functionality of this Light button that they need to be aware of.

You must turn the computer off FIRST. So the trick is to turn off the computer first. Hitting the power button at the top of the computer also turns off the lights. When you then turn off the battery (if you are so inclined) the lights stay off. No more blinking. This is the only way to get the lights to stay off, short of removing the battery altogether.

Moving the bike can cause the lights to blink. You get the lights turned off, move your bike, and now what the heck?! They are blinking again!! I think this may be triggered by the wheel magnet on the back tire moving past the sensor. When this happens, you have to turn the bike ON at the battery, and then turn the computer off again.

Not the most ideal solution, but I'm happy that it no longer looks like I'm keeping an aircraft parked in my garage at night. I've been VERY happy with the Nip/Tuck system and the amount of light they both provide. I also rather like that the lights come on without me thinking about it.

Lastly, if you are interested in using proper male blade connectors to fit the female connectors know that these are 2.8mm or 0.110 inch wide connectors. I purchased item #MST1620 from Cycle Terminal (link to the 0110 connectors page), and wound up snipping the ends of the blade to shorten it a bit. Worked like a charm! They are so cheap that I got a few extra in case I screwed one up. And I did. I also used dielectric grease and heat shrink tubing for the ultimate weather proofing. There are ample videos you can find that show you how to properly crimp a blade on a wire.

Let me know if you have questions, or "Like" this post if you found it helpful. ;)

scrambler
5 months ago

Regarding the Blade and the Carbon Gates, although they say it is supposed to have the same strength specs as the chains they replace... I have not actually been able to find a max power / max torque for it, they seem to be avoiding the subject...
That said, I would give up the belt if I could get the Bafang ultra.

I agree that the chainline may also be an issue on the FLX blade, although I have not found the chainline spec for the new 380x nuvinci.
I also agree that FLX is still an unknown entity as far as longevity and reliability is concerned, but all the E-bikes parts are standard, and not very complex to maintain.
So at this point the Blade / NuVinci scenario is more wishfull thinking around the perspective of getting better motor power than anything else :)
Good find on the alibaba FLX blade/attack clone by the way :) , and definitely, if FLX is already an unknow entity, Alibaba is one big extra step in that direction :)

I am aware the Bosch is one system with different limitations, but I have tried the 250W, and on steep hills, I find it is less than adequate. I also want to be able to pedal the bike fast at the 28mph limit, and this is why I am kind of setting the bar at the 350W version minimum.
But I may be overthinking that one, and in the end it may come down to compromise...

Agree on unknown reliability of the New Evelo bikes (mostly the new Bafand Max drive), that said, Bafang in general has a long track record now, and Evelo offers 4 years warranty, which buys some peace of mind :)

Interesting to hear about the Harmony Glitches. I have ridden several bikes with the NuVinci, but have not actually tried the Harmony. I do like the idea of simplicity of operation for my wife.
The Harmony does have the ability to be used in the regular manual mode of the NuVinci, so there is always that fallback.
Testing a harmony equipped bike is on my agenda next.

I am hoping more people will want the simplicity of use and maintenance of the configuration I am after, and that more manufacturer will offer it.

Thanks again for all the input, I am taking things slow, every perspective is valuable.

Ravi Kempaiah
5 months ago

Thank you for the quick answer, I will contact the newwheel to see what they could do and at what price.

I actually have the Tempo on a secondary list, but they only offer the 250W Bosch on that bike, and the fork is not a real suspension fork.
So for cheaper, the Evelo Galaxy looks like a better fit with a more powerful motor.
But other than that it is a great contender too.
The Atom also has a 250W motor and an IGH versus the Harmony, so also on the secondary list :)

Thanks again for your input

Most of the Bosch motors are 250W anyway. Even the speed motors. The US version is spec'd 350W but the hardware is absolutely same.
Going by Watts is the sure fire of completely misjudging a bike's capability. I suggest you visit a bike shop and ride it actually.
Harmony has some glitches and that is why manufacturers are not using them extensively.

EVELO Galaxy won't ship until late October and there is no guarantee of the reliability of the system.

Just like the ATOM Wave, most of the Specialized Levo bikes use the Brose system but most motors whether it is Bosch or Brose or Yamah put out significantly more.

You can't just take the FLX blade and add a NuVinci to it. The chainline won't work and the Bafang system will rip the Gates carbon drive in no time.
You can get the exact same BLADE model for $2000 here but I suggest you to stay away from products like that because down the line, you will end up struggling to find parts.

scrambler
5 months ago

Hi, new here, but long time lurker :)

I am looking into an E-bike for my wife that would ideally have the following characteristics

Integrated Torque / speed / cadence sensor for best of breed PAS
IGH, Ideally a NuVinci CVT, ideally with Harmony
Gates carbon drive belt system
Mid drive with as much power as possible for the steep hills of the SF Bay Area... The Bosch 350W would be a minimum, the new Bafang Max looks interesting with more torque, and the Bafang Max Ultra sounds exciting with 1000W...
Front suspension, plus suspension seat post for light trail riding.

I have a few on my radar (see below), none of which of course fit the complete bill, so I am looking at what it would take to customize one of the almost perfect ones to fit the bill.
One of these customization, would be to replace the rear derailleur and cassette by a NuVinci.

Hence my Question / post title.
Does anyone know of a bike shop in the San Francisco Bay Area that can source and install the NuVinci system on an electric bike?

Thank you for any insights.

PS: For those sharing the same specs interest, here is my current shortlist.
EVELO new Galaxy model (closest to spec at lowest price): Would need to add a suspension fork and seat posts.
FLX Blade (more exciting motor): Would need to Add the new NuVinci 380x, and a Belt drive system
RIESE &MUELLER Nevo (expensive, no throttle ): Would need to add the harmony controller
Other expensive contenders:
FELT versa E10; Cube SUV Hybrid pro 500; BULL Lacuba Evo E8 Wave

Lost
7 months ago

Hey i figured out how to fix a dolphin pack that wont charge it happened to me and so i opened it up and there is a 5 amp blade fuse you just pull it out and put new 5 amp blade fuse there you go put it back together and put it on the charger it will charge i wwas so wxcited i did it last night in 25 minutes cheers
Yes, that charge fuse should be accessible from the outside.

Also, if you ride in wet conditions, you may do well to get the Lunacycle battery bag. Even sealed, the ports and switch will leak.

Brayden is RAD
7 months ago

Hey Lost,

I have a Radrover battery that fails to charge; but, it discharges normally. The battery thinks it is fully charged and doesn't take any juice from the wall charger (the second wall charger light stays green). Even the battery indicator light on the side of the battery pack shows full bars all the time. I can only see the battery charge level when I turn on the RR LCD screen. The external fuse on the battery pack is not blown.

The battery was replaced under warranty by RR and I now have a 7 lb paper weight in my garage. Is there any internal fuse, circuit board problem, or wiring that you saw with your battery cover exchange that might explain the problem? It would be nice to fix the battery for a spare.

Hey i figured out how to fix a dolphin pack that wont charge it happened to me and so i opened it up and there is a 5 amp blade fuse you just pull it out and put new 5 amp blade fuse there you go put it back together and put it on the charger it will charge i wwas so wxcited i did it last night in 25 minutes cheers

Mr. Coffee
7 months ago

Don't I have to remove wires, etc?:eek: Anyone have a tutorial on this?

This really depends on the make and model of the bike. If you look on youtube a bit you can often find tutorials on how to do it for your particular bike.

For myself, I carry the awful little tool kit that came with my bike, small needle nose pliers, small snips, a very small locking blade knife, tire pressure gauge, CO2 canister (and maybe a spare) duct tape, a few cable ties, tire levers, and a spare tube.

On an extended multi-day tour I'd probably carry an actual bike pump, some more spares (brake cables come to mind), chain lubricant, a headlamp, and a (very) modest amount of camping gear.

One thing that is a bummer about integrated lights is I liked being able to use your bike light as a flashlight in camp and for emergency repairs in the dark.

I'd strongly recommend both tire liners and a tube sealer (or the pre-sealed tubes Slime and others carry) just to minimize the risk of flats.

I also carry a bottle or two of water, sunglasses (or goggles on a cold day), bike locks, a helmet to protect what little brains I have left, and often times a dog or two.

Mr. Coffee
9 months ago

I also carry a tiny locking blade knife. usually this one -- https://www.crkt.com/shop/pocket-knives/delilah-s-p-e-c-k.html

I'm not really a fan of multi-tools (or swiss army knives, for that matter), mostly because they become hopelessly impractical if you are in a situation when you need a tool in each hand (e.g. tightening a locking nut while maintaining tension on a cable) and also because the tools don't often lock in place.

Larry Ganz
9 months ago

When I ride I take a camelback with everything I might need. A cell phone is a must. I also take the above items, but my needle nose is a Gerber multi-tool, and I take a folding hex wrench set, and my Swiss army knife. My screw driver is reversible and has a philips and flat blade, but with the Swiss army knife I don't need to carry this now.

I also have a small 5nm torque T-wrench with some hex tips for my handlebars and other areas. I also keep a tire pump along with the Co2, and a couple of Presta to Schrader valve adapters, and a spare tube. I have light weight tire levers and patch kit too, in case I have more than one flat (or my wife and I both get a flat).

Add to that an Altor 560G Ti lock, headlight, and tail-light, but those aren't tools in that sense. I might replace my electrical tape with duct tape squares.

mrgold35
10 months ago

What type of bike does he have, how many miles per week, average mph, and is it mostly paved road, hard packed trail, single track, or down hill?

I commute to work and trail ride with my 4" fat tire ebike about 45-75 miles per week. So far, every mis-hap on the trail was usually 100% my fault. My worst spill so far was when I flipped over the bike on a muddy turn, ended up snapping 2 of the bolts and bending a 3rd that secure the handle bars, landed on my left shoulder blade, and my head bounced of the dirt. I know the helmet saved me from a concussion and my Osprey backpacked acted like an airbag to cushion my fall.

I haven't had any spills work commuting; but, I've had a few close calls. Every single time it was from a distracted driver zoning out, they were on the phone, or the driver was assuming they had the right away because they had the bigger vehicle (rolling stop signs or traffic circle stuff). Adding in road and trail accident together mouth/teeth injuries are extremely low % compared to head, limbs, and torso.

I would lean toward making sure he is visible 1st and protected 2nd if the worst happens.
- good LED headlight that can be seen day/night in any mode. Distracted drivers will see a blinking LED light better than a solid light in the day (I use Niterider Pro 3600). The good thing about this light is it cast a extremely bright wide and long beam down the road. The light is bright enough at night to be seen from the rear and my bike silhouette is clearly outlined for added safety. I just need low for commuting and use med or hi for night trail riding.
- blinking rear tail light that can be clearly seen during the brightest daylight. I use Light and Motion Vis 180 and it has an added feature of a yellow follow light you can switch to if he likes to ride in a pack (so he doesn't night blind the bikes in the rear).
- helmet light (Niterider Pro 2200), nice to have a back-up if primary fails. I also use my helmet light when street riding to see around corners, highlight/avoid road debris/potholes, and to shine oncoming cars to get their attention at intersections if they might do a rolling stop.
- helmet rear light, I use the same Vis 180 tail light and mount it to my Fox helmet.
- bright neon colored riding gear with reflective areas (neon for day, reflective for night). Helps with the side view since most bike are very hard to see from that angle at night.
- he might want to add reflective tape to help with the side view if it doesn't take away from the bike's aesthetics.

If he is a road bike person that travels +20 mph on average. I would think about padded leg and arm protection to help with spills that might result in road rash. The protection will also help limit sunburns and UV exposure if he sweats off the sunblock.

ragingbullwinkle Rocky
4 days ago

I have a Gen two trail with a 17ah battery and like it very much. Down side was waiting almost six months for it. IF you order from these people make SURE the bike is in the states. If you do not get a tracking number in two three days get a refund. Next HOPE you do not have an issue. My controller will show <5% left in the battery but still have 2 bars on the battery itself. I have sent videos of both and FLX just keeps asking for more. Once the controler gets down to 1% your pretty much tost even though the battery still has 35-45% charge left. If you do buy this Blade keep it out of the parks a trails PLEASE. So far no one has blinked at my trail and I have even stopped and talked to park rangers and no one has said a thing. I see a hand full of ass holes on blades wrecking what fremdom we have now. The Blade is not an E-Bike and should stay on private property. Thanks in advance for not being a dick.

ragingbullwinkle Rocky
3 days ago

That's great enjoy.

brandonjpj1
3 days ago

ragingbullwinkle Rocky FLX quoted me a wait time without any deception so I happily preordered and they provided terrific tracking info thus far all the way from China.

MattSlinky
7 days ago

This bike is NUTS!
This is a true E Bike! None of this 25mph max speed shiz... I'm finding all these other bikes that are around 3k still can't compete with my simple electric skateboard.. shouldn't all E bikes be able to hit speeds like this one? They have gears as well as pedal assistance and massive wheels! Why do they all seem so pathetic and overpriced? My boardis faster than all these expensive bikes (except this one) at the squeeze of a trigger, no peddling, no gears, small wheels and half the price. What am I missing? Or what are the companies missing?
FLX seems like they are getting close to making proper use of the technology available these days.. but still, that's a big price tag.
On the topic of FLX, can you review their previous models? That'd be swell 👌👌👌

Steve Aldebaran
1 week ago

To expensinve and it is not high quality! Over price! Build your own!

brandonjpj1
1 week ago

Steve Aldebaran you can also build a car for cheaper than buying one new .. doesn’t mean everyone wants to or has the skill / time

F r e e l e e
1 week ago

It seems like Bafang could very well take over the motor market for ebikes pretty soon. Their BBS02 and BBSHD mid drive motors both destroy the Bosch and Yamaha mid drives that I tested. You can do 32-35mph on the BBSHD and the 120nm is much more powerful up hills than the others. I am very impressed with their progress and now with the ultra motor that Luna Cycles is now offering, I can see a lot of DIY people hot rodding it to new heights.
Show less
REPLY

sbcfilm
1 week ago

when will you review the sur-ron ebike...thanks..

MRBARBARYCOAST
5 days ago

They have a few videos on youtube and Luna Cycles offers them right now.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 week ago

Hmm, I haven't heard of them, will keep an eye out though!

brandonjpj1
1 week ago

Been researching FLX for some time. They had issues when they started in 2016 like any new startup. They have seemed to refine their product and customer service and continue to improve. A FLX rider / owner forum seems to be full of happy riders who have had issues at times ( mostly with early gen bikes ) that get resolved by the company. Can’t wait to ride a blade soon.

brandonjpj1
1 week ago

Brent McCluskey — Electrified Reviews I actually have a blade preordered and on its way and def plan on providing feedback !
Loved your review on the works electric scooters btw, I was torn between one of those beasts and the blade.

Brent McCluskey — Electrified Reviews
1 week ago

If you end up getting one of their bikes I'd be interested to hear your feedback. Thanks for the comment!

brandonjpj1
1 week ago

ElectricBikeReview.com ride FLX on Facebook has a lot of FLX owners 👍

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 week ago

Great feedback, the guys who run this company seem very enthusiastic and sporty. I've got an FLX section in the EBR forums but there isn't as much activity there, we leave it very open so there could be more critical feedback there or you could get other perspectives if you wanted: https://electricbikereview.com/forum/forums/flx/ there just isn't much conversation happening there yet

Luke Johnson
1 week ago

Hey, I was wondering if the battery percentage on the display mean how much battery is left on the actual motor battery or the battery for the display.

Luke Johnson
1 week ago

Thanks!

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 week ago

Hi Luke! I believe the battery readout on the display is communicating how full the primary battery is (that powers the display, the motor, and the optional lights). I believe there is only one battery on this electric bike.

Rejean Paquet
1 week ago

Thanks for reviewing the FLX Blade, an amazing bike, it's a big investment, I want one, so I will wait a few months like spring time, I will keep an eye on reviews and other videos from FLX. I also like the HyperFAT BIKE from Juiced Bikes.

Martin Schmidt
1 week ago

Rejean Paquet haibike is a good choice. Not Sure if you can get a fully in your price range from them but your needs are more road bike. Bulls, Focus are also good companys. I prefere the Bosch mid drive.

Rejean Paquet
1 week ago

Martin Schmidt any suggestion? Haibike? Giant? $3500 range. 60%road/40%off-road

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 week ago

Hey Rejean! I'd love to check out the HyperFAT too, should be hooking up with Juiced later this year :D

Martin Schmidt
1 week ago

Rejean Paquet i would spend this much money on another bike from an known bike Company. Warranty and Service are important.

Gary Bryan
1 week ago

I agree with you, I too like the finish. Thanks for a great review.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 week ago

Thanks for the positive feedback Gary!

Brent McCluskey — Electrified Reviews
1 week ago

Gary Bryan Thanks, Gary! Glad you enjoyed it.

stratostear
1 week ago

You'll enjoy rapidly worn chainrings and cogs. Along with broken chains with this bike.

F r e e l e e
1 week ago

Wrong.

stratostear
1 week ago

That motor has a Max torque of 160 N.m. There's a reason why the other mid drives are rated to 75 M. m. They're limited to what current bike drive trains can handle.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 week ago

That's what crossed my mind... it appears that their shift detection is working well, but all that force is bound to strain the components

Brent McCluskey — Electrified Reviews
1 week ago

stratostear Is this something you’ve experienced? I’d be interested to hear what happened with your model and if you found out any solutions.

benzoesan sodu
1 week ago

This is rebranded Frey ebike which you can buy directly from Alibaba for about 2k. Recipe for bussiness? Buy from China and made your own logo ;) Want this bike cheaper almost 2 times? Just write in Alibaba: "48V 1000W Bafang mid drive electric mountain".

Jason Hoo
3 days ago

Richard, not true. I got a bike from Alibaba too. Same Magura & EX1 system, however with more upgrade. Including back rack, integrated cable ready for F/R right with USB adapter. 36 Stainless steel spook 13 gauge. Red anodize F/R hub, horse shoe lock, kick stand, beautiful paint red strip on frame. Cost around $2.6K. Excluding Freight shipment that was pretty expensive. As for Frey it is dual suspension, only difference is they use Shimano 11 speed instead of EX1 system. Observation from https://endless-sphere.com/forums/index.php?sid=1ef240d5290124684f65ba6178dea7ca there customer service is top notch. FYI, I was FLX customer too.. for their G! models.

Daniel Jarquio
5 days ago

Magura brake levers, Rock Shox hydraulic 203 mm disc brakes, SRAM EX1 groupset are not cheap parts.

Ddr Hazy
1 week ago

I can buy a bike from bikesdirect.com for $1k that would be similar in performance and attach a BBSHD + 700kW battery for another $1.3k. Tell me again why this bike is $4k?

Richard Lester
1 week ago

I'm afraid that's just not true, the frame is designed and made by FLX, all the components are top end mountain biking parts. The only thing in common between the blade and the frey is it has a bafang motor and two wheels. Completely different machines.

Ddr Hazy
1 week ago

I don't understand how this bike can be this expensive. There's only a few e-bike vendors which are charging a fair price for offering warranty and making sure all the parts look good and fit together. A fair mark up might be something to the tune of $300-750. Anything more and it's just a complete rip off. Vendors who hide information such as battery and motor manufacturer, beware. They are obfuscating to make a profit.

James Mason
1 week ago

40 mph I would get in trouble if I owned this bike

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 week ago

Yeah... or maybe you could outrun trouble?! It looks fun, but perhaps painful, on those service roads in the video

Brent McCluskey — Electrified Reviews
1 week ago

James Mason Haha. Exactly!

Steve Petttyjohn
1 week ago

"This bike is ridiculous" Yes it is, and over 350 watt motors is why ebikes will be completely banned from all trails.

Ian Mangham
1 week ago

Steve Petttyjohn Never been ridiculous, it's not for snowflakes but it's far from RIDICULOUS lmmfao

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 week ago

Yeah, I've slapped a warning on the written review and coached Brent a lot about how this isn't really a moped or motorcycle or ebike. I wish he would have been a bit more toned down and explained the surrounding legislation, but he did provide a basic warning. This review does not constitute an endorsement of the product, but for people with private property it could be a fun toy

Michael Sprinzeles
1 week ago

Not quite a fair review...the motor can be ordered limited to 750 watts and the rider not the power determines the danger level. If power determined danger levels super cars would not be road legal. I have a BBSHD kit which achieves similar speeds & power yet I rarely exceed 20 mph and my average right now reads 4 mph. It's also unfair to categorize the FLX as outside the e-bike realm for having a throttle. Having a throttle does not force the rider to use it! Other than testing the top speed I have never used my throttle.
I would like to give props to FLX for using the EX1 cassette which (IMO) will change the e-bike world. I killed my 8 speed cassette putting that much power to it and researched heavily before replacing it with a steel wide ratio 10 speed. The EX1 was too expensive for me at the time but it has great specs for an e-bike.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 week ago

Great feedback Michael, I like the EX1 as well and am excited to see how many higher-end models start using it and how it holds up

Brent McCluskey — Electrified Reviews
1 week ago

Michael Sprinzeles That’s a good point. You can also use the control center to limit top speed as well if you wanted.

Florida Scot
1 week ago

Would like to see a review of FLX's less expensive models, they are like $2 grand less & I did read some complaints about early models, wondering if issues have been resolved ect. ?

ragingbullwinkle Rocky
4 days ago

Hey Scott I looked at a bunch but ordered a Gen two Trail with a 17ah battery see ^ for more on that. at 2200 is not a bad price point for what you get. Check out Ride FLX facebook page for more from a bunch of owners.

Meno Passini
1 week ago

Thank you, The only way I got my expense E bike, it was a Demo and last years model plus my friend gave me money instead for B day and Xmas present. Now it's 2 below zero and my $3,000 money saving transportation is in the basement til March.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 week ago

Hey! I believe that Brent will be covering a couple of their other products, the more traditional low-powered ones :)

Brent McCluskey — Electrified Reviews
1 week ago

Florida Scot Thanks for the suggestion! Stay tuned as we’ll have some reviews up on some other FLX models soon!

FarcryTheBrave
1 week ago

I'm sorry but your videos are no good. this channel should be retitled courtselectricbikereview

Marcy Marc
2 days ago

Brent McCluskey — Electrified Reviews I enjoyed the review too. You and Court are both good. Well done

Brent McCluskey — Electrified Reviews
1 week ago

Glad you dug it, Phil, and please feel free to leave any suggestions or feedback on this and/or future videos as well! Court has really been helping me get up to speed with everything, but it's always good to hear from you guys as well. There's always just so much room to grow, which is one of the reasons I love electric bikes so much!

Phil Hogan
1 week ago

I disagree with FTB. I think Brent did a good job! I always like Cort's reviews but it's not a bad idea to have a different or 2nd perspective.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 week ago

Thanks for the feedback, I'm still producing lots of videos and feel that Brent is getting better. The reason I opened it up like this is that I would be completely missing bikes like the FLX Blade. I don't want to dilute the brand or insights I strive for in my own reviews, but we're making progress. Feel free to share which aspects Brent could improve on. I spend hours talking to him and providing feedback for each review.

Brent McCluskey — Electrified Reviews
1 week ago

Steve Petttyjohn Thanks for the kind words, Steve!

Ian Mangham
1 week ago

Wow, 40mph is madman speed on a bike, it's a beast,gets a lot better the more one watches 😊

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 week ago

Yeah, the drone footage was neat. I'm glad they were being safe and found some off road space to do these tests ;)

Brent McCluskey — Electrified Reviews
1 week ago

Ian Mangham Definitely! Rob, the owner, managed to push it past 40 mph during testing but I kept it around 35 mph. :)

Ian Mangham
1 week ago

Looks rugged looks tough, also looks a bugger 😄

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 week ago

Yeah, the design looks good... I like the brushed Aluminum style here... rugged

Ian Mangham
1 week ago

Great review, I'd ride one but I wouldn't buy one 😄

Brent McCluskey — Electrified Reviews
1 week ago

I'll second that. The front suspension is buttery smooth but I could definitely feel the lack of rear suspension as I was hammering across some more difficult terrain.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 week ago

Same here, I'm not sure how comfortable it would actually be with no rear suspension. I could feel myself tensing as I saw the rep riding across that bumpy field at the end

trekkeruss
1 week ago

The eyelets on the dropout are not for a kickstand, but for a traditional rack and/or fenders; notice there are two more on the drive side as well.

trekkeruss
1 week ago

NP. I enjoy and appreciate all the reviews.

Brent McCluskey — Electrified Reviews
1 week ago

Yes! Thank you for pointing that out. I'm still learning here with Court and you guys so I appreciate you bringing that to my attention.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 week ago

Right you are... I was thinking the same thing when Brent said it. Thanks for the feedback and sorry for the misinformation