FLX Trail Review

Flx Trail Electric Bike Review
Flx Trail
Flx Trail 170mm Cranks Angled
Flx Trail 13ah Battery Suntour Xcr Suspension
Flx Trail Flx Branded Bafang Control Center
Flx Trail Button Pad Throttle On Left
Flx Trail Flx Branded Bafang Control Center Close
Flx Trail Shimano Alivio Trigger Shifters On Right
Flx Trail Spank Handlebars
Flx Trail Shimano Alivio Derailleur
Flx Trail 13ah Battery Kenda 27.5 Inch Tires
Flx Trail Rear 135mm Hub Spacing
Flx Trail Bafang 350 Watt Mid Drive Motor
Flx Trail 180 Mm Tektro Auriga Hydraulic Disc Brake
Flx Trail Flx Branded Saddle
Flx Trail 170mm Cranks
Flx Trail Front 100mm Hub Spacing
Flx Trail Electric Bike Review
Flx Trail
Flx Trail 170mm Cranks Angled
Flx Trail 13ah Battery Suntour Xcr Suspension
Flx Trail Flx Branded Bafang Control Center
Flx Trail Button Pad Throttle On Left
Flx Trail Flx Branded Bafang Control Center Close
Flx Trail Shimano Alivio Trigger Shifters On Right
Flx Trail Spank Handlebars
Flx Trail Shimano Alivio Derailleur
Flx Trail 13ah Battery Kenda 27.5 Inch Tires
Flx Trail Rear 135mm Hub Spacing
Flx Trail Bafang 350 Watt Mid Drive Motor
Flx Trail 180 Mm Tektro Auriga Hydraulic Disc Brake
Flx Trail Flx Branded Saddle
Flx Trail 170mm Cranks
Flx Trail Front 100mm Hub Spacing

Summary

  • A hardtail cross country style electric mountain bike with quiet Bafang Max Drive 350-watt mid-drive motor, adjustable top speed upwards of 35 mph position it for private property or OHV use only
  • Three different colors to choose from - White Lightning, Carbon Black, and Gun Metal Gray - with several different upgradable options including a larger battery, rear rack, fenders, and integrated lighting
  • Custom designed frame with sturdy rear-end, internally routed cables keep it looking clean and reduce snags, large LCD display, powerful 180 mm hydraulic disc brakes with motor inhibitors
  • Offers pedal assist and trigger throttle operation, excellent weight distribution, only sold direct at the time of this review but comes with a one-year warranty and FLX has been around since 2016
Warning, in some configurations this electric bike is classified as a moped or motorcycle and may not be ridden on cycling trails or paths. It may require licensing, insurance and lights when used on public roads.

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

FLX

Model:

Trail

Price:

$1,899 ($2,198 for Optional 17ah Battery, $2,169 for Optional Touring Package, $2,469 for Optional Touring Package + Optional 17ah Battery)

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Urban, Trail, Mountain

Electric Bike Class:

Moped or Motorcycle (Class 4)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States, Worldwide

Model Year:

2018

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

50.3 lbs (22.81 kg)

Battery Weight:

6.8 lbs (3.08 kg)

Motor Weight:

8.5 lbs (3.85 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

19 in (48.26 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

19" Seat Tube, 24" Reach, 28.5" Standover, 24.75" Width, 73.5" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

White Lightning, Carbon Black, Gun Metal Gray

Frame Fork Details:

SR Suntour XCR Spring Suspension with 120 mm Travel, Lockout, Preload Adjust, 9 mm Skewer, 100 mm Hub Spacing

Frame Rear Details:

135 mm Hub Spacing, 9 mm Skewer with Quick Release

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

9 Speed 1x9 Shimano Alivio Derailleur, Shimano CS-HG200-9 11-34T Cassette

Shifter Details:

Shimano Alivio Triggers on Right

Cranks:

Prowheel EB01, Aluminum Alloy, 170 mm Length, 40T Chainring with Narrow Wide Teeth, Aluminum Alloy Bash Guard

Pedals:

Wellgo KC005 Aluminum Alloy Platform

Headset:

Neco, Tapered 1-1/8" to 1-1/2", Threadless, Internal Cups

Stem:

Neco, 6061 Aluminum Alloy, 80 mm Length, Two 10 mm Risers, 31.8 mm Clamp Diameter

Handlebar:

Aluminum Alloy, 630 mm Length, Low-Rise

Brake Details:

Tektro Auriga Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Rotors, Dual Piston Calipers, Tektro Three-Finger Levers with Adjustable Reach and Motor Inhibitors

Grips:

Velo Flat Rubber with Lockers

Saddle:

FLX Branded Velo, Active

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

300 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

31.8 mm

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy, Double Walled, 25.6 mm Width, 32 Hole

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 13G, Black with Nipples

Tire Brand:

Kenda Nevegal, 27.5" x 2.1" (25-584)

Wheel Sizes:

27.5 in (69.85cm)

Tire Details:

40 to 65 PSI, 2.8 to 4.6 BAR

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

USB Charging Port on Control Center, Optional Rear Cargo Rack ($55), Optional Front and Rear Fenders ($55), Optional Suspension Seatpost ($40), Optional Smartphone Mount ($20), Optional Integrated Headlight and Taillight ($100)

Other:

Locking Removable Downtube Mounted Battery Pack with USB Port, FLX Branded Bafang Control Center

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bafang

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

350 watts

Motor Peak Output:

750 watts

Motor Torque:

80 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

LG

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

13 ah (Optional 17.5 ah)

Battery Watt Hours:

468 wh (Optional 630 wh)

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

5.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

20 miles (32 km)

Estimated Max Range:

45 miles (72 km)

Display Type:

FLX Branded Bafang DP C18, Fixed Backlit LCD, (Double Press i for Settings Menu and Password)

Readouts:

Current Speed, Max Speed, Average Speed, Odometer, Tripometer, Range, Calories, Trip Timer, Clock, Mode, Watts or Amps, Battery in Percentage or Bar, Assist Level (0-5)

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad on Left, USB Type A Port on Display Panel

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle on Left (Measures Pedal Torque, Cadence and Wheel Speed)

Top Speed:

35 mph (56 kph) (25 MPH with Throttle Only)

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Written Review

The Trail is the second bike in FLX’s lineup I’ve reviewed so far, and like the Blade, the Trail is a fun, purpose-built electric mountain bike designed with dirt trails in mind. It only comes in one frame size, 19”, but offers three different colors: Electric White, Carbon Black and Gun Metal Gray. It also comes in a few different configurations. The base model of the Trail runs for $1,899, the Touring Package runs for $2,169 and includes a rear rack, integrated front and rear lights and fenders, and there’s also the option of upgrading the 13ah battery to a 17.5ah battery for an additional $299. The Trail has a higher-than-normal top speed, upwards of 40 mph, placing it squarely outside the typical classes of electric bikes. The high top speed is cool for tearing through the trails, but it also means it’s likely illegal to ride in most places, making the Trail more of an off-highway vehicle (OHV) or private property experience as opposed to general cross country and trail riding. Riding this bike on the road could pose some legal issues, especially in the case of an accident, so please be careful. Because the Trail can be considered an unregistered vehicle (due to its top speed), there may be some serious legal ramifications if you were to hit another biker, pedestrian, vehicle or even damage public or private property. That being said, given the Trail only has a 350 watt mid-drive motor, I don’t think it’s likely I could hit the top advertised speed of 40 mph unless I was on level pavement in some sort of super aero position. However, I was able to get it close to 30 mph relatively easily and have ranked it as a 35 mph bike in the stats here. FLX started as FLUX back in 2016. They launched an Indiegogo campaign, asking for $50,000 and raked in an incredible $1.7 million from the campaign, plus an additional $400,000 from their website. Needless to say, they crushed it. FLX has dropped the “U” and now they have some second-generation models being added to the lineup. So let’s dive into the Trail and see what this bike is all about.

Driving the trail is a 350-watt mid-drive motor, called the Max Drive from Bafang. This is the second time I’ve tested a bike with this specific motor and I like it even more this time around. While it’s nowhere near as powerful as the 1,000-watt motor on the Blade, it is far quieter. It’s so quiet, in fact, that I have to strain to hear it running. The motor has a modest 80 newton meters of torque, but thats more than enough to help get me (as a 200 lb rider) climb some steeper hills. Riding the Trail with this motor is an entirely different experience than the Blade (obviously :). With the Blade, it felt almost like the bike could get away from me because of the immense power, but with the Trail, it feels more like it’s assisting me – like I’m in control vs. the bike being in control. I also appreciate the 350-watt motor as it still allows me to get my heart rate up, even when I’m on the highest pedal-assist mode. The torque sensor on the Trail works well with the motor, giving power almost immediately after I apply pressure to the cranks and stopping just as quickly when I let off the gas. Like I mentioned in the FLX Blade review, I deeply appreciate the torque sensor versus a cadence sensor as it allows for a finer degree of control when traveling at low speeds. This is especially important to me when I’m trying to navigate trickier terrain. I like that when I stop pedaling, the motor stops giving power. I’ve run into issues before with cadence sensors where I’m trying to creep along a ridge crest or something and the motor just doesn’t want to shut off. Thankfully, that’s not an issue at all with the Trail. With this particular setup, the motor will technically continue giving pedal assist up to 40 mph, but the top speed with the throttle is limited to 25 mph.

I like the trigger throttle design that FLX went with for this bike because it will stay out of the way compared to a twist throttle and allow you to focus on steering and grip if the terrain gets rough. You cannot activate the throttle at standstill, which can be annoying when you go to start, but this does make it a bit safer to mount and dismount the bike when it’s turned on. I usually try to remember to turn off electric bikes with throttles before doing anything besides riding them, especially messing with the gears, fixing flats, or mounting them to my car rack. The way this throttle works is that you have to be moving upwards of five miles per hour before it goes active… I have tested other ebikes where you only have to go one or two miles per hour, and I preferred those. You may notice that at one point during the ride test in the video review, I was struggling to go fast enough (while climbing) to get the throttle active. It was a bit annoying and perhaps this is a setting that FLX can adjust in the future. Thankfully, the throttle can override all of the assist levels with 100% power once you are going fast enough. It’s a convenient way to zip up to speed or climb a hill without adjusting the assist level using the button pad.

Braking with the Trail is a breeze. It’s equipped with 180 mm, dual-piston Tektro hydraulic disc brakes in the front and rear, with adjustable-reach, three-finger brake levers. Thanks to the motor inhibitors, the motor shuts off whenever the brake levers are depressed. This ensures I’m not fighting against the motor when braking, which could increase my overall stopping distance. There are moments when I have felt a bit of adrenaline and accidentally twisted throttles or kept pedaling even as I pulled the brakes, and motor inhibitors are really nice to cancel out any unwanted or unintended signals like this, especially at higher speeds. I like that FLX opted to go with 180 mm rotors since this is really meant to be an off-road trail blazer (probably why they named it the Trail). The larger rotor diameter helps to improve leverage over the wheels and allows them to cool faster. The brake levers are also adjustable reach, a feature I dig as I sometimes find the levers can pinch my hands when set too close. It’s nice to know I could let them out (or take them in if I was wearing thicker gloves) if I needed to. The Shimano Alivio trigger shifters work well enough, but unlike the Blade, there doesn’t appear to be a shift sensor with the Trail. So the motor will continue to run when you switch through the gears. With only 350 watts of power and 80 newton meters of torque, there will of course be far less strain on the components compared to the much more powerful Blade, but I could still run into problems if I don’t let off the gas before shifting. Over time, the chain, sprockets, and derailleur will take some abuse if you don’t ease off when shifting. The Trail also loses the frame-mounted chain guide featured on the Blade, but retains the aluminum bash guard and narrow-wide chain ring tooth setup as mentioned earlier.

The frame itself is made from aluminum alloy, offering an average curb weight of 50 pounds. And, since the motor is located low on the middle of the frame, and since the battery is on the down tube, it’s pretty well balanced. There’s probably two main reasons this bike is so much lighter than the Blade: It has a much smaller motor and battery. The roughly 10-pound difference between the Trail and Blade is definitely noticeable when riding and I was able to flick the Trail around pretty easily during the ride test. The frame also looks pretty cool (to my eyes) and was custom designed by FLX to take a beating. The Trail I tested was the Electric White color, which stands out nicely against pretty much all backgrounds and would be more visible in dark conditions. While the Electric White color does stand out, I might lean more towards the Carbon Black myself since everything is all one color. With that setup, the battery and cables really disappear into the frame and it has a stealthier look. One of my biggest complaints about the frame though is the lack of rear suspension. While I could add a seat post suspension, it’s not the same as an integrated rear suspension. Additionally, the tires are only 2.1 inches wide, and since this bike doesn’t have boost, I can’t add plus size tires, which would increase the overall air volume and make for a cushier ride. FLX does offer a seat post suspension of their own, but most aftermarket seat post suspensions with a 31.8 mm diameter should also work (or you could use a shim to hit this size, I was a little surprised at my own measurements of 31.8 mm because it seems like 31.6 mm is much more common, feel free to correct me in the comments below). The frame also has fender bosses, water bottle bosses and rear rack bosses, which are great for those who want to pedal through the city on the Trail (but just remember the potential legal issues of doing so). The locking, integrated battery fits snugly to the frame and doesn’t bulge out past the sides. It’s a 36 volt, 13 amp hour battery, but there’s also that option of the larger 17.5 amp hour battery for those who want to ride further (and I love that that pack does not bulge out past the sides).

FLX estimates the range at around 60 miles in the lowest pedal assist setting with the 13ah battery, but I think realistically I would get around 20 miles with the way I ride. I really appreciate that the battery and display console up at the handlebars have USB ports for charging accessories on the go! You could use this to maintain the charge of your smartphone while using GPS and then take the battery pack off and use it to power other portable electronics while camping etc. Mounted in the middle of the handlebar is the FLX-branded Bafang control center, which offers tons of information. This control center displays current speed, top speed, average speed, range, battery level, pedal assist mode, wattage output and quite a bit more. More importantly, I can see it in direct sunlight! The only downside to this display is that it’s not easily removable, so leaving it unattended in a public place could subject it to tampering. Another cool thing about this control center is the extensive configuration options. I can set up a passcode to keep children or anyone else from accessing the electronics. I can also change the top speed to whatever I like. So if I want to tone this bike down, that’s an option.

I think the Trail is a good choice for those looking for a fun off-road electric mountain bike that’s capable of reaching higher top speeds. While there’s a few compromises to hit that lower price, like boost and rear suspension, it still feels more than capable of tackling pretty serious trails. This was a fun bike to test and I’d like to thank FLX and especially Rob for partnering with me on this review and for coming all the way out to California to hang out! As a closing thought, it appears that the fork used here is a spring design vs. air, this increases the weight and limits adjustability but also saves costs. It does offer preload adjust, but no rebound, so it could feel bouncy and is just a bit cheaper than you’d get from a nicer mountain bike suspension fork. Had they gone with an air fork or a more adjustable spring with hydraulic damping, the overall weight of the bike would be lower or the performance might be more fine-tuneable. I would consider the 50 lb weight of this e-bike to be a bit high considering that the bike we reviewed didn’t have the rack or lights. For a naked hardtail with standard width hubs and average sized tires, it’s not super lightweight, but even the stock sized battery is a touch above average in terms of capacity and the weight is all centrally located and fairly low on the frame. I love that it has room for a bottle cage on the seat post, and that they included bosses here to mount one easily.

Pros:

  • With a base price of $1,899, the Trail is much more affordable than the FLX Blade, which starts at $3,999, as well as many other high-speed ebikes, it’s very capable and has a great motor/battery setup from Bafang
  • The frame is purpose-built for off-road use, offering tons of rigidity and the weight of the motor and battery are positioned low and center to improve handling
  • The LCD control center offers tons of information and is easily visible even in direct sunlight, you can angle it a bit to reduce glare, navigating through the different display features is intuitive and I was able to reach the button pad without taking my left hand off the grip
  • With a max speed of 35 mph, this thing is much faster than most electric bikes, but the top speed can also be toned down through the options in the control center
  • Bafang’s Max Drive motor is incredibly quiet and smooth but still very responsive, the motor controller relies on a multi-sensor to gauge rear wheel speed, pedal cadence, and pedal torque
  • Locking integrated battery pack fits snugly into the frame and doesn’t bulge out past the sides, it also has a full sized USB Type A port at the bottom to charge accessories (just be careful not to bump this when pedaling, you might want to use it as an energy bank off the bike)
  • 180 mm, dual piston, hydraulic disc brakes offer ample stopping power, which is especially important for an electric bike that can reach these kinds of speeds, the brake levers have motor inhibitors which make the bike safer to stop
  • Aluminum bash guard on the chainring should help protect the sprocket ring teeth from damage during log and rock strikes if you take the FLX Trail into the woods
  • The chain ring has a narrow-wide tooth pattern to help keep the chain securely locked on, this is really nice for riding at high speed on bumpy terrain, especially since there isn’t a chain guide
  • Locking screws on the end-cap of the grips ensure they won’t spin around when you bear down hard on the handlebars, this is a great safety feature and a little upgrade compared to cheaper products
  • Suntour XCR suspension works well enough to absorb moderate bumps and jumps, but isn’t as lightweight or adjustable as an air fork, it offers adjustable rebound and lockout however and both wheels have quick release skewers for easy trail maintenance
  • FLX offers several different variations to the base model, including upgraded battery and the Touring Package which includes a rear rack, fenders, and front and rear lights

Cons:

  • No rear suspension makes for a stiff bouncy ride which can buck the chain off track, you may also lose traction and control compared to full suspension… especially at higher speed, consider a 31.8 mm seat post suspension to make the bike more comfortable
  • The tires are relatively standard and don’t offer puncture protection, without Boost hub spacing there isn’t the option of swapping them out for much wider tires which would add a little bit more cushion and compensate for the lack of rear suspension
  • Shimano Alivio derailleur is nice enough, but it’s not e-bike specific and without shift sensing it may struggle to handle the power of the motor over time, so shift gears thoughtfully by easing off as you pedal
  • Control center isn’t removable, which means it could get scratched up if you crash the bike or if it’s left out in the open at a public bike rack, it also means that if a passcode isn’t enabled then anyone, including children, could potentially operate the bike or tamper with the throttle at a rack
  • The handlebars feel a little narrow for a mountain bike, especially when compared to the very wide handlebars on the FLX Blade
  • No chain guide means the chain has a higher chance of popping of towards the inside, but at least the narrow-wide teeth are there to keep it tight
  • Higher potential top speed limits where the FLX Trail ebike can legally be ridden, since this is technically a Class 4 vehicle, there could be some legal liability in the event of a crash or property damage
  • Base price of $1,899 is good, but adding the Touring Package and upgraded battery adds more than $500 to the purchase which seems like much more than the cost of the upgrades
  • Skewers are used instead of thru axles, and this coupled with the standard hub spacing seems like it may not be enough structural integrity to handle the highest top speed of 35+ mph
  • The throttle does not become active until you’re pedaling upwards of five miles per hour, which can take several pedal strokes to achieve… I understand and appreciate the safety of not having it active when the bike is completely still but would prefer a one or two mile per hour activation vs. five because there are times when climbing steep sections that the bike just won’t go as fast and the throttle could cut out even though you really need it to help you up, most other ebikes with throttle limiters are set at ~2 mph in my experience

Resources:

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Ken
1 day ago

The FLX ebikes look impressive from a small start-up. The Blade and Trail look like the same basic frame that Magnum uses on their Magnum Peak but it’s a rear geared hub drive. I just have the impression the mid-drive system is best for slower speeds and lower speed climbing and that hub drives are superior when riding long distances at high speeds (15 – 30 mph) because the torque is directly applied to the rear wheel (mid drives benefit from gear ratios at low speeds but once your riding at high speeds the front to rear chain ring ratios effectively reduce torque delivery to the rear wheel).

I still like how there is room in the market for some innovative companies like FLX that want to push the legislative boundries that limit the adoption of eBikes for transportation in the US (time is money so anyone commuting on an bike is going to want to sustain speeds in the 25-35mph when the road is smooth and clear).

I my opinion, anyone commuting on a bike sharing the road with cars that isn’t going at least 20mph is just an organ donar in the making. The danger of going fast reduces the likelihood of being hit by a car and thus improves safety overall. Sure, a biker can still wreck on his own but most wrecks under 35mph aren’t going to be be that seriously injured (it’s the impact with autos that kill most bikers).

Reply
Court Rye
1 day ago

Thanks for your input and feedback Ken! I have heard similar arguments about going “with the speed of traffic” and feeling more safe and respected. I like that there are options for mopeds and electric motorcycles that truly fit in and are designed to handle the added forces of speed and offer the appropriate signaling tools. I feel that these higher speed ebikes are neat, but should be treated with caution from a legal standpoint, or if the basic 9 mm skewers get worn down etc. I have heard of people breaking bones because their regular bicycle had a loose front wheel and they did a nosedive. I take safety pretty seriously (this is Court btw.) because I have been knocked out a couple of times while wearing a helmet doing non motorized sports. I don’t want to see anyone get seriously hurt or sued if something goes wrong. But again, I appreciate your feedback and do agree with the convenience of higher speed and personal freedom to make ones own choices :)

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bob armani
1 day ago

Well, the locals think it is freezing, but compared to -25C when I left Illinois, it's nice here. We packed our two folders, which fit in the space behind the seats in a minivan. It's a lot better having the bikes inside than on the platform rack.

We've ridden the Pinellas Trail near Dunedin, the Venetian Waterway trail by Venice, and crossed the causeway to Sanibel island. Florida seems set up pretty nice in the towns with lots of paths, presumably for seniors on motorized wheelchairs. In the country, the roads have a little asphalt marked off for bikes, but that's too risky for me.

The causeway bridges are like hills, except that a fall/crash risks either squashed by a car or going over the guard rail and falling 100 feet into the water. There's about 5-6 feet of bikeway between the road and the rail. It's one way. Motors plus pedalling cranked us right up the steepest climb, which I figure was 60 feet. We almost caught a guy on a road bike on the summit, but we held back. Bridge traffic is 35 mph, and the cars backed off to pass us, but it was a high alert ride. My wife refused to look anywhere but right over the bars.

At 55F, still lots of bikes, mostly rentals, on the paths in Sanibel in town. More peaceful on the east/west ends of the island. I packed a spare battery for both. Did not want to run out of power on the causeway coming back, so I "refueled" just before the final leg.

Hi Harry and wife-I am stuck here in Illinois while you are riding with fun in the sun. Good for you! Do you stay for the entire winter season? I hear it is really nice in Coconut Grove as indicated on this page. What a great alternative to 55 degree riding temps. Love the Florida signage with icicles. That's crazy. Enjoy your rides! ;)

rich c
3 days ago

I rode both the all wheel drive BB and the new model with the Brose mid drive. The Brose was better for climbing, it had more torque. I was riding it on a paved trail, but dropped off the side of the trail to test it's climbing. No snow anywhere that time of year, so can't compare snow handling.

JRA
4 days ago

Yes lighter but only 80mm travel which is plenty for the way I ride, or should I say speed.

I wasn't impressed with the grip display because it has a funky grip throttle thing going on. I like the thumb version on the other side next to my grip shift better. I am so used to a CA3 that any display is second rate and the stock display is fine for my needs after I broke the stock mount and have it strapped on even. I was easily able to access the settings to adjust to my preferences and haven't done much with it since. As I said I use eco 99% of the time.

Good luck getting it to cruise that fast. I suppose it would but you will want to have pretty high gear ratio's to support it. I still prefer my hub bikes for that type of speed and the cadences associated with them. I have had mine up to 25 a few times on the pavé but mostly ride off road with mine so rarely see even 20 doing that.

The magic legs feeling that torque sensing gives you feels good to me up to about 70rpm and then it just starts to feel vague. Beyond that I prefer pure access to my gearing without motor interference at all and why I use a throttle on my road bikes.

Yes, Ft. Stevens. There is a single track trail system (outside of the paved ones) there that I have ridden off and on for years that I always say is one of my top 5 favorite in the U.S.. Can be ridden year round but sometimes the water table gets the low spots flooded so you have to get wet. I like to think that Lewis and Clark walked the same trails back in their time. The above pic of my FS bike was taken at Coffenbury Lake inside the park.

mrgold35
6 days ago

I have two 2106 750w Radrovers rear hub fat tire bike since Sept/2016 with around 3800 miles between them. They are Class II ebike limited to 20 mph and it has a throttle and PAS levels 0-5. The way my Radrover works is it has a certain limited watt level per PAS level at around:
PAS 0: 0 watts
PAS 1: 75 watts
PAS 2: 175 watts
PAS 3: 375 watts
PAS 4: 550 watts
PAS 5: 750 watts

I mostly ride using PAS 2/3 at 8-12 mph for trails and PAS 3 at 15-20 mph with PAS 4 on steeper hills. Really never had a need to use PAS 5 for work or trail riding.

The full 750 watts do really come in handy when I need to use the throttle. Having full throttle power comes in handy:
- trail riding and you hit a sandy spot and the extra power can power you out
- short inclines if you just need to a touch more power to maintain your mph
- if you need to push the bike up hills or over obstacles (I even used the throttle to help push my ebike up a flight of stairs)
- getting across intersections in a hurry
- using the throttle if pedaling would hit the ground or obstacles
- helps to get going if you are starting up an incline
- less shifting required to get up to cruising speed
- can get up to your cruising speed faster using the throttle and shifting

Extra power also comes in handy because my ebike is about 75lbs with rack+gear and I'm around 275-290 lbs depending on summer and winter riding gear+commuter back pack.

rich c
6 days ago

I'd suggest a Specialized Turbo Como 2.0. Beautiful bike, 20mph, and a really easy upright ride. Very close to your price range at $2600. I'm also 65. I ride speed pedelec Haibikes, but rode that Specialized at the local bike shop. Coming down hills, I was a bit annoyed at the speed assist pulling and stopping as I rode in the 19-21mph range. I ride the 28mph bikes, but almost never get above 23. I have one rail trail I ride that has a negative grade for about 10 miles. I ride it in the 22 mph range. Of course not that speed on the way home, but I could!

1/1
bob armani
6 days ago

Chicago e-biker here! I ride on the forest preserve paths (north branch trail, lakefront path, north shore channel trail) all the time and have NEVER even been questioned by anyone. I'm usually riding with my dog in tow in a trailer. Every cop i've seen just smiles as we pass, or asks to say hi to the dog. We've ridden to Blackwell Forest Preserve near Wheaton, to Illinois Beach State Park in Zion, and all the way to Kenosha without a single issue. I think as long as you're not being a jerk and you don't bring harm to others, the cops don't care. We even road through Chicago Botanic Gardens and stopped to fill our water bottles with the dog (not allowed) and no one, including security, said anything. We got lots of smiles and waves though :)

That is great news Goose! I am with you on the smiles received throughout my Chicago trail ebike riding experience this past season. More inquisitive than anything else. Being that ebikes are not so popular here yet, perhaps we can act as reps and a rider when asked a bunch of questions. Great to get the word out to other fellow riders. I have been on most of the trials you have mentioned, and not one problem. I ride an EM Jet, so the bike is advertised as "the ebike that does not look like one", so everything is more integrated into the frame and downtube. At a glance, looks like a regular bike. I went with that model, not knowing if I would be confronted by enforcement or not. Working out great so far. I also enjoy the Green Bay Trail that starts at Wilmette Ave to Lake Cook Rd, then you can swing over to the NBT in Turnbull Woods and head back. Nice cruise indeed! Thanks for the heads up in your post! Ride Safe.:)

Solom01
1 week ago

Thanks for the report. As a local I stopped riding last week when it got into the 50s...just too cold, but it's back to 70 today so I was able to ride again. Curious, saw you took the trail to the train depot, did you keep going on the Legacy Trail? It is totally away from the roads and goes from Venice to South Sarasota. We're hoping to expand it into downtown Sarasota in the near future. It's a good way to get a long ride in if you're concerned about being near cars.

harryS
1 week ago

Well, the locals think it is freezing, but compared to -25C when I left Illinois, it's nice here. We packed our two folders, which fit in the space behind the seats in a minivan. It's a lot better having the bikes inside than on the platform rack.

We've ridden the Pinellas Trail near Dunedin, the Venetian Waterway trail by Venice, and crossed the causeway to Sanibel island. Florida seems set up pretty nice in the towns with lots of paths, presumably for seniors on motorized wheelchairs. In the country, the roads have a little asphalt marked off for bikes, but that's too risky for me.

The causeway bridges are like hills, except that a fall/crash risks either squashed by a car or going over the guard rail and falling 100 feet into the water. There's about 5-6 feet of bikeway between the road and the rail. It's one way. Motors plus pedalling cranked us right up the steepest climb, which I figure was 60 feet. We almost caught a guy on a road bike on the summit, but we held back. Bridge traffic is 35 mph, and the cars backed off to pass us, but it was a high alert ride. My wife refused to look anywhere but right over the bars.

At 55F, still lots of bikes, mostly rentals, on the paths in Sanibel in town. More peaceful on the east/west ends of the island. I packed a spare battery for both. Did not want to run out of power on the causeway coming back, so I "refueled" just before the final leg.

1/5
JRA
1 week ago

This field of uncut hay is today's bike backdrop. Banks Vernonia Trail, OR. 01/06/18

1/1
Tripp
1 week ago

Interesting choices on the fatbikes, but I dont' think the RC will work the same. It's the tires baby! (if it can run 3" tires maybe, air down, ??? But not the 2.6" that fit the "normal" bikes.
My BB would climb equally with the Haibike using both motors on dry ground, on snow I'm sure the 2wd would walk all over the mid drive that would have enough power but be much more likely to spin the rear wheel. You need that front tire pulling through any kind of standing snow. Still aren't going to break trail with a lot of snow. The BBP actually has limited slip as if one of the wheels spins more than 1/4(?) turn faster than the other it cuts power to that wheel. I didn't get to use it much as we get next to no snow any more. It's heavy feeling and handling on dry land, fun if you don't have a much more spirited feeling mount in your stable, sits if you do. But if I lived where you did, I'd still have it. ;)

JRA
1 week ago

Today's ride encompassed the usual texture of trail surfaces. Pavé MUT to rooty, muddy single track. The new chain ring configuration worked great. Never lost the chain and had all the gears I needed all day. Lots of climbing slick, snotty, leafy stuff like this (STIL)

But lots of nice flowing trail too with lots of different forest views and conditions, I had stopped here because I saw 5 elk up ahead in the path but they had spooked by the time I got my phone out

The biggest revelation of the day was that it was the first e bike ride I have ever taken where the battery wore me out instead of the other way around. I don't have a great read on my use due to a wonky interface with the controller @ 52v but I was out and about for 3.5 hours and underway pretty much all the time. Did lots of climbing and did some more wear on the brake pads. Slow and steady riding I guess makes for longer battery life.

1/2
Goosewiththefur
1 week ago

I wish I could calmly ride on the Chicago bike paths that keep getting upgrades, plus are passing through some beautiful areas. The muni-code clearly stipulates that you can receive anywhere from a $75 dollar fine up to $500 dollars for any power assisted vehicle. I have not heard of anyone receiving a violation, however, I yet to see anyone with an ebike on any of our forest preserve district trails. Seems most ebikers stick to roadside paths only to ensure no violations can be had.
If any ebikers from Chicago see this thread, please chime in and let us know your experience with local authorities. Thanks in advance!:cool:

Chicago e-biker here! I ride on the forest preserve paths (north branch trail, lakefront path, north shore channel trail) all the time and have NEVER even been questioned by anyone. I'm usually riding with my dog in tow in a trailer. Every cop i've seen just smiles as we pass, or asks to say hi to the dog. We've ridden to Blackwell Forest Preserve near Wheaton, to Illinois Beach State Park in Zion, and all the way to Kenosha without a single issue. I think as long as you're not being a jerk and you don't bring harm to others, the cops don't care. We even road through Chicago Botanic Gardens and stopped to fill our water bottles with the dog (not allowed) and no one, including security, said anything. We got lots of smiles and waves though :)

MLB
1 week ago

Interesting choices on the fatbikes, but I dont' think the RC will work the same. It's the tires baby! (if it can run 3" tires maybe, air down, ??? But not the 2.6" that fit the "normal" bikes.
My BB would climb equally with the Haibike using both motors on dry ground, on snow I'm sure the 2wd would walk all over the mid drive that would have enough power but be much more likely to spin the rear wheel. You need that front tire pulling through any kind of standing snow. Still aren't going to break trail with a lot of snow. The BBP actually has limited slip as if one of the wheels spins more than 1/4(?) turn faster than the other it cuts power to that wheel. I didn't get to use it much as we get next to no snow any more. It's heavy feeling and handling on dry land, fun if you don't have a much more spirited feeling mount in your stable, sits if you do. But if I lived where you did, I'd still have it. ;)

bob armani
2 weeks ago

My son rides a Pivot 429 Trail and its a wonderful MTB. I decided to buy the Pilot Shuttle based on how great his bike is, but you are correct - its not coming to the USA, Europe only. So I went with the Specialized Turbo Levo FSR 6 Fattie, and its just the coolest bike - I really enjoy it. I have ONLY ridden it off-road, and can keep up with my 25-year-old son on his Pivot in all sections, including technical up /down hills. Pedal strike are my single biggest complaint - in fact my only complaint. They are a little lower than most MTB bikes so you have to watch it on tree roots and rock gardens. The Specialized is very integrated, is not near as heavy as my Stromer ST2-S, and you do not feel like you are paying a penalty for the electric assist. I'm 63 years old and overweight. The only way i can ride with my son is with a bike like this, and its a lot of fun doing the father/son off-road stuff. The fact I can stay with him all the way is the key, he never has to "wait up" for the Old Man, so it lets us do something he loves - together. I used to race motocross and ride competitive enduros back in the 70s on motorcycles, so I have a considerable off-road experience on how-to-read-a-trail, etc., however the whole MTB thing is new to me. Mods to my Levo FSR are putting in a dropper seatpost, and I need to get a 1.5" riser for the handlebars, but that's it....the rest is spot on. Oh, and once you ride a Fattie tire, you'll never go back to skinnies.
Hey I feel ya on the father /son outings to keep up with him on a Pivot Mach 429. The speed and agility on these bikes are amazing indeed. On a good trail, they are reaching speeds in excess of 25mph, downhill going over roots, rock gardens, etc. The bikes take a major beating and keep going and going. Not sure if the Levo could take that beating over the long term, however is a pretty solid bike. I also used the Levo, and it is super nimble IMHO, but so much more weight to sling than the Pivot type MTBs.
Wow you were a motocross guy in the 70s that is impressive. Me and my buddies use to ride on weekends on dirt trails in the 1980s/90s. Anything from Yamaha,
Husqvarna to Honda, we had a number of different ones to choose from, but nothing too rad like the motocross guys. Now us older dudes have to get on ebikes to hang with the pack. Perfect timing for me to get on an ebike to feel the speed a bit more that on a traditional MTB.
In addition, not sure if any of the aforementioned companies will be getting into the ebike market or not. I only see Pivot and not many others in that high end category. I have to say the components on these $5000 plus MTBs are impressive, however not sure if they are a bit overpriced or inflated for the market or not...

rich c
2 weeks ago

My first ebike was going to be a RadRover, but found a Sondors on Craigslist. Hard to pass up an experiment for $500. Put 1500 miles on it and knew I was hooked. Second bike was a Haibike Full Seven S RX. Mid-drive Bosch stole my heart. It has oversized Schwalbe tires, but not fat tires. I find it as a whole different experience as a fat bike. 28mph, nimble, and the full suspension is great for my 65 year old body. Kids, dogs, and even adults are no longer frightened as I ride by them on the trail. Fat knobby tires put out a hell of a rumble on paved trails! I justified the cheap bike for my first experience, but who doesn't love an ebike? So do you buy a better bike, or buy a lower end starter and then spend more money latter to upgrade. These things don't hold their resale too well. It's all fun!

drcollie
2 weeks ago

My son rides a Pivot 429 Trail and its a wonderful MTB. I decided to buy the Pilot Shuttle based on how great his bike is, but you are correct - its not coming to the USA, Europe only. So I went with the Specialized Turbo Levo FSR 6 Fattie, and its just the coolest bike - I really enjoy it. I have ONLY ridden it off-road, and can keep up with my 25-year-old son on his Pivot in all sections, including technical up /down hills. Pedal strike are my single biggest complaint - in fact my only complaint. They are a little lower than most MTB bikes so you have to watch it on tree roots and rock gardens. The Specialized is very integrated, is not near as heavy as my Stromer ST2-S, and you do not feel like you are paying a penalty for the electric assist. I'm 63 years old and overweight. The only way i can ride with my son is with a bike like this, and its a lot of fun doing the father/son off-road stuff. The fact I can stay with him all the way is the key, he never has to "wait up" for the Old Man, so it lets us do something he loves - together. I used to race motocross and ride competitive enduros back in the 70s on motorcycles, so I have a considerable off-road experience on how-to-read-a-trail, etc., however the whole MTB thing is new to me. Mods to my Levo FSR are putting in a dropper seatpost, and I need to get a 1.5" riser for the handlebars, but that's it....the rest is spot on. Oh, and once you ride a Fattie tire, you'll never go back to skinnies.

RITIREDVET
2 weeks ago

He

Hey Ron-
Glad to see you back! The Expo was GREAT and test rode over 2 dozen ebikes. It was great meeting all of the kind reps which were most hepful with my 1000 questions about their brands. BMW was also an interesting addition to the pack. The guys at EM and Trek were very informative indeed. I picked up an EM Jet on a sale from a dealer. That is my bike of choice right now. Rear hub motor and very zippy ride. During the warm season, I biked mostly on NBT, Green Bay Trail etc. Very impressed with the performance. I think now I'll be looking at a second ride soon.
How do you like your Trek conduit? Is it meeting your expectations? Ride safe! Bob A.
Hi Bob,
Glad to hear you enjoyed the expo,it was quite a ways for me to go but well worth it.I really like the conduit,kind of like a xm700 but with a shimano motor instead
of the bosch.I made it a lot better ride wise with the mono-shock fork I had put on.All and all a great ride for what I paid for it.
I have never ridden anything with a hub mounted motor,(outside of the show)how does this compare to a mid mount motor for all around riding?
Would love to get something else to compliment my conduit but I think I'm going to hold off for about a year or so because they
are coming out with so much new and high tech models I don't want to jump in too soon.But I have to admit that Juiced hyper-fat
1000 watt motor has my attention!!Look this up if you get a chance,there's a couple of great you-tubes on this one.One more thing,
is that your KTM in your avatar pic?I'm asking because I also ride motorcycles and wanted to know if you did too.Take care.
Ron

smitty
2 weeks ago

I was not fan of where the assist levels are located the turbo levo (along the side of the down tube),so I invested in a garmin remote so that I could change the assist level from the handle bars. It worked fine except there was no visual of the assist level to be observed. I solve that problem by downloading a piece of Garmin software (for my Garmin 1000 Edge cycle computer) that picked up the visual of eco, trail, etc. as well as providing whatever else I chose to display on that screen (speed, distance, etc). The remaining button on the remote allowed me to move forwards and backwards thru different screens. I also found a beam rack that fit my seat tube while still allowing me to control the dropper and clearing the rear tire. Here are some links for same:

https://wheelworld.com/product/garmin-ebike-remote-12616.htm?gclid=CjwKCAiAj53SBRBcEiwAT-3A2BiM1godIRqHass6Ou37D0JBTjFfwa-FszK5IYt0mmJ8_rbVOP4NBhoC7pMQAvD_BwE

Amazon: Topeak Mtx Beamrack Ex Fit Mtx And Klickfix/Racktime Snap-It System Trunk Bags

bob armani
2 weeks ago

He
Sorry for the long hiatus everybody,had a lot of family obligations to take of over the past several months.
Last time I posted I was looking for a discount for a leftover trek xm700 but to no avail.So I got a real good
deal on a trek conduit(almost half off).I really wanted a speed pedelec but I'm more than happy with what I got.
Only thing I did'nt like about it was the very harsh ride because of the steel fork(I was used to carbon fiber in the past)
So I swapped out for a mono shock front fork like the one used on the xm700,it makes all the difference in the world.
Oh yeah, also went to the e-bike expo in Lincolnwood,Il.which helped me make up my mind.What a great show that was,
I think I rode almost everything they had out there.For anybody thats thinking about an e-bike this is THE place to go!!
Will try to post some pics if I can figure it out.Good day to everybody and please stay warm.
P.S.Hey Bob,did you get that deal on a Bulls?Also is that a KTM in your avitar pic?
Ron
Hey Ron-
Glad to see you back! The Expo was GREAT and test rode over 2 dozen ebikes. It was great meeting all of the kind reps which were most hepful with my 1000 questions about their brands. BMW was also an interesting addition to the pack. The guys at EM and Trek were very informative indeed. I picked up an EM Jet on a sale from a dealer. That is my bike of choice right now. Rear hub motor and very zippy ride. During the warm season, I biked mostly on NBT, Green Bay Trail etc. Very impressed with the performance. I think now I'll be looking at a second ride soon.
How do you like your Trek conduit? Is it meeting your expectations? Ride safe! Bob A.

Larry Ganz
3 weeks ago

That hip picture looks familiar. Bambi didn’t like me on his trail so at 30 mph he came running across the trail and pushed my tire to the right, how far out did yours swell? A year later mine still itches occasionally

It was swollen out by about 1.5" or more after the Mtn bike accident. My hip is still slightly deformed after that, which looks worse after the head-on car crash the next year, that left me with 5 broken ribs, two left ankle surgeries in the first month, one right knee surgery, and two left femur surgeries 11 months apart. I'm lucky to still be around to ride my bike at all.

PS: The screw coming out of the femur rod in the last photo was taken out under local anesthesia in the doctor's office, because I refused to go to the OR a 3rd time for the femur. Not fun being awake for that.

1/5
john peck
3 weeks ago

Reid Welch commented:
Edison said to reporters (am quoting from imperfect memory), "Nothing worthwhile works the very first time, all by itself, just to please you. You've got to make the damned thing work."

At the Juiced Bikes updates page,

HyperFat 1000 Production Update: Try Harder

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2017 AT 2:56AM

All of the HF1000 Founders Series frames got remade. We were not happy with the frame performance and just scrapped the entire batch of frames and started over. The new frames are much stronger and more capable of standing up to the powerful 1,000 Watt motor. We lab tested the frame with 33% more load and 4x more load cycles than what is necessary for production and it easily passed....
Show more

REPLY
Sounds like most of my builds,Reid. :)I wish someone with an HF would make a video of a mountain trail with one.

David Sorrentino
3 weeks ago

When you look at the test done where they take on most every variable.
The difference is very minor.
I do feel the Yamaha and the Bosch not feel zippy on the first few pedal strokes.
But after a 25 mile trail ride I’m just as spent on all of them.
I have found to like the smoother lazy natural feel of the Brose as i rode a lot of technical areas and both the Yamaha and Bosch are to aggressive and cause issues of you don’t have ability to control power level on the fly.

Thanks very much for this insight. it's something I
When you look at the test done where they take on most every variable.
The difference is very minor.
I do feel the Yamaha and the Bosch not feel zippy on the first few pedal strokes.
But after a 25 mile trail ride I’m just as spent on all of them.
I have found to like the smoother lazy natural feel of the Brose as i rode a lot of technical areas and both the Yamaha and Bosch are to aggressive and cause issues of you don’t have ability to control power level on the fly.

Thanks for the insight. It actually supports what I suspected though is tough to measure in a 5-10 min rest ride, namely that a less zippy feel in initial take off might even out over time. And I do like the idea of "natural" feeling control...

Macc
3 weeks ago

Are you trail riding? If so I'm assuming full fenders isn't what you want. There are those half fenders that attach to the seat post.

Just my .02

Have fun riding.
Not a lot, but apparently too much for the full fenders. I just didn't like the lack of coverage of the half fenders for the street, which is what I spend most of my time on.

Andy_in_CA
3 weeks ago

Are you trail riding? If so I'm assuming full fenders isn't what you want. There are those half fenders that attach to the seat post.

Just my .02

Have fun riding.

manifest 73
11 hours ago

I own this bike your not going to hit 30mph with those tires, change to street tires then yes. But your going to have to pedal pretty hard. The draw back is the 350 watt motor, its good but torgue could be better.

roadpanzir
14 hours ago

One size frame? that's pretty sad.

David Bradford
14 hours ago

Court is so busy he is getting another guy to help do the reviews, glad to see that! Keep up the good work , both of you

B G
15 hours ago

Is there anyone that can answer a question about the led display. I can't store it inside, when I have really hot or really cold weather will it hurt the display?

F r e e l e e
1 day ago

Another under power e bike .yawn......

izabela bien
2 days ago

I want the blade so baaaad

Gary Bryan
2 days ago

Nice drone coverage, thanks for the review much appreciated.

Herbert Torres
2 days ago

You made a very good point about your legal liability if you get into an accident with this class of bike. Even if you are not speeding and get into an accident. This is something that is often over looked by reviewers. And should be stated when applicable. Good for you and thanks.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 day ago

Thanks Herbert, we are trying to be supportive of different products but also help guide people on how and where to use them appropriately. We love riding but want people to be safe too :)

Marlinspike Mate
1 day ago

Just because this 350w 36v e-bike  (comparatively weak) can have the top speed adjusted to above thirty does not mean it will do it. Many class three e-bikes have the ability to be set above 30mph for "off road mode", but this does not make it illegal to ride in class three or two areas so long as it is configured this way..

Mark Chapman
2 days ago

Hard to believe that any 350w motor goes 35mph. Mid drive or not, how many amps and how miles with out pedaling. Braking system sounds good, and I can shut down motor myself. I can build better than that for less money.

mobgma
2 days ago

Where is the other guy?

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 day ago

Hey mobgma, this is Court! I'm still here... Brent is helping me to cover more bikes for EBR because I simply cannot get to them all. I realize we have different styles and levels of knowledge, I'm working with him to make these reviews as good as possible but I will still be reviewing A LOT on my own :)

D Danilo
2 days ago

Well done, Brent! I'm glad you addressed the issue of legality with the higher top speeds. It's nice to have these things figured out BEFORE an unhappy incident! Thanks!

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 day ago

I agree, this is a topic I have been exploring with Brent, trying to help explain the different scenarios so people could be aware. It's an awesome product, and pretty well priced, but we don't want to see anyone get hurt

Brian Moore
2 days ago

@ ebr The speed limiter is configurable on the controller, If I recall correctly, by default they are configured as a type 3,. You would have to go into the config to change the top speed, this is no different from any bike where you can get into the configuration. You can set up the controller to be a class 1 or class 2 pedelec. I have an attack, but I have removed the throttle, if for no other reason, throttles are stupid on ebikes, and I have configured it to be a type 1, so I can take it on bike trails. So the pro is you can configure the FLX to be a type 1,2 or 3, and technical be unregistered vehicle if you set the governor above the legal classifications, but IMO the benefit is not there vs the potential legal jeopardy, in combination you get very little speed upside.

You are incorrect on the cassette, unless they have recently changed them, it is an 11-34t, IMO this is an area that should be upgraded to a 11-38 or 11-40, it is less than $50 upgrade and if you are in a hilly it is well worth the change.

BTW the their bike is ok but they continue to have challenges on supporting their products, I think you should make that part of your review. IMO they have been trying to improve, but IMO they continue to be challenged. I have created a wiki for FLX bikes to help owners find information that you cant get from flx and how to support their bikes.

Joe N
2 days ago

The forks, the brakes makes this bike dangerous and your asking for your death! Immediately take those horrid horrid Suntour and tektro and throw them in that field. For the wild life to piss on lol

Florida Scot
16 hours ago

The frame, motor & battery is  what you're paying for here mostly, very easy to upgrade forks, rims if one wanted, much like my KHS FS MTB I had, excellent frame entry level fork, crank, rims ect. Really no problem for sensible use light trails & street as is.  😀

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 day ago

I agree that thru-axles would make the bike sturdier but the brakes looked solid and even though this is heavier than a traditional mountain bike by ~20 lbs, that's not much different from a rider who weighs 20 lbs more... and most bicycles are rated up to 250 lbs. Maybe the big takeaway here is that they saved cost by using some cheaper parts. The spring fork is cheaper and more basic, but not terrible, the 9 mm skewers are basic but can still handle a lot. I have ridden my regular mountain bike upwards of 40 mph on some steep off-road sections and it was fine. Still worth checking your parts and paying closer attention here anytime you plan to ride fast

D Danilo
2 days ago

Yes, Joe N, you really should tell us WHY the forks and brakes are such a danger. We see the same brands and models on dozens of other bikes.

Florida Scot
2 days ago

I wouldnt do big jumps or drops with it,  it wont break

Marlinspike Mate
2 days ago

how so? Aluminum framed road bikes have caliper rim brakes and reach speeds up 40+ mph

Steve Donovan
2 days ago

I've gotten a new impression of you, you're a safety, safety feature kind of guy - I hope you can temper it some. I enjoy your reviews, and selection of bikes.

Brent McCluskey — Electrified Reviews
2 days ago

Thanks for the feedback, Steve! I definitely dig safety, but I also dig the incredibly powerful, ridiculously fast stuff too. Kind of a weird juxtaposition I know. :)

roflsyndrome
2 days ago

They have made some nice progress in the last year.

Brent McCluskey — Electrified Reviews
2 days ago

Right?!

MRBARBARYCOAST
2 days ago

That has got to be some sort of record for top speed on a 350 watt mid drive motor. The future is here, now. Thanks for the review.

MRBARBARYCOAST
10 hours ago

Thanks for the info and that is great performance that you are getting out of your Pedego.

Florida Scot
11 hours ago

I read today in the comment section of Court's review on the bike that it's a rebranded Dolphin {s} bike from Switzerland & there's an article about Currie marketing them in the US, so you could get parts from Swiss parent company maybe, thanks for the reply, I bought my 3rd ebike in '13 a pedego city commuter & customized it slightly with Big Apple 29er tires & more but just cracked 18k miles, original 15 AH battery, motor still going strong,   👍  thanks for the comeback

MRBARBARYCOAST
11 hours ago

I absolutely Love the bike. It was my first ebike and I knew nothing about electric bikes and had never even ridden one before. It is a rocket, but you have to be in shape to really push it. I personally like the noise, it kind of snarls and let's people know that it is a beast. My problems with it were the back spokes broke, so I had thicker ones installed because they were too weak and I upgraded the front rotor. I currently have about 4000 miles on it, but I have two batteries. I wouldn't buy one now because the people most likely have let the battery degrade from sitting around too long. Take care.

Florida Scot
16 hours ago

@MRBARBARYCOAST, can I ask how you like that IZIP, it's a unique bike & I came close to buying one when they deeply discounted them to make room for the new IZIP line, did you have problems with it ?    Also how many miles have you done & is it noisy like I read once ?  thanks

MRBARBARYCOAST
2 days ago

Thanks! I wish IZIP would re release the model with a 52v 20ah battery and 48v motor(plus throttle). I have called them numerous times about certain issues and letting them know that they have a potential world beater on their hands. I look forward to your next review. Please try to test some of the LUNA CYCLES. It seems like you handle the high speed ebikes and they might be just right for your style. Take care.

norcalchrismeister
2 days ago

Nice review bro! Is that trail in the bay area?

Brent McCluskey — Electrified Reviews
2 days ago

Thanks! It's about an hour outside the City. I'm fortunate to have tons of seriously epic trails where I live. I'll try to get some footage of the trails down by the American River in one of the upcoming reviews. :)

SUMANTA GHOSH
2 days ago

One suggestion : Pls mke each video bit short. I understand you deliver all meaningful information but still who has 30 mints to watch a bike review

kawikaphotography
2 days ago

1.5x playback speed

D Danilo
2 days ago

I have a special mouse w/left-click abilities. It allows me to shorten ALL videos to fit my schedule.

Brent McCluskey — Electrified Reviews
2 days ago

Thanks for the feedback, Sumanta! I'll keep an eye on the time. ;)

joes joey
2 days ago

This one seems nice! where can i get this i want the highest motor highest speed for off road every bike ive bought in quebec is 32kph but need one for private terrain off road pleas help court!!will this come unblocked?great reviews!

Brent McCluskey — Electrified Reviews
2 days ago

+joes joey Fo sho!

joes joey
2 days ago

Thank you will chek it out really need a unblocked one havnt been lucky due to quebec regulations to 32kph but what do people do for off road cant get no damn ebike faster then 32kph in quebec ;(.need one for off road .will let you guys know!

Brent McCluskey — Electrified Reviews
2 days ago

joes joey I know you can get them from FLX.bike, but you may be able to find them elsewhere as well. Also, if you dig this bike you might dig the Blade from FLX too! It’s got the same frame but a lot more power and some upgraded components as well. We hit a review on that just a few days ago. Good luck and if you end up getting one it would be awesome to hear your experience with it!

Ian Mangham
2 days ago

keep your trousers clean that crank disc and stop tearing the bottoms of ones combat trousers, I've shredded more pants on the chainring than I care to remember.