Gocycle GS Review

Gogycle Gs Electric Bike Review
Gocycle Gs Profile Right
Gocycle Gs Motor
Gocycle Gs Battery Indicator
Gocycle Gs Handlebars
Gocycle Gs Microshifter
Gocycle Gs Front
Gocycle Gs Throttle
Gocycle Gs Stem Quick Release
Gocycle Gs Front Fork
Gocycle Gs Handlebars Quick Release
Gocycle Gs Seat Post Quick Release
Gocycle Gs Suspension
Gocycle Gs Seat
Gocycle Gs Seat Top Down
Gocycle Gs Cleandrive Rear
Gocycle Gs Kickstand
Gocycle Gs Pedal
Gocycle Gs Profile Left
Gocycle Gs Folded
Gocycle Gs Charger
Gogycle Gs Electric Bike Review
Gocycle Gs Profile Right
Gocycle Gs Motor
Gocycle Gs Battery Indicator
Gocycle Gs Handlebars
Gocycle Gs Microshifter
Gocycle Gs Front
Gocycle Gs Throttle
Gocycle Gs Stem Quick Release
Gocycle Gs Front Fork
Gocycle Gs Handlebars Quick Release
Gocycle Gs Seat Post Quick Release
Gocycle Gs Suspension
Gocycle Gs Seat
Gocycle Gs Seat Top Down
Gocycle Gs Cleandrive Rear
Gocycle Gs Kickstand
Gocycle Gs Pedal
Gocycle Gs Profile Left
Gocycle Gs Folded
Gocycle Gs Charger

Summary

  • A futuristic, lightweight folding electric bike with a relatively powerful motor and high top speed that performs great in an urban setting
  • While much more affordable than the G3, the GS doesn't sacrifice quality for price and still retains many features from the higher-end models
  • Quick-release levers and pins throughout the GS means you can quickly and easily fold it down to compact and portable size, making transporting the GS incredibly easy, especially with the optional docking station
  • The finish and performance is the GS is well worth the money and the bike is brimming with features and positive aspects, though there are still a few negatives like a less-than-desirable range and relatively loud motor

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Gocycle

Model:

GS

Price:

$2,799

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Urban, Commuting, Travel

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

3 Year Frame, 2 Year Components, 1 Year Battery

Availability:

United States, Europe, Worldwide

Model Year:

20172018

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

36.3 lbs (16.46 kg)

Battery Weight:

5.5 lbs (2.49 kg)

Motor Weight:

2.2 lbs (0.99 kg)

Frame Material:

Injection Molded Magnesium

Frame Sizes:

12.5 in (31.75 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Unfolded: 12.5" Seat Tube, 21.5" Reach, 20.5" Stand Over Height, 22.5" Width, 61.5" Length, Folded with Wheels Off: 32.75" Length, 21.5" Height, 11.5" Width

Frame Types:

Compact, Folding

Frame Colors:

Frame: White, Grey, Cleandrive Chain Case: Red, Blue, Teal, Pink, Black

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid 6061 T6 Aluminum Alloy, Detachable Side-Mounted Wheel with Pitstop Lock System

Frame Rear Details:

Gocycle Lockshock™ 25 mm (1 in) Travel, Detachable Side-Mounted Wheel with Pitstop Lock System

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses, Lock Bosses, Pannier Bosses

Gearing Details:

3 Speed 1x3 Internally Geared Shimano Nexus Hub with Cleandrive® Chain Case

Shifter Details:

Microshifter Half-Grip Twist on Right

Cranks:

Alloy 170 mm

Pedals:

VP Folding Plastic Platform

Headset:

Integrated Steerer, 1-1/8" Straight, Upside-Down (Adjustment on Bottom)

Stem:

Alloy, Height and Reach Adjustment, ~40 mm Clamp Diameter

Handlebar:

Flat, Aluminum Alloy, 570 mm Length

Brake Details:

Proprietary Hydraulic Disc with 140 mm Rotors, Two-Finger Adjustable Reach Levers

Grips:

Flat Rubber, Black

Saddle:

Velo Sport

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

31.8 mm

Rims:

Injection Molded Magnesium Wheelset, Three Quick Release Levers, Five Supports

Tire Brand:

Gocycle Branded Vredestein, 20" x 1.75" (50-406)

Wheel Sizes:

20 in (50.8cm)

Tire Details:

Reflective Sidewall Stripes, 35 to 60 PSI, 2.5 to 4 Bar

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Proprietary Handlebar Phone Mount, Optional Integrated LED Light Kit ($126), Optional Front Pannier Bag ($180), Optional Fold Leg ($20), Optional Portable Docking Station ($315), Optional Front Mudguard ($54), Optional Rear Mudguard ($54), Optional Abus Lock with Holster ($135), Optional Rear Luggage Rack ($225)

Other:

Maximum Rider Weight 220 lbs (99.8 kgs), Gear Sizing: 1st 39.1 in, 2nd 53.3 in, 3rd 72.5 in, Universal Vgonomic™ Frame Size (Reach and Height Adjustment), 1.5 lb 4 Amp Charger, Proprietary Battery Management System (BMS), Internally Routed Cables

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Proprietary

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Gearless Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Motor Peak Output:

500 watts

Battery Brand:

Panasonic

Battery Voltage:

22 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

13.5 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

300 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium Nickel Cobalt Aluminium (LiNiCoAlO2)

Charge Time:

3.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

17 miles (27 km)

Estimated Max Range:

40 miles (64 km)

Display Type:

GocycleConnect® Bluetooth App (Android and iOS)

Readouts:

Ride Mode (City, Eco, On-Demand, Custom), Fuel Gauge, Speed, Gear (1-3), Efficiency, Trip Odometer, Calories Burned, Equivalent MPG

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle (Senses Torque and Cadence)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph) (15.5 mph in Some Geographies)

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Written Review

After finding success with their original Gocycle, G2 and then G3, Karbon Kinetics Limited is bringing to market a new, more affordable version of their now-iconic electric bicycle: the GS. Priced at $2,499, the GS is about half as much as the G3, which runs for $4,499. But half the price doesn’t necessarily mean half the quality, at least in Gocycle’s case. In 2002, Gocycle creator and former McLaren automotive engineer Richard Thorpe embarked on a quest to “develop the world’s most innovative and technologically advanced electric bicycle,” and it’s clear by the construction and performance of the GS that he didn’t stray too far from that ambition with the company’s latest iteration. While more affordable than the G3, the GS still retains many of the features that Go Cycle has become known for. The frame and rims are still made from injection-molded magnesium, bringing the curb weight of the GS to a manageable 36.3 pounds; the GS still has an integrated app that syncs with your smartphone to display all the pertinent information; the GS keeps the Shimano Nexus hub and three gears; virtually all the wires and cables are still neatly hidden away inside the frame; the same 500 peak watt motor still drives the the GS to the same 20 mph top speed as the G3, the GS still quickly folds up thanks to the many quick-release pins and levers and the geometry of the GS can still accommodate a wide range of riders. However, just like the price, some features had to be cut. Automatic shifting has been replaced with a traditional twist-shift on the right side of the handlebars, the twist-throttle is replaced with a push-button one, the LED light bar that graced the front of the handlebar is gone, the ergonomic grips are replaced with standard (though still comfortable) straight, rubber grips and the front suspension has been abandoned. Still, the GS is a remarkable machine built to impress.

Riding the GS is an exciting experience. Though it doesn’t feel designed for hopping curbs or enduring rough terrain, the GS is a nimble electric bike that feels at home in an urban setting. It likes smooth streets with only occasional pot holes, I’m not sure it would be the best choice for someone looking for an all-terrain electric vehicle. The handlebars and stem are made from T6 aluminum and sport standard rubber grips on either side. On the right side of the handlebars is the three-speed Microshifter, which connects to the Shimano Nexus hub inside the Cleandrive at the rear of the bike. The Microshifter is clearly marked so you can easily and quickly see what gear you’re currently in. Shifting is surprisingly snappy, even under heavy load, and I had no issues shifting from first to third gear and back again. On the left side of the handlebars is the push-button throttle. I like that the GS was able to retain a throttle, but since it’s not a twist-throttle there’s only two available power settings: full speed and off. A light press will activate the motor and it doesn’t take much pressure to keep it pinned, which means thumb fatigue is minimal. Having a push-button throttle isn’t the worst thing in the world, but it would be nice if there was an option to upgrade to the same twist-throttle featured on the G3. Also on the handlebars are the adjustable-reach brake levers, which lead down to the front and rear 140 mm hydraulic disc brakes. The brake levers are well-tuned and there is zero play in the GS I tested. This means I was able to get a good, tactile feel for exactly how hard I was braking. The brakes themselves are also well-tuned, with absolutely zero rattle out of the box. Brake rattle is a huge point of contention for me so I was pleased to see the GS rode without so much as a squeak. The wires for the brakes, throttle and Microshifter feed into the handlebars and then through the frame, with only one point where they actually protrude from the GS. This makes for a clean and minimalistic look – so much so in fact that at a glance it’s not immediately evident that the GS is even electric. Towards the bottom of the stem is the quick-release lever to fold down the handlebars. Actually, “quick” might be the wrong word here. It doesn’t take too long, but in order to fold the handlebars the quick-release lever has to be fully unscrewed and removed, then reinserted once the stem is in the folded position.

Beneath the stem rests a single-sided fork, the 20″ Pitstop wheels and the proprietary 500 peak watt motor that drives the GS to a top speed of 20 mph. The Pitstop wheels are truly a thing of beauty – they can be installed and removed in just a few seconds thanks to three levers and a rotating lock that keeps them securely in place. This is hugely helpful for anyone looking to utilize the GS’ portability factor. The rims themselves are made from injection-molded magnesium, just like the frame, and have five spokes; the tires are smooth and reminiscent of racing slicks. The motor is relatively responsive when it comes to spool-up times. In my experience, motor activation took anywhere from 1/4 of a second to 1/2 of a second from the time I pressed the throttle. This is close to what I was expecting since I’ve found that hub motors often have a slight delay from the time you give it to power to the time the motor actually spools up and propels you forward. When it comes to noise, the motor is a little louder than I expected. In my opinion, one of the best attributes of a hub motor is their stealthy nature. I’ve ridden electric scooters and bikes with hub motors that were so quiet I couldn’t even hear them running. But that wasn’t my experience with the GS. The motor isn’t terribly loud, but I could certainly hear it whirring and humming as I rode along. On the other hand, the 500 peak watt motor may not sound like much of a powerhouse, but I found that it was actually more than enough to carry me up every hill I could find in my city. Compared to hub motors that are built into wider wheels, the GoCycle’s compact 20″ wheels offer a nice mechanical advantage. At some points the motor did bog down and I had to give it some good ol’ traditional pedal power to reach the top, but that’s okay! The GS doesn’t seem like it’s built to be a performance bicycle – it feels like it’s built to be an urban commuter that can carry a rider up and down moderate hills in style and comfort while being durable and lightweight.

The frame, like the rims, is made from injection-molded magnesium, giving the GS a curb weight of 36.3 pounds and a maximum carrying capacity of 220 pounds. I love the finish and look of the frame, and the fact that it comes in a variety of color schemes, but the fact that the GS can only carry 220 pounds is somewhat of a downside for a rider like me who weighs 200 pounds (Brent is writing this review vs. Court who weighs 135 lbs). Anyway, this means that if I want to ride within the specifications of the GS that I can only carry minimal gear with me. It also means that if I want to use the optional $225 rear luggage rack that bolts onto the rear of the frame or optional $180 front pannier bag that latches onto the handlebars that I have to be overly conscientious of exactly what I put in them. Kind of a bummer since I’d love to carry my camera gear and also take the GS to the grocery store to grab some groceries. Looks like I’ll have to choose one or the other. That being said, the frame itself is indeed aesthetically beautiful, and inside are stored some of the technical components as well as the Panasonic 22v, 13.5ah, 300wh batteries, which, according to Gocycle, are good for around 1,000 charge cycles. Gocycle also estimates the pedal-assist range to be around 40 miles. However, I found the real-world pedal-assist range on the maximum setting to be closer to 17 miles. Again, I’m a 200-pound rider and I was on the highest pedal-assist level the entire time, so I’d venture a guess that a lighter rider, or one that was willing to ride on a lower pedal-assist setting, would be able to travel much further on a charge. I also conducted a separate throttle-only range test and was able to travel for 13 miles before power failure, which was much further than I anticipated. A 17-mile real world pedal-assist range isn’t necessarily terrible, but I would have liked to seen a higher number here since Gocycle’s estimate was a whopping 40 miles. Charging the battery takes about seven hours with the standard charger, or if you opt for the fast charger, that time gets cut in half to approximately three and-a-half hours. On the back of the frame is the power button and charging port. The power button has four, red LEDs that illuminate briefly when the bike is powered on. While the bike is powered on, this can be used as a quick way to check the battery level without syncing with the app. Four red LEDs means you’ve got 100% battery or left, three red LEDS means 75% or less and so on. The charging port has a rubberized grommet that pressure-fits into the port to keep it closed when it’s not in use. And surprisingly, the protective grommet actually stays in place until you want to remove it! It’s a small detail, but one I greatly appreciate – too often do I find that these protective covers come loose during use or are difficult to fit into place. On the left side of the frame is a quick release screw to remove the seat post. A few turns and voila! The seat easily separates from the frame. The only downside? In order to actually adjust the seat height, you have to use a tool. Thankfully it’s stored beneath the seat itself, but still, it would be great if there was a quick adjust for that as well.

Now on to the suspension and Cleandrive. The GS only has suspension in the rear, and even then it’s negligible. The rear suspension has only 25 mm of travel and nearly bottoms out just from me sitting on it. Having the ability to adjust the suspension to compensate for various rider weights would be great, but even as is, it does the job well enough given the paradigm of the bike – it’s meant as an urban commuter, not an off-road trail blazer. There’s also a quick-release pin in the suspension and with a quick yank it can be disassembled, allowing for the Cleandrive to be folded down. Just like the rest of the GS, the Cleandrive is aesthetically perfect. In fact, it’s pretty much perfect in every respect in my opinion. Inside is housed the Shimano Nexus internally geared hub, three gears and the chain. Not only does the Cleandrive look, well, clean, it also serves to protect your pants and legs from chain grease. Given that this is a folding electric bike, it’s nice to have a drivetrain that won’t easily drop the chain, there’s one sprocket up front and one in the rear and they are both completely enclosed.

Overall, the GS exceeded my expectations in virtually every aspect. It’s a fun, nimble urban electric bicycle that has a relatively powerful motor and relatively high top speed. It looks great and performs just as well. If I was only able to ride one electric bike for the rest of my life, it would without a question be the Gocycle GS. But again, with all the aforementioned positive aspects, there’s still a handful of things I’d like to see improved in future models. The motor is too noisy for my liking, the seat deserves a quick-adjust lever, the range could stand to be increased (or the estimation changed to better reflect real-world riding) and the price is still a lot higher than many folks are willing to pay for an electric bike. But for those who are looking to commute around the city in style and aren’t afraid to open their wallet and pay top dollar, the GS more than fits the bill.

Pros:

  • The option of pedal assist and a push-button throttle makes for a versatile electric bike that can be traditionally pedaled or ridden more like a moped or scooter with the throttle
  • The body and wheels are magnesium, which is known for being rigid and lightweight, apparently it’s more environmentally friendly than carbon fiber and also more resilient
  • The Cleandrive not only looks great, but serves as fully closed container that stores the Shimano Nexus hub, gears and chain so your pants never get dirty or caught up while pedaling
  • The various quick-release levers and pins allow for the GS to be quickly folded up and since it weighs only 36.3 pounds it’s relatively easy to lug around, especially with the optional docking station
  • The hydraulic disc brakes work well and there’s no brake rattle whatsoever
  • Mid-suspension design balances weight and simplicity with comfort and foldability, the bike doesn’t feel flexy but you do get a cushioned feel because of the bumper shock and medium-width tires
  • Pitstop wheels allow for quick and easy installation and disassembly of the wheels and the three levers and rotating lock removes the challenge of alignment and over-tightening that standard quick release presents
  • Integrated app serves as a great HUD that offers all the information I like to see… top speed, current speed, odometer, tripometer, battery level and more
  • Because the Gocycle GS uses a torque and cadence sensor combination it feels both smooth and responsive, not jerky and surprising like cadence only or finicky like some cadence-only designs
  • The wheelbase is longer so the bike feels steady and can accommodate taller riders (as the seat post angles up and back), many other folding ebikes with 20″ wheels feel more squirrely when riding, especially at higher speeds
  • Almost all the wires are all internally routed, making for a clean and sleek look

Cons:

  • At 17 miles, the pedal-assist range isn’t quite as far as I’d like to see, especially since Gocycle’s estimation is 40 miles
  • The motor is noisier than I prefer, and the whirring can be heard even under light strain
  • The push-button throttle only offers two settings: full power and off, it would be great if there was an option for a twist throttle like on the G3
  • There doesn’t seem to be a sleep mode with the GS, so if you forget to turn the bike off after using it you could potentially run down the battery
  • The front-folding kickstand stays out of the way and holds the bike well but is also a little tricky to get down with your foot
  • While there’s a quick-release screw to take out the seat post, you must use a tool adjust to actually raise and lower the seat height
  • Even at $2,499, the GS is priced much higher than many people are looking to spend on an electric bike
  • In order to run this electric bike, you need to have a smartphone and there aren’t any USB charging points to keep it full while you ride like some other e-bikes now offer

Resources:

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Start a new gs thread on the Gocycle Forum page

Robert Ho
3 days ago

Looks like this bike does not fold, Disassembles. Reviewer more interested in comfort of the shade vs good video. This video is not up to the standard of EBR.

ElectricBikeReview.com
7 days ago

Hi everyone! The person conducting this review is Brent, he's a friend who is working with me so that EBR can have more variety. I am still traveling, filming, and posting constantly... At the time of this comment I have over 40 videos shot that will be edited, written up, and posted as my travels continue. We want you to know that Brent is working to have better lighting, show the folding, wheels, more details on components etc. in the future reviews that he does. This was his first video and he actually re-shot it after we talked about ways it could be improved... but there were some technical difficulties and the footage was lost, at that time he was no longer in possession of the Gocycle and could not reshoot. I thought about whether to publish the video still but figured that it was worth sharing, even though it's imperfect. Thanks for your support and feedback, we want to make this as good as it can be to help you guys! - Court

Adrian Legaspi
2 weeks ago

Good first attempt Brent! Keep learning and you’ll get to the level that you want. Rome wasn’t built in a day. I have to admit though, Brent contrasts the unique style Cort has. I took for granted the amount of work Cort puts in with every upload. Thanks EBR! Two words: collab vid!

brighton dude
2 weeks ago

I think this is a very good review. Well done Brent! The only "fault" is that we don't see the bike folding, however we can see that with other GoCycle models here at EBR if we want to, so that has been covered.

NYCeWheels
2 weeks ago

Hey Court, glad you were able to have Brent go over this bike! One thing about the motor though, just like the G3 it is geared, which is why it's a bit loud but so light and efficient! GoCycle really did it right with the GS, still great quality at a much more approachable price.I think both pages on your site might have the wrong info about the motor but everything else looks good. Keep up the good work, no shame in getting some help if it means getting videos on more electric bikes!

John Durkin
2 weeks ago

Maybe not film in shadow in the future.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Yeah, great feedback John... We re-shot this video to make it better but the footage was stolen because it was left in a camera. Unfortunate, but future shoots will be better :)

Joey Love
2 weeks ago

Cort is the king of this.

Joey Love
2 weeks ago

ElectricBikeReview.com he still did better than I️ would have.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Thanks Joey, this wasn't Brent's best video, I believe his future work will be better... and I have many many more videos and reviews to post of my own. I'm just happy that he is excited to learn and that we can cover more by working together a bit. Feel free to share your feedback on any of the videos you see here and we will listen

Seb K
2 weeks ago

WE WANT COURT
WE WANT COURT
WE WANT COURT
WE WANT COURT
WE WANT COURT
WE WANT COURT
WE WANT COURT

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Ha! Thanks Seb, I'm excited to get Brent up to speed so we can cover more bikes but I have over 30 new reviews that I shot recently and just need to edit and post. They will be coming soon, thanks again for your support

Floyd Rudolph
2 weeks ago

The GoCycle is not compact when folded

simchad613
2 weeks ago

Time to do a test on the new flash e bike. I bought it on indiegogo. They actually sent it on time, no delays and the bike turned out better then I expected. It comes with a lot of bells and whistles. Rides fast and smooth.

maxkielbasa
2 weeks ago

Where is Cort?

Sam Binder
2 weeks ago

seriously! Cort has developed quite an audience with his personable attitude and worked hard to do a thorough job. Throwing up a video on this channel and not explaining
why Cort isn't hosting is not only confusing, but insensitive to his followers. Even though you did a decent review, it would be nice to know why Cort isn't performing it. Is he sick, on vacation or had a falling out with EBR? As far as the GoCycle is concerned, it is probably the best engineered electric bike. I'd buy one in a heartbeat if I had an extra $2500 (or $4000) lying around.

Sam Binder
2 weeks ago

Speaking of electric bikes being so expensive, are you aware of financing programs for ebikes? If so, has EBR done any reviews or coverage of them.I believe one reason the Sondors have had success and a fairly large following is their affordability. If there were low or no interest programs where people could buy high quality e bikes with a down payment and $100 monthly payments, $2000 + bikes would be within the reach of a greater audience.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Hi Sam! Yeah, I know Larry pretty well and have interviewed him one a couple of occasions (about the Brose model, why some electric bikes are so expensive, and overviews of IZIP products). I will see him again in January or February if you want me to say hi and share your story... maybe he remembers you and that fancy bike you got with no brakes :D

Sam Binder
2 weeks ago

Thanks Court. As you can tell from other comments, your subscribers have come to like you and your friendly manner. Watching EBR reviews is like having a knowledgeable friend sharing with us. I always thought that your schedule must be hectic considering all the reviews you post. Your new co-reviewer is quite good and should be a great addition to EBR. As an aside, have you ever interviewed Larry Pizzi from Raleigh Electric bikes. Back in the day, he owned a shop in Philly called Bike Tech and sold me a Gitane steel track bike for $100. In 1980, Riding a brakeless direct drive bike around town got a lot of comments. (mainly, they were "are you nuts?") I believe he was at Currie before heading Raleigh's electric division. It looks like Raleigh is hitting the electric bike market hard with a good line-up of affordable bikes.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Hi Sam, this is Court, I own EBR entirely so can't really have a falling out :D but this video was produced by my friend Brent because GoCycle sent him one of their products and I have been busy traveling and doing other reviews. I am working to train him so that in the future EBR can cover more stuff and have a different voice. I initially rejected this video because of the lighting, didn't show it being folded, didn't show the wheels, wasn't thorough enough, didn't show the motor well enough etc. etc. so Brent re-filmed it... but then someone broke into his storage locker and stole the bike and his camera with the new footage. It's heartbreaking, but I figured it would be better to share this first-draft video than nothing at all. Thanks for your feedback, didn't mean to be insensitive.

Bran Vasqez
2 weeks ago

Who is this guy? Where's Court?

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Sweet, and it will get better, he has a great attitude and is probably already better than when I started out ;)

Bran Vasqez
2 weeks ago

ElectricBikeReview.com I'm sorry for what happened to Brent. He's doing a good job so far. Keep it up! ^_^

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Hi Bran, sorry for the issues with this video. It was shot by my friend Brent (because I am traveling and cannot cover as many different ebikes as I would like). I had him re-shoot but that footage was lost when his storage locker was broken into and his gear was all stolen... so we went with the original, his first time trying to help with a review. There's lots of room for improvement here. Brent will be helping occasionally with reviews and I'm doing my best to train him so EBR can have more variety. Future videos should be much better.

Lysle Basinger
2 weeks ago

Your right. Too noisy.

Lysle Basinger
2 weeks ago

Poor pictures in shadows.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Yep, sorry about that Lysle. This was filmed by a friend of mine named Brent and has lots of room for improvement, he did re-shoot but the footage was lost recently when someone broke into his storage unit and took the bike and all of his camera gear. I figured it would be better to post this than nothing at all, and I thoroughly edited and fixed up the written portion. Hopefully Brent's future work will be better

Anonymous Ted
2 weeks ago

man it's a FOLDING bike, and you didn't even FOLD it. Do you even understand WORDS?

William Stevens
2 weeks ago

Where is Cort

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Hi William, thanks for the feedback, I'm Court! and this was Brent who is helping me cover more electric bikes... he's learning, this video didn't quite make the cut so I had him re-film it, but then his storage locker was broken into and the new footage (and his bikes) were all stolen. So, we rolled with this, I'm sorry it wasn't introduced well and clarified

Funkywallot
2 weeks ago

3oo w /h battery , the load limit and the cost , and the utterly lack of self mainatining,makes this contraption yesterdays tech. It is a shoppingbike for yacht owners to move a couple of champagne bottles between the liquor store at the marina and home base . And you have to buy fenders, and shopping basket extra . No lights (extra) . This bike is not foldable. It is quickly dismantable . The wheels come off and the steering stem can be tilted bakwards.
Last month I was a serious speculater for one of these bikes. The riding position is def not meant for a heavy ( 90 kg) tall rider it rides (naturally) very top heavy and the 20 inch wheels felt like skateboardwheels . Todays minimum standards for a folding bike are a 500w/h battery 22-24 inch wheels and a large degree of self maintanence, and load limits in access of 140 kg. And a pricetag 1/3 of this exotic failure.

Vhey Preexa
2 weeks ago

Are those hydraulic brakes? Looks like it. Feel like that was worth mentioning. Would have liked to see how if folded up too.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Thanks for the feedback Andy

Andy Lau
2 weeks ago

ElectricBikeReview.com well I just want him say his name in the beginning. I really don't care about overpriced gocycle myself.

Vhey Preexa
2 weeks ago

Oh man, hope you guys get your stuff back!

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Yeah, sorry for the limited coverage here Vhey. I believe they are actually mechanical. This video was shot by my friend Brent who is going to be helping with EBR so we can cover more products. It was his first attempt, and I actually asked him to re-shoot, but the footage was stolen recently when his storage locker was broken into (along with several bikes). I figured this video was worth sharing even though it has lots of room for improvement. I appreciate your input!

catsdgs
2 weeks ago

What is going on who are you how does this bike fold and why is the video so dimly lit??!

FarcryTheBrave
2 weeks ago

We only want Court doing reviews. He is the best!

catsdgs
2 weeks ago

ElectricBikeReview.com Thanks for telling me.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Yeah... sorry for the issues with this video. It was shot by my friend Brent (because I am traveling and cannot cover as many different ebikes as I would like). I had him re-shoot but that footage was lost when his storage locker was broken into and his gear was all stolen... so we went with the original, his first time trying to help with a review. There's lots of room for improvement. Brent will be helping occasionally with reviews and I'm doing my best to train him so EBR can have more variety. Always open to feedback! One of the things I suggested to him was to fold the bike on camera... so good cal ;)