IZIP E3 Dash Review

2016 Izip E3 Dash Electric Bike Review
2016 Izip E3 Dash
2016 Izip E3 Dash Aluminum Chain Guide Tranzx M07 Motor
2016 Izip E3 Dash Sks Fenders Spanninga Led Lights
2016 Izip E3 Dash Ergonomic Grips Adjustable Display Panel
2016 Izip E3 Dash Rubberized Button Pad
2016 Izip E3 Dash 18 Kg Rear Rack
2016 Izip E3 Dash 180 160 Hydraulic Disc Brakes
2016 Izip E3 Dash Shimano Deore 10 Speed
2016 Izip E3 Dash 2 Amp Portable Charger
2016 Izip E3 Dash Electric Bike Review
2016 Izip E3 Dash
2016 Izip E3 Dash Aluminum Chain Guide Tranzx M07 Motor
2016 Izip E3 Dash Sks Fenders Spanninga Led Lights
2016 Izip E3 Dash Ergonomic Grips Adjustable Display Panel
2016 Izip E3 Dash Rubberized Button Pad
2016 Izip E3 Dash 18 Kg Rear Rack
2016 Izip E3 Dash 180 160 Hydraulic Disc Brakes
2016 Izip E3 Dash Shimano Deore 10 Speed
2016 Izip E3 Dash 2 Amp Portable Charger

Summary

  • A feature complete speed pedelec (capable of ~28 mph top speeds) with a high torque mid-drive motor from TranzX
  • Quality full length plastic fenders from SKS with integrated mud flaps, mid-level suspension fork with lockout, larger wheels and tires for efficiency and comfort
  • Available in three standard sizes but only black and high-step, quick release wheels with 12 mm rear and 15 mm front thru-axles for stiffness and disc brake alignment, Shimano hydraulic disc brakes
  • No shift sensing on this motor, optional "boost button" for throttle mode up to 20 mph, solid two year comprehensive warranty, integrated LED lights and rack for commuting

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

IZIP

Model:

E3 Dash

Price:

$2,599

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Urban, Commuting

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedalec (Class 3), Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Comprehensive, Lifetime Frame

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2016

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

54.5 lbs (24.72 kg)

Battery Weight:

6.1 lbs (2.76 kg)

Motor Weight:

9.5 lbs (4.3 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

15 in (38.1 cm)17 in (43.18 cm)19 in (48.26 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

31" Stand Over Height and 73" Length on the Medium 17" Frame

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Gloss Black with Blue and White Accents

Frame Fork Details:

SR Suntour Suspension NCX D-EB LO with Lockout and 63 mm Travel, 15 mm Thru-Axle with Quick Release

Frame Rear Details:

Alloy 142 / 12 mm with Quick Release

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

10 Speed 1x10 Shimano Deore, HG62 Cassette 11-32T

Shifter Details:

Shimano Deore Triggers on Right

Cranks:

Lasco EB05 Chainring with Alloy Guide, 42T

Pedals:

Wellgo Aluminum Alloy Platform, Black

Headset:

VP Semi-Integrated Ahead, 4 Risers

Stem:

Tranz-X 3D forged Alloy 31.8 mm Diameter

Handlebar:

Tranz-X DB Alloy 31.8 mm Diameter, 650 mm x 25 mm Low Rise

Brake Details:

Shimano M355 Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Front Rotor and 160 mm Rear Rotor

Grips:

Velo Dual Density, Ergonomic Rubber

Saddle:

Velo Street

Seat Post:

Tranz-X Alloy with Quick Release Collar

Seat Post Length:

300 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

31.6 mm

Rims:

Alex DH19 Doublewall, Aluminum Alloy

Spokes:

Stainless Steel 13 Gauge, Black

Tire Brand:

Denda Kuick Bitumen, 700 x 45c

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tube Details:

Presta Valve

Accessories:

Integrated Front and Rear LED Lights (Corona 40 Headlight and Lineao Back Light by Spanninga), SKS Plastic Full Length Fenders with Rubber Mud Guards, Aluminum Alloy Rack (18 kg, 40 lb Max Load), Single Side Adjustable Length Kickstand, Aluminum Alloy Chain Guide

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, 2 Amp 1.8 Pound Charger

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Currie Electro-Drive® (TranzX), Model M07

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

350 watts

Motor Peak Output:

400 watts

Motor Torque:

73 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung or LG

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

8.7 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

417.6 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

15 miles (24 km)

Estimated Max Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Display Type:

Fixed Monochrome Backlit LCD with Adjustable Angle

Readouts:

Speed, Odometer, Battery Capacity (5 Bars), Assist Level (0-4), Range Estimation

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad on Left

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist (Optional Button Throttle)

Top Speed:

28 mph (45 kph)

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Written Review

The 2016 IZIP E3 Dash features a high torque mid-drive motor while the previous two iterations used gearless direct drive hub motors. This improves balance and frame stiffness while making quick-release on both wheels possible (and easier). You get thru-axles for improved stiffness (12 mm rear and 15 mm front) and hydraulic Shimano disc brakes with a larger 180 mm rotor up front for quick stops. I found the motor to respond mostly to cadence, to run quietly and to be slightly delayed… both starting and stopping. It’s a more basic motor that does not detect shifting and therefor may strain the chain, sprockets and derailleur more if you try to shift while pedaling hard and using a high level of assist. The 10 speed Shimano Deore drivetrain is solid mid-level and should hold up well if cared for. While this is a speed-pedelec Class 3 with only pedal assist by default, you can spend $50 extra for a boost button to be mounted near one of the ergonomic grips. This plastic ring has three buttons… one to enable boost, one to slowly and smoothly reach ~6 mph and another unlabeled button offering full power up to ~20 mph if you’re using one of the higher gears.

To truly reach ~28 mph on this electric bicycle you do have to pedal along and use one of the higher gears. The speed range of the motor itself is somewhat limited but it’s very powerful which is great for climbing and it’s fairly quiet. I appreciate the included fenders, rear rack and integrated LED lights from Spanninga! This e-bike is ready to go right out of the box and all of the parts match. It comes in three sizes and I was using the medium ~17″ frame which felt slightly small for my 5’9″ build but kept my body upright for improved city riding. Expect the range to be limited around 15 to 30 miles given the higher torque motor and high-speed operation (where wind resistance becomes more of a factor). Extend it by staying under 20 mph and using the lower 1 or 2 levels of assist.

Pros:

  • High speed pedal-assist performance (up to 28 miles per hour with active rider input) means you’ll arrive quicker but also drain the battery faster above 20 mph due to air resistance
  • The suspension fork, larger diameter wheels and thicker tires provide comfort when traveling over longer distances, bumpy terrain and at higher speeds… the ergonomic grips feel good, the saddle is firm for active pedaling
  • This electric bike is feature complete meaning it comes with all of the supporting accessories you might need for commuting (a rear rack), riding at night or early morning (integrated LED lights) and dealing with inclement weather (full length fenders with mud guards)
  • Since the E3 Dash is a speed pedelec the wheels and frame will endure more stress and strain so both axles are upgraded to thicker 12 mm rear and 15 mm front for improved stiffness and better alignment of the disc brake rotors with the calipers and pads
  • Even though this model only comes in a high-step “diamond” frame design, it has been engineered with a sloping top tube to lower stand over height which makes holding the bike at rest or walking over it easier, I measured ~31 inches on the Medium 17″ frame
  • Because the motor is mounted at the center of the frame along with the battery pack, weight is kept lower which improves stability and the rear rack is left completely open for gear
  • The center-drive system leverages your chain and 10 speed cassette to operate more efficiently for climbing or reaching higher speeds, it offers better range than a similarly rated hub motor if you manage your gears properly
  • Higher-end parts all around including Shimano hydraulic disc brakes with a larger 180 mm rotor in the front for better stopping power (the rear rotor is standard 160 mm), Shimano Deore derailleur for precision shifting and large stiff Wellgo alloy platform pedals for stability and grip
  • If you want even more control, a boost button can be added which offers two drive modes: a 6 mph starting speed (almost like walk mode) and a traditional throttle up to 20 mph which has to be held down to operate
  • The motor is very capable at climbing and can easily hit the ~28 mph top speed if you’re in the higher couple of gears, it’s also surprisingly quiet… but doesn’t offer the same high RPM as Bosch so your gear matters more

Cons:

  • The display panel and associated button pad can be a bit confusing at first, holding the power icon when you’re in assist level 1 will take you down to zero (so you can use the lights and display without the motor), it would be nicer if you could just arrow down to zero
  • The display unit is not removable so it could take more damage when the bike is parked outside or in a public location if you commute with it, thankfully the battery is removable for convenient charging
  • The fenders, rack and lights are awesome but there do not appear to be bottle cage bosses on the seat tube… that’s a bummer because it means you need a trunk bag or panniers to bring liquids, locks, pumps or other accessories and that will add weight and be less convenient to reach
  • The battery pack must be activated before the display unit can be powered on, it’s a two step process that takes extra time and can create confusion when going straight for the display on/off
  • You get a lot of power with the high-torque motor but it’s not as responsive or dynamic (feels mostly like a cadence sensor in there) and the range is more limited than some of the other ebikes I’ve tested (estimate 15 to 30 miles per charge depending on the assist level you choose)
  • There’s no shift detection built in to the system so I tried to power through climbs rather than shifting down for fear of mashing and prematurely wearing out the chain, sprockets and derailleur

Resources:

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Edwin vasquez
1 year ago

Where can I buy this bike? Where are the stores located?

Court Rye
1 year ago

Hi Edwin! You can find a dealer map on the IZIP website here or order one through a dealer that ships to many areas of the world if you are outside of the United States. One dealer that I believe offers shipping is Motostrano.

James Ledesma
1 year ago

Not trying to bash any of these companies I’m just shocked that they’re doing this to everybody I don’t want to post anything I was trying to talk to you but this is how you make point I like all your videos to you but the only thing is you don’t tell us if the bike is durable for a hundred thirty pound writer and you go get that bike up how good will it be in five months will it last if you have no clue that’s the problem you just reviewing a new vehicle that has absolutely no right time on it and you go from one of the next and at the end of the year when you tell me which was going to be good to be nothing left of them did you see what they did to your family over clocked it was a little screen comes on his bike through all that and all the other companies can’t do nothing with him and then you can buy a bigger battery make them all with 30 amp batteries or rechargeable ones I don’t understand this I’m just trying to make you the most but nothing 8.8 hour to go 5 miles 5 Miles Electric 5 miles Nowhere To Ride Like That We’re Going up on those Hills

Court Rye
1 year ago

Hi James, I appreciate your feedback and acknowledge that my reviews are somewhat superficial. I go from one bike to the next (all new) and am only able to provide my impressions vs. real world long-term experience. This is why I created the EBR forums and keep open comments, so that you and others might chime in about how products hold up over time. I wish I could do more but if I tried to go in-depth I would only be able to cover a small percentage of the products I do now and I’m not sure that would serve the community vs. working with them to get direct customer feedback and allowing it to go up unedited.

Rob
12 months ago

If you had a choice between the 2016 Dash or 2015 Dash with a $600 discount, which one would you pick? What are the performance differences between the new mid drive and the rear hub? I would be using to commute four miles with some minor inclines. Most of it on city roads. Which one would have less maintenance issues down the road?

Court Rye
12 months ago

Good question Rob… both models are pretty close in my mind. I like how smooth, quiet and zippy the hub motor feels but appreciate the efficiency of mid-drive (and the newer battery you’d be getting). Batteries slowly age over time so newer tends to be slightly better and higher capacity even if the packs are the same design/rating. You mentioned minor inclines so the hub motor would probably be fine, it’s going to be more rear-heavy and require more work to change flats etc. Maintenance for the two models will probably be similar and related more to the drivetrain, tires and tubes than the motors. If you’re price sensitive then go for the older Dash but if this is your one shot at a long lasting bike and you want the climbing power but don’t mind shifting and some extra tuneups along the way (because the motor pulls the chain, sprockets, derailleur…) then go for the newer version :)

Renato Kalugdan
7 months ago

Hi! I bought and received mine at a killer deal and loving every minute of my commute now! Thanks for the review as it assisted in my decision to go with this model. However, I’m trying to find a manual/install guide for the boost button but to no avail. Nothing on currie or izip website. Any thoughts?

Thanks,
Renato

Court Rye
7 months ago

Hi Renato! I’m surprised to hear that… There should be a chat window or phone number to call and I know the part exists. I can’t speak for IZIP but maybe one of their dealers could help get one and ship it to you? They have a dealer map on their website here.

Renato Kalugdan
7 months ago

Hi Court,

I was able to install the boost button without the need for the guide as it was pretty basic. Question w/ the boost button however is that whenever I reach 20mph, it immediately throttles back down to 18-19mph or so. Climbs back up to 20 and this repeats. Any reason why it just doesn’t stay at 20 so I can just cruise at that speed without the bike jerking back and forth?

Thanks,
Renato

Court Rye
7 months ago

Hey Renato! Glad you got the button and were able to install it easily… What you’re describing has happened to me with some throttle systems (and even pedal assist at times). It sounds like the sensor they used isn’t as precise or there isn’t a slower ease-off approaching 20 mph. Considering it’s a button vs. a twist throttle, it’s more of an on/off performance anyway which isn’t as smooth or refined (but does stay out of the way at least). I don’t have any solutions to offer but I appreciate you chiming in so others can get an idea of the performance beyond what I shot on video and tried to describe myself. I don’t think you can get a twist throttle for your bike but there are other brands like Pedego that still offer them and they have models like the Ridge Rider that resemble the sporty look of the Dash but are more for off-road riding.

Pedro
5 months ago

I had one question for commuting to work what would be better option izip dash or the peak ds and which is faster

Court Rye
5 months ago

Hi Pedro, I’d probably go for the E3 Dash because it has city tires vs. off-road as well as a rack and fenders! The Peak is more of a trail bike and you’d have to add a rack or wear a backpack. The Dash is also very fast with up to 28 mph top speeds :)

Pedro
5 months ago

Thanks, I can pick up the Dash for a little less than the Peak DS, didn’t know what would be a better buy for the money.

Pedro
5 months ago

Thanks I like the peak ds probably go for that one

Pedro
5 months ago

I had one more question if you had a choice between 2016 izip dash or 2016 turbo base model which one would be better you think

Court Rye
4 months ago

Hmm, I might opt for the Dash if it’s less expensive. I like that it has a suspension fork… but I definitely prefer the look of the Turbo since the battery is built in. Would depend on the terrain I planed to ride, any bumps would push me towards comfort or I’d get a suspension seat post for the Turbo :)

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GingerBeardMan
1 day ago

I was able to upgrade my front LED light with new components and still utilize the ability to turn it on and off with the native buttons/display. Requires some basic soldering wiring stripping skills but that's it really

Here are the parts I used:

- 10w LED chip (purchased from this seller) - http://www.ebay.com/itm/10pcs-10W-LED-Chip-White-SMD-for-Light-Bulb-Lamp-or-Project-US-Stock-10-pieces-/262940436884
- Adjustable power supply (also purchased from this seller) - http://www.ebay.com/itm/10X-Re-DC-DC-3A-Buck-Converter-Adjustable-Step-Down-Power-Supply-Module-LM2596S-/222245520202?hash=item33bedd834a:g:UZsAAOSwknJX05VB

Found a DIY page to confirm what parts I needed then didn't refer back to it after I got the parts so I don't remember which site I used

Now do note I used an older metal bike lamp that I found at a local bike shop selling used parts. This LED GETS HOT! I dialed it down since I don't have a proper heatsink to mount on the back of the LED for now but still is a HUGE upgrade. I was okay if I messed up because it was cheap for 10 pcs per part.

So far not noticing any dropping of battery life or anything strange. I was riding home once from the grocery store and it got really dark by the time I was heading home. The stock LED front lamp did nothing for visibility. I live in Michigan so pot holes are plenty through every road that hasn't been newly added that year. On roads or trails that are not well lit at night the stock light is not suitable for so I went out to find a solution that would work and be stronger than the previous while still being able to turn it on from the "handlebar dash" buttons or whatever you call them.

Mark Peralta
1 day ago

With the 48x11 top gear, you get about 33 mph at a cadence of 90 rpm. You can cruise at 28mph in the 48x13 next to top gear at the same cadence. With a 40T chainring and 40x11 top gear, you can still get to 28 mph, but have to hit a cadence of 95 rpm in the top gear. OTOH, a nice 80 rpm cadence in the 40x13 next to top gear (9 or 10 depending on mech) would be 20.5 mph.
.

At 28 mph, I want to be contributing as much power as I can to help the motor and to prevent it from over heating. At that speed I want to maintain my cadence to be at least 100 rpm. I don't even use the tenth gear of my 2015 Izip Dash (that ebike is over geared at the top end). The mid drive can be a different story since it has a limit on the maximum allowable rpm to effectively operate (some 80 rpm, others 90 rpm or 100 rpm, Bosch 110-120 rpm)

Jax
7 days ago

I'm curious what folks think about the assist on the 2016 Dash. Court's review suggests it feels like it responds more to cadence and is a bit delayed. I'm a big fan of the smooth feel from torque sensors and dislike the jerky, delayed feel from cadence sensors, but am also really interested in the 2016 Dash and don't have a place to try before I buy. Any opinions? Thanks

Mark Peralta
1 week ago

I know this isn't Rad-specific so sorry if this is not allowed.

When I ride my RadRover, my hands go numb. I hadn't done much riding before this so I'm not sure if I'm doing something wrong or if there is a technique to alleviate this.

The keep it Rad related, I now have about 210 miles on my RadRover. I love it.
I had similar experience when I first got my 2015 IZIP Dash. I was surprised since I did not have the problem with my old ebike. When I compared the riding position. The old one has shorter reach, increased height of the handle bar in comparison to the seat, and the hand position is more neutral at 45 degrees. To have the same comfortable riding position, I changed the handlebar with the classic shape;
https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&rlz=1C1EODB_enUS565US565&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=swept+back+handlebar&tbm=shop&spd=4042716084750401037
and used a shorter stem;
https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&rlz=1C1EODB_enUS565US565&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=short+stem&tbm=shop&spd=794389533030235897

When I got another electric bike, I also did the same plus added a stem riser;
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Aluminium-Bike-Bicycle-Fork-Stem-Extender-Handlebar-Riser-Head-Rise-Up-Adapter/112290869938?_trksid=p2047675.c100623.m-1&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D40130%26meid%3Da7074b8a9cf54ee4b9cfdbe08d26dfae%26pid%3D100623%26rk%3D4%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D261744964607

That solved the problem of pains to the wrists, elbows, and the rest of the upper body.

Joe Remi
2 weeks ago

I'm not so sure it's the PW-X. It has the same characteristics as the older generation Yamaha drives, so I think it's just a 'spiced up' PW series drive. BTW I'm amazed that you can climb the 19% grade hill in front of your house. I guess you're in better shape than me. I climb that little 15% grade hill in Vufflens-la-Ville (which you probably know, as you lived in that area) and I'm already struggling.

It sounds like you're able to get a lot of range out of this drive & battery combo. I think that hills and a rather upright riding position have been pulling my range down. And, of course, the bike goes 45km/h which can sometimes be 'tempting'. I occasionally indulge myself in a little 45 km/h dash, but I've been reducing my average speed in order to try and gain a little range. In a certain sense, you guys over there in the US are lucky because the 20mph speed limit is a good compromise and forces you to 'save fuel'. I only had the choice between 25km/h and 45km/h, but after leasing, renting, and demoing a certain number of e-bikes I found that 25km/h was just simply unbearable.

Do you guys ever use ECO+? I'm struggling to find a use for it. The drive feels pretty much 'dead' to me in that configuration. I'm also struggling to see any difference between High and Standard.
I agree about the power settings: ECO+ is near useless, Standard and High feel about the same to me.

topcatken
2 weeks ago

I rode both Dash bikes for 2000 miles each. The brakes were constantly needing adjustment, and noisy. Finally I replaced the stock Shimano brakes with Sram BB7s. No problems, no noise. Very pleased with the result.

JayVee
2 weeks ago

The furthest we have been so far is about 21 km so I'm no help. I was reading that your system is probably the new PW-X motor which may respond differently from our PW motors. By all accounts its got more power which means it might give you more speed and more fun which you might pay for in juice :).

I'm not so sure it's the PW-X. It has the same characteristics as the older generation Yamaha drives, so I think it's just a 'spiced up' PW series drive. BTW I'm amazed that you can climb the 19% grade hill in front of your house. I guess you're in better shape than me. I climb that little 15% grade hill in Vufflens-la-Ville (which you probably know, as you lived in that area) and I'm already struggling.

I don't have a lot of data yet to know for sure, I've only clocked about 100 miles so far. The last two rides were both about 35miles on relatively flat terrain. 50/25/25% eco, standard and max. I have the 400w battery and used about 50% of battery. I'm pretty sure 50 miles is doable without much worry, (better then I expected). I can say running on max would shorten the ride considerably! For me the standard power setting is my favorite, plenty of power but you still have to work a little to keep the pace at about 14-16mph.

It sounds like you're able to get a lot of range out of this drive & battery combo. I think that hills and a rather upright riding position have been pulling my range down. And, of course, the bike goes 45km/h which can sometimes be 'tempting'. I occasionally indulge myself in a little 45 km/h dash, but I've been reducing my average speed in order to try and gain a little range. In a certain sense, you guys over there in the US are lucky because the 20mph speed limit is a good compromise and forces you to 'save fuel'. I only had the choice between 25km/h and 45km/h, but after leasing, renting, and demoing a certain number of e-bikes I found that 25km/h was just simply unbearable.

Do you guys ever use ECO+? I'm struggling to find a use for it. The drive feels pretty much 'dead' to me in that configuration. I'm also struggling to see any difference between High and Standard.

Lenny
3 weeks ago

Hi all,
I am a 42 year old 6'0" chubby guy pushing 280 lbs and I need to get back on the bike to commute for health and sanity sake. I ride 16-22 miles round trip to work over some hilly roads. Right now on my commuter bike I take about an hour to do the trip when I am feeling good. I want an e-bike to speed things up a bit for the commute. I have narrowed down my choices between the Izip E3 Dash or the Bulls Lacuba Evo for a commuter e-bike and need some input. Price wise the Izip is a little easier to digest where as the Bulls looks like a better motor and battery. So looking for suggestions and input?

BULLS Lacuba EVO 45 or the belt drive version EVO are really high-quality bikes built for heavy duty use. BULLS also has bigger battery (650Whr compared to 418whr on the izip) which means you can do a complete roundtrip commute without recharging at office. Lower the capacity, more charge cycles for the same distance. If you are going to be putting 20 miles everyday, we suggest you go with the higher capacity version. There are lots of benefits to this. One day if you just want to use the highest level of assist for your commute, you won't have worry about running out of charge and you won't have worry about upgrading your batteries for 2 more years.

BULLS is slightly on the heavier side (although not so much compared to izip).

I would also recommend you look at Six50 E2 street. This would be a better commuter bike than the 2 you mentioned.

http://www.bullsebikes.com/product/six50-e-2-street/

Dewey
3 weeks ago

Haibike sduro hard seven SM has a torquey Yamaha motor. Izip E3 dash or Raleigh Route IE use the transX motor. The 2017 Focus Jafira 29 ($2800) uses the Bosch Performance Line CX motor. The Prodecotech Phantom mid-drive isn't on sale yet but will have the new Bafang Max motor, it would be worth waiting to test ride the Phantom if you're prepared to wait and spend a bit more ($3k). Treks use the Shimano Steps motor which provides less torque but more range. Try different motors to find what works for you.

bazzapage
3 weeks ago

What about the Sromers and the long popular Direct drive Izip Dash? I would be very much interested how those compare to the other ebikes.
Mark, we don't get either of those in New Zealand. My likely next test subject will be a Turbo Vado 3.0 in May (the less powerful). I should get my hands on a Vado 5.0 around June. It's also worth noting that two bikes in different places might be different. Eg the Smartmotion bikes (designed in NZ) are less powerful than the US versions of the same (36v vs 48v).

I am also aiming to do some 'actual' range estimates in my tests. A supplier is going to set me up with some kit to do that. Sick of the bogus claims by manufacturers...

Josh973
3 weeks ago

Hi all,
I am a 42 year old 6'0" chubby guy pushing 280 lbs and I need to get back on the bike to commute for health and sanity sake. I ride 16-22 miles round trip to work over some hilly roads. Right now on my commuter bike I take about an hour to do the trip when I am feeling good. I want an e-bike to speed things up a bit for the commute. I have narrowed down my choices between the Izip E3 Dash or the Bulls Lacuba Evo for a commuter e-bike and need some input. Price wise the Izip is a little easier to digest where as the Bulls looks like a better motor and battery. So looking for suggestions and input?

Mark Peralta
3 weeks ago

What about the Sromers and the long popular Direct drive Izip Dash? I would be very much interested how those compare to the other ebikes.

topcatken
1 month ago

Howdy, all -- Hoping for specific tire recommendations. Whatever you have tried and had good OR bad experiences with, I'm interested in -- specific size, profile, brand, vendor, etc.

For context, the stock tires are fine on my new/used 2014 Dash, but I'm 240 lbs and wore them out quickly on previous bikes, so expect the same here. I've seen Schwalbe and Kenda tires in what appears to be the right size, but am interested in your breadth of experience. The 2016 Dash now comes with "Kenda Kwick Bitumen 700x45c" but any and all recommendations are appreciated. I ride 10-20 miles daily, in the so-called wilds of Toronto, so temperatures vary widely, as do the potholes, road salt volume, and other conditions.

This forum has been great, and I appreciated all the posts which already led me to great 29er fenders and rear rack. Riding in as cold as minus 20c, so far, awesome!

Thanks in advance!
Just fyi, my stock tires have gone 2000 miles without incident. But I only weigh 160.

Timothy
1 month ago

Howdy, all -- Hoping for specific tire recommendations. Whatever you have tried and had good OR bad experiences with, I'm interested in -- specific size, profile, brand, vendor, etc.

For context, the stock tires are fine on my new/used 2014 Dash, but I'm 240 lbs and wore them out quickly on previous bikes, so expect the same here. I've seen Schwalbe and Kenda tires in what appears to be the right size, but am interested in your breadth of experience. The 2016 Dash now comes with "Kenda Kwick Bitumen 700x45c" but any and all recommendations are appreciated. I ride 10-20 miles daily, in the so-called wilds of Toronto, so temperatures vary widely, as do the potholes, road salt volume, and other conditions.

This forum has been great, and I appreciated all the posts which already led me to great 29er fenders and rear rack. Riding in as cold as minus 20c, so far, awesome!

Thanks in advance!

Mark Peralta
2 months ago

It has nothing to do with riding. The room is needed to mount all the gadgets for a modern e-bike enthusiast.

-1 inch for the thumb throttle.
-1 inch for the button controller used with most LCD's.
-4 inches for your LCD.
-1 inch for a bell
-3 inches for a smart phone cradle
-8 inches for grips
-2 inches for brakes
-2 inches for shifters

Yikes, That's 22 inches already. Where will I put the dash cam and headlites? And if you're a 2WD tinkerer, there's an extra throttle.

or look for other similar drvices.
https://www.google.com/search?q=handlebar+accessory+bar&rlz=1C1EODB_enUS565US565&espv=2&tbm=isch&imgil=sutGwyceJX33SM%253A%253BlEWVe5JS87th1M%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.bikewhenever.com%25252Faccessory_bars.html&source=iu&pf=m&fir=sutGwyceJX33SM%253A%252ClEWVe5JS87th1M%252C_&usg=__6XMsk3D-hZ1zeCuPngsCztYaV9o%3D&biw=731&bih=364&dpr=1.75&ved=0ahUKEwj84Z68_8nSAhVY9WMKHUNYC1QQyjcIlgE&ei=V5fBWLzaEdjqjwPDsK2gBQ#q=handlebar+accessory+bar&tbm=isch&tbs=rimg:CW7RB3dny27fIjhubTS9_1FdErbztfsY16xdrsAeijox1X9RNJ-4J77AAW1pyX6iqz04ivkkT6xTGir-rNM-gMbSJdCoSCW5tNL38V0StEStcWO2EzuavKhIJvO1-xjXrF2sRZ2OqfnjXQNkqEgmwB6KOjHVf1BGz2WHIRO_1kryoSCU0n7gnvsABbEfNwCGabTExoKhIJWnJfqKrPTiIROvsLdvr5v-EqEgm-SRPrFMaKvxF-lK6VDHMc5CoSCas0z6AxtIl0ESqV7C7nTHf8&*

harryS
2 months ago

It has nothing to do with riding. The room is needed to mount all the gadgets for a modern e-bike enthusiast.

-1 inch for the thumb throttle.
-1 inch for the button controller used with most LCD's.
-4 inches for your LCD.
-1 inch for a bell
-3 inches for a smart phone cradle
-8 inches for grips
-2 inches for brakes
-2 inches for shifters

Yikes, That's 22 inches already. Where will I put the dash cam and headlites? And if you're a 2WD tinkerer, there's an extra throttle.

Mark Peralta
2 months ago

I noticed I get different degree of work out from 3 different e bikes. I used to ride a regular bicycle to school in my high school years, and continued to ride a bike in college. Now that I am 50 (and not as energetic anymore), I wanted to have a semblance of non-ebike feel (or "natural feel"). Each of of the 3 have their prose and cons.

Bike A, 500 watt DD hub (Izip Dash). I can choose whatever gear and cadence regardless of speed and assistance level. It felt "natural" and I can have a good work out since I can increase my cadence above 100 RPM. One drawback is when I want to cadence above 100 RPM at PAS 1, the torque sensor sometimes is not sensitive enough resulting to "surging" since the motor assist comes and goes. My target cadence is near 100 RPM since it gives me a good work out.

Bike B, 350 watt mid drive (Raleigh Tekoa). The motor feels very gutsy, and it has a subtle sweet turbine-like sound when the motor comes on and off. It, noticeably, has more miles per battery charge compared to bike A. The drawback is the power assist tapers down above 80 RPM. So I usually finish my 25 mile ride and still not have a drop of sweat since my cadence barely goes beyond 85 RPM. For my kind of riding, it does not feel natural since I want to cadence from 80-120 RPM. With this ebike my cadence drops to 70 or less after upshifting and I feel that I am not contributing enough forward push to the ebike.

Bike C, 1,000 watt mid drive (Bafang BBSHD) The motor does not kick in as abruptly as Bike B but the power assist is sustained and does not taper off even above 130 RPM. I can pedal at any cadence and it is not limited by the motor cut-off. It feels very natural to me. I can choose the lowest assist level and cadence above 100 RPM to save the battery and have a great work out at the same time. It felt the most natural to me (no surging). The drawback is that the whole ebike is heavy since it is retrofitted to a full suspension mountain bike. This bike is more fun and provides more exercise than Bikes A and B.
I am describing my ebike experience while doing my target sustained speed of 18-22 MPH.

E-Wheels
2 months ago

I noticed I get different degree of work out from 3 different e bikes. I used to ride a regular bicycle to school in my high school years, and continued to ride a bike in college. Now that I am 50 (and not as energetic anymore), I wanted to have a semblance of non-ebike feel (or "natural feel"). Each of of the 3 have their prose and cons.

Bike A, 500 watt DD hub (Izip Dash). I can choose whatever gear and cadence regardless of speed and assistance level. It felt "natural" and I can have a good work out since I can increase my cadence above 100 RPM. One drawback is when I want to cadence above 100 RPM at PAS 1, the torque sensor sometimes is not sensitive enough resulting to "surging" since the motor assist comes and goes. My target cadence is near 100 RPM since it gives me a good work out.

Bike B, 350 watt mid drive (Raleigh Tekoa). The motor feels very gutsy, and it has a subtle sweet turbine-like sound when the motor comes on and off. It, noticeably, has more miles per battery charge compared to bike A. The drawback is the power assist tapers down above 80 RPM. So I usually finish my 25 mile ride and still not have a drop of sweat since my cadence barely goes beyond 85 RPM. For my kind of riding, it does not feel natural since I want to cadence from 80-120 RPM. With this ebike my cadence drops to 70 or less after upshifting and I feel that I am not contributing enough forward push to the ebike.

Bike C, 1,000 watt mid drive (Bafang BBSHD) The motor does not kick in as abruptly as Bike B but the power assist is sustained and does not taper off even above 130 RPM. I can pedal at any cadence and it is not limited by the motor cut-off. It feels very natural to me. I can choose the lowest assist level and cadence above 100 RPM to save the battery and have a great work out at the same time. It felt the most natural to me (no surging). The drawback is that the whole ebike is heavy since it is retrofitted to a full suspension mountain bike. This bike is more fun and provides more exercise than Bikes A and B.
Mark, thanks for sharing your experiences which are helpful in allowing me to decide on my first ebike purchase
I am still reasearching for a commuter ebike that suits my riding style which is similar to how you describe the way you like to ride
I want a mid drive ebike that I can ride most of the time without motor assistance and only have the motor kick in when needed when my speed drops below the legally allowed 25km/hr power assist limit here in Australia
I had a preference for Bosch driven ebikes to try before I buy but have had to disgard them as it would be near on impossible for me to maintain my unassisted average speed of 32km/hr with the small motor pinions giving under drive ratios
I am now looking at Brose, Yamaha and Shimano powered mid drive ebikes which have the larger chain rings and over drive ratios which will hopefully compliment my riding style and will allow me to retain the traditional bike riding experience and still allow me to get a workout which I prefer
Having an ebike with the motor assist available in the back gound to kick in when needed when I'm climbing hills, tackling a head wind or just having a bad day will be a perfect blend and allow me to continue my daily 80km commute and retain my fitness
My choice of ebikes in Australia is pretty limited but I have been advised that the Scott E-Silence 10 will be available soon https://www.scott-sports.com/global/en/products/249761007/SCOTT-E-Silence-10-Bike
Other options are Giant Quick-e + https://www.giant-bicycles.com/au/quick-eplus
BH Revo Cross http://perthelectricbikecentre.com.au/shop/bh-emotion-revo-cross/
Wallerang M.01 http://www.electricbikecentre.com.au/bike/wallerang-m01-smart-e-bike
Do any forum members have any of these ebikes or know anything about them for use as a commuter who could chime in with their thoughts?

Mark Peralta
2 months ago

I noticed I get different degree of work out from 3 different e bikes. I used to ride a regular bicycle to school in my high school years, and continued to ride a bike in college. Now that I am 50 (and not as energetic anymore) but I still want to maintain a relatively high speed of 18-22 MPH. I wanted to have a semblance of non-ebike feel (or "natural feel"). Each of of the 3 have their prose and cons.

Bike A, 500 watt DD hub (Izip Dash). I can choose whatever gear and cadence regardless of speed and assistance level. It felt "natural" and I can have a good work out since I can increase my cadence above 100 RPM. One drawback is when I want to cadence above 100 RPM at PAS 1, the torque sensor sometimes is not sensitive enough resulting to "surging" since the motor assist comes and goes. My target cadence is near 100 RPM since it gives me a good work out.

Bike B, 350 watt mid drive (Raleigh Tekoa). The motor feels very gutsy, and it has a subtle sweet turbine-like sound when the motor comes on and off. It, noticeably, has more miles per battery charge compared to bike A. The drawback is the power assist tapers down above 80 RPM. So I usually finish my 25 mile ride and still not have a drop of sweat since my cadence barely goes beyond 85 RPM. For my kind of riding, it does not feel natural since I want to cadence from 80-120 RPM. With this ebike my cadence drops to 70 or less after upshifting and I feel that I am not contributing enough forward push to the ebike.

Bike C, 1,000 watt mid drive (Bafang BBSHD) The motor does not kick in as abruptly as Bike B but the power assist is sustained and does not taper off even above 130 RPM. I can pedal at any cadence and it is not limited by the motor cut-off. It feels very natural to me. I can choose the lowest assist level and cadence above 100 RPM to save the battery and have a great work out at the same time. It felt the most natural to me (no surging). The drawback is that the whole ebike is heavy since it is retrofitted to a full suspension mountain bike. This bike is more fun and provides more exercise than Bikes A and B.

Ravi Kempaiah
2 months ago

Does'nt anyone produce a mid drive e-bike with a throttle ? If not why? Thanks Carl.

Carl,

There are couple of good quality E-bikes with throttle or Boost feature. "Izip" bikes have this unique feature and I do think it can be handy for certain customers.
You press the button and it acts like a throttle.

Some of the bikes that can had with this boost feature are..

2016 Izip Dash and 2016 Izip Protour.

You can check out Court's review here:

Even the 2017 Dash will accept this Boost control pad.

1/2
Jerome Johnson
2 months ago

Matt :  I cant figure out if I like this bike or the Surface 604 colt as my first e bike?Any suggestions for this 67 year old man who is in pretty good shape?

Jordan Smith
4 months ago

Hey Rob I rode this bike used and it seemed pretty nice. The guy only wants 1200 canadian for it. Thats about the same price as a brand new 750 watt bafang mid drive. Which do you think is my best option? You had recommended the bafang for quality and price. But the Izip is a good deal used and has less than 500miles on the bike

Jordan Smith
4 months ago

It is the hub motor Izip not the mid drive

RC
8 months ago

Nice to hear you embrace both a brand and a model of electric bike. If I ever buy an electric bike I'll be sure to look for the IZIP name.

cbr9927
11 months ago

Had a chance to ride this at the ebike expo, it is an excellent bike. The power is really as good or better than 500w motors at the expo. You can really feel that torque.

matta6301
1 year ago

Let's say you can get an izip e3 pro tour at $2900 or this at $2200? Which would you recommend for commuting with some hills?

matta6301
1 year ago

+ElectricBikeReview.com thanks for taking the time to reply! The compare feature will be awesome! I can't decide, my commute is only about 5.5 miles right now, and does have ~.75mile of 8% grade in the middle. Would be nice to reduce the strain a bit during that portion of the ride. I know this is going to sound crazy, but I keep coming back to the rad rover with some maxxis hookworm tires. The price is pretty good and since my ride really isn't very long... It'd probably get the job done? Or, as my wife says, just ride the road bike...

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+matta6301 Hmm... both offer high speed operation but the motor is more compact and refined with the ProTour and the battery is integrated into the frame. As a result, it's stealthier. Both are awesome to be honest, I'd be happy with either. You can compare the specs manually back at https://electricbikereview.com/category/izip/ and sometime soon I'll have an actual "compare" feature, it's just not launched yet :/

matta6301
1 year ago

Also, $700 isn't really a big deal.. If it's "worth" it

FRANK ROBY
1 year ago

exceptional value nice bike too.

nicco merritt
1 year ago

Looks great, just wish it had a better range

Yulian Baskoro
1 year ago

Oh that bike is so beautiful :D