IZIP E3 Peak DS Review

2017 Izip E3 Peak Ds Electric Bike Revew
2017 Izip E3 Peak Ds
2017 Izip E3 Peak Ds Bosch Powerpack 400 Battery
2017 Izip E3 Peak Ds Chain Lift Pulley Guide
2017 Izip E3 Peak Ds Bosch Intuvia Display Panel Removable
2017 Izip E3 Peak Ds Sram Guide Hydraulic Brake Levers Locking Velo Grips
2017 Izip E3 Peak Ds Rockshox Monarch Rt3
2017 Izip E3 Peak Ds 200 Mm Front Disc Brake Rotor
2017 Izip E3 Peak Ds 11 Speed Sram Nx
2017 Izip E3 Peak Ds Rockshox Reba Air Suspension Rear
2017 Izip E3 Peak Ds Vented Alloy Skid Plate For Motor
2017 Izip E3 Peak Ds Electric Bike Revew
2017 Izip E3 Peak Ds
2017 Izip E3 Peak Ds Bosch Powerpack 400 Battery
2017 Izip E3 Peak Ds Chain Lift Pulley Guide
2017 Izip E3 Peak Ds Bosch Intuvia Display Panel Removable
2017 Izip E3 Peak Ds Sram Guide Hydraulic Brake Levers Locking Velo Grips
2017 Izip E3 Peak Ds Rockshox Monarch Rt3
2017 Izip E3 Peak Ds 200 Mm Front Disc Brake Rotor
2017 Izip E3 Peak Ds 11 Speed Sram Nx
2017 Izip E3 Peak Ds Rockshox Reba Air Suspension Rear
2017 Izip E3 Peak Ds Vented Alloy Skid Plate For Motor

Summary

  • A value-driven full suspension electric cross country mountain bike with higher end drive system and components from Bosch, SRAM and RockShox, it's $300 cheaper than prior year with lots of upgrades
  • Beautiful hydroformed frame with inset battery mount and tapered head tube, the motor hangs down a little compared to some other designs I've seen with the Bosch motor but I love the alloy skid plate
  • Large grippy pedals performed well compared to the standard cages I see a lot and wouldn't need replacing, stiff thru-axles on both wheels with quick release, large hydraulic disc brakes with adjustable levers
  • Unique rear suspension design felt stiffer to me, white fork doesn't seem to match the rest of the frame and wasn't my favorite look, solid two-year warranty with a decent dealer network in the USA

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

IZIP

Model:

E3 Peak DS

Price:

$4,199

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Trail, Mountain

Electric Bike Class:

Pedal Assist (Class 1)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Comprehensive, Lifetime Frame

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

51.2 lbs (23.22 kg)

Battery Weight:

5.4 lbs (2.44 kg)

Motor Weight:

8.8 lbs (3.99 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminium Alloy, Hydroformed

Frame Sizes:

17 in (43.18 cm)19 in (48.26 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Large: 19" Seat Tube, 31" Stand Over Height, 23" Reach, 76.5" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Matte Black with White and Neon Green Accents

Frame Fork Details:

RockShox Reba Air Suspension with 120 mm Travel, Compression Clicker with Lockout, Rebound Clicker, 71° Slack Angle, 100 mm / 15 mm Thru-Axle with Quick Release

Frame Rear Details:

RockShox Monarch RT3 Air Suspension with 120 mm Travel, Compression Clicker with Lockout, Rebound Clicker, 142 mm / 12 mm Thru Axle with Quick Release

Attachment Points:

Threaded Eyelet on Fork Arch

Gearing Details:

11 Speed 1x11 SRAM NX Derailleur, 11-42 Cogset

Shifter Details:

SRAM NX Triggers on Right

Cranks:

Aluminum Alloy Cranks, 175 mm Length, 18T Narrow-Wide Chainring with Alloy Bash Guard, Chain Pulley Wheel NW with Plastic Guide

Pedals:

Aluminum Alloy Platform, Oversized with Adjustable Pins

Headset:

FSA, Tapered 1-1/8" to 1-1/2"

Stem:

Alloy, 6° Rise, 31.8 mm Bore, 90 mm Length

Handlebar:

Alloy Flat, 720 mm Length

Brake Details:

SRAM Guide Hydraulic Disc with 200 mm Front Rotor and 180 mm Back Rotor, 4 Piston Calipers, SRAM Guide Levers with Tool-Free Adjustable Reach

Grips:

Velo Flat Rubber, Locking

Saddle:

Velo Racing

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy, 73° Seat Tube Angle

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

31.6 mm

Rims:

Alexrims MD21, Alloy, Double Wall, 21 mm Width, 32 Hole

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 14 Gauge, Black with Nipples

Tire Brand:

Kenda Honey Badger, 27.5" x 2.2"

Wheel Sizes:

27.5 in (69.85cm)

Tire Details:

30 to 50 PSI, 30 TPI Casing, Wire Bead

Tube Details:

Presta Valve

Accessories:

Rubber Slap Guard, Alloy Vented Motor Protector Skid Plate

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, 1.6 lb 4 Amp Charger, SRAM PC1130 Chain

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bosch Performance Line CX

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

350 watts

Motor Torque:

75 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

396 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4 hours

Estimated Min Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Estimated Max Range:

65 miles (105 km)

Display Type:

Bosch Intuvia, Removable, Adjustable Angle, Grayscale, Backlit LCD

Readouts:

Speed, Assist Level (Eco, Tour, Sport, Turbo), Battery Level (1-5), Odometer, Trip Distance, Estimated Range, Clock, Max Speed, Average Speed, Trip Time, Shift Assist Recommendation

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad with Tactile Feedback on Left (Up, i, Down), 5 Volt Micro USB Port on Display

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (Measures Wheel Speed, Pedal Cadence and Pedal Torque, Power Output Relative to Pedal Input: Eco 50% 40 Nm, Tour 120% 50 Nm, Sport 210% 60 Nm, Turbo 300% 75 Nm)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

IZIP is one of the older electric bike companies operating in the United States, they’ve been a leader in the mid-level product space for several years and are now owned by the Accell Group which has Raleigh Electric and Haibike as well. It’s a company with good customer support, a solid network of dealers (mostly independent electric bike shops) and a whole range of products. The IZIP E3 Peak DS is at the top end of the spectrum with high-performance components from SRAM and light weight air suspension from RockShox. With 120 mm of travel, and 27.5″ x 2.2″ tires, this is more of a cross country style electric mountain bike. It’s very sturdy and serviceable thanks to 15 mm and 12 mm thru-axles with quick release and an oversized tapered head tube. And since it’s running a 1×11 drivetrain, shifting between gears is smoother (shorter jumps than 8 or 10) but you still get comfortable cadence options for climbing and riding fast. The top assisted speed is 20 mph and it’s easy to hit with the Bosch CX high torque motor. This motor offers software driven shift sensing as well, so the chain, sprockets and derailleur won’t take a beating. Further bolstering the drivetrain is an elevated chain pulley with surrounding guide and a narrow-wide tooth pattern on both the pulley cog and chainring sprocket. This system elevates the chain, reduces chain slap, eliminates kickback and chain slip. Hardware wise, I was very impressed with the new Peak DS and stunned by the price drop of $300 over prior-year model considering the upgraded motor and battery from Bosch vs. TranzX before. The older motor system just wasn’t as responsive or smart as this… still good, but not great.

The Bosch Performance Line CX motor offers 350 watts of nominal output but peaks above 550 and produces a maximum of 75 Newton meters of torque. That’s a lot, it’s exactly what you want for mountain biking and is capable of steep climbs. The motor weight is positioned low and center, mounted to an integrated plate that seamlessly connects it to the seat tube and downtube. More and more, I hear from shops that are specializing in Bosch powered ebikes because they are so reliable… but if it did fail, the motor can be replaced all at once, a new one bolted in place where the old one was. Thes motors aren’t silent but the high pitched whirring noise is mostly eclipsed by the knobby tires on pavement or hard packed Earth. instead of spinning a traditionally sized chainring (or chainrings) the sprocket is smaller (18 tooth) and spins roughly twice for every pedal rotation. This empowers the motor with a mechanical advantage and allows the chain to start and stop very quickly. It does not however, elevate the chain as a normal sprocket would and thus, the chain pully system is extra important. The motor controller measures rear wheel speed, pedal cadence and pedal torque 1,000 times per second and that makes it perfect for navigating unstable terrain where starting and stopping is critical.

Just like the motor, the battery is mounted low and center along the downtube of the frame. It’s actually inset slightly and blends in with the dark gray paint. With the Bosch Powerpack 400 and 500, you get convenience and access to the battery with quick removability but it’s not as hidden as the Brose batteries and some others from Easy Motion and other companies. You can charge the battery on or off the bike and it only weighs ~5.5 lbs so carrying it around by the plastic loop handle feels secure. The only consideration is with mounting and dismounting the pack because it’s sort of wedged below the top tube and rear suspension shock. The pack pops upwards and could collide with these other sections of the bike and get scratched… not a huge issue, but there definitely isn’t room for a bottle cage in there and the top tube might have been raised more than otherwise necessary to accommodate this battery design. Note also that the latest Bosch powerpack 500 is compatible with the interface here. What you get is the older more standard Bosch Powerpack 400 with roughly 396 watt hours of capacity. It’s a solid pack with excellent range, an integrated LED charge level indicator on the side and a solid locking core with metal slat to keep secure. One final compliment here goes to IZIP for their large rubber plug design that fits in to keep dust and water out of the charging port area on the left side of the downtube below the battery pack. It felt solid but wasn’t difficult to remove and would be easy to use with gloves on. So many other charge port covers are small, difficult to press in, prone to coming loose and just plain frustrating. The only catch here is that the plug doesn’t have any sort of connection to the frame and could get left behind if you set it down while charging.

Operation of the electronic systems on this bike feels professional and natural. Once the battery is charged and mounted, just press the power button on the lower left of the Bosch Intuvia display panel. From there, the screen flickers to life showing speed, a battery icon and an assist level chart with a little power graph next to it. This power graph jumps up and down as you pedal and helps to demonstrate how much energy the motor is using to give you support. I tend to ride in the second level of assist with quick jumps up to the highest level for climbing. Range can vary between 30 and 60 miles per charge which is very impressive for a mountain bike with knobby tires. The motor naturally works with you and requires pedaling to activate… but doesn’t quite as you pedal faster and faster. Some competing products seem to offer a limited RPM while Bosch is much wider. As a rider with hurt knees, I love being able to quickly reach over with my left thumb to arrow up or down on the button pad then immediately feel a boost of energy even while spinning quickly. I tend to go for cardio spinning vs. lumbering hard pushes due to my sensitivity and Bosch feels the best to me for this style. While the display is removable, it isn’t as small as some of the other options out there and might get scratched or broken off if you take a hard fall. For this reason, I sometimes take the display completely off before bombing a big descent. In addition to a soft backlight glow and the option to integrate LED lights with help from your dealer, the Intuvia display panel has a little Micro USB port on
the right side for charging a portable electronic device.

The experience I had with the IZIP E3 Peak DS was great, a big step up from the 2015 and 2016 models and on par with Haibike and other brands that also use Bosch. The biggest downside was style… the design and color scheme just didn’t excite me the way that some other models have and it seems like the white front fork didn’t match the gray and green frame. This is especially true when comparing to the 2015 model with red and black integrated throughout. When riding… I’d never notice and maybe a coat of trail dust would completely eliminate this vanity consideration. For the price, though it may sound high to someone new to the ebike space, I feel like you get a solid product here, very solid. And being able to choose from two frame sizes means you’ll get a bike that fits you and rides better. The dealer network cannot be overstated but given the reputation for reliability that Bosch has built in Europe and the USA it’s possible that you could buy this once from an ebike shop then have it serviced at any normal bicycle outlet. The wheels and shifting mechanisms are all standard bicycle hardware that won’t intimidate or require additional training to service. Big thanks to IZIP for partnering with me on this review and letting me hang out at their headquarters for a few days to see the new stuff :)

Pros:

  • Significant motor and battery upgrade from the 2015 model, you get Bosch vs. TranzX which delivers shift sensing, a nicer motor integration (with alloy skid plate) and larger removable display panel yet it costs $300 less!
  • IZIP went above and beyond with their battery integration here, notice how the downtube is molded around the pack letting it inset and blend in at both the top and bottom
  • Unique rear suspension isolates vertical travel and felt stiffer to me, should handle the higher speeds of an electric bike well and is optimized for cross country riding from what I could tell
  • Awesome pedals, they’re large and stiff with great traction points (metal pins), way better than some of the prior-year cage style pedals in my opinion
  • Smart chain guide system with elevated pulley wheel designed to eliminate kickback and phantom shifting as the rear swing arm travels up and down, it also keeps the chain from dropping with a full-surround guide piece and raises it to reduce chain slap
  • The chain guide and chainring use narrow wide tooth patterns to prevent chain slip and rattling, the teeth on the cogs fit more snugly into the alternating chain links
  • Great rubber slap guard on the rear right chainstay, many bikes aiming to be affordable use a clear plastic sticker but this one felt higher quality and is probably more important on a dual suspension setup
  • Great choice of motor with the Bosch CX high-torque model, it offers 75 Nm of torque which is perfect for climbing and trail riding
  • Given that the Bosch system only currently offers a single front chainring option, I like that IZIP put an 11 speed cogset on this bike vs. 10, it helps you hit and maintain the 20 mph top speed comfortably while still climbing efficiently at low speeds given the 51.2 lb curb weight of the bike
  • Awesome hydraulic disc brakes with larger rotors (I found it strange that the front rotor is 200 mm vs. the more common 203 mm but perhaps it’s a SRAM thing vs. Shimano), the levers offer tool-free adjustable reach which is convenient
  • The bike is available in two different sizes, this is great for tall and short riders alike… especially given the diamond high-step frame design used to boost strength and accommodate the rear suspension
  • Sturdy thru-axle design for both the front and rear wheels, both offer quick release systems for easy trail maintenance or transport, overbuilt tapered head tube also adds stiffness for off-road riding strength
  • I like the rubber plug design they’ve created for the battery charge port on the left side of the frame, it’s large and stays put but be careful not to set it down and ride off without it (there’s no leash system to keep it with the bike)
  • Great internal routing on the shifter cables and braking mechanisms, the frame looks clean and won’t snag or bend as easily in rugged conditions
  • The Bosch battery charger is great, not only is it relatively light weight and compact but it puts out 4 Amps vs. 2 Amps on most other chargers so you can fill your bike faster
  • I love that both the battery pack and display can be locked to the frame but are also easily removable, this is convenient for moving the bike (to reduce weight) or if you need to park it outside and want to keep the sensitive bits nice
  • The display panel has a built-in Micro USB charging port on the left side, this could be useful for charging a light or keeping your phone topped off if you use Strava or another GPS app
  • Solid two-year warranty backed by larger companies (the Accell Group which owns IZIP and Bosch), there are also more dealers for this brand so you can maybe test ride it and get fitted locally

Cons:

  • I don’t love the color scheme, the fork is bright white while the rest of the frame is dark gray with green accents, it just doesn’t look like it matches
  • Bosch has a new 500 watt hour battery pack that would take you further but the Peak DS comes with the older 400 watt hour (still great) probably to keep the cost down… the good news is that the mounting interface is forward compatible so you could upgrade later if you wanted
  • The battery pops “up” instead of sliding out to the sides and given the tight inner triangle of the frame here (especially with the rear suspension) it can be a little bit trickier to put on and off and I think it forces them to raise the top tube height which changes the stand over height of the bike
  • While the battery is easier to access for removal and is more standardized for future replacement, it isn’t as hidden as some other designs like those from Brose and people might know your bike is electric as a result, for mountain biking sometimes it’s nice to blend in more if you can

Resources:

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Jim Taylor
7 months ago

So how would this bike compare with the Bull’s bike with the Bosch CX motor? Thanks

Reply
Court Rye
7 months ago

Hi Jim! There are several full suspension options from Bulls including ones with the Bosch CX and others with the Brose motor. If the drive system is the same I’d say the big differences will be wheel size, suspension design, frame sizes and a bit of geometry along with the look and price. Unfortunately, I’m not expert enough to dive too much deeper into the details of one frame vs. another but I always consider weight and stand over height when I choose an ebike. I hope this helps a little! Feel free to ask in the forums for more advice too :)

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Geoffrey Bloom
1 day ago

Could be, depending on model and how you spec it out (Sterzing starts at about $7500). It is state-of-the-art Carbon frame, dual piston, brakes, etc etc.

http://www.motostrano.com/M1-Sterzing-GT-E-Bike-S-Pedalec-p/sterz.htm

But if you are looking for the best value / performance ratio out there, it is the Magnum peak for sure. It has the basic essentials like 48v battery / power and 90nm of torque, hydraulic brakes, 24 gears, 29" wheels - all for about $2000.

https://www.magnumbikes.com/product/magnum-peak/

John from Connecticut
4 days ago

Hello all - I need some help. I am getting the below 4x4 Sprinter Van that has a bed that raises. I want to put two bikes under the bed that fit when it is lowered - which will require taking the front wheel off.

What my requirements are:

A fun - want to ride every day - ride.
Suspension (through forks / tires) that will allow us to ride on easy to medium trails. I assume the full suspension bikes can't take a bike rack.....
Must have a bike rack as we will be taking camping stuff at least 10 miles down the trail... or getting groceries.
Long lasting battery.
Tough as we will be banging this thing around.
Unique - I love having cool things that spark conversations. Not to show off - but to start a conversation... I like to talk....
Weight - In my experience the lighter the bike the better the carve. But... I understand the electric bike is a lot heavier which is fine - expected - but 70+ pounds I wonder if that is too heavy for some of these??

We will be peddling a lot - I have a Carbon Fiber DaVinci (which is over my head in capabilities) so I want a bike that I can peddle a lot of the time.... maybe 50% on assist 1 or 2.. At least that is my vision - might change as I've never had an electric bike! I'm 48 and still want to go to places that others people aren't.

The bikes (I need two - one for me / one for my girl -- 5' 10" / 5' 6") that I'm kind of excited about are:

Haibike SDURO Trekking 9.5 - a little expensive and unsure about the off road capability. Looks like it is well put together - well thought out bike. Looks mad cool. A take down from this bike might be the M2S XC Sport?? Half the price.

M2S R750 Looks like a nice bike for the price. Looks like it is mad fun and has decent options. Unsure if that is an actual 750 Watt motor or the peak? Wish the battery was 52v. 62 pounds.

RadRover Man I love this company - flew from Key Largo up to Seattle to tested the bike. My only problem with the RadRover is that it seems that it hasn't been updated that much. I wish it had an option for a better battery and forks.

Volt Yukon Limited Looks like a real nice bike - possibly a step above the Rad but that is more like a Ford / Chevy argument.... they are too close to call so go with the one that looks the best. And the Volt guy is a little aggressive replying to comments anywhere the Volt is talked about. If I had to pick between the two - I think I would go Volt but would choose the R750 over both.

Teo S Another well priced bike and it seems to be a pretty nice one with a 750W motor . I am unsure how it compares the other Rad / Volt. Looks like the people who bought this bike really like it. But that is all relative -

Bulls / Specialized / Trek / and many other high end brands that make amazing bikes... but they seem to be a lot more expensive. I'm sure super nice rides - but is the price justified?

HaiBike
https://www.haibike.com/en-US/US/bikes/672/2018-sduro-trekking-9-5?variant=3840272848
M2S XC Sport
https://shop.m2sbikes.com/collections/frontpage/products/xc-mid-drive-electric-commuter?variant=38435959432
M2S R750
https://shop.m2sbikes.com/collections/frontpage/products/all-terrain-electric-fat-bike
RadRover
https://www.radpowerbikes.com/products/radrover-electric-fat-bike?variant=1121017965
Volt Yukon Limited
http://www.voltbike.ca/voltbike-yukon/voltbike-yukon-750-limited.html
Teo S
https://teofatbike.com/boutique/en/teo-s/teo-s-medium-noir-750w-p111c83/

Hello SV Moving On,
Looking for opinions on e-Bikes. I purchased a Trek XM700+ this past July and I absolutely love it ! My average daily ride is 20-ish miles and I hate to stop.

The Bosch Performance Motor is silky smooth, but very powerful, the Intuvia Controller is simple to use. My XM700+ glides along bringing me great joy....Hills, 'there are none' : ) I never thought cycling could be so much fun !... I made one change and added the Cirrus Bodyfloat seat post which I consider and absolute must. For me the frame stiffness was more then my back would tolerate, but the Bodyfloat is a marvelous piece of engineering, now my Trek is so comfortable...

The disk brakes are strong, extremely smooth and boy do they work. The swept back handlebars and the ergonomic grips make for a very comfortable ride.... The bike feels rock solid and is very well built. I've put on a little over 1000 miles in 3 months.

I'm sure there are many fine e-bikes out there, and I'm sure a few that are 'not so fine', but to me the Trek XM700+ plus is worth every penny and I'd do it all over again...

In fact I'm sort of doing that. I just ordered a Trek Powerfly 7 Mountain Bike based on my 700+ experience. I want to ride gravel/stone dust trails and I don't feel stable enough on the 7oo. The bike is fine, the issue is me, my 71 year old agility isn't what it used to be.

One last thing...A bike rack. I bought a Sirrus Freedom SuperClamp 2. It is great, once the hitch is installed, the rack is simple to install and remove from your vehicle. The rack is well built. Sirrus is a US company ( Madison Wisconsin ) . They've been in Wisconsin for 40 years, long before the catch phrase "Make America great again" . : ) I hope this was helpful.
All the best, John

Mark Peralta
4 days ago

Does anyone know what percentage of electrical energy input actually gets converted into forward motion?

At, say, 500W power consumption, how much energy remains to turn the wheel as opposed to heating the motor?

I presume the conversion efficiency varies a great deal with speed and load?
All electric motors has a bell curve of the efficiency range (albeit skewed) when plotted against RPM. That is the efficiency of converting electrical energy from the battery to mechanical energy in the motor. The peak is usually in the low to mid 80's %. A 500 watt hub drive's peak efficiency will depend on how it is wound and geared. In the US there are the 20 mph and the 28 mph hubs. The peak efficiency will be somewhere below 20 mph (15-18 mph) or for the speed pedelec it will be proportionally at higher speed, maybe from 19-26 mph.

http://www.ebikes.ca/tools/simulator.html
When it comes to the load. The new controllers now use MOSFETS that feed optimum load all the time for maximum efficiency (gone are the inefficient variable resistors of the past), but the optimum current is produced in pulses and the pulses are controlled or modulated by there width, pulse width modulation or PWM. So the load is always near optimum with the new controllers.

Small mid drives has the potential to have the highest overall efficiency by taking advantage of the gear ratios and keeping the RPM within the optimum range.

TForan
4 days ago

Just got the new pack yesterday, will share some initial impressions:

This pack is awesome! barely larger than the stock sized packs, 100% compatible on any of their bikes with the inframe style battery (in 48V). No problem fitting it on my Stunner LT, weight difference is very minor and the pack is not particularly any taller, just a bit wider out the left side (about 7/8"). Cell gain would be about 50% more (78 cells versus 52, rough guess)

Peak voltage off the charger seems to be the same as my smaller pack, 55.0V (equating to 13S), so there's no cheating for amp-hour gains with voltage sacrifice. This pack will all around perform better, and based on that voltage it should have around 1,100 Watt-hour peak!!!

Will provide some further dimensional/weight/range test details next week (and snap a pic), for now I'm extremely glad Roshan got these produced... Great upgrade for anybody looking to get a big range boost!

I really like those Stunner LTs. I almost bought one but decided on the Juggernaut Ultra.

Deafcat
4 days ago

Just got the new pack yesterday, will share some initial impressions:

This pack is awesome! barely larger than the stock sized packs, 100% compatible on any of their bikes with the inframe style battery (in 48V). No problem fitting it on my Stunner LT, weight difference is very minor and the pack is not particularly any taller, just a bit wider out the left side (about 7/8").

Peak voltage off the charger seems to be the same as my smaller pack, 55.0V (equating to 13S), so there's no cheating for amp-hour gains with voltage sacrifice. This pack will all around perform better, and based on that voltage it should have around 1,100 Watt-hour peak!!!

Will provide some further dimensional/weight/range test details next week (and snap a pic), for now I'm extremely glad Roshan got these produced... Great upgrade for anybody looking to get a big range boost!

Mark Peralta
5 days ago

Thank you! I tried both Magnum peak and Magnum metro. i was able to get to 26m with the Peak and max to 27 miles. Metro was weak. I only can get to 23 miles with the best effort. The sale person says that Magnum has instructions online to program it to Offroad mode to get max to 30 miles. But I wasn't able to find the instruction online. I also tried Stromer S1 sports. I was able to get it to 26 miles max. I felt the Peak was better than Stromer.
Also, it seems the trend is towarding to central drive. Do you think a hub drive is better to maintain a maximum speed for 17 miles one way than center drive?

Thank you! I tried both Magnum peak and Magnum metro. i was able to get to 26m with the Peak and max to 27 miles. Metro was weak. I only can get to 23 miles with the best effort. The sale person says that Magnum has instructions online to program it to Offroad mode to get max to 30 miles. But I wasn't able to find the instruction online. I also tried Stromer S1 sports. I was able to get it to 26 miles max. I felt the Peak was better than Stromer.

Anything above 20 mph, the energy consumption rises exponentially. You consume more than twice the energy at 30 mph vs 20 mph. Maintaining 28+ mph requires a lot of power, overheats the motor, and quickly drains the battery. A good compromise between speed and power consumption is 21-24 mph (average).

Your chain ring needs minimum tooth count of 46 so your cadence is at most 80 rpm when cruising at 28 mph.

Also, it seems the trend is towarding to central drive. Do you think a hub drive is better to maintain a maximum speed for 17 miles one way than center drive?

Above 20 mph, the energy efficiency between hub and mid drive is about the same but the hub drive preserves the life of the drive train (chain ring, sprockets, chain) while the mid drive accelerates the wear and tear and shortens the life of the drive train.

At low speeds, the mid drives with smaller motors tends to be more efficient (longer range per battery charge) and also has better climbing ability with less tendency to overheat due to the leverage from the drive train.

I have both hub drive and mid drive speed ebikes (>28 mph). I don't use the maximum assist level but I still hit 28+ mph on slight down hills. I just set the assist level just enough that I can maintain 22-23 mph on the flat (consuming 20 wh/mile) and then let it rip on the slightest down hills.

Hope that helps.

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JamesY
6 days ago

Thank you! I tried both Magnum peak and Magnum metro. i was able to get to 26m with the Peak and max to 27 miles. Metro was weak. I only can get to 23 miles with the best effort. The sale person says that Magnum has instructions online to program it to Offroad mode to get max to 30 miles. But I wasn't able to find the instruction online. I also tried Stromer S1 sports. I was able to get it to 26 miles max. I felt the Peak was better than Stromer.

Ravi Kempaiah
2 weeks ago

I'm proud to announce Biktrix's latest offering! 1000W nominal 1500W peak - torque assist bikes! Not pre-order, shipping now!

Check them out here:
https://www.biktrix.com/collections/bikes/products/juggernaut-mx?variant=44216265557

Can you reprogram at your level?
Many of the bikes I tested, had very jerky response. If tuned well, I can see these bikes taking off.

roshan
2 weeks ago

I'm proud to announce Biktrix's latest offering! 1000W nominal 1500W peak - torque assist bikes! Not pre-order, shipping now!

Check them out here:
https://www.biktrix.com/collections/bikes/products/juggernaut-mx?variant=44216265557

Gogogordy
2 weeks ago

Vincent, the batteries are 18ah, and it's a 48v system. The motor is rated at 500w constant use and can peak at around 1200w on a hill.

PS. Meant to add this the first time; part of moving to the biking lifestyle, I split my garage into Auto and Bike sides :)

Please describe (briefly OK) the route you took from Universal to coastal OC. It's highly likely you made better time then the cagers (that's car drivers for those whom dont come from a motorcycling background BTW)

The bikes likely "Thank You" for a separate room!

john peck
2 weeks ago

BTW, with 20 amps peak on the Cross Current S (960 watts) that basically brings it to parity with the Stromer ST2. Similarly equipped with the 1kWh battery the Cross Current S will be around $3k with the display, rack, fenders and lights. That's less than half the price.

The stock list when I purchased my CCS was $1699. I opted for the 21ah which was $2399. Even that is way less than ST2, and the performance has been 1st rate.
The out-of-the-box tuning was precise & has remained so for a 170 miles so far.

Verde
2 weeks ago

SIMI VALLEY, Calif. (Interbike 2017) – No matter the adventure, IZIP, a leader in fun-focused electric bikes, has a bike that will amplify your fun so you can travel further and faster. Whether you’re looking to explore endless miles of unknown dirt roads and trails, change your commute to work by skipping the car ride in favor of your city’s bike paths, or spending your weekend cruising along the coast in comfort, IZIP will enable and inspire you.

Heading into this year’s Interbike trade show, IZIP unveils four new models for 2018 that span a variety of riding styles that integrate modern performance – from pavement to trails.

E3 Moda (MSRP $3,749)
Bold style compliments practicality in the speedy new E3 Moda bike that combines a max 28 MPH pedal-assist German-made Brose motor that’s integrated into the downtube with bright lights and a rear rack for cargo versatility. A workhorse commuter, the Moda efficiently clocks miles on the way to work or while you're getting some extra exercise in on the way to yoga class. With a 504Wh battery, 27.5-inch wheels for fun and stability, disc brakes, and Shimano Deore 10-speed drivetrain, the Moda, simply put, is a practical speedster.

E3 Moda

E3 Moda

E3 Dash (MSRP $2,699)
The reputable E3 Dash is a proven performer that gets you where you need to go … fast. Well known in speed pedal-assist circles as a seriously fun transporter, the Dash flattens hills and takes on long commutes with ease. Sporting a 28 MPH TranzX Center Motor, 700c wheels, RockShox Paragon front suspension fork, robust alloy fenders, and a rear pannier rack, potholes and bumps are no match for the Dash as you comfortably ride in style.

E3 Dash

E3 Zuma (MSRP $2,299)
The E3 Zuma, inspired by the beach lifestyle found at world famous Zuma Beach in southern California, blends comfort with style. The relaxed frame geometry makes it feel like your flip-flops never left the ground, but the bike remains perfectly balanced with a low center of gravity thanks to a downtube-mounted battery pack and powerful mid-drive motor. The Zuma’s long-range 417Wh battery, 26-inch wheels, disc brakes, and lightweight aluminum alloy frame powers weekend surf adventures, as well as mid-week errands around town.

E3 Zuma

E3 Zuma

E3 Peak DS (MSRP $4,599)
With 130mm of RockShox full-suspension, 27.5-inch all-mountain wheels, and Enduro-inspired geometry, the new E3 Peak DS eMTB is built to conquer the toughest terrain – up and down. The super-responsive 6061 aluminum ally frame is built with proven trail engineering to inspire any rider, but it's the best-in-class Bosch Performance CX mid-motor with a 500Wh battery that really amps things up. Magura disc brakes, SRAM NX 1X 11-speed drivetrain, and short chainstays give the Peak DS excellent handling performance for an unforgettable ride on your favorite dirt.

E3 Peak DS

IZIP is also leading the charge in helping preserve our environment with its new, first in the cycling industry Call2Recycle battery-recycling program. Batteries contain hazardous materials, and if dumped or disposed of incorrectly the harmful elements can find their way into our water sources and adds to pollution. IZIP’s program disposes of old batteries in an environmentally responsible manner, and collection sites are located throughout the U.S. and Canada. After collecting and sorting, the batteries are processed and turned into new batteries, stainless steel products, and other products. For more, please check: call2recycle.org.

About IZIP
No matter how you ride, IZIP has a fun, fast, and efficient ebike for you. From commuters, cruisers, and cargo bikes to full-suspension, trail, and touring models, IZIP covers every riding option for leisure, trails, and pavement. With more than 10 years of experience in the ebike industry, IZIP is now a veteran and a leader in ebike technology in the U.S. A division of Accell North America, IZIP is supported by a network of authorized dealers and backed by the Electric Bike Competence Center of North America. For more about IZIP, please check: izipelectric.com.

MEDIA CONTACT: Keith Cozzens, Verde Brand Communications, keith@verdepr.com, 970-259-3555 x122

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Eric Kuyper
2 weeks ago

Vincent, the batteries are 18ah, and it's a 48v system. The motor is rated at 500w constant use and can peak at around 1200w on a hill.

PS. Meant to add this the first time; part of moving to the biking lifestyle, I split my garage into Auto and Bike sides :)

1/1
SV Moving On
2 weeks ago

Hello all - I need some help. I am getting the below 4x4 Sprinter Van that has a bed that raises. I want to put two bikes under the bed that fit when it is lowered - which will require taking the front wheel off.

What my requirements are:

A fun - want to ride every day - ride.
Suspension (through forks / tires) that will allow us to ride on easy to medium trails. I assume the full suspension bikes can't take a bike rack.....
Must have a bike rack as we will be taking camping stuff at least 10 miles down the trail... or getting groceries.
Long lasting battery.
Tough as we will be banging this thing around.
Unique - I love having cool things that spark conversations. Not to show off - but to start a conversation... I like to talk....
Weight - In my experience the lighter the bike the better the carve. But... I understand the electric bike is a lot heavier which is fine - expected - but 70+ pounds I wonder if that is too heavy for some of these??

We will be peddling a lot - I have a Carbon Fiber DaVinci (which is over my head in capabilities) so I want a bike that I can peddle a lot of the time.... maybe 50% on assist 1 or 2.. At least that is my vision - might change as I've never had an electric bike! I'm 48 and still want to go to places that others people aren't.

The bikes (I need two - one for me / one for my girl -- 5' 10" / 5' 6") that I'm kind of excited about are:

Haibike SDURO Trekking 9.5 - a little expensive and unsure about the off road capability. Looks like it is well put together - well thought out bike. Looks mad cool. A take down from this bike might be the M2S XC Sport?? Half the price.

M2S R750 Looks like a nice bike for the price. Looks like it is mad fun and has decent options. Unsure if that is an actual 750 Watt motor or the peak? Wish the battery was 52v. 62 pounds.

RadRover Man I love this company - flew from Key Largo up to Seattle to tested the bike. My only problem with the RadRover is that it seems that it hasn't been updated that much. I wish it had an option for a better battery and forks.

Volt Yukon Limited Looks like a real nice bike - possibly a step above the Rad but that is more like a Ford / Chevy argument.... they are too close to call so go with the one that looks the best. And the Volt guy is a little aggressive replying to comments anywhere the Volt is talked about. If I had to pick between the two - I think I would go Volt but would choose the R750 over both.

Teo S Another well priced bike and it seems to be a pretty nice one with a 750W motor . I am unsure how it compares the other Rad / Volt. Looks like the people who bought this bike really like it. But that is all relative -

Bulls / Specialized / Trek / and many other high end brands that make amazing bikes... but they seem to be a lot more expensive. I'm sure super nice rides - but is the price justified?

HaiBike
https://www.haibike.com/en-US/US/bikes/672/2018-sduro-trekking-9-5?variant=3840272848
M2S XC Sport
https://shop.m2sbikes.com/collections/frontpage/products/xc-mid-drive-electric-commuter?variant=38435959432
M2S R750
https://shop.m2sbikes.com/collections/frontpage/products/all-terrain-electric-fat-bike
RadRover
https://www.radpowerbikes.com/products/radrover-electric-fat-bike?variant=1121017965
Volt Yukon Limited
http://www.voltbike.ca/voltbike-yukon/voltbike-yukon-750-limited.html
Teo S
https://teofatbike.com/boutique/en/teo-s/teo-s-medium-noir-750w-p111c83/

bluecat
2 weeks ago

750W is the maximum in the US.
I wonder how they will bring in 800W to comply with the law?

You're right!

In the US, the power sticker will be "750W".

Maybe, you have the same fuzziness among the power values as in europe:

Is the given value the electrical power which the motor takes from the battery? Or is it the mechanical power which the motor gives to the axle? Are the values defined through standard conditions? And if so, what are the standard conditions? Or are they more or less peak values?

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fxr3
2 weeks ago

Tame down the PAS3 from 800w to 750w. Peak power will still be the same and most people rarely use PAS3 level anyway. Most will be happy with PAS2, so there will not be much difference.
I don't mean to challenge your statistic, but 'most people rarely use PAS3 level anyway'.?
You can balance that out a bit- I only use PAS3 level.

dr3131
4 weeks ago

I am looking to buy a bike for my college age son. 5'7" 135lb who will mainly be using around campus. I am looking at anything 1600-3000. Interested in the best quality for the money. He will want a rack and fenders but doesn't want the bike to scream E-bike

Have never purchased an E-bike before and just tested a Juiced Cross current S.

mrgold35
4 weeks ago

The battery indicator on the Rad bikes does double duty. It shows the current charge at rest within 20% AND it show the current load on the battery when pulling power within 20% when riding. I've started out with 5 bars and PAS 4 and the battery indicator will drop down to 4 or even 3 bars showing the load/draw on the battery pack when riding. The battery indicator is back at 5 bars when I park my bike at work 6 miles later.

Pretty much the best way to figure out your true range is ride until the battery indicator starts to blink or even when the bike shuts power off. Between heat/cold, inclines/declines, wind, stop/go traffic, drag from riding position, weight, pedal power you add, tire PSI, etc... it is hard to get an exact range with and electric bike. I've gone a little under 40 miles on my Rover at PAS 2-3 with avg speed of 11-13 mph on mostly level ground with a solid 1 bar after the ride. I usually average 23-27 miles at PAS 3-4 if I need a higher average speed closer to 17-20 mph.

One difference I think from the Yukon bikes compared to the Rad Rovers is the battery/controller delivers full power in the selected PAS until it starts to deplete the battery reserves and it then reduces the peak power; but, still provides the max amount of power available. Example is riding PAS 4 at 550w until you have 2 or 1 bar showing. There will be zero drop off in performance until the controller can't draw the extra power from the battery to maintain 550w. The controller will then step down the watts availble to deliver max power in the slected PAS (PAS 4 with 1 or 2 bar might show 450w -400w-350w-etc.. until the indicator starts to blink or bike shuts off).

Mark Peralta
4 weeks ago

750W is the maximum in the US.
I wonder how they will bring in 800W to comply with the law?
Tame down the PAS3 from 800w to 750w. Peak power will still be the same and most people rarely use PAS3 level anyway. Most will be happy with PAS2, so there will not be much difference.

Dunbar
4 weeks ago

The problem with the aftermarket mid-drive kits is that very few of them have torque sensors. A good torque sensor transforms the way an e-bike rides IMO. It feels less like an electric scooter and more like a normal bike where the electric assist is given proportional to how hard you pedal. A good hub motor is fine on flatter ground. Where mid-drives shine is on steeper climbs (above about 10%.) They give you the mechanical advantage of the gearing. As the video on the Juiced Bikes YouTube channel shows the Hyper Fat has no trouble climbing. The 30 amps of peak power goes a long way addressing the shortcomings of a hub motor on a hill. Another issue with mid-drives is that many of them cut assistance when you pedal over about 80rpm. Since I come from a road bike background that would be super annoying as I generally pedal 80-90rpm.

Ravi Kempaiah
4 weeks ago

Thanks.

By Swiss law, 1000W is maximum. The upcoming EU law also allows 1000W power. So, the ST5 motor will have 800W nominal and unknown peak power. Furthermore, 48NM will support you. These values are clearly above the ST2 motor.

750W is the maximum in the US.
I wonder how they will bring in 800W to comply with the law?

Mark Peralta
1 month ago

Great input and real world observations, especially helpful to me and other Tekoa owners. I have less than 100 miles on my new Tekoa, but that is enough to know and understand what you write about the motor. My main ride for eight years was the Yamaha Super Easy. It employs the Yamaha 250 watt nominal mid drive, and it feels very much like the Tekoa's drive system in where it wants to be ridden efficiently and effectively. I don't know what that older Yamaha would generate at peak in terms of watts, as I never saw a published figure and I never had it metered on my bike. But it feels like the TranzX generates more peak watts in similar riding situations than that Yamaha motor on the Super Easy did. I hope the Tekoa can be the bulletproof ride for as long as the Yamaha served me!
If the your Yamaha is rated 250 watts then the Tekoa is more powerful since it is rated at 350 watts.

This is how I mounted my modified cadence meter.

1/1
mid drive merv
1 month ago

Great input and real world observations, especially helpful to me and other Tekoa owners. I have less than 100 miles on my new Tekoa, but that is enough to know and understand what you write about the motor. My main ride for eight years was the Yamaha Super Easy. It employs the Yamaha 250 watt nominal mid drive, and it feels very much like the Tekoa's drive system in where it wants to be ridden efficiently and effectively. I don't know what that older Yamaha would generate at peak in terms of watts, as I never saw a published figure and I never had it metered on my bike. But it feels like the TranzX generates more peak watts in similar riding situations than that Yamaha motor on the Super Easy did. I hope the Tekoa can be the bulletproof ride for as long as the Yamaha served me!

RRAPTRR
1 month ago

That's the interesting part! I consistently hit 680-watts peak power during our testing (only one jumped to almost 700 momentarily)... but the app always shows about 525-watts peak power output! Sandbagging? lol

The only reason that we tested the power output with the meter, is because Eric flat out did NOT BELIEVE it was only 530-watts, after seeing it outperform a 1500-watt mid-drive bike on our hill climbs tests. Erik was SUPER IMPRESSED with the Levo and has an entirely new found respect for them after our day of testing. The fact he was convinced it had to be way more power than stated, says a lot. In fact, he was theorizing that it was more like 1000+ watts, because of the way it was climbing the hills against his other bikes.

As for the flats, I had no issue keeping up with the other guys with the 1500/2500 watt bikes on the streets... and on the trails, they'd likely be chasing ME! The biggest limitation is the battery capacity for these bikes, and the overall range when using Turbo mode aggressively. That being said, we're looking into reverse-engineering these packs and possibly even offering a higher capacity USA-made pack from LUNA, at half the price of a OEM spare. Some complications to work through, but we're going to be working on it!

On a side note, check out Erik's full (and a bit long) review and impressions of the Levo:

MoneyJB 4real
3 months ago

how much is the price?

Erik Villegas
3 months ago

proud owner of an izip nice Customer bike support.

Evil Component
7 months ago

0:35 "so the whole rear end goes up and down like that, it feels a little stiffer"

Mark Elford
7 months ago

Good review, nice bike...ive been ghost watching for a while.

Carlos Pedro
7 months ago

Nice Bike bela bicicleta 😅👌🚴🚵🚴🚵🚴♥

Dave Caldwell
7 months ago

Nice bike, not a fan of the white fork though !

R D
7 months ago

👍🏻🇨🇦

ElectricBikeReview.com
7 months ago

Glad you enjoyed it! More in the works

sharrafshow
7 months ago

can you do a video on best economy e-bikes? you know someting good for students.
live ur vids

sharrafshow
7 months ago

ElectricBikeReview.com thnx bro will be waiting 😁

ElectricBikeReview.com
7 months ago

Sure, I've created a section on the site with more "affordable" electric bikes and just for you, I'll review a new one called the Juiced CrossCurrent Air today. Keep an eye out for it: https://electricbikereview.com/category/affordable/

joes joey
7 months ago

very nice bike this thing hawls assss seems pretty fast!

joes joey
7 months ago

nice!

ElectricBikeReview.com
7 months ago

It can definitely ride faster than 20 mph if you pedal or go down a hill like I was doing with some of the shots but the max assisted speed is 20 mph since it's a Class 1 Ebike

Fat Bike Freak
7 months ago

Can you say dongle in your next video please...

ElectricBikeReview.com
7 months ago

Ha! I'll keep that in mind when I head back to NYC soon and film more reviews. I'm just processing some of the video from my last trip to SoCal at the moment :P

LivingLifeElectric
7 months ago

IZIP. UZIP. WE ALL ZIP FOR IZIP...

ElectricBikeReview.com
7 months ago

Ha! Awesome :D

Festivejelly
7 months ago

Paying that much Id prefer a higher end haibike. Imo they look a bit more sturdy and you seem to get more for your money. At least in europe.

ElectricBikeReview.com
7 months ago

Yeah, I lean that direction too. This bike performed well and the drive system is exactly the same as Haibike but it doesn't look as cool and I don't think the frame engineering is quite as dialed in... at least from just looking at it, it rode well tough ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

ForbinColossus
7 months ago

Are we suspicious about its odd rear suspension setup?? As Court pointed out earlier, the Horst-link is a type of four-bar linkage suspension design that is now allowed to be used by every manufacturer and seems to be regarded as the best 'full-squish' setup.
History here:
https://www.bikeschool.com/blog/horst-of-a-different-color-the-history-of-the-horst-link-four-bar-linkage/
And pinkbike has more analysis on rear suspension variants with copious photos:
https://www.pinkbike.com/forum/listcomments/?threadid=146074

ElectricBikeReview.com
7 months ago

Yeah, thanks for the links. I didn't know how to respond to the suspension but the Raleigh Electric product manager was stoked on it... hard to tell if marketing or actually a better design. To me, that connected metal part is just strange? Maybe they will chime in to help explain :)

Jeff Perteet
7 months ago

nice test ride

ElectricBikeReview.com
7 months ago

Thanks Jeff! I've been trying to show more of how the bikes work, especially when I have time and am at cool locations. Knowing you appreciate it is good feedback

Tahir Rana
7 months ago

4199$, I guess only NASA employees can afford this as they do steal tax $$$ to give the sheep fake space!

ElectricBikeReview.com
7 months ago

Yeah, I wish we didn't have baby formula, cordless tools, ear thermometers, golf clubs, invisible braces, MRI or CAT scans, memory foam, shoe insoles, water filters, UV blocking sunglasses or solar panels... what was NASA thinking inventing all of that stuff in pursuit of space technology and exploration! Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NASA_spinoff_technologies in case you're just looking for a less expensive ebike, here's a long list: https://electricbikereview.com/category/affordable/

Rob02150
7 months ago

The white fork looks odd with the rest of the bike. Very nice bike though.

ElectricBikeReview.com
7 months ago

I tend to agree with you... it just doesn't look mean or beautiful or tight the way that some other bikes do, but it does cost a little less and the ride was good :)

BOB NIEVES
7 months ago

wow,that's a awesome E- bike

BOB NIEVES
7 months ago

ElectricBikeReview.com that's a great price.

ElectricBikeReview.com
7 months ago

Agree! Big step up from last year and $300 cheaper, very cool

Seb K
7 months ago

Did you hear about the NYC cops seizing those Ebikes recently ?!!! It's all over the cycling communites . Absolute idiots. I don't understand why NYC doesn't lift the ban . Cars kill on a daily basis . What the hell does an Ebike do compared to 2 tonnes of metal - a lot of people are very angry as a lot of the riders were delivery riders so customers won't be getting their goods . I'm glad I don't live in NYC .

Seb K
7 months ago

Won't surprise me if they ban pedal assist too .

Propel Electric Bikes
7 months ago

It's not really scientific. They made a law in 2004 before ebike were even really a thing. The law was designed to ban all bikes and scooters that can't be registered so they used the words "can be propelled without human power" and frankly pedal assist is kind of a loophole for now until we get some clear laws which should hopefully happen soon.

Seb K
7 months ago

Cheers Chris . I wish they could give a clear statement as to why they don't allow throttle activated Ebikes . Maybe the higher top speeds but if you stick a 50T chainring and use the 11t sprocket with an Ebike you are going to hit well over 20mph . Heck I even it 30mph on my traditional bike . Could be the torque of the motor . I don't know but they need to be more clear as to why they are apposed to throttle Ebikes .

Propel Electric Bikes
7 months ago

This was just throttle activated bikes. It still kind of stinks. Throttle activated bikes have been illegal in NYC since 2004 and the enforcement has been sporadic. There seems to be a new approach for handling this now, particularly in some precincts.

This is bringing some much needed attention to this issue in NYC and NYS. I feel we're getting closer and closer to having clear laws for ebikes in NY, but it's always been the case that bikes with throttles are illegal in NYC. Unfortunately the press often don't take the time to make this distinction, but we're clear on it. We've even went to court to prove that pedal-assist bikes are not illegal under NYC law, but throttle bikes are.

It would be our preference to allow for both, but through speaking with many politicians and city officials, it seems pretty clear that they're not going to support any legislation that allows for both. - Chris

Seb K
7 months ago

I think any electrically assisted bicycle . Also the officers were parked IN THE BIKE LANE when handing out tickets !!!

http://www.bicycling.com/culture/nypd-initiates-e-bike-crackdown-and-cyclists-are-outraged?utm_source=plus.google.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=sharebutton

CLOTHED IN SHADOWS.
7 months ago

I like the "moustache asphalt" but the "I zip E 3 peak DS" design is more sporty-looking to me. Which is more my style. The fenders on these bikes (the asphalt) make them look more vintage and old fashioned.

And the top speed on this model totally sucks. Why such a low speed on such a cool, sporty bike ?. I must admit courtney, it was you who greatly influenced me too appreciate the Bosch drive systems. I had heard of them before but, I really didn't pay them that much attention. I was more focused on the "bafang BBSHD" motor.

Now the Bosch is one of my favorites. I hope they offer this model with a higher top-speed in the future.

CLOTHED IN SHADOWS.
7 months ago

ElectricBikeReview.com Thanks Courtney. We truly appreciate what you do fellow.

ElectricBikeReview.com
7 months ago

There are other bikes with the Class 3 speed pedelec motor from Bosch but it's rare, I think the full suspension models usually avoid it unless the tires are slicks and there are fenders because they aren't allowed on off-road trails in California and elsewhere that follow the Classes. In this case, the Peak DS is Class 1 so you can mountain bike with it :)

SheaDesign
7 months ago

Drive gear turns 2.5 times per crank revolution. I've ridden about 18 thousand miles on the Bosch and can honestly not tell the difference between 'shift detect' enabled or disabled. Seems like all it does is enable the shift prompt (arrows) in the display. That pulley is so high and forward it reduces the length of engagement on the critical drive gear, let's see how that goes and if a divorce is eminent. Funky engineering. -S

SheaDesign
7 months ago

Size of the chainring has nothing to do with what is happening internally, it could be 48 feet and would maintain the 2.5:1 ratio. I have not measured the CX line but would bet you a taco it is the same. I'd like to see 'shift sensing' in action on a bench, when roadies try one of my haibikes they always mash until they learn to backoff for the shift. For now I call hooey ;) - Thanks for the reply and continuous reviews. -S

ElectricBikeReview.com
7 months ago

Thanks for the feedback! I usually say "about 2 times" because Bosch lets manufacturers choose the chainring size (like 15 to 20 teeth) and I thought that would change from exactly 2.5 to more of a range. I believe the shift recommendation has more to do with the motor RPM and recommending you to shift to enable it to help more. Shift sensing tells the motor to ease off for a moment when the derailleur is in action but I'm not sure exactly how it works, I think it senses strain and is software driven... it's not perfect but I'd rather have it than not :)