Juiced Bikes ODK U500 Review

Juiced Riders Odk U500 Electric Bike Review
Juiced Riders Electric Cargo Bike
500 Watt Front Geared Hub Motor
Battery Charger Port Lithium Manganese
Twist Shifter Battery Indicator
Rear Chain Protector
Juiced Riders 48v Battery
Juiced Riders Odk
Internally Geared Rear Hub Shimano
Chain Guard
Juiced Cargo Bike Child Seat
Juiced Riders Rear End Battery
Yepp Child Seat Rear Rack
Juiced Riders Odk U500 Electric Bike Review
Juiced Riders Electric Cargo Bike
500 Watt Front Geared Hub Motor
Battery Charger Port Lithium Manganese
Twist Shifter Battery Indicator
Rear Chain Protector
Juiced Riders 48v Battery
Juiced Riders Odk
Internally Geared Rear Hub Shimano
Chain Guard
Juiced Cargo Bike Child Seat
Juiced Riders Rear End Battery
Yepp Child Seat Rear Rack

Summary

  • A sturdy, thoughtfully designed cargo bike with a low center of gravity that's easy to mount and handle
  • Super strong 500 watt front hub motor paired with 48 volt Lithium Manganese battery pack
  • Long lasting 15 amp hour battery gets awesome range and includes one year warranty
  • Very affordable but packed with extras including upgraded pedals, fenders, chain guard and tires

{{title}} {{distance | number:2}} miles away

{{excerpt}}

National eBike Shops

Electric Cyclery
900 N Coast Hwy
Laguna Beach,  CA  92651
Propel Bikes
134 Flushing Ave
Brooklyn,  NY  11205

Video Review

Trusted Advertisers

Introduction

Make:

Juiced Riders

Model:

ODK U500

Price:

$ 2199.00 USD

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Urban, Cargo

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Frame, 1 Year Battery

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2013

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

72.5 lbs ( 32.88 kg )

Frame Types:

Step-Thru, Cargo

Geometry Measurements:

70.2” x 29” x 44” (178 cm x 73 cm x 112 cm)

Frame Material:

Aluminum Alloy

Frame Fork Details:

JMF02 Steel, 6 mm Anti-Torque Dropouts

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Front Basket Bosses

Gearing Details:

3 Speed 1x3 Sram i-3 Internally Geared Rear Hub

Shifter Details:

Twist Grip

Cranks:

170 mm

Pedals:

Wellgo Aluminum Alloy Platform

Stem:

Promax 180 mm

Handlebar:

Moto Style

Brake Details:

Tektro HD-E710 Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Rotors

Grips:

Velo Lock On

Saddle:

Velo Comfort, Wide

Seat Post:

Quick Release

Rims:

Double Wall, 36 Hole

Spokes:

Front: 12G, Rear: 13G

Tire Brand:

Kenda 924

Wheel Sizes:

20 in ( 50.8 cm )

Accessories:

Heavy Duty Welded Rear Rack, Optional Front Basket, Front and Rear Fenders with Mud Guards, Rear LED Light, Side Kickstand (Optional Center Kickstand), Bash Guard on Gear Shifter in Rear

Other:

Maximum Weight (Rider + Payload) 330 lbs, Cruise Control

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bafang BPM

Motor Type:

Front-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

15 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

720 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

35 miles ( 56 km )

Estimated Max Range:

40 miles ( 64 km )

Display Type:

LED Console on Left Bar

Readouts:

Battery Level 1-5, Cruise Control

Drive Mode:

Twist Throttle

Top Speed:

20 mph ( 32 kph )

Trusted Advertisers



Written Review

The Juiced Riders ODK U500 has one of the worst names I’ve seen but offers one of the best electric cargo bikes I’ve come across. Please note that this review is for the 2013 model, to learn about the most recent version check out the ODK V3 review. The ODK U500 is available as a standard non-electric cargo bike for just $899 or a very reasonable $2,199 as an ebike. For the money, you’ll get strength, range, durability and a decent one year warranty on the frame, components and battery system! Unlike some other entries in this space such as the the Pedego Tandem that optionally converts to cargo bike by removing the rear seat, the Juiced Riders ODK U500 was purpose built with hauling in mind and it really shows.

The hub motor on this bike offers 500 watts of power (as you might have guessed from the U500 name) and is designed to work with 48 volts of power input which is at the upper end of mainstream ebikes. It’s a geared motor meaning it offers more torque but has internal parts that could wear out a little faster over time. You’ll be able to ride with large loads (up to 330 lbs including rider) and easily manage small and medium sized hills without pedaling. The motor runs smooth and quiet (see the video review above) and is so powerful that the front wheel will actually spin out if the throttle is twisted abruptly from stop.

The battery configuration chosen for the ODK U500 is Lithium Manganese which strikes a balance between the high performance, low weight benefits of Lithium-ion and the lower cost but fewer cycles offered by Lead Acid. All things considered, given the generous one year warranty and low price of this bike, this battery choice makes sense. In terms of positioning on the bike, the battery is protected very well in a long aluminum case that is mounted in the rear rack area and completely surrounded by aluminum tubing. The front of the pack has an on/off switch and the rear has a twist cover for charging. Unfortunately this battery is not so easy to take off so you’ll want to charge it while on the bike. The battery offers 15 amp hours of capacity which is 50% more than most electric bikes and that extends range dramatically, especially when paired with the higher 48 volts of power which creates efficiency in riding. This bike gets over 30 miles on a charge and that’s without pedaling!

Beyond the motor and battery chosen for the ODK U500, the frame and components are all very solid and well thought out. I have very few complaints other than the relatively stiff ride quality. The wheels are 20″ in diameter which is smaller than the standard 26″ or 29″/700c that most bikes use. This makes the bike easier to mount, load and balance on at stop signs but doesn’t smooth over bumps quite as gently. Also, there are no shock absorbers and while the tires are oversized, they are made with extra thick rubber that takes some of the softness out. The seat is oversized and fairly soft which helps but I recommend considering a seat post shock if you live in an especially bumpy area or will be riding a lot.

A few drawbacks to this bike include the lack of pedal assist, although there is a unique cruise control feature built in. This is an interesting feature, rare in the world of ebikes, that could serve to relax the hand of a rider who might otherwise have to twist the throttle unendingly over the course of long commutes. I also would have liked integrated lights, especially given the extra capacity of the 15 amp hour battery. The control unit on this bike is very simple and won’t display your speed, distance or other fancy statistics. One other drawback is the lack of a rear disc brake, only the front wheel has it. In wet conditions and with heavy loads disc brakes are preferred and it would be nice to have them on both wheels but I think this decision was made to keep the rear wheel simple, inexpensive and to more easily accomodate the hub gearing system in the rear.

My favorite part of this bike is the rear rack itself. I was delighted to find that the cross bar configuration works perfectly with child seats, food boxes and other after market accessories. There are five cross bars to work with along the top and three along each side. The top bars on the rear rack are oversized, providing strength and durability but the extra side bars are narrow gauge and match standard bicycle racks exactly! This is a big deal because it opens up a whole world of pannier accessories. Many electric bikes require double sided panniers that sling over the top because the rear racks are too fat (having to support a battery and extreme forces), but that’s not the case here.

Other pleasing features of this bike include the internally geared rear hub which makes shifting from stand still possible. While it only offers three gears, this bike wasn’t built for speed and three works well enough while keeping the bike light, simple and avoiding derailleurs. The chain itself is relatively tight because there aren’t any rings for shifting gears, this means it won’t slap the chainstay or fall off as easily when riding over bumps. The chain is also protected with an extended chain guard to keep your pants clean and snag free. The metal studded Welgo pedals work well and will hold up in wet conditions or if the bike tips over onto its side. The rear hub has a protective metal cage surrounding the cable inclosure. The spokes on both wheels are wide gauge, offering increased strength for heavy loads.

In case you couldn’t tell, I’m a big fan of this bike. I was delighted by the features and quality I found when inspecting and riding it. The combination of thoughtful design choices, durability, warranty and low price combined with three fun colors make this bike a strong competitor in the world of electric cargo bikes and even as a stand along electric bike! It’s not as smooth riding as a bike with 700c wheels and oversized balloon tires with a sprung saddle, but it more than delivers in almost every other way. Especially if you’re using it as a delivery bike ;)

Pros:

  • Extra thick tires are durable and thorn resistant
  • Rear rack provides numerous top mounting points that work seamlessly with Yepp child seat, mobile food boxes, seat pads and other accessories
  • Rear rack provides side bars made with narrow gauge tubing that match standard bicycle racks, making it compatible with nearly all pannier bags
  • Smaller 20″ wheels keep the weight of this bike low to the ground
  • Low step design makes mounting, and resting with one foot very easy, this is especially helpful when hauling heavy loads
  • Super strong 500 watt motor and 48 volt battery combination
  • Large sized 15 amp hour battery will go 30+ miles
  • Ultra durable aluminum battery case is protected on all sides by rear rack
  • Internal hub gear can be shifted from standstill, helpful when hauling large loads
  • Solid Welgo pedals, high end Tektro ebike brake levers and quality fenders
  • Built in “cruise control” button allows twist-free riding over long distances
  • Plastic chain guard keeps pants clean and snag free, rear derailleur cage protects shifting mechanics
  • Wide gauge spokes and additional cross bar supports on frame support heavy loads up to 330 lbs (150 kg)

Cons:

  • Lower grade Lithium Manganese battery pack won’t get as many charge cycles as Lithium-ion but keeps the bike affordable
  • Only three gears available, work well enough but more limiting than other comparable bikes
  • Smaller wheels combined with thick tires make this bike more jarring when riding over bumps, no shocks but the soft wide seat helps some, consider a seat post shock absorber
  • Battery is meant to be left on the bike, cannot easily remove for charging
  • No computer console to show speed, distance or precise battery level, instead opts for a cheaper LED indecator
  • No pedal assist mode, must twist throttle or use cruise control
  • No lights included, must buy separately and power from separate sources
  • Wires are not run through the bicycle frame but do stay out of the way and are managed well enough

Resources:

Trusted Advertisers

More Juiced Bikes Reviews

Juiced Bikes CrossCurrent Review

  • MSRP: $ 1499.00
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

An affordably priced speed pedelec that's well balanced, not too heavy and available in three frame sizes for a good fit, you can also upgrade the battery size. Comes stock with a powerful 48 volt battery but lower 7.8 amp hours, uses a…...

Juiced Bikes ODK U500 V3 Review

  • MSRP: $ 1995.00
  • MODEL YEAR: 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016

A sturdy, high torque, cargo style electric bike with enormous range thanks to a 48 volt 15 amp hour battery pack with premium Panasonic Lithium-ion cells. Powerful 500 watt internally geared front hub motor by 8Fun, benefits from a smaller wheel…...

Angelo
3 years ago

How the heck can the "ride time" be 1.5 hours with a 48 volt 15 amp hour Lithium Manganese battery, yet the "range" is 35 to 40 miles? I know the road, wind and weight of the rider makes a difference but what a difference.

Court Rye
3 years ago

Hi Angelo! That's a great point and I bet the bike would actually go for upwards of two hours but since it's a cargo bike with smaller diameter wheels there are a couple of other factors to consider in there. It's got excellent torque but also weighs 70+ pounds without rider or cargo and honestly the range spec is more of an estimate. I'll try to get a more detailed response from the founder of Juiced. Thanks for chiming in!

Angelo
3 years ago

By the way. Great blog. I'm spend alot of time here tonight.

Steve Loar
2 years ago

On the Juiced site it says it's a 48v 22amp Panasonic Lithium battery that will get over 50 miles of travel. And the price is now $3199, which is not cheap. That's for the Version 3, this one must be the Version 2?

Court Rye
2 years ago

Yeah, they are constantly tweaking the models and V3 has even undergone some improvements and refinements since I reviewed it a while back :)

Dennis Figueroa
8 months ago

PLEASE try your best to review the Juiced Cross Current electric bicycle. New for 2016, Thank you, Dennis

Court Rye
8 months ago

Hi Dennis, it's definitely on the list and I'm speaking with a dealer about doing a review soon. Thanks for making the suggestion!

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

CafeRoaster
1 month ago
I know I'm resurrecting a dead topic, but this is a pretty dead subforum. ;)

We purchased two U500's in the winter. We live in Seattle, where we got about 11" of rainfall in our first month of riding. Also, we work downtown, which is a 328-ft. gain in less than a mile. Not too steep if you're constantly going uphill like on a mountain road, but when you consider that they're short city blocks, you could get an idea of how steep the hills are (a bunch of 5% grade blocks with 0% grade intersecting cross-streets). We've also taken it up 12% grades with a kiddo on the back.

This bike is very capable of winter riding. The only issue I've had with any sort of traction loss is if I stop at a stop sign that's just before the crest of a hill. So I either ride up further than the stop sign into the cross-walk, or go very slowly and not stop at all. At a hill like this on my way home from work, if it is raining, I like to stand over the handlebars. Never any traction issues with doing that.

Most important is maintenance. If your tires and brakes are in proper working order, you'll be fine. I actually deflated our front tires from 55 PSI to 30 PSI in order to gain a bit more traction. It did have a noticeable effect on the wear of the tire and the drain of the battery, but I decided that more traction was important.

As for the battery – remember, cold weather will drain your battery. I had a motorcycle that would die overnight every dang time. Then I started bringing the battery inside and leaving it on the tender.

If you have an outlet in your garage, that might help. Charging the battery generates heat. Contact the owner of Juiced. He's always willing to help and pretty quick to respond! tora AT juicedbikes.com
Bicyclista
2 months ago
I would have bought a Juiced CrossCurrent but for the fact that they do not carry a small frame size. Their headquarters is in Chula Vista, next to San Diego, so it would have been very convenient for me to pick it up there. I did try their U500 Utility Bike with 20-inch wheels. It was a lot of fun!

As it relates to Eddy, the original poster, the CrossCurrent has a moderately aggressive riding position (meaning you are leaning forward) whereas the U500 Utility Bike has an upright position (and you can carry stuff!). One could probably make the CrossCurrent upright with a taller stem and/or a different handlebar. Both are reasonably priced, the CrossCurrent at $1499 and the U500 at $1999.

http://www.juicedbikes.com
Cory151
2 months ago
(Im copying this from another post I responded to.)

I own an $8,000 Stromer ST2 and a $12,000 Stealth Bomber (the baddest production e-bike ever made). I have tried a GREAT many bikes on the market, so you may be surprised to learn that I consider the JUICED RIDER (the Honey Badger of Ebikes) to be the best all around ebikes that I know of. I own one, and even purchased one for my mother recently. I have grown to love the details of these bike more and more and has been these most reliable and durable bike in my collection.

http://shop.juicedbikes.com/collect...u500-january-2016-delivery?variant=9745066309
Cory151
2 months ago
I own an $8,000 Stromer ST2 and a $12,000 Stealth Bomber (the baddest production e-bike ever made). I have tried a GREAT many bikes on the market, so you may be surprised to learn that I consider the JUICED RIDER to be the best all around ebikes that I know of. I own one, and even purchased one for my mother recently. I have grown to love the details of these bike more and more.

http://shop.juicedbikes.com/collect...u500-january-2016-delivery?variant=9745066309
Ian
3 months ago
Stromer Bomber
I had about 1,550 miles on the clock and I charged it every time after I rode - so It must of been close to 600 charges. But since it was over the two year warranty period Stromer would not cut me a small break on a new battery so I paid full price on my new one.
Interesting - that seems like a really low number of miles to get on a battery before it goes bad. I just got my ODK U500 with a 32Ah battery a couple weeks ago. I am averaging about 20 miles a day so far - if I keep that average up over the two year warranty I'd get 14,600 miles before the warranty is up. I'm hoping the battery can last for at least 30,000 miles (about 700 charge cycles at 42 miles per charge). Replacement cost is $1,700 I believe, so that would be 5.6 cents per mile over the course of a battery's life. That's about the same as the price per mile in my car for gas interestingly.

At $1,700 replacement for a 1,536 Wh battery, that's $1,100 per kWh.
Ian
3 months ago
Gerald Scott
It seems that there is simply no battery out there capable of the kind of range I need. ... I would love to have an ebike with a 30 mile range, with no pedaling, even if I had to ride it at 5-7 mph. In fact, the slower you go, the more time you get to enjoy riding. I had very little trouble transitioning from a mountain bike, which I rode fairly aggressively, to a cruiser, which I rode in a very leisurely manner.
I would recommend a Juiced Bikes ODK U500 with the 32Ah battery. I have it and can do a 44 mile round trip commute on one charge at 17 mph average with lots of stops and end up with battery to spare. I am pedaling most of the time, but I could do the whole thing without pedaling if I wanted to (although I go on shared trails so I always pedal to blend in a bit better). You can go about 18-20 mph without pedaling and range is said to be up to 80 miles of fast riding.
Ian
3 months ago
Carmen Jiménez
Good morning mr. Court Rye,
I've read at: www.ebici.cat/news, that I can ask you (on your knowledge), may be the electric bike that best fits for my abilities. I would like to buy one.
- 60kg (132.27 pounds)
- 1'64m. (5.38 feet)
- Sportswoman (medium)
- For go from my house to my work (arroud 17km-10'56miles)
- Good health
- Little space for storage
- Asphalt road trip
- Economic but average/good quality
- I've never used one of these

THANK YOU SO MUCH :)
Carmen
I own a Juiced Bikes bicycle (ODK U500) and am a fan of the company. For you, I would recommend a Juiced Bikes Cross Current (likely with the 10ah battery) - you can check out check their website for more information on the bicycle - probably the medium size would work well for you. Email them at sales@juicedbikes.com to talk about shipping costs to Mallorca (in Spain?) Cost is $1,800 + shipping so it's quite economical. You can check out a thread about the bicycle here.

I chose the ODK U500 since I have a 44 mile (71km) round trip commute so I wanted the extra range and the ability to charge less often and leave the charger at the office.

Saludos de Minnesota, USA!
Ian
3 months ago
Probably not the kind of miles you're looking for, but I figured I'd kick the thread off anyways and wait for others to follow. I've done 250 miles in two weeks of ownership of my Juiced Bikes ODK U500, so far no repairs or maintenance. It has extra thick tires so hopefully won't have any flat issues there, and it has an internally geared hub so no cassette to worry about. The chain stays in a straight line with no derailleur so hopefully that lasts a long time.

The one intermittent issue I have experienced is a fussy throttle cable connection but that seems to be sorting itself out on its own.

Maybe I can provide updates at 1,000 mile intervals going forward. Cheers!
Ian
3 months ago
Hey Korvus,

Just wanted to chime in with my experiences and situation and see if it's any use to you in your e-bike quest. I have a perfectly good car but wanted to lower my carbon footprint as well as stop worrying about traffic for my commute, which is 22 miles one-way with a couple long, gradual hills. I was initially set on doing a conversion of a BikesDirect road/cyclocross bike but ended up going with a Juiced Riders ODK U500. Here are a few points that helped me convince the wife this was worth while - 1. I got rid of a motorcycle and replaced it with the ODK which is in theory safer, 2. The ODK with the 32ah battery can do my full commute round trip w/o recharging with very little pedaling effort, so I can do it even if I'm totally exhausted or not in the mood to exercise; this theory applies to all other trips and makes us more likely to use it 3. The frame geometry means my wife can ride it as well, which is a HUGE plus and makes the bike much more valuable to us as a couple, 4. It can carry enough cargo such that I can do the grocery shopping (and general shopping) with it. My wife can also use it for shopping if I'm not using it. 5. It comes with a 2 year warranty on everything- something a DIY setup generally lacks, 6. It's stress-tested and waterproofed - another thing a DIY setup can't ensure, 7. You actually get customer service so it feels like you're not doing it all on your own if you run into problems.

I've owned the bike for 11 days and have put 226 miles on it and haven't had any major issues. It is very heavy and a bit cumbersome when moving it indoors so if that's an issue you could look at the CrossCurrent offering that Juiced has that's sportier and lighter I really like Juiced because they have awesome customer support (founder and CEO Tora will reply to email questions the same day) and they only do two models, so they're very focused on making those the best possible value and success.

Just my .02!
David Elderton
4 months ago
Hi all, just a note to any Canadian cyclists out there interested in the CC or U500. Hill Eater E-Bikes is now the exclusive Juiced distributor for Canada. We have a small but growing number of bike shops carrying Juiced. The list can be found on our web site:

http://juicedriders.ca/canadian-dealers/

If you don't have a local dealer you can order directly from us through our website or by calling 250-538-0911. If you have a favorite shop, and they don't sell Juiced, please have them call us to set up a dealership. We will get you a referral bonus.
As of June 2016 we have stock of only XL CC in black or red, with the 7.8 ah battery, and only a few U500. We have a large shipment coming later in the summer, and the selection will be much better, please stay tuned.
mbirds
4 months ago
If you don't require folding, I'd consider the Juiced ODK. It also has a geared hub motor/20" wheel, more battery capacity, with a massive 400lb capacity. If I were your weight I would probably get the ODK.

http://shop.juicedbikes.com/collect...u500-january-2016-delivery?variant=9745115141
Ravi Kempaiah
4 months ago
Just a solid, well-built bike.
As of now, we have sold ~8 ODK U500's and not one problem. Tora's bikes mean business.
Jep
4 months ago
We've used 3 types of bike bags with the U500. We've used Koki UP1: http://www.decide2ride.com/products/up1. This is a single bag with clips, so you could fit 2, one on either side. However, one of our 3 U500's had a manufacturing issue with the bike rails: it was too far inward, so the clips couldn't reach the rails. It fit fine on the other 2 though. After 1 year of daily use (and probably overloading it) the clips broke, but I guess that's normal.

Then we used the Koki UP2, which is a Dutch style pannier with bags on both sides: http://www.decide2ride.com/products/up2. The first two worked great, although the velcro was a tiny bit short. However, when we bought the third one, the Velcro was a couple of inches shorter and it didn't fit anymore on the U500's oversize rack. So if you want to try this one, definitely try it out first.

Our most recent purchase is the A2B Dual XL bag, which is made by Basil: http://www.wearea2b.com/us/accessories . It is bigger and more solid than the Koki, also more expensive (about $120-130 if I remember correctly). I like these a lot, but we've only had them for a couple of weeks. These are easy to install.
Tora Harris
6 months ago
Fensus
I'm currently considering the Crosscurrent for this commuting route: https://goo.gl/maps/VuKbkiUxSL82 (just so you can see the distance and elevation change) but my issue is I will also be towing a child trailer with a 25 lb dog in it (I'm already 210 lbs). Do you think this bike with its 350w motor be able to handle that load?
A much better bike for this kind of job would be our ODK U500 Utility E-bike. Its has much more pulling power and larger payload capacity. On top of this the battery capacity is up to 4x greater.
Cory151
7 months ago
Tora Harris
Jim,

That is really good information about your usage.

With the Cycle Analyst, you will start to see many interesting things that are normally hidden from view on most all e-bikes.

The first thing is that we did not program the Cycle Satiator charger to charge the battery to 100% even in the "100%" mode. It is a bit conservative, but you can activate the hidden profile to "Max Charge" if you go on a road trip or something and you really need to get a few more miles out of the pack.

The other thing is that the motor controller is programmed to not let you squeeze every drop out of the pack. It is also somewhat conservative and ramps down the power so to not drop below around 42V.

For this type of lithium battery chemistry, avoiding the high and low voltage extremes is what has been found to be the most gentle way to use the pack.


The 32Ah pack uses more special cells and can technically be discharged to a lower voltage to squeeze out more power than the 23Ah pack's cells.

The 32Ah pack is such a radical product on the e-bike market and pushes the boundaries of what's available on a production e-bike vehicle at the moment. We try to find the right balance between good motor power, long riding range and overall battery lifespan. This is always 2nd to safety anyway.

We are still learning about what's possible and how people use the bike. One thing that seems constant: the riders will find a way to use any increase in performance that the new technology makes available.

To put it in perspective, most standard "cargo e-bikes" have only 8Ah to 13Ah and max out at 18Ah with pack upgrades!




About the range of any electric vehicle:

With the Cycle Analyst you just need to know 2 things to estimate the range of any e-bike.

1. How many Wh can you pull from the battery.
2. How many Wh you use to go 1 mile.

You can think of a Wh like a drop of gasoline. Wh (Watt-hour) is just Ah x Voltage, for the U500 just multiply by 48 Volts.

So, after riding several miles, flip to the Wh/mi screen. There will be a number like between 10 and 35. Let's say it is 25Wh/mi for fairly spirited riding.

That means that you used 25Wh to go 1 mile.
2 miles will cost you 50 Wh.
4 miles will cost you 100 Wh and so on.

The charged 32Ah pack can comfortably pull a solid 1,250-1,350 Wh (26-28Ah) from the pack without much stress.

So at 25Wh/mile your range:
1,250/25 = 50 miles
1,350/25 = 54 miles

That's decent range.



If you go slower and do average-ish pedaling you could see like 10-12 Wh/mile while still going about a good 15mph on the flats.

1,250/12 = 104 miles
1,350/12 = 112 miles

Not bad!
Even more range is possible but, I guess you could just turn the battery off and pedal the bike 900 miles, then turn it on for the last 100 miles to get 1000 mile range. So there are practical limits.




Many things will effect the range including, hills, wind, tire inflation pressure, riding position, payload, outside air temps, even little bumps in the road among many other things.

With a loaded payload and full throttle we can see numbers like 33-35Wh/mile even when pedaling.

1,250/35Wh = 35 miles
1,350/35Wh = 38 miles

It is what it is...

So you can see the range is highly variable, but at the end of the day it is all about how much energy you have aboard vs. your burn rate.



The range we state in the marketing material is the middle range without going super slow or whatever, but we now provide a table for the range of distances you can get out of the pack. Most range estimates we have seen on some marketing material are a little exaggerated, but oh well...

The U500 is not really optimized to squeeze out the maximum range. The tires, tubes and spokes are heavy duty. There are lots of robust parts that in the end, trade a little range for better reliability. With the ability to spec the largest pack out there, you can have the most useful e-bike ever.

Great job explaining the workings of the CA. Here are some shot of much less efficiency as I average 45-50 w/h per mile, with rarely aggressive riding.
View attachment 5234View attachment 5234View attachment 5235View attachment 5236View attachment 5237
Tora Harris
9 months ago
Jim,

That is really good information about your usage.

With the Cycle Analyst, you will start to see many interesting things that are normally hidden from view on most all e-bikes.

The first thing is that we did not program the Cycle Satiator charger to charge the battery to 100% even in the "100%" mode. It is a bit conservative, but you can activate the hidden profile to "Max Charge" if you go on a road trip or something and you really need to get a few more miles out of the pack.

The other thing is that the motor controller is programmed to not let you squeeze every drop out of the pack. It is also somewhat conservative and ramps down the power so to not drop below around 42V.

For this type of lithium battery chemistry, avoiding the high and low voltage extremes is what has been found to be the most gentle way to use the pack.


The 32Ah pack uses more special cells and can technically be discharged to a lower voltage to squeeze out more power than the 23Ah pack's cells.

The 32Ah pack is such a radical product on the e-bike market and pushes the boundaries of what's available on a production e-bike vehicle at the moment. We try to find the right balance between good motor power, long riding range and overall battery lifespan. This is always 2nd to safety anyway.

We are still learning about what's possible and how people use the bike. One thing that seems constant: the riders will find a way to use any increase in performance that the new technology makes available.

To put it in perspective, most standard "cargo e-bikes" have only 8Ah to 13Ah and max out at 18Ah with pack upgrades!




About the range of any electric vehicle:

With the Cycle Analyst you just need to know 2 things to estimate the range of any e-bike.

1. How many Wh can you pull from the battery.
2. How many Wh you use to go 1 mile.

You can think of a Wh like a drop of gasoline. Wh (Watt-hour) is just Ah x Voltage, for the U500 just multiply by 48 Volts.

So, after riding several miles, flip to the Wh/mi screen. There will be a number like between 10 and 35. Let's say it is 25Wh/mi for fairly spirited riding.

That means that you used 25Wh to go 1 mile.
2 miles will cost you 50 Wh.
4 miles will cost you 100 Wh and so on.

The charged 32Ah pack can comfortably pull a solid 1,250-1,350 Wh (26-28Ah) from the pack without much stress.

So at 25Wh/mile your range:
1,250/25 = 50 miles
1,350/25 = 54 miles

That's decent range.



If you go slower and do average-ish pedaling you could see like 10-12 Wh/mile while still going about a good 15mph on the flats.

1,250/12 = 104 miles
1,350/12 = 112 miles

Not bad!
Even more range is possible but, I guess you could just turn the battery off and pedal the bike 900 miles, then turn it on for the last 100 miles to get 1000 mile range. So there are practical limits.




Many things will effect the range including, hills, wind, tire inflation pressure, riding position, payload, outside air temps, even little bumps in the road among many other things.

With a loaded payload and full throttle we can see numbers like 33-35Wh/mile even when pedaling.

1,250/35Wh = 35 miles
1,350/35Wh = 38 miles

It is what it is...

So you can see the range is highly variable, but at the end of the day it is all about how much energy you have aboard vs. your burn rate.



The range we state in the marketing material is the middle range without going super slow or whatever, but we now provide a table for the range of distances you can get out of the pack. Most range estimates we have seen on some marketing material are a little exaggerated, but oh well...

The U500 is not really optimized to squeeze out the maximum range. The tires, tubes and spokes are heavy duty. There are lots of robust parts that in the end, trade a little range for better reliability. With the ability to spec the largest pack out there, you can have the most useful e-bike ever.
Jim W
11 months ago
Garden Gear
Hello everybody. I joined the forum a moment ago so I could more closely tap in to this brain trust. If available, I'll be buying an ODK V3 about the first week of December. I'll be pulling a trailer for my irrigation & gardening business... among other things.

I had a chance to test drive one last week after a month or so of comparing specs of other systems. After comparing, I'm astonished by the value this bike offers. SOLD! After running the numbers, a 23Ah ODK makes the most sense to me (Wh's per dollar spent).

I wonder how everyone here is using the drive train. Are most of you "twist and go" types? It took a few minutes into my test ride to figure out how to "pedal along" with the assist using the cruise control. Are most here shifting among the 3 internal gears or just leaving in high gear?

I know those are a lot of questions for a first post... sorry. But I do appreciate any and all replies. So glad I was directed here. Thank you all!

GG
Hi Garden Gear,

I'm impressed by your trailer. You're going to enjoy your new ODK when it arrives. I shift gears just as if I were using a manual stick in a car, so I'm constantly changing the gear ratio up and down, depending on the terrain. I have a lot of hills in my neighborhood. For me, I pedal and throttle while on level roads and while going uphill. Going downhill, I'll just pedal and throttle until the bike reaches a speed where the controller cuts off power to the motor. At that speed I can't keep up my pedaling cadence, so I just coast until I slow down enough to start pedaling and throttling again. In other words, anytime I'm throttling, I'm also pedaling, unless of course I'm just too plumb tuckered-out to pedal anymore.

I wish the ODK came with an additional two gears to shift into. I find that when I'm pedaling and throttling in third gear on a level street, I can maintain about a 95 rpm cadence, but if the road tilts downward ever so slightly, I can't keep up and have to depend solely on the throttle. With another two gears, I could easily get the bike's speed above the threshold where the controller cuts power to the motor, even on level surfaces. This translates into longer battery life per charge, and more exercise for my beer belly.

By the way, I promised the forum to look into the significance of the ODK designation assigned to our e-bikes. I got an e-mail response from Tora. Here's what he said:
"The ODK is the name of the platform. It is like the MQB platform for the car. For us it is the big battery and the utility frame with 20" wheels. We have lots of accessories for it and there is the U500 and other bike variations planned based on the same platform. We call the bike you have a "U500" sometimes we refer to them as 'Riders.' "​
Mr. Rabbit
1 year ago
I hope to get the 32Ah model, because I don't own a car anymore, and that model strikes me as a "true car replacement." I'm willing to wait until they're available up here in Portland, Oregon. I'm visualizing a black Juiced Riders ODK U500 V3 as hauling me and my tent camping gear out on some of our beautiful forest and meadowland bike trails to do some Fall camping! I'll let you know how it is.
George S.
2 years ago
http://bikecalculator.com/how.html

I think you are painting too bleak a picture. About 300 watts will get a 160 pound rider up to 20 mph or so on the flat. A 350 # rider will lose 3 mph. If you pedal moderately, you add 75 watts, so you'd go faster.

On a hill? Depends on the hill. Up a 7% grade the light rider goes 7 mph, the heavier one maybe 4 mph. But that's with 300 watts. A mid drive with a lower wattage motor will handle the hill, be less likely to overheat. But total climb does not equal the % grade. Moderate grades are relatively easy, especially short ones.

Bafang (8Fun BBS 02) needs to add a sensor for shifts, but there are people working on after-market solutions. The Nuvinci is not a total solution, and the older one is not rated for 750 watts.

Lots of watts and lots of weight would put lots of stress on wheels and spokes. The motor hub has to be reinforced to transfer torque to the frame elements of the bike.

This bike is designed for carrying cargo, with a huge battery:

http://www.juicedriders.com/storage/U500 ODK V3 Spec Sheet R20141031.pdf

Was looking for weight limit for a popular bike. This article mentions 250#

http://www.beste-bikereviews.com/best-cruiser-e-bike/
Peter Q
3 weeks ago

Whats better this or the Rad Wagon?

Chris Hvid
3 years ago

Pedal you fool! Is the gearing high enough at top speed?

Chris Hvid
3 years ago

Thanks...ebikes are HYBRID vehicles! Human power will help you live with a
smile! :-)

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Are you referencing Gandalf from Lord of the Rings... because if so, that's
awesome. To answer your question, the three speed internally geared hub
works alright at low and high speeds (top speed on this ebike with the
motor is 20mph). I didn't ride it at full speed a whole lot but your
cadence would probably be higher than if this were a seven speed ebike. The
gears are sort of middle-range. Sorry for the very qualitative answer
here... it has been a while since I rode this particular bike :)

LiveCheapAndProsper
3 years ago

Excellent review. Looks great bike.