Piaggio Wi-Bike Comfort Plus Review

Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Electric Bike Review
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Lasco Cranks 42 Tooth Belt Ring With Chain Protector
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus 37 Volt 11 6 Amp Hour Battery Pack
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Continental Lcd Display Panel Removable
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Stitched Grips Shimano M315 Hydraulic Brake Lever Bell
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Aluminum Alloy Tubular Fenders
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Nuvinci N360 Continuously Variable Transmission Hub
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Aluminum Alloy Rear Rack Adjustable Kickstand
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Lots Of Rear Reflectors And Supernova E3 Led Light
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Backlit Lcd Display Panel
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Connecting The Smartphone App With Bluetooth
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Smart Phone App Ebike Status Screen
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Smartphone App Standard Screen Speed
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Smartphone App Fitness Gps Screen
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Smartphone App Profile Setup
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Smartphone App Recommending Tire Pressure And Saddle Height
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus 4 Amp Ebike Battery Charger And Optional Axa Art Frame Lock
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Branded Axa Art 4001 Cafe Lock
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Electric Bike Charger 2 4 Lbs Fast 4 Amp Output
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Electric Bike Review
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Lasco Cranks 42 Tooth Belt Ring With Chain Protector
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus 37 Volt 11 6 Amp Hour Battery Pack
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Continental Lcd Display Panel Removable
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Stitched Grips Shimano M315 Hydraulic Brake Lever Bell
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Aluminum Alloy Tubular Fenders
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Nuvinci N360 Continuously Variable Transmission Hub
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Aluminum Alloy Rear Rack Adjustable Kickstand
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Lots Of Rear Reflectors And Supernova E3 Led Light
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Backlit Lcd Display Panel
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Connecting The Smartphone App With Bluetooth
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Smart Phone App Ebike Status Screen
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Smartphone App Standard Screen Speed
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Smartphone App Fitness Gps Screen
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Smartphone App Profile Setup
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Smartphone App Recommending Tire Pressure And Saddle Height
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus 4 Amp Ebike Battery Charger And Optional Axa Art Frame Lock
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Branded Axa Art 4001 Cafe Lock
Piaggio Wi Bike Comfort Plus Electric Bike Charger 2 4 Lbs Fast 4 Amp Output

Summary

  • A blend of active and comfort riding with unique drivetrain options such as a belt drive and continuously variably transmission from NuVinci or traditional 9-speed Shimano Deore derailleur
  • Available in two frame sizes and two frame styles (step-thru or high-step) as well as two colors, this bike will keep you clean with sturdy tubular fenders and a paint-matched chain cover
  • Excellent weight distribution but the bike does weigh a bit more at ~60 lbs if you get the NuVinci drivetrain, integrated lights and reflective tires keep you safe in low-light conditions
  • Premium leather saddle and stitched ergonomic grips, unique frame details including a fin at the back, angular battery casing, and smooth welds throughout, hydraulic disc brakes, GPS theft-recovery app, fantastic mobile app

Search EBR

Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Piaggio

Model:

Wi-Bike Comfort Plus

Price:

$3,699

Body Position:

Upright Relaxed

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Cruising

Electric Bike Class:

Pedal Assist (Class 1)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States, Italy, Netherlands, Germany, Spain, United Kingdom, France

Model Year:

20172018

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

60.5 lbs (27.44 kg)

Battery Weight:

6.1 lbs (2.76 kg)

Motor Weight:

9.9 lbs (4.49 kg)

Frame Material:

Aluminum Alloy, Hydroformed

Frame Sizes:

18.5 in (46.99 cm)19.7 in (50.03 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Medium 50 cm: 20" Seat Tube, 23" Reach, 17" Stand Over Height, 26.5" Width, 77" Length

Frame Types:

Step-Thru, High-Step

Frame Colors:

Gloss Black, Gloss Sabbia

Frame Fork Details:

Aluminum Alloy with Integrated Head-Tube Shock, 20 mm Travel, 100 mm Hub Spacing, 9 mm Security Lock Skewer

Frame Rear Details:

135 mm Hub Spacing, 10 mm Axle with Nuts

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

1 Speed 1x∞ NuVinci N360 Mechanical Continuously Variable Transmission, 22T Rear Sprocket

Shifter Details:

NuVinci N360 Half-Grip Shifter on Right

Cranks:

Lasco, Aluminum Alloy, 175 mm Arm Length, 42 Tooth Beltring

Pedals:

VP Aluminum Alloy with Rubber Tread

Headset:

FSA Threadless, Sealed Cartridge, Internal Cups, 1-1/8" Straight

Stem:

Aluminum Alloy, 100 mm, 17° Angle, 31.8 mm Clamp Diameter, Two 10 mm Spacers, One 5 mm Spacer

Handlebar:

Low-Rise, Swept Back, 660 mm Length

Brake Details:

Shimano M315 Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Front Rotor and 160 mm Rear Rotor, Dual-Piston Calipers, Two-Finger Leers with Adjustable Reach

Grips:

Ergonomic Leather, Locking, Brown

Saddle:

Velo Active, Leather, Brown

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

340 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

31.6 mm

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy, Double Wall, Deep V Design, 36 Hole, Polished Silver

Spokes:

Stainless Steel,14 Gauge Front and 13 Gauge Rear, Black with Adjustable Nipples

Tire Brand:

Continental TourRide, 28" x 1.6" (42 x 622)

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

Reflective Sidewall Stripe, Puncture Resistant, 65 PSI, 4.5 BAR

Tube Details:

Presta Valve

Accessories:

Proprietary Aluminum Alloy Rear Rack (Gloss Black), Proprietary Aluminum Alloy Tubular Fenders (45 mm Width), AXA Nano50 Integrated LED Headlight (40 Lux), Supernova E3 Integrated LED Backlight, Paint-Matched Plastic Chain Cover, Flick Bell on Right, Water Resistant Small Canvas Backpack for Charger, Optional Piaggio Branded AXA ART 4001 Cafe Lock

Other:

IP67 Rated Electronics (Highly Water Resistant), Locking Removable Seat Tube Mounted Battery Pack, 2.4 lb 4 Amp Battery Charger, Multi-Language User Manual

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Piaggio

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

350 watts

Motor Peak Output:

500 watts

Motor Torque:

60 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung

Battery Voltage:

37 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11.6 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

417.6 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

3.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

35 miles (56 km)

Estimated Max Range:

75 miles (121 km)

Display Type:

Continental, Removable, Backlit, Greyscale, LCD

Readouts:

Battery Level (5 Bars), Clock, Speed, Assist Level (Off, Eco, Tour, Power), Infographic Gear (Human and Motor), Range, Battery Percentage, Odometer, Trip, Max Speed, Avg Speed, Watt Hours, Watt Hours Per Mile, Timer, Settings

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad, USB Type A 2.0 Female Plug 5 Volt 0.5 Amp, Bluetooth Smartphone App and Diagnostics

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (Rear Wheel Speed, Pedal Rate, Left-Pedal Torque, Pedal Acceleration)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

I’m most familiar with the Piaggio company because of their gas powered Vespa scooters, which were launched in 1946… but the parent company is actually older than that! dating all the way back to 1884. Their latest product offering is a line of electric bicycles called Wi-Bike. The Comfort models, that I’m focusing on with this review, offer Class-1 performance with up to 20 mph pedal-assisted speeds that are activated with advanced pedal sensors. The bikes feel smooth, stable, and efficient to pedal. The video review above shows several different models but I focused in on the Comfort Plus, which offers a clean, quiet, belt drive and continuously variable transmission hub from NuVinci that can be shifted at standstill for $3,699 vs. the stock Comfort model which uses a still-good Shimano Deore 9-speed derailleur and traditional chain for $3,099. The cheaper model opts for a full sized suspension fork and suspension seat post vs. the clean integrated monoshock with paint-matched fork on the Plus model. For riders like myself who appreciate style but also want the comfort of that suspension post, and don’t mind riding with the saddle raised up at least three inches from the seat post clamp, you can always buy your own 31.6 mm suspension post online like this to match the dual-suspension feel of the standard Comfort model. In my opinion, what sets the Wi-Bikes apart from other electric bike products I have seen in the market recently is their style, premium accessories (like tubular alloy fenders, integrated lights, and color-matched chain guard and battery casing), along with the service you will get from Vespa dealers who will begin carrying the bikes in 2017/2018. Just like most other high-end ebike brands, the Wi-Bike products come with a two year comprehensive warranty and there’s a line of optional accessories like bags and locks. During the ride test portion of my review, I was impressed with the even weight distribution across the frame, but also how open the step-thru model was without suffering too much from frame flex. And, I love that they offer both tan and black color options for the step-thru for a more gender neutral look. The black spokes, deep-dish rims, creme colored tires, and leather touch points make it look and feel more like a Vespa than a bicycle, and I was amazed at how many features were built into the optional smartphone app. The bike has GPS tracking and alerts built in, so you can rest easy that your investment is safe at the rack during work… or at least, somewhat findable if it gets stolen. This service is included free for the first two years but then costs something like $35/yr which seems very reasonable to me. Helping with this review was a gentleman named Andrew, from Vespa Brooklyn, who was dressed very nicely in a long sleeve shirt. He talked about riding the bike to work without getting sweaty but then switching to workout mode on the way home, syncing a heart rate monitor, and getting a great exercise while commuting. It’s a neat concept, but very few e-bikes offer heart rate monitor integration natively like the Wi-Bike. Also helping was the Wi-Bike Project Lead for North America, Larry Ferracci, and my friend Chris Nolte from Propel bikes (a competing ebike-only shop in Brooklyn). I tried to be comprehensive with the specs, measurements, and ride tests which are all available as part of this review.

Driving the bike is a 350 watt nominally rated mid-drive motor that has been designed, developed and produced by Piaggio which has been producing motors for over 100. For people who live in Europe and have access to the Wi-Bike line, the motor may be rated at 250 watts to comply with local legislation. This thing measures rear wheel speed, pedal speed, pedal cadence, and pedal torque to provide a responsive and natural feel. It can produce up to 60 Newton meters of torque, which is about average for mid-drives, and it weighs 9.9 lbs. I found that the motor started and stopped with a bit of delay that helped smooth the ride out vs. feeling zippy and sporty. You can see the chainring spin down slowly after I stop pedaling in the video, and you can hear the high-pitched electronic whir soften as I pedal slower and when we were not climbing or going so fast. I did not have difficulty climbing hills but found that in order to reach the maximum assisted speed, I did have to shift up into a higher gear, and I rode mostly in the lower gears because the chainring is fairly large with 42 teeth up front. Shifting gears with the NuVinci N360 grip-shifter requires a bit more strength and grip than the triggers, but it feels smoother. The motor on this bike does not have shift detection and if you were pedaling hard in the highest level of assist (perhaps while climbing) and tried to shift down, it would mash and bang a bit, causing wear on the drivetrain. So, while the NuVinci is heavier and more expensive, it does seem very durable and easy to use. My favorite part about the motor is actually how hidden it is. Piaggio has done a great job matching the plastic covers and protectors around the motor and battery to make it stealthy.

Powering the bike is a 37 volt 11.6 amp hour battery pack mounted just behind the seat tube. I would call the 417.6 watt hour capacity somewhat average for the 2018 timeframe, where many products are hitting the 500 watt hour mark without being any heavier. The pack itself weighs about 6.1 pounds and can be charged on or off the frame. The charge port cover has a spring built in and works very well, there’s much less screwing around with a dirty rubber flap like on other bikes. If you decide to remove the battery for safe keeping or more convenient charging, there’s a large comfortable handle built into the top. The battery locks onto the bike frame using a trusted AXA locking core and then tips out to the left when being removed. I think it would be neat if AXA offered a keyed-alike program for this lock so that you could match it to the optional cafe lock or other folding/u-lock accessories. As it stands, you may end up dealing with several unique keys. In closing, the battery gets the job done and its capacity will be spent efficiently if you shift gears thoughtfully. Mid-drive motors are frequently praised for their ability to go further with the same energy… and while I could not range test the bike during this review, I have no reason to think that it would not be comparable or even better than the zippy Bosch Performance Line motor which is rated very similarly in terms of specs with 63 Nm of torque and 250 to 500 watts output. I do wonder how the plastic casing around the battery pack works, and if it can be transferred to a different battery pack if/when it starts to run low and requires replacement after several years of continuous use? That could increase the price and complexity of replacement, but if you store the pack in a cool-dry location and keep it at ~50% capacity when not in use, it should hold up very well over the long term.

Operating this electric bike is potentially more involved than other products, but that’s only because it provides so many cool features… and you don’t have to use them if you don’t want to. The included LCD display is removable, backlit, and easy to activate. Just press the power button on the control pad near the left grip and then cycle through the three levels of assist, watch as the speedometer changes, keep track of your battery capacity, and keep an eye on the gear info-graphic which communicates motor power and rider power back to back, so you can see how much the bike is helping. The Mode key lets you cycle through trip stats, and if you arrow down to no-assist you can then hold walk mode and the bike will push itself slowly (great, considering the heavier weight). If you hold the mode key on the display, you can enable bluetooth in the settings menu and connect your Android or iOS smartphone using the Wi-Bike App. This is where the real fun begins! Rather than just three levels of assist, the app provides ten power steps and four different ride modes including Fitness, which can sync with a heartrate monitor (as mentioned earlier). The app also lets you create a profile, will recommend tire pressure and saddle height based on your body specs, and can even do GPS route planning and remember you “home” to make it easy to get around. I love that the app has a battery percentage readout as well as the five-bar infographic to really let you track and plan rides, and avoid getting stranded. But again, the bike charges pretty quickly with the four-Amp charger, it’s just a little bulky and heavy compared to some others I have seen. Sometimes it’s nice to just have a simple display to work with and other times it can be fun to geek out and dial the settings in. I like that you can completely remove the stock display and use your phone as both the key fob and settings adjuster for the bike. This entire system feels more like an automobile or just a premium scooter to me and that helps to justify the higher price point.

All things considered, I really enjoyed the Wi-Bike Comfort Plus. It offers the unique belt drive + CVT combination which is smooth and durable. The motor seems like a good fit in terms of performance and stability while also being durable and efficient. I like all of the integrated accessories, especially the lights, and am a big fan of hydraulic disc brakes… so that’s nice to see as well. Performance was good, style was great, and the app was fantastic. Depending on your needs and tastes, this could be a great bike to consider. There is room for improvement with the addition of bottle cage bosses, and maybe some settings to make the motor more responsive or quieter, but it’s on-par with most of the other mid motors in that respect. I feel that 9-speed Shimano Deore version of standard Comfort (vs. the Comfort Plus) would be lighter, shift quicker, and be more comfortable for commuting on bumpy streets because the suspension travel is longer and the seat post suspension comes stock. I would probably opt for the step-thru frame because it felt stiff but was easy to mount and would just work better if the rack was all loaded up with bags. Big thanks to Vespa Brooklyn and the Piaggio team for meeting me with several bikes and partnering with me on this post. They helped to pay for my travel and accommodations to make this review possible and provided support in figuring out all of the technical nuances of the app.

Pros:

  • The design is refined and polished, note the color-matched suspension fork and plastic chain cover, the sweeping angular points on the battery surround and rack mounting point behind the seat tube, the flowing hydroformed tubing and smooth welds throughout
  • Feature complete with sturdy tubular alloy fenders, integrated LED lights, and a sturdy rear rack setup for trunk bags or side bag panniers
  • Comfortable but efficient, the leather ergonomic grips and swept-back handlebar provide a more upright riding position but the hybrid tires and leather saddle are comfortable to pedal with, the components seemed like high quality that would last
  • Hydraulic disc brakes from Shimano provide good stopping power, note the larger front rotor, it’s good to have this sort of brake setup because the bike is a bit heavier than average at ~60 lbs (in part because of the NuVinci CVT drivetrain on the bike I reviewed)
  • Battery and motor weight is positioned low and center for improved handling and stability but the wave style step-thru frame is still open and accessible, it’s not quite as stiff as the optional diamond high-step frame
  • If you opt for the Belt drive and NuVinci continuously variable transmission (CVT) the bike will be super clean and quiet, you can shift at standstill without worrying about any sort of mashing (as you would with a traditional derailleur and chain) but the NuVinci does add some weight
  • Both the battery and display panel can be removed easily, this could allow you to keep them protected from harsh weather or a rough bike rack (the display acts as a key-fob so the bike cannot be moved without it), and the removability also makes the battery easier to charge if you’re commuting and there aren’t plugs near the rack or you cannot bring the bike inside
  • It’s neat that Piaggio has created an app to let you plan routes, get diagnostics, and even learn how to set your tire pressure and seat height but you don’t need to use this if you prefer to rely on the display only, one other cool feature is GPS tracking to help recover bikes if they get stolen and Piaggio offers two years of free data with the purchase as I understand it
  • Available in two frame sizes, 47 cm and 50 cm, as well as two frame styles, step-thru and high-step, so you can really dial in fit, there are also two colors (black and tan)
  • In addition to the lights, this bike had plenty of plastic reflectors and a reflective sidewall stripe painted onto the tires to increase your visual footprint and be safer in dark riding conditions
  • Piaggio sells a branded line of accessories, such as the trunk bag, so you can maintain the beautiful look and consistency across the bike, the trunk bag had some reflective fabric on it as well as zip-down panniers on both sides
  • I believe that the Wi-Bikes are only sold through dealers, but it appears that Vespa has a large network of dealers so finding and test riding the product could be easier, as well as getting help with the two-year warranty should something go wrong
  • The motor is custom made for Piaggio but seemed very high quality (comparable to the Yamaha or Bosch Active Line motors in terms of build and performance for me), it measures four signals including rear wheel speed, pedal cadence, pedal speed, and pedal torque for fluid operation
  • The charging port is located low on the left side of the frame, near the left crank arm, and has a loaded cover to keep the port clean, it’s color-matched and just works great… just be careful not to bump the charging plug by moving the bike backwards when it’s plugged in or that could bend the connector or get snagged
  • The bell that comes included seems one step up in terms of quality and the control pad used to interact with the display is also upgraded and appears to be almost completely sealed against water and dust
  • The mount for the display has a full sized USB Type A female port built in so you can charge portable electronics and maybe keep your phone full while using the app and riding

Cons:

  • Minor complaint here, the headlight on both the standard Comfort and Comfort Plus model is mounted to the moving portion of the suspension fork vs. being “sprung” and mounted to the head tube or handlebar, this design choice keeps the cockpit more clean and the light seemed like a high-quality part, but it might bounce around more being unsprung the way it is mounted
  • The motor casing is larger than many of the other mid-motors I have seen and test ridden, the motor itself weighs more at ~9.9 lbs vs. 6.61 lbs for the Brose Drive T and 8.8 lbs for the Bosch Performance Line
  • It looks like they thought of everything, except for bottle cage bosses, even on the high-step frame! That’s a bummer because sometimes I like to ride without bags or a backpack but want to bring some fluids to drink or maybe a folding lock and there’s nowhere to mount that here by default, you might have to use an aftermarket adapter and those just aren’t as sturdy or good looking
  • It’s neat that the skewers use this security key vs. quick release so that the bike can be used for commuting without as much potential for theft… but don’t lose that key or you could struggle to fix a flat on the go, also, I wish they offered the AXA frame lock option keyed-alike so that you didn’t have to use two sets of keys if you plan on locking the bike frequently that way, or even three sets of keys if you also get a u-lock or cable lock to be very secure
  • The battery charger is heavier and larger than average, but I’d estimate that it does offer about double the charging speed because it puts out 4 Amps vs. 2 Amps on most generic chargers I see
  • The motor feels more subtle, it doesn’t engage as instantly when you first begin pedaling and it doesn’t spin down as quickly as some alternative drive systems I have tried, it’s a relaxed experience vs. sporty and zippy in my opinion
  • This bike is a bit longer, and seems to have a longer wheel base which makes it more flowy vs. snappy and nimble, it felt stable to me but I just wanted to call this out because shorter chainstays seem to be desireable for some riders and this bike might not fit as easily in confined spaces

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Joseph Green
5 days ago

Kenny - We have one in the shop that I have ridden several times. My initial thoughts are: Compact bike made to fit a variety of riders. It rides like a full size bike due to the stiff frame and wider tires and it's a lot of fun and very easy to handle making it great for urban environments.

Let me know if I can answer any questions.

Chris, I really like the comfort and versatility of the Tinker. I have a few questions about configuring the Tinker:
1) Ideally i'd like more seatpost suspension combined with an original Tinker seatpost: Can R&M fit it with a Cane Creek Thudbuster LT instead of an ST, or even a Body Float? I know they don't show those options online, but maybe you have inside info. I'd prefer not to use shims, and to get the adjustment tick marks and the full range of height adjustments of the original unsuspended seatpost.
2) Is R&M's CCT ST seatpost just as long as their unsuspended seatpost? I'm 6'6" and the Tinker felt comfortable only at the highest unsuspended seatpost setting. My wife is much shorter, so I'm also wondering if the ST adds to the minimum seat height (maybe not since I think the unsuspended seatpost doesn't go all the way down either)?
3) Are there any pneumatic suspension fork options (from R&M or Propel)? Seems like this should be an option for a ~$5k ebike.

Thank you!
Joe

Ann M.
6 days ago

Named after the historic Junto Club started by Benjamin Franklin a couple of hundred years ago, the Junto Gen1 electric bike is an incredibly well thought out design at a very reasonable price, $2,200. Designed for all around city riding, the bottom bracket, headset & hub bearings are all sealed, so you're not going to get road grit & water out of the bearings. Junto chose a very high torque 350 watt geared Bafang motor and a larger 48V 11ah lithium pack for better range & overall lighter weight. With the weight balanced a little to the front, you have more positive steering and quicker reaction, much like a better made mountain bike and offsetting the weight of the rear hub motor. Note too the reinforced eyelets on these wheels; a much stronger build. And with Junto's focus on just one model right now, the bike is built to be upgraded without a lot of problems. I'm looking forward to an opportunity to test one of these bikes soon! Check out Court's review for all the details.

https://electricbikereview.com/junto/... The Junto Gen 1 is a sporty, responsive, urban style electric bike with 29er wheels and higher volume tires that create stability and add comfort, available in three frame sizes and two color options. All-aluminum frame is purpose built for ebike applications with a suspension-corrected geometry so you can add a 100 mm suspension fork aftermarket, tapered head tube and 15 mm thru axle. Excellent 11-speed Shimano SLX drivetrain with Shadow Plus clutch, wider 25 mm rims with reinforcement eyelets and thicker 13 gauge spokes in the rear to support the 350 watt geared motor. Simple display only shows battery level and 1-5 assist, the blue LED's can be annoyingly bright in dark ride conditions, nice locking ergonomic grips, gel saddle, and alloy platform pedals, hydraulic 180 mm disc brakes with motor inhibitors.

flipper
7 days ago

So i have a one-day chance to buy a lightly used Yuba Spicy curry Bosch, which retails for like 4500, I think, but I can get it for 2575. The other option is the Radwagon, on sale for $1349, which is 200 off the normal price. Price diff is $1200, in favor of the Rad. That said, which do you think would be the better bet for me, given that:

-- I'll be going up some pretty steep hills.
-- I need a bike that's very easy to step through. looks like the Yuba might be better on this front, though I don't know for sure.
-- I need as much stability as possible, especially since I plan to carry my 20 lbs dog on the front or the back.
-- the Yuba weighs around 60 lb, the Radwagon about 71 lbs. How much real world difference does that 10 lbs diff make to ease of handling?
-- and so forth.

What say ya'll? I know this topic has come up before, with the Radwagon given the nod by most people. Then again, there weren't many Yuba riders around at that time, and the price for the Yuba was 4500 not 2575. Sure, I'd love to save $1,200 but maybe the Yuba, with the mid Bosch motor, is that much much better.

Thanks for any thoughts you might have!

late contender that I don't know much about: Ariel c class cargo bike. retails for $2200 but if I drive 3 hrs north, i can get a lightly used one for $1220. this one can go up to 30mph w 500watt motor. wow. https://www.amazon.com/Ariel-Rider-C-Class-Electric-Cargo/dp/B06WD13GK8 . weight is 72 lbs. it's a very good looking bike, imo, and comes with a nifty bamboo basket on the front.
https://www.arielrider.com/product/c-class-comfort-ebike/#pod-system--power-on-demand-

I dunno. But at the very least I have to decide on the Yuba by later today or it'll be gone.

halp!

Ed P
1 week ago

I've been pedaling a non-electric, crank -forward Fuji for years, but age is catching up with me. The geometry that allows me to place my feet firmly on the ground when needed is even more important to me now in my early eighties. I need an electric version. What category do these bikes fall in? EBR doesn't seem to make it clear. Is it "cruiser" or "comfort" or something else?
And which electric bikes have this geometry? The only one I've found is the Electra Townie Go, which is actually higher adjusted for me than it should be - not really a "flat foot" in my opinion, and has fatter tires than I like for pedaling. Are there other electric bikes out there with the crank-forward geometry?
Any help will be much appreciated. Thanks.
I, too, have loved my non-electric, crank-forward, step-thru bike (RANS Fusion) for the past 10 years here in somewhat hilly Washington, DC; 10 months ago I brought it to the flat, Delaware shore and finally decided on a a step-thru e-bike (Kalkhoff Include 8) for use here and have been very pleased.

e-boy
1 week ago
WilliamT
2 weeks ago

Hi,

I want to ask you lot about what how you protect your beautiful face and head in bad weather, aka in rain, very windy, cold and snowy weather.

I live in east coast, US. It is cold now and there will eventually be snow.

From what I gather bike riders have very little in the form of comfort and functional products that are useful for more than one area of your head.
Most helmets provide protection for you head, but cannot provide cover or, insulation in cold winds or, rain/snow.
Additional items that can help are extra add-ons that are annoying because, they add the problem of storage, use and time to put on and off. They also do no go perfectly with each other, so you have to make them fit with a helmet that should be snug to work perperly.
They are:
Sunglasses for your eyes,
Rain covers for helmets,
Winter ear muffs,
Scarfs for protecting your neck and mouth,
Balaclava,
Pollution filtering mask,
etc.

I find it very odd that they are not many bike helmets with visors, at least on "e-bike helmets".

IMO, a helmet with a good, long visor that is fog-free will provide adequate protection from wind and rain to your face that would perform multiple functions with one equipment.
Throw in a set of ear muffs and scarf and you are set.

What options have you found to solve the problem of jig-sawing things to your face and head to protect it from weather?

Cheers!
Thank you for your answers!

There are the things I recommend:

- ski helmet that has vents allow airflow and the ability to close for rain
- neoprene face mask
- neoprene skull cap
- bar mitts (docooler sells the similar mitts for under $20 on Amazon)
- waterproof jacket/waterproof pants. Just get them on clearance at REI
- waterproof shoes one size up to accommodate thick wool socks. Rockports sells waterproof shoes that work well for freezing temps.
- lightweight googles to keep eyes from drying out in winter.
- different layers of fleece jackets to put under the waterproof jacket.
- fleece gym pants to wear under the waterproof pants. (most discount stores carry these cheap)

I've also used neoprene overshoes and they work well over bike shoes, but they are a pain to put on and off.
I've also tried different waterproof overshoes and they work with light rains but not for heavy rains.

I have gloves that are made to handle 30F temperatures. These + bar mitts work for the coldest temperatures.

On occasion I use electric glove liners which keep you very warm but they are pretty expensive ($200-$300)
They work great and keep you hands very warm even in single digit temperatures.

I have these electric glove liners which also work with 12v batteries you can get at Home Depot for power tools.
(These gloves work great) http://powerinmotion.ca/Products/Heated-Wear

RCG
2 weeks ago

When purchasing a new electric bike, it seems that the number of years that the company has been in business is not fully appreciated. I'm as excited as the next person when you see the next cool project by Indiegogo or others but I don't think people appreciate how many companies go out of business. If you have to wait six months for your bike, after a number of broken promises, just think how long a spare part will take you. Or what are the ramifications of the company going completely under?

The weighting of each category is as important as the consideration themselves. Quality, Cost, Comfort, Components, Style, Manufacturer, Bike Shop (Web Purchase), Assembly Required, Warranty and Ease of Doing Business.

I will tell you in three years how I did...

1/1
Leandro
2 weeks ago

The Nevo frame is a couple of pounds heavier than most low-step/wave frame bikes on the market and for good reason. The frame is a bit more burly and robust to keep the frame rigid. Speed wobbles is less of a concern on this bike versus any other low-step/wave frame bike that I have ridden.

Riese & Muller states that the reason for the weight of most of the bikes in their line-up is too add comfort. They worry less about efficiency since the motor can do some of the work for you.

Parker Grissom
2 weeks ago

I just started working for a company that sells multiple e bikes and I am making a trifold brochure that I will be handing out and posting all over north carolina (mainly western mountain cities). I am using a 1 to 10 (terrible to amazing) grading scale to help an average person who has no e bike knowledge understand the value of each e bike. I am going to be grading:
Seat Comfort
Storage (rack) Space
Battery Life (range)
Top Speed
Suspension
Gear Options
Tire Size
Weight
Style
Acceleration
Toughness
Overall Bang for your buck

Here is the companies I will be showing.

AMP Electric Bicycles
Easy Motion Electric Bikes by BH
Magnum Bike
Pedego Electric Bikes
Leisger Bikes
Surface 604 Bikes

Here is our website. http://www.gerhardtcycles.com/home.html.
Please look at our bikes and post your grade for each of these models that you have or experienced. Any feedback is appreciated.

Thanks in Advance,
Parker G

PCDoctorUSA
2 weeks ago

I've looked at both for my first ebike (waiting on Santa now), and if I had to pull the trigger on one today it would be the Yukon 750 Limited (includes rack and fenders). For one, I prefer the Yukon's aesthetics over the Rad Rover when it comes to the controller and battery setup. A fat tire bike commands enough attention with its tires alone, and the Rad Rover's battery back just screams, "I'm electric!" Not a bad thing if trail riding, but not something you necessarily want when commuting in a community with restrictive ebike laws.

As I've been following one of the Yukon 750 threads, I've seen Voltbike respond to riders' input by making improvements to the bike. I haven't read any of the Rad forums so I would recommend checking to see if they are as responsive. Price-wise, both bikes are comparable, but when I posed the question about shipping to Honolulu (both companies ship from the West Coast) Rad Bikes wanted $400 while Voltbike only charged $120. My shipping question and any others I had were responded to within one business day by both companies.

DIY-ing an electric bike is definitely out of my comfort zone, but there are quite a few riders here that could speak to that option. I think the best perk with doing a DIY bike is you get to choose which components to use instead of settling for a vendor's package. Best of luck on your endeavor!

TntE3+
2 weeks ago

Oh the 35 mm stem takes a few miles to get used to once your comfortable with the stock stem.
But the bike is so much more agile and feels 10lbs lighter with the short stem.
Also really helps on chunky drops the bike pushes through better. 180 berms the bike is much faster and more balanced, square edge drops the bike floats off and you don’t feel the need to rub you butt on rear tire to keep the front from dropping out on you.
The company i ride with are very accomplished riders on Evil wreckoning and Santa Cruz. High tower LT.
both 9k plus builds and when the trail is chunky, steep and fast the Fs3 gives them all they can handle and when it gets chattery machine gun arm rough the 50lbs monster shines and they can’t match the speed.
18 KOM on strava now with the Fs3 on lagit enduro trails that put a pucker factor on most seasoned of riders.
I went from hating this bike stock and took it back to bike shop asked them to sell it because there was no data available to set it up. To completely blown away and it was less then 400 invested in mods.
Dropper seat, 35mm riser bars, grid tires, 35mm stem, 160mm air rod, 203mm rotors, 1 air token front, 3 shock tokens rear.
The monarch rear shock is the biggest limit and keeps big air out of this bikes comfort Zone, But i take this bike on any chair lift DH run and feel solid.

Mark Peralta
3 weeks ago

Giant 2018 Road-E+ - Range 100 mile
Yes, I just rode 100 miles on one battery charge.

The Bike - 2018 Road-E+. Yamaha 500WH. Set up with Schwalbe Marathon Plus tires. 700*38C.
Great tire last set road 10,000 miles with no flats.

Bike set up for touring and comfort. Cain Creek Thudbuster seat post, Brooks B17 saddle. Rear rack. Arkel Handlebar bag, Arkel Tailrider trunk bag and 2 Arkel rear panniers.
Myself - I’m 68, 140 pounds, been riding normal bike my whole like, enjoy riding the Pacific Coast from San Francisco to Orange County Ca. Now ride about 5,000 miles yearly.

Goal with E-Bike. Take the pain out of touring. Ride 100+ miles per day and not feel dead at the end of each day. Would like the E-Bike to provide small amount of assistance and have power to help get over the hills. Increase MPH average by 20%. Range at least 150 miles per day.

I have been looking and reading about E-Bikes for 2 years and not encouraged by post that state the ranges are 20-50 miles. But the LBS owner assured me she is getting 80+ miles from a battery and offered to let me use her Giant E-bike for a couple days. I did and riding 60+ miles with ease on 50% battery, I decided to purchase one. I’m so happy I did.

Special thanks to Kristen (LBS owner) at Pure Ride Cycles in Lake Forrest Ca.

The trip- One Day from Port Hueneme Ca to Mission Viejo. 125 miles. It was really a two day trip. I road the train from MV to Santa Barbara, road the first day from Santa Barbara to PH and spent night in hotel. I’m not counting that first day mileage in this story. I carry two days of clothing, an extra Battery ( yes, I plan to carry a second battery on long trips), food, water, tools, etc. The total extra weight is about 30 pounds.

So the goal was to cover 125 miles along the coast in 1 day and, achieve 100 miles from 1 battery, increase average MPH by 20% and reduce overall time by 2 hours. I do this trip 2-3 times a year on normal bike. My average on normal bike is 12 mph at the end of the day and 13 hours elapsed time. To average 12 mph you spend a lot of time at 16 mph, you lose MPH with the rolling hills and stop and go areas along the route.

The route- Yesterday was strong headwinds from Redondo Beach to Laguna Beach. Usually these are tailwinds. Huntington Beach was hosting the Airshow with Blue Angels and about a million people show up for this, slow going thru this area. The rest of the route was perfect.

Well I did it, battery down to 2% at 100 mile mark. Average speed up to 14.5 (2 mph increase). Change batteries at 100 miles and flew the last 25 miles. Total trip was 11 hours 15 minutes.

How- The Giant Road-E has 3 power settings Eco, Normal and power. I’ll refer to them as level 1,2 and 3. My plan was to stay in level 1 for 85% of the time, using level 2 for hills and headwinds and never use level 3.

And that is how I achieved the 100 miles on 1 battery. So the Road-E meets my goal for multi day touring. I plan to Tour the Pacific Coast this summer. Hopefully CalTrans is able to repair and reopen Coast Highway in California by then. 100 miles on a battery is achievable!
Average 14.5 mph (23 kph) is about right. That's about as fast as a seasoned cyclist on a century ride. One hundred miles was achieved using 500wh battery at the average speed of 14.5 mph or ride time of 6.9 hours. The battery consumption was a very very impressive 5 wh/mile. The average battery's output was 72.5 watts (500/6.9). Factoring in the actual motor efficiency of about 80% (electrical energy conversion to mechanical energy), that's about 58 watts to the wheels..Comparing the calculated value to the existing plotted value, it appears to be in the ball park. As you can see, the motor's power (at low setting) is barely enough to overcome the aerodynamic resistance but you still have to overcome the rolling resistance. And that's where rider's effort comes into play to achieve the speed and mileage.

https://www.sciencelearn.org.nz/images/1658-power-needed-to-counter-aerodynamic-drag-and-rolling-resistance
That is the advantage of having a small motor (250 watt nominal) since it can still operate at optimum efficiency even at the low end of the power band (72 watts).

1/1
SENIOR WOTH
3 weeks ago

Giant 2018 Road-E+ - Range 100 mile
Yes, I just rode 100 miles on one battery charge.

The Bike - 2018 Road-E+. Yamaha 500WH. Set up with Schwalbe Marathon Plus tires. 700*38C.
Great tire last set road 10,000 miles with no flats.

Bike set up for touring and comfort. Cain Creek Thudbuster seat post, Brooks B17 saddle. Rear rack. Arkel Handlebar bag, Arkel Tailrider trunk bag and 2 Arkel rear panniers.
Myself - I’m 68, 140 pounds, been riding normal bike my whole like, enjoy riding the Pacific Coast from San Francisco to Orange County Ca. Now ride about 5,000 miles yearly.

Goal with E-Bike. Take the pain out of touring. Ride 100+ miles per day and not feel dead at the end of each day. Would like the E-Bike to provide small amount of assistance and have power to help get over the hills. Increase MPH average by 20%. Range at least 150 miles per day.

I have been looking and reading about E-Bikes for 2 years and not encouraged by post that state the ranges are 20-50 miles. But the LBS owner assured me she is getting 80+ miles from a battery and offered to let me use her Giant E-bike for a couple days. I did and riding 60+ miles with ease on 50% battery, I decided to purchase one. I’m so happy I did.

Special thanks to Kristen (LBS owner) at Pure Ride Cycles in Lake Forrest Ca.

The trip- One Day from Port Hueneme Ca to Mission Viejo. 125 miles. It was really a two day trip. I road the train from MV to Santa Barbara, road the first day from Santa Barbara to PH and spent night in hotel. I’m not counting that first day mileage in this story. I carry two days of clothing, an extra Battery ( yes, I plan to carry a second battery on long trips), food, water, tools, etc. The total extra weight is about 30 pounds.

So the goal was to cover 125 miles along the coast in 1 day and, achieve 100 miles from 1 battery, increase average MPH by 20% and reduce overall time by 2 hours. I do this trip 2-3 times a year on normal bike. My average on normal bike is 12 mph at the end of the day and 13 hours elapsed time. To average 12 mph you spend a lot of time at 16 mph, you lose MPH with the rolling hills and stop and go areas along the route.

The route- Yesterday was strong headwinds from Redondo Beach to Laguna Beach. Usually these are tailwinds. Huntington Beach was hosting the Airshow with Blue Angels and about a million people show up for this, slow going thru this area. The rest of the route was perfect.

Well I did it, battery down to 2% at 100 mile mark. Average speed up to 14.5 (2 mph increase). Change batteries at 100 miles and flew the last 25 miles. Total trip was 11 hours 15 minutes.

How- The Giant Road-E has 3 power settings Eco, Normal and power. I’ll refer to them as level 1,2 and 3. My plan was to stay in level 1 for 85% of the time, using level 2 for hills and headwinds and never use level 3.

And that is how I achieved the 100 miles on 1 battery. So the Road-E meets my goal for multi day touring. I plan to Tour the Pacific Coast this summer. Hopefully CalTrans is able to repair and reopen Coast Highway in California by then. 100 miles on a battery is achievable!

Michael,

Didn't know it at the time, but I walked into Pure Ride while you were being set up with your bike. I bought one to become the 4th rider in one of my riding groups to now have one. It's a real game changer for we in the senior set. Like you, I've been asked MANY times about the speed and distance of my Road-E.

With over 700 miles of experience on it I now have some real-world numbers to answer some of those questions. I will post a more complete list of my recent rides on my E-Velo4Senors play list shortly but here's what I did yesterday: Local ride here in south O.C. Entire ride on NORM, 500w batt fully charged, 60 miles, 2690 ft of climb, 24% batt left, 18 miles estimated remaining, 14.5mph average.

As you know, the supported "assist" distance is very dependent on the settings and how much human effort is applied. On one ride I took the batt down to 6% after only 40 miles on NORM but I was hammering every hill (17.5mph av.) as hard as I could manage (and we have a lot of those around here) So my answer to the inquiry of speed and distance is always "it depends....."

Steve Plattner
3 weeks ago

After a 870 mile small group ride through the Canadian Rockies on my 40 year old vintage Trek with my Radical Design trailer this summer I came to a couple realizations.

I love long distance cycling touring
I love camping
I can survive some pretty demanding physical challenges
The trailer is a great touring tool
The trailer can be a real liability when the shoulder disappears or is crumbling and scattered with debris
and lastly, if I want to continuing long distance touring I should get a properly outfitted modern bike.

After investigating and pricing the latest purpose built heavy duty touring bikes I also realize that being in my 60's, it was going to take a very long time to recoup my investment in a $7-10k for custom world touring bike.

While thinking about my 500 mile ride across Iowa in 2016 on my ST2 with my trailer in tow, I started to come to the conclusion that the Stromer was way overbuilt and had many of the qualities of the world touring bikes. A super strong frame, large heavy duty rims and tires, disc brake, a reasonable amount of gearing and a modern geometry to name a few.

So I started to dream of what would happen if I got over some of the limitations of the Stromer and created an ebike/bike packing hybrid for long distance touring - thus this crazy concept was born. A makeover of my ST2 into a long distance road, rail to trail, and gravel road touring animal.

The main challenge was how to increase the balanced gear carrying capability and improve the tour ride qualities without permanently altering the ST2.

Here was the game plan...

Replace the original rear rack with something strong and solid including reconfiguring the fender attachment
Bite the bullet and do the suspension fork upgrade i’d been lusting after for a long time
Upgrade to a Jones HBar handlebar
Add the appropriate storage capability

Each part of the plan has had its own challenges which I can go into details later, but here is where I've ended up. I did an initial first ride and it went fantastic. Everything stayed on the bike and it rode smooth and steady. The test ride was with placeholder gear so the next challenge was to see if I could pare down my gear for sustained self-supported touring. I'm feeling comfortable that it can be done, with most of the bigger challenges resolved.

Initial test configuration

Salsa seat post rack adapter

Salsa seat tube bracket to Salsa bent stays to a Tubus Evo rack

Jones HBars and quick access day storage bags from Bedrock

A little handcrafted mods to attach fender using original mounting hole and screw

After the initial test I've modified the hanging of the handlebar bags and been working through getting 3L of hydration (bladder in the frame bag). I also added a second set of bottom clips on the Ortlieb panniers, an idea I borrowed from their gravel panniers design, which makes the bags rock solid. The panniers hang off the lower rail on the Tubus rack which lowers the center of gravity and provides greater stability. I’ve also continued to experiment with various top bags for the rear rack, but ultimately ended up with an Ortlieb Rack Pack (small 24L) as the final solution. Its a configuration I saw being used by a couple of Hungarian tourers who were passing through town this summer in year 2 of a 3 year around the world adventure. The arrangement provides quick access to a food storage area, and yet with my down sleeping bag and down sweater it remains pretty light on top of the rack.

A couple of final mods I'm still considering include perhaps a 2 legged kickstand and maybe a slightly larger low gear on the cassette for added climbing comfort with or without lower assist levels.

Current configuration on 3 day self contained touring test

I recently completed a test ride with my actual gear (about 97% finalized) and 2 days food supply to start to measure the impact of the mods and the gear weight on my range. My rides have mainly been in assist level 1 with some NO assist for several miles, and although the route was mostly flat city riding with a few small hills and only an occasional light headwind, initial results are suggesting a likely range of 60-80 mile per full charge. The ride I did in 2016 with the loaded trailer confirmed that an 80 mile day on a single charge was entirely doable, but this new rig represents a whole different wind profile so only time and more real world testing will tell.

So, where is all of this craziness leading you might ask? How about a west to east US crossing next summer using a combination of Rail to Trail segments as well as some gravel roads like the one below and some Adventure Cycling Northern Tier/Lewis and Clark routes.

At least that's the dream for the moment.

As always, thoughts, questions and opinions are welcome.

Great to see this. Re: rear rack—you nailed it. Did the same thing with the Salsa seat post collar and a really solid Racktime rack. Your addition of a second clip on each bag to hold panniers tightly is excellent too — I need to do that for sure as once in a while an unexpected pothole at a higher speed can lead to a pannier’s single clip coming loose. I like the Jones H Bar idea—I have one on my Salsa Fargo and it gives you lots of options. The big issue for me with my ST1 Platinum on Long rail trails is battery life. Even with three batteries (adds a lot of weight and they are hard on my Ortlieb panniers), and being sure not to run them down under 10%, I can only count on a range of 70-75 miles. You seem to get much further on yours. I always stay in hostels or motels or campgrounds with power. Looks like you have a Brooks Cambium sear with Body Float.

Last but not least I found a weird tire tube last year in case I ran into a blown tube in a remote spot—instead of being round, it’s long with two ends. It would allow you to remove your old tube and insert and feed the new tube without removing the rear wheel. Haven’t had to do it but think it would work.

vroom
3 weeks ago

Hi,

I want to ask you lot about what how you protect your beautiful face and head in bad weather, aka in rain, very windy, cold and snowy weather.

I live in east coast, US. It is cold now and there will eventually be snow.

From what I gather bike riders have very little in the form of comfort and functional products that are useful for more than one area of your head.
Most helmets provide protection for you head, but cannot provide cover or, insulation in cold winds or, rain/snow.
Additional items that can help are extra add-ons that are annoying because, they add the problem of storage, use and time to put on and off. They also do no go perfectly with each other, so you have to make them fit with a helmet that should be snug to work perperly.
They are:
Sunglasses for your eyes,
Rain covers for helmets,
Winter ear muffs,
Scarfs for protecting your neck and mouth,
Balaclava,
Pollution filtering mask,
etc.

I find it very odd that they are not many bike helmets with visors, at least on "e-bike helmets".

IMO, a helmet with a good, long visor that is fog-free will provide adequate protection from wind and rain to your face that would perform multiple functions with one equipment.
Throw in a set of ear muffs and scarf and you are set.

What options have you found to solve the problem of jig-sawing things to your face and head to protect it from weather?

Cheers!
Thank you for your answers!

newfydog
3 weeks ago

I guess you haven't had any pushback from the traditional mtb crowd? I'm retired and ride during the week to prevent any confrontations locally, but on-line, those guys are rabid about electric assist mountain bikes on their trails. I made the mistake ONCE about asking for advice and listing my bike on a traditional site. You'd have thought I was a mass murderer the responses I got back. You're in a comfort zone here though, WELCOME!

We have so much riding we have no need to overlap with them. My wife did poach one of their trails on a cold rainy day just out of principle. Actually we prefer to leave the famous and crowded Bend single tracks to the Strava heads. and downhill shuttlers, and ride the double tracks and the renegade single tracks the dirt bikers put in.

John from Connecticut
3 weeks ago

I got my first e-bike a couple of weeks ago (Trek Crossrip+), and as I'm sure you all know, getting on the bike and pulling away in Turbo mode is So Much Fun! Question is - does it ever stop being so much fun? Will I get used to it and stop noticing? For how long can I expect to enjoy it so much? ;)

Hello, First off congratulations on your new ride...The Trek Crossrip+ is a nice bike and a first ( I believe )..Does the e-bike fun ever stop ? For me, absolutely not. It's
all personal of course, but I can't wait to hit the road or trail. Unfortunately CT weather will crimp my style. E-bike riding gives me freedom to ride many places
in comfort that I was not able to do prior. I've had my e-bike since July of this year and I feel more connected and a great sense of joy then I did at the time of purchase.

John from CT

rich c
3 weeks ago

I guess you haven't had any pushback from the traditional mtb crowd? I'm retired and ride during the week to prevent any confrontations locally, but on-line, those guys are rabid about electric assist mountain bikes on their trails. I made the mistake ONCE about asking for advice and listing my bike on a traditional site. You'd have thought I was a mass murderer the responses I got back. You're in a comfort zone here though, WELCOME!

Dfstarman
4 weeks ago

I got my Wi-BIke about 2 weeks ago. It is the Unisex Comfort Plus Model, Cort just posted a review the other day. I have the model he reviewed. This is my 4th ebike I had a Eflow Nitro E3 which I really loved but my hip went bad and I couldn't swing my leg over it any more, I also had an EM Jumper which I sold, and I bought a Benelli Classica for my wife.

The App is great, the bike has plenty of power for me. I love the belt drive and the Nuvinci and the built in theft alarm which is very sensitive , you touch the bike and a message gets sent to your phone. I bought a LE BT chest strap to use in the Fitness mode which tracks BPM and Calories.

1/2
smitty
4 weeks ago

After a 870 mile small group ride through the Canadian Rockies on my 40 year old vintage Trek with my Radical Design trailer this summer I came to a couple realizations.

I love long distance cycling touring
I love camping
I can survive some pretty demanding physical challenges
The trailer is a great touring tool
The trailer can be a real liability when the shoulder disappears or is crumbling and scattered with debris
and lastly, if I want to continuing long distance touring I should get a properly outfitted modern bike.

After investigating and pricing the latest purpose built heavy duty touring bikes I also realize that being in my 60's, it was going to take a very long time to recoup my investment in a $7-10k for custom world touring bike.

While thinking about my 500 mile ride across Iowa in 2016 on my ST2 with my trailer in tow, I started to come to the conclusion that the Stromer was way overbuilt and had many of the qualities of the world touring bikes. A super strong frame, large heavy duty rims and tires, disc brake, a reasonable amount of gearing and a modern geometry to name a few.

So I started to dream of what would happen if I got over some of the limitations of the Stromer and created an ebike/bike packing hybrid for long distance touring - thus this crazy concept was born. A makeover of my ST2 into a long distance road, rail to trail, and gravel road touring animal.

The main challenge was how to increase the balanced gear carrying capability and improve the tour ride qualities without permanently altering the ST2.

Here was the game plan...

Replace the original rear rack with something strong and solid including reconfiguring the fender attachment
Bite the bullet and do the suspension fork upgrade i’d been lusting after for a long time
Upgrade to a Jones HBar handlebar
Add the appropriate storage capability

Each part of the plan has had its own challenges which I can go into details later, but here is where I've ended up. I did an initial first ride and it went fantastic. Everything stayed on the bike and it rode smooth and steady. The test ride was with placeholder gear so the next challenge was to see if I could pare down my gear for sustained self-supported touring. I'm feeling comfortable that it can be done, with most of the bigger challenges resolved.

Initial test configuration

Salsa seat post rack adapter

Salsa seat tube bracket to Salsa bent stays to a Tubus Evo rack

Jones HBars and quick access day storage bags from Bedrock

A little handcrafted mods to attach fender using original mounting hole and screw

After the initial test I've modified the hanging of the handlebar bags and been working through getting 3L of hydration (bladder in the frame bag). I also added a second set of bottom clips on the Ortlieb panniers, an idea I borrowed from their gravel panniers design, which makes the bags rock solid. The panniers hang off the lower rail on the Tubus rack which lowers the center of gravity and provides greater stability. I’ve also continued to experiment with various top bags for the rear rack, but ultimately ended up with an Ortlieb Rack Pack (small 24L) as the final solution. Its a configuration I saw being used by a couple of Hungarian tourers who were passing through town this summer in year 2 of a 3 year around the world adventure. The arrangement provides quick access to a food storage area, and yet with my down sleeping bag and down sweater it remains pretty light on top of the rack.

A couple of final mods I'm still considering include perhaps a 2 legged kickstand and maybe a slightly larger low gear on the cassette for added climbing comfort with or without lower assist levels.

Current configuration on 3 day self contained touring test

I recently completed a test ride with my actual gear (about 97% finalized) and 2 days food supply to start to measure the impact of the mods and the gear weight on my range. My rides have mainly been in assist level 1 with some NO assist for several miles, and although the route was mostly flat city riding with a few small hills and only an occasional light headwind, initial results are suggesting a likely range of 60-80 mile per full charge. The ride I did in 2016 with the loaded trailer confirmed that an 80 mile day on a single charge was entirely doable, but this new rig represents a whole different wind profile so only time and more real world testing will tell.

So, where is all of this craziness leading you might ask? How about a west to east US crossing next summer using a combination of Rail to Trail segments as well as some gravel roads like the one below and some Adventure Cycling Northern Tier/Lewis and Clark routes.

At least that's the dream for the moment.

As always, thoughts, questions and opinions are welcome.
Totally awesome...have been thinking some about this myself; lottos valuable info here...thank you so much

Dfstarman
4 weeks ago

Yes I saw it and I have it :-)

FITNESS: Turns the Wi-Bike into a true mobile fitness machine: the rider selects its pedal power level to be maintained along the route (i.e. 100 Watt) and the electric motor dynamically adjusts the assistance level to maintain as constant as possible the effort close to the user selected target. In the graphic representation of the strategy behavior, the orange bar and the related number indicate the target power level; the blue area shows the instantaneous power of the cyclist.
Here are a few excerpts from the App manual which you can download from the appstore.

The are two models active and comfort the comfort has the Nuvinci with the manual control. The Active Plus has the Harmony sync.

By clicking on any of the five parameter areas the following values can be selected:
-Vehicle speed - monitor
-Average vehicle speed - monitor
-Traveled distance from the application start - goal
-Pedaling frequency - monitor
-Heart rate - monitor
-Average heart rate - monitor
-Calories burned from application start - goal WARNING: to enable the heart rate display the connection of a Bluetooth heart rate monitor (not included) to the app through the dedicated page is needed. The calories burned are calculated: - based on the heart rate if a heart rate monitor is connected to the app: in this case it is crucial to correctly insert your pulse rate at rest in the user data
-based on the power measured on the pedal if no heart rate monitor is connected to the app
Once the preferred data to be displayed has been selected, it is possible to ignore (‘skip’) or fix (‘set’): - upper and lower limits for parameters visualization (monitor) - target value to be achieved (goal) For monitored parameters the data are displayed in green or red whether within or outside the selected range. The parameters associated to goals are increased while using the app and the completed percentage is shown. The split of the parameters between goals and monitors is described on the previous page.
While using the dynamic assistance modes (CITY-HILL-FITNESS), the electric motor may be in ‘OFF‘ condition even if non-zero assistance levels are selected on the app (e.g. when in ‘FITNESS’ mode the cyclist is delivering much lower power respect to the selected target). These conditions are in line with the desired behavior of the system. In dynamic assistance modes and, in particular, in FITNESS mode, the pedal torque multiplier factor is calculated in real time by the app and sent to the Wi-Bike. Therefore sudden changes in pedaling assistance over time shall be expected

Mark Peralta
4 weeks ago

Chrck out Court's review!
I really want to know more about the Piaggio's exclusive fitness program and other smart phone program, especially when paired with the automatic shifting nuvinci.

https://electricbikereview.com/piaggio/wi-bike-comfort-plus/

John ware
4 weeks ago

After a 870 mile small group ride through the Canadian Rockies on my 40 year old vintage Trek with my Radical Design trailer this summer I came to a couple realizations.

I love long distance cycling touring
I love camping
I can survive some pretty demanding physical challenges
The trailer is a great touring tool
The trailer can be a real liability when the shoulder disappears or is crumbling and scattered with debris
and lastly, if I want to continuing long distance touring I should get a properly outfitted modern bike.

After investigating and pricing the latest purpose built heavy duty touring bikes I also realize that being in my 60's, it was going to take a very long time to recoup my investment in a $7-10k for custom world touring bike.

While thinking about my 500 mile ride across Iowa in 2016 on my ST2 with my trailer in tow, I started to come to the conclusion that the Stromer was way overbuilt and had many of the qualities of the world touring bikes. A super strong frame, large heavy duty rims and tires, disc brake, a reasonable amount of gearing and a modern geometry to name a few.

So I started to dream of what would happen if I got over some of the limitations of the Stromer and created an ebike/bike packing hybrid for long distance touring - thus this crazy concept was born. A makeover of my ST2 into a long distance road, rail to trail, and gravel road touring animal.

The main challenge was how to increase the balanced gear carrying capability and improve the tour ride qualities without permanently altering the ST2.

Here was the game plan...

Replace the original rear rack with something strong and solid including reconfiguring the fender attachment
Bite the bullet and do the suspension fork upgrade i’d been lusting after for a long time
Upgrade to a Jones HBar handlebar
Add the appropriate storage capability

Each part of the plan has had its own challenges which I can go into details later, but here is where I've ended up. I did an initial first ride and it went fantastic. Everything stayed on the bike and it rode smooth and steady. The test ride was with placeholder gear so the next challenge was to see if I could pare down my gear for sustained self-supported touring. I'm feeling comfortable that it can be done, with most of the bigger challenges resolved.

Initial test configuration

Salsa seat post rack adapter

Salsa seat tube bracket to Salsa bent stays to a Tubus Evo rack

Jones HBars and quick access day storage bags from Bedrock

A little handcrafted mods to attach fender using original mounting hole and screw

After the initial test I've modified the hanging of the handlebar bags and been working through getting 3L of hydration (bladder in the frame bag). I also added a second set of bottom clips on the Ortlieb panniers, an idea I borrowed from their gravel panniers design, which makes the bags rock solid. The panniers hang off the lower rail on the Tubus rack which lowers the center of gravity and provides greater stability. I’ve also continued to experiment with various top bags for the rear rack, but ultimately ended up with an Ortlieb Rack Pack (small 24L) as the final solution. Its a configuration I saw being used by a couple of Hungarian tourers who were passing through town this summer in year 2 of a 3 year around the world adventure. The arrangement provides quick access to a food storage area, and yet with my down sleeping bag and down sweater it remains pretty light on top of the rack.

A couple of final mods I'm still considering include perhaps a 2 legged kickstand and maybe a slightly larger low gear on the cassette for added climbing comfort with or without lower assist levels.

Current configuration on 3 day self contained touring test

I recently completed a test ride with my actual gear (about 97% finalized) and 2 days food supply to start to measure the impact of the mods and the gear weight on my range. My rides have mainly been in assist level 1 with some NO assist for several miles, and although the route was mostly flat city riding with a few small hills and only an occasional light headwind, initial results are suggesting a likely range of 60-80 mile per full charge. The ride I did in 2016 with the loaded trailer confirmed that an 80 mile day on a single charge was entirely doable, but this new rig represents a whole different wind profile so only time and more real world testing will tell.

So, where is all of this craziness leading you might ask? How about a west to east US crossing next summer using a combination of Rail to Trail segments as well as some gravel roads like the one below and some Adventure Cycling Northern Tier/Lewis and Clark routes.

At least that's the dream for the moment.

As always, thoughts, questions and opinions are welcome.

1/12
Mike's E-Bikes
4 weeks ago

PS. Also, here is a link to a number of crank forward bicycles.... https://www.electricbike.com/12-crank-forward-bikes/
Most of these can make great candidates for conversion kits. Fuji also makes the Barnebey 7 (updated version here http://www.fujibikes.com/usa/bikes/cruiser-comfort/comfort/barnebey/barnebey-7) which is a very good candidate for conversion, just like the Firmstrong is, and KHS makes the Smoothie, another popular candidate for using e-bike kit conversions.
Good luck in your hunt.

Benjamin Nordland
2 weeks ago

Aesthetically, they push all the right buttons for me. But I would not buy one unless there is a way to de-restrict the 25kph speed limit (like Bosch/Yamaha aftermarket dongles). It's too frustrating.

Charles Bradley
2 weeks ago

Great review. Too bad the local Piaggio dealers have no clue about any of their WI Bikes in the PNW.

Andrew Hadjiminas
5 days ago

Hey Charles! My name is Andrew, I own Wi-Bike NYC. We carry a full stock of Wi-Bike models and can ship to you. We are the first retail location to take on Wi-Bike and it has been a great experience. Check out our site: www.wibikenyc.com and let me know which model you're interested in or have questions about.

Funkywallot
3 weeks ago

Gorgeous bikes. Highly desirable by thieves I can imagine ... Not so sure about the electronic gadgets though. Takes away a great deal of just pedalling a simple machine that takes you from A to B

Charles Bradley
4 weeks ago

Thanks for a great review. Made me want to buy one today but alas, good luck trying to find a dealer or even someone who has heard of them.
The search continues.

Yuriy K
4 weeks ago

Bikes are great. But prices are really high. with taxes these toys will go into 4000k. This is the cost of a motorbike.
I suspect, it will take couple more years before some economy of scale large volume producers start making them below 1000$ as current mark-ups are just huge.
Frame aluminum- 50-60$
Shimano Deore set - 150$
Tyres - 20$
mudguards - 10$
lights - 20$
Battery assume 36V 11.5mA - 80-100$ (expect price to half in 12 months)
Motor - 200$ (30% price reduction)
Wheels - 60$
breaks - 40$
Shipping cost - 30$
Assembly - 100$
800$ total price
plus 1000$ Verpa mark-up (if high volume competitor enters this will reduce margins by 200$)
plus 1000$ retailer mark-up (buying online or high volume retailer will slash 200$)
plus sales tax

Glenn Watson
4 weeks ago

I would LOVE to open an ebike/last-mile e-vihic store in Toronto...it's one of my wishes

eBikeaholic
4 weeks ago

Exactly as classy as you would expect from Piaggio! I'm glad they're giving belt drive and nuvinci igh options for commuters.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 weeks ago

Yeah, this is such a cool combination for durability, reliability, and quiet/clean use

philodygmn
4 weeks ago

So sad this is Bluetooth, which sickens me terribly. If Bluetooth will only be active when I choose, then that's probably still doable for occasional sync-ups and whatnot. Many out there are sensitive to wireless!

Dave Feldstein
4 weeks ago

I bought the Unisex Comfort Plus from them 2 weeks ago and love the bike This is my 4th Ebike and the most hi_tech. Great Bike

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 weeks ago

Nice, glad you're enjoying it so far Dave, feel free to chime in anytime with feedback on it (here or the comments or the forum) since you seem to be one of the early adopters :)

fallscitybob
4 weeks ago

I'm ready to trade in my old Vespa!

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 weeks ago

Nice, I feel like the new Wi-Bikes really honor the heritage of the company because they invested a lot to make a good looking higher quality product. Hopefully if you do get one someday, it will hold up for just as long for you :)

Amanda Comeau
4 weeks ago

I wish there was a frame mounted wheel lock for a larger tire and fender like on the Surface604 Rook. :(

Glenn Watson
4 weeks ago

Really enjoyed that review, it had a more social dynamic, and the pace was in keeping with the additional faces and people. Well done!

Glenn Watson
4 weeks ago

ElectricBikeReview.com that's a great "place" to be in, man...a place of learning and growing. Cheers!

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 weeks ago

Thanks Glenn! I feel like I'm still learning and tweaking the formula to provide good technical data but also some fun and interest around the bikes. Always open to input

Glenn Watson
4 weeks ago

That thing is so quiet

Le Lu Yan
4 weeks ago

Hi Court, seems to me the motor used is the TranzX m25, i think piaggio they used panasonic motors in their previous generation bikes, may be i'm wrong but they look very alike specially the app and the geometry of other TranzX bikes.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 weeks ago

Hmm, thanks for the feedback, I got the impression that they might be using Panasonic but couldn't be sure

Gary Bryan
4 weeks ago

Finally an ebike that gives you your money’s worth. And not all that flat black coloring, but very attractive color choices.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 weeks ago

Agree, people really seem to be liking the color choices here :)

277kne
4 weeks ago

Hi Cort,
You are close to R.I. Could you come to review Aviva Electric Bikes. That was my first electric bike test drive. I was wondering about the build. And the price is under $2000

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 weeks ago

Hey! I'm no longer on the East Coast, went to LA after to film some Bulls models. I will keep this company in mind though and try to review someday :)

Tiddojr
4 weeks ago

Just wat to say, that your Chanel is absolutely amazing . Love to watch your reviews, and it helped me to choose my first city ebike. But seeing the reviews on the MTB series. I’m even more enthusiastic to buy a E-MTB.. thanks so much. Tiddojr (Netherlands)

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 weeks ago

Thanks Tiddojr, I'm doing my best! Lots of bikes out there, want to give each one the attention it deserves and it's nice to hear your encouragement and feel like my work has helped you to find a good bike for your own lifestyle :)

GixrGuy
4 weeks ago

Brooklyn Represent

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 weeks ago

Oh yeah!

abbaby555
4 weeks ago

Great review as always Court. I really like piaggio products I didn't know that they were in the ebike game as well. Back in the 70's they imported moped's here in the USA along with Vespas. Thanks for sharing this review

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 weeks ago

Sure thing, glad you enjoyed it! So cool to see companies adapting to the new technology and industry of ebikes. I felt that the shop we visited for this review was very nice and professional, did a great job showcasing and answering questions

Torian Allen
4 weeks ago

Your videos are awesome man. I like how you’re future proofing some of the things you say so that when someone finds this in the future it’s just a reminder.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 weeks ago

Hmm, I appreciate the feedback! What do you mean by future proofing? I'd love an example or to hear more thoughts so that I can keep it in mind as I move forward