Sun Seeker Fat Tad Electric Trike Review

Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx Electric Bike Review
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx Rear Mounted 500 Watt Geared Hub Motor Sram Derailleur
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx Battery Handle And Key Slot Rack Closeup
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx Seat Steering Cockpit
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx Trigger Throttle Right Shifter Bar
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx Fixed Lcd Display Panel Closeup
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx Sram 24 Speed 3 Chain Rings Plastic Tubing
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx Rear Spring Suspension And Swing Arm
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx Front Suspension And Disc Brake
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx Chao Yang Tire Punched Rim Red Tire Liners
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx Plastic Wellgo Pedals 12 Magnet Cadence Sensor
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx Rack Mounted Battery 48 Volt 10 Amp Hours
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx 3 Amp Charger With Aluminum Case
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx Electric Bike Review
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx Rear Mounted 500 Watt Geared Hub Motor Sram Derailleur
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx Battery Handle And Key Slot Rack Closeup
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx Seat Steering Cockpit
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx Trigger Throttle Right Shifter Bar
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx Fixed Lcd Display Panel Closeup
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx Sram 24 Speed 3 Chain Rings Plastic Tubing
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx Rear Spring Suspension And Swing Arm
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx Front Suspension And Disc Brake
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx Chao Yang Tire Punched Rim Red Tire Liners
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx Plastic Wellgo Pedals 12 Magnet Cadence Sensor
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx Rack Mounted Battery 48 Volt 10 Amp Hours
Sun Seeker Fat Tad Cx 3 Amp Charger With Aluminum Case

Summary

  • A full suspension, fat tire, recumbent electric trike designed for off-road fun on trails, sand or snow, powerful 500 watt rear-motor with throttle and pedal assist modes
  • Adjustable length boom and tilting seat accommodate a range of riders, large backlit display offers adjustable speed and power settings but isn't removable
  • Rear-mounted battery and motor make the bike rear-heavy but afford space for bags and there are four pairs of bottle cage bosses for fluids or accessories
  • Heavier and a bit flexy due to the larger wheels and battery rack mount design, this is a conversion ebike vs. purpose built so there's more wire clutter, key must be left in to ride but collides with the rack if you pull the battery out for independent charging

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Sun Seeker

Model:

Fat Tad Electric Trike

Price:

$2,435 ($350 Shipping, Fully Assembled Ready to Ride)

Body Position:

Recumbent

Suggested Use:

Trail, Sand and Snow

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2), Speed Pedalec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

80.5 lbs (36.51 kg)

Battery Weight:

9.3 lbs (4.21 kg)

Motor Weight:

9.4 lbs (4.26 kg)

Frame Material:

Chromoly Steel

Geometry Measurements:

59" (150 cm) Wheel Base, 78" - 83.5" (198 - 212 cm) Overall Length, 33.25" (92 cm) Width, 16.5"- 17.75" (42-45 cm) Seat Height, 20" - 21.5" (51-55 cm) Bottom Bracket Height

Frame Types:

Trike

Frame Colors:

Gloss Red with Black Accents

Frame Fork Details:

High Tensile Steel with Integrated Suspension

Frame Rear Details:

Coil Over Suspension, 190 mm Axle Length

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

24 Speed 3x8 SRAM S4, 13-28T

Shifter Details:

SRAM Grip Shift 3.0

Cranks:

170 mm Cranks, 22-32-42T Chainrings

Pedals:

Wellgo B223 Plastic Platform

Headset:

Steel, Sealed Mechanism

Handlebar:

Chromoly Steel, Roadster Style

Brake Details:

Promax Mechanical Disc with 160 mm Rotors, Wuxing Levers with Motor Inhibitor and Parking Latch

Grips:

Flat Foam, Locking

Saddle:

Alloy Frame, Padded Mesh

Seat Post:

Rans Style Seat Slide

Rims:

Alloy, 20x54mm 36 Hole, Punched Out

Spokes:

Stainless 14G, Black

Tire Brand:

Chao Yang, 20" x 4"

Wheel Sizes:

20 in (50.8cm)

Tire Details:

5 to 20 PSI, 1.4 Bar, Nylon

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Bolt-on Rack with Pannier Blockers 25 kg Max Weight, Adjustable Angle Seat with Removable Cover, Adjustable Length Boom, Heavy-Duty Torque Arm for Motor Mount

Other:

Locking Removable Battery, 1.5 lb 3 Amp Charger, KMC Z Chain, 300 lb Max Load

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Electric Bike Technologies

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Motor Peak Output:

1000 watts

Motor Torque:

45 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Electric Bike Technologies

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

10 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

480 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4 hours

Estimated Min Range:

15 miles (24 km)

Estimated Max Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Display Type:

King Meter, Fixed, Backlit, Monochrome LCD

Readouts:

Battery Level (5 Bars), Speed, Avg. Speed, Max Speed, Power Level (0-5), Odometer, Trip A, Trip B

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle (12 Magnet Pedelec Sensor)

Top Speed:

26 mph (42 kph) (Adjustable Speed, PAS Sensitivity, Current)

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Written Review

The Sun Seeker Fat Tad fills me with excitement and a sense of “go anywhere” adventure even without the electric motor systems that Electric Bike Technologies has added here… The fat tires, full suspension setup and soft adjustable seat make it feel like floating as you ride over grass mounds. In the video review above, one of the engineers (Alec) and I rode around a gravel parking lot, over some concrete blocks and across some hilly sections of grass occasionally catching air and skidding. It made me feel like a kid again, pushing the limits and grinning when we got away with a daring maneuver like riding on two wheels. While the rear mounted motor and nine-pound battery pack make it rear-heavy (and there is a bit of frame flex and wheel tilt), the trike performed surprisingly well and felt solid. An oversized torque arm secures the hub motor on the left rear dropout while a 90-degree metal angle protects the derailleur and motor cable on the right. You get 24 gears to pedal with, and that’s very nice given the 80 lbs of weight you’re moving around (in addition to yourself) but the trigger throttle with instant power significantly helps when starting. This is the kind of electric bike that you don’t have to pedal if you don’t want to… unless you’re ascending a steep hill starting from zero. There are grip shifters on both bars, a button pad on the left to control your power and speed and a trigger throttle on the right. To me, it sort of feels like a fighter jet, just the way you’re sitting and situated. Many times with recumbents, I get a headache from the weight of my helmet adding to my head, straining my neck so I can’t enjoy riding around. This is exacerbated by skinny tires and lack of suspension… so with the Fat Tad, the ride is much more comfortable and enjoyable. In some ways, it’s a large, heavy and inefficient platform but the battery and motor are powerful enough together that you overcome and end up go places and do things that other electric bikes and trikes just can’t… like sand, snow and soft Earth. It’s also more stable at rest and the seat is higher so mounting (squatting down) didn’t agitate my sensitive knee the way some of the sportier lower models sometimes do. Sure, you might have to buy a trailer for your car to pull this thing around (check Harbor Freight for cheap ones) and yes, there’s a $350 shipping fee unless you can drive to Pennsylvania and pick it up, but the price isn’t ridiculous at ~$2,500 and you get a solid warranty backed by a company that has been in the ebike business since 2010.

Powering this tadpole style recumbent electric trike is a rear-mounted internally geared hub motor putting out 500 to 1,000 watts at up to 45 Newton meters of torque. It’s zippy and you an hear a bit of electronic whirring in the video… but it’s not too pronounced given the large studded tires. I like that the motor is in the rear because you get more traction, especially with the battery pack and possibly some gear mounted above. The rack is done about as well as it can be from my perspective but the front struts are longer and nearly 10 of your 55 lb max weight is taken by the battery. Honestly, given the way the rack sways and flexes a bit, I’m not sure I’d overload it with gear. Probably aim for pannier side bags to keep weight low and reduce some of the flex. I love that there are extra bottle cage bosses to spread out cargo and make it easier to reach and I like the adjustable mesh saddle.

Powering the motor and LCD display is a sturdily packed 48 volt 10 amp hour battery pack. It’s filled with long lasting, lighter weight Lithium-ion cells but they aren’t the highest energy density or quality. I don’t love that the key has to be left in the battery pack and turned to on in order to ride the bike with power. It’s a minor gripe but there’s reasoning behind it because it can be difficult to reach in this position when pannier bags are added, it can snag them and if you try to pull the pack out without removing the key it will collide with the support rods on the rack and could bend or break. Not perfect but not a huge price to pay for a more open-source design. You can replace this battery more easily and with third party options down the line. The Electric Bike Technologies company, which owns E-BikeKit.com sells a range of options, has a long history of supporting their products and have not locked them off to other brands. So in the future when batteries are lighter or cheaper or just higher capacity you can still use your trusty old platform. And the Fat Tad is made from sturdy Steel tubing that should last. I guess the only other wish-list item I have regarding the battery is that it would power some lights or have a USB port for running portable electronics. It’s just a simpler design and that’s part of what keeps the price reasonable.

Activating the bike involves charging the battery (on or off the rack), inserting and turning the key, then pressing the power button on the control pad near the left grip. From here, the beautiful backlit LCD comes to life showing battery charge level, speed, power level and some ride stats. Depending on the level chosen, both pedal assist and throttle mode will be limited. This was a bit of a bummer to me because I sometimes ride in lower levels of assist then BOOST with the throttle to climb hills or catch up with friends. As it stands, you have to arrow up, up, up then boost. Now, the benefit of this moderated design is that it’s harder to get out of control and doesn’t require the fine hand motor skills to ease into the throttle at all times. You can set the power to level one or two and completely open the throttle without risk of getting out of control or going too fast. Depending on your courage to enter and explore the display, you can also adjust the power output, lower the maximum speed, turn off pedal assist or throttle and even map the power curve of a new battery so the display reads more accurately. That’s pretty cool, very few ebike systems I’ve tried allow all of this.

All things considered, this is not only a unique electric bike, it’s well supported and well priced. It might just be my favorite in the lineup from ElectricTrike.com but I actually love the Sun Traditional as well, just for how simple and useful it is with the rear basket. The knobby tires here do cut into your maximum achievable range and can make you feel paranoid that a hive of bees is right on your tail (due to the distinct noise they make). Do air them up to ~20 PSI for maximum efficiency and then down to as low as 5 PSI to handle snow and sand well. Note that the faster you ride, especially above 20 mph, the faster your battery will drain. This trike uses a few basic parts like the cheap plastic pedals and I wasn’t thrilled with how the cadence sensor was mounted (blocking the smallest chainring) or the limited range and adjustability of the suspension… but it got the job done. There’s only one size but the frame is fairly adjustable to fit a range of body types and the classic red color is fun. I’d like to thank Alec and Electric Bike Technologies for partnering with me on this review, they flew me out to see all of their ebikes and even filmed with me when I was sick! Thankfully no one got ill. This trike made me laugh and smile and I admired their American-built philosophy even though some of the parts just couldn’t be found without going direct to Asia. They partner with J&B for the frames but do some custom stuff locally as well as assembly, shipping and support. The bike is designed to arrive “ready to ride” in a huge box… that your cat or kids will love :)

Pros:

  • I love that in addition to offering rack-mounted storage in the back, there are several sets of bottle cage bosses (on the support bars of the seat and on the steering bars), this spreads weight out and allows for things like locks or fluids to be more accessible when riding
  • Given the 80 lb weight of the trike, I love that they offer 24 gears to work with and have upgraded to SRAM components
  • This is one of the only fat tire recumbent electric trikes I’ve ever seen and I love that it offers full suspension to boot! some of the components are lower-end but the price point is fantastic at ~$2,500
  • Highly adjustable boom and seat accommodates a range of riders and offers different body positions, I tend to prefer a more upright seat but others like the way-back aerodynamic setup… it’s all possible here
  • The wheels are all the same size making it easier to replace tubes and tires, I appreciate how comfortable fat-bike tires are when riding off-road as they span cracks and absorb vibration
  • You get lots of adjustability with the Electric Bike Technologies display including max speed, power and battery curve… their system is more open-source so you can use your own battery down the line if you want and even map its discharge for accurate battery readouts
  • I love that this trike offers throttle on demand to help you get moving as well as pedal assist, the throttle overrides assist for extra help if you’re pedaling along and need to pass someone or climb a hill
  • You can buy the motor, battery and display kit from Electric Bike Technologies and transform your own Sun Seeker Fat Tad if you’d like… they even have video tutorials and stuff
  • The hub motor was customized specifically for this bike, it offers more torque and is spoked into a fat tire with a longer 190 mm axle
  • Electric Bike Technologies is the parent company of E-BikeKit.com which has been doing kits since 2010 and is based in the US where much of the labor, accessorizing and customizing is performed… they still sell replacement parts and do service on some of their oldest kits which is reassuring
  • I liked how the seat was a little higher due to the fat tires, I didn’t have to bend down quite so far to sit and get back up
  • Three amp charger will fill the battery quicker and it’s built into an Aluminum case for strength, I’d probably toss it into a trunk bag and keep it with the bike on the rack all the time
  • Since this thing is kind of a beast and might take damage on rough terrain, I love that they sell replacement parts and it’s more modular… probably less expensive to repair

Cons:

  • Heavy and flexy, the Fat Tad Electric looks awesome but those big tires, rear-mounted battery, rear-mounted motor and mid-frame pivot point create a ride that isn’t especially stiff or responsive… it does feel stable however, given the three-wheel design
  • I’d probably limit how much cargo I stow on the rear rack because it’s mounted further out and already supports the 9.3 lb battery pack
  • I appreciate the disc brakes, one on each wheel which helps you corner, but would have opted for 180 mm rotors vs. 160 given the size and weight of the bike… I’d also love hydraulic vs. mechanical
  • Note that shipping costs $350 extra but the Sun Seeker Fat Tad arrives fully assembled and ready to ride, I like that you can opt to drive to Croydon Pennsylvania and pick it up if you so choose and save on shipping
  • The display panel is larger than normal which helps you read it but it’s mounted way up front, thankfully the control pad is on the left grip and easy to access while seated
  • Only one color option and one frame size but it’s adjustable and this simplification keeps the price down
  • This is a conversion trike meaning the motor, battery, display and wires were added to an existing non-electric bike… they did a good job setting it up and adding a torque arm but the overall look is less clean and some compromises were made to fit the throttle and button pad in, they aren’t perfectly easy to reach and use
  • I noticed that the cadence sensor sort of interfered with the front chainrings, perhaps that will be refined or was just setup incorrectly on my demo bike
  • Throttle power is limited by the level of pedal assist you choose, for a more aggressive off-road bike like this it would be nice if you could use full power at any time given the variable speed design of the trigger throttle… but at least the system does let you disable throttle or pedal assist, set a max speed or limit Amperage so it can be toned down for mellow riders or those with special needs
  • The key must be left in the battery pack when riding and if you have a keychain it could rattle around or snag on a pannier bag, you have to take the key out in order to pull the pack off or it could collide on the rack bars and bend

Resources:

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adam
3 months ago

Thank you for another excellent review Court. I own quite a few ebikes that all vary from one another quite a bit, but after watching your video of the test ride of this particular style and model, I have to say this might be the most fun. I can imagine just going full speed ahead on private property and doing all sorts of crazy maneuvers. I could even see this as the future of getting a really interesting electric trike racing league going . One complaint I have always had with my electric fat bikes is that you really have to be very careful when making sharp turns. This style looks like the turning part could now be the most fun. Thanks again and take care.

Court Rye
3 months ago

Hey Adam! Sounds like you’ve got a whole quiver of ebikes going. Indeed, the three-wheel fat tire design is pretty cool and empowering. You can still get it on two wheels when turning but it also slides a little depending on the surface. If you get one and start a racing league give me a ring so I can join in on the fun :P

Edward McDonald
4 weeks ago

I like to ride on trails and being in Florida most trails have sections of loose sand. A normal two wheel fat bike would just slide out and I would end up walking and pushing. Would a fat tire three-wheeler like the Sub Seeker Tad Electric bike allow me to ride through these soft sections or would the rear tire just spin? How about hills? Can this bike start and stop on hills using electric power only or is human power required?

I would like to hear from anyone with experience with this three wheeler. Thanks in advance for your help.

Court Rye
4 weeks ago

Hi Edward! I’ve done some riding on sand with two-wheel fat bicycles and noticed a huge difference when deflating the tires to 5 PSI. It sounds really low, but this allowed the tire to grip and not sink in. It also helps with steering. Here’s an example of me riding in the sand on a beach in Mexico with some friends.

As for the Sun Seeker Fat Tad, I think it could handle sand if the tire pressure was lowered too… it would be more stable than a two-wheel bike but you might need to pedal along and help if the sand got soft and you started climbing a hill. Most ebikes struggle when starting from zero and climbing or pushing through difficult terrain. I hope this feedback helps and do study the video so you can get your own insights.

Dana Pearson
1 week ago

Started looking at this as I’m in the market but noticed much higher price from their website ($2962) and THAT is for the dinky, 9 ah raw battery in a bag which sits on TOP of the rack, not the metal encased one that fits in the middle, which is up to $366 for the larger 20ah model. Price starts adding up fast so I’ll now look in a higher price range

Love ALL you do… this IS the real revolution we should be focusing on!

Court Rye
1 week ago

Glad you’ve enjoyed the site Dana, and yeah, sometimes prices change or I’m given the base price but shown a higher end product. Glad you’re finding your way and thanks for sharing your discoveries and thoughts here :)

Dana Pearson
1 week ago

As I’ve just relocated to northern Idaho where it’s snowy I’ve been pouring over your fat bike reviews… It seems the recombinant would be best for my 67 year old bad knees but I’m torn between this and the Rad mini, for portability… Or just a normal fat bike with a sturdy hitch mounted bike rack! So many choices, and never using a bike before! Primary use would b for improving my lower body leg strength and trips to the store… At these prices, versus the high-end bikes I could probably get both in the long run but which to choose first?

Small town, Post Falls… So no way to test um as I do full-time home care for my 90-year-old mom now… Decisions decisions! So glad there’s so much happening in this area of mobility. Thanks again for your passion and awesome detailed reviews

Court Rye
4 days ago

Hi Dana, I’m glad you’re enjoying the site! I know it can be tough to decide when there are so many choices AND you don’t have access to try in person. The RadMini is fairly stable because of the fat tires but those recumbents are cool too… just a lot heavier.

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Matt A
1 day ago

So, Rohloff Delite GX HS it was. I reached out to Chris Nolte of Propel and (at my prodding) he was kind enough to offer a modest discount on his floor model, but with the proviso that I had to wait for him to take delivery of another one before he sent the demo to me. Fair enough. Chris was good to his word re: estimated delivery time. Three weeks passed and sure enough, he got the new demo in and made arrangements to have the bike brought to my office on a Sunday afternoon (I live in a small city an hour or so north of NYC). Nice of him to go out of the way and offer to deliver as I had some personal things going on that would have kept me from picking it up within the next week or so.

First impressions: Sweet! Only 22 demo miles on the odometer. I already had a few alterations and additions in mind (guess that is the male version of "accessorizing") , but the essential core was all there - substantial frame, nice components, obviously well thought out, maybe a bit over-engineered - if that is even possible. Being purpose built exclusively as an e-bike, nothing about it has that "aftermarket-afterthought" feel. Solid as can be. No pretensions of being anything but a steady road warrior, capable of taking hard knocks and shrugging off the usual daily insults from the two ton motorized behemoths one encounters on the daily commute. Yeah, kind of a motorcycle feel, but still very much a vehicle that requires human input to motivate. Pretty heavy, but I had spent a lot of time in another life piloting touring bikes loaded down with four panniers and 50-69 additional lbs of gear, so I knew I wouldn't be phased by the weight that the two batteries and Bosch motor entailed. This thing knows it's purpose: built to bull through most stuff, on or off road, without the rider wondering if something is going to crack, snap off, or otherwise make things unpleasant.

As things go, the first week that I had it turned out to be nasty weather-wise. Record low temps, mixed precipitation. I think I clicked maybe 15 miles total over the over the first few days. On the first nice day, the following Sunday, I put 30 + miles on it. Super happy with it. Went on road and on trail. The brakes, suspension, beefy 27.5" tires, and power package all work well together. It's not a "pocket rocket", as we used to refer to certain motorcycles way back when, but the whole package works as advertised. I am liking it a lot. The Rohloff gives it an awesome low range, though I would like to get a bit more headroom at high speed ie. have pedal input over 30 mph. I did get the bike over 40 mph, but that was going down a big hill with inertia being the only motivator. In day to day riding, that really isn't a factor and I guess I could always put a smaller cog on the Rohloff at some point (but probably won't). At high speed, I had total confidence and the suspension ably handled a surprise pothole around 35 mph. Why potholes in NY in the spring should be a surprise, I don't know, but it was a substantial one nonetheless and the bike pretty much took it in stride. Power assist is just about right. At first you find yourself obsessing over the (4) available ranges, but I find myself pretty much either running it on tour or turbo mode. You definitely know that all those micro adjustments for shifting and human pedal effort are going on in the Bosch brain, but for the most part it just does that job well and it works rather seamlessly. After the first 100 or so miles, I was over any second thoughts about not having gotten a "throttle" type e-assist or opting for more power. Despite the added weight of the electric assist components, the pedal effort vs. a non-electric bike is reduced by maybe 50%, Works for me. The Intuvia controller is pretty straight forward. Almost like a typical bike computer but with power functions added. It took some getting used to not having the wealth of detailed data that the Cycle Analyst produces on my EcoSpeed trike setup, but simplicity is a good thing too. I am curious, Matt, how your Nyon is working out for you.

Time to start using the bike on a daily commuting basis. And then a few hiccups occur . . .
I enjoyed reading everything you wrote. I am glad I got the NuVinci, but only because of my riding stlye. The Rohloff is definitely better. I use the bike for going to a number of destinations around the city and I like to get done quickly, so I am constantly shifting as I ride around very quickly. If I owned a Rohloff, I'd likely get used to it but when I tried a demo I just hated it. I have been testing the limits of the bike a lot, and have crashed a number of times. The bike never gets hurt really, and the Nyon back is scuffed up from a couple spills but still works great. It is very detailed and I like looking at my rides afterwards. I ride almost always in Turbo, I only ride in Tour if I will be running out of battery. Hard to believe I know, but I frequently do over 60 miles on the bike at once. I am really looking forward to upgrading the suspension on the bike and having a set of MTB tires for off-roading. I have been testing the limits of the bike and have fallen off a number of times, so once I upgrade the rear shock and fork, I want to avoid scratching them lol.

There are a lot of paved trails near me and also some dirt and gravel trails too. I went up a steep climb on a 6 inch wide dirt path covered in roots and boulders like it was nothing. Coming back down was a bit scary with the Super Moto X tires that have 1500 miles of wear on them, I am sure I will feel much more confident with some nobby nics on like the GX has I believe. I never did any trail riding before, but I really had a blast trying it out and will be doing a lot of it in the future.

More on the Nyon, I really am glad I upgrades. It just looks so much cooler and gives you a ton of information. I know the exact battery percentage as well which is a plus since steep sections of a ride can really distort the range for the overall ride. You can see a map of your path and can see your altitude, cadence, speed, and power output and any point along the ride. I like the navigation, but it is not as good as Google Maps. It is just like using a tomtom or garmin sat nav. The directions are fine but the city has a lot of close streets, it would be nice to see the street names on the map but it just shows the roads with no names. Sometimes of course navigation lags a little, so it would be nice to see the name of the roads on screen. It does not show the names of random streets around you on the map, nor the name of the street you are supposed to turn onto next, and also not the street you are currently on. No street names, just an animation to follow. I really just like the Nyon for how it looks, the Intuvia works fine but it is such a simple display on a bike that has so much more to offer (not to mention it looks high tech).

The Nyon display does take a few extra seconds to load up, and sometimes restarts during a ride (not often). The good thing though is that the power assist works from the second you hit the power button, even though the display is loading. And when the Nyon restarts mid-ride for no reason, the assist never stops, so really doesn't bother me. One other thing is that the Nyon does not allow me to turn on the High Beam of my Supernova M99 Pro. The Intuvia light button worked for the high beam and also for turning it on during the day, but with the Nyon connected, the headlight is completely independent. It won't turn on when the sun is out, and won't turn off at night nor turn the high beam on, the light button is useless even though the light icon appears when I click it. Perhaps I need it to be changed to switchable from a shop, I have not checked yet. Worst case scenario I will have to attach the high beam button that came with the light, but it will not reach my handlebars since the light is mounted on the fork crown. I like it better there, the lighting is perfect and cars can see my lights better in their mirrors because it is at the same level as car headlights. I will have to epoxy the button onto the actualy light or something lol.

Hugh
2 days ago

I have decided to use the brakes and electrics on my Bionx 500 equipped EVO road bike and build a 3 wheeled electric recumbent trike. I bought the plans, got the steel tube and have started the project. The style is called a tadploe trike which means the 2 wheels are in front and 1 wheel in back It is called the Warrior and i got the plans from a site called Atomic Zombie. The frame is made from 1/16" or 16 gauge 1 1/2" square tubing. You need a few parts from discarded bikes. The headsets from 3 old bikes are cut down and used in the steering assembly. A bottom bracket from one bike is also used. After i bought the plans there was the annual police bicycle auction where stolen and not claimed bikes are auctioned off. It just happens to be less than a block from my home. So i picked up 3 old bikes for $20 apiece. A grinder with cut wheels and a flap disc was used to cut them up and polish the pieces i needed. I also have a small 110 volt welder which is more the sufficient for the job. The BionX wheel is 28" in diameter and will be used as the rear drive unit. The EVO has 2 180 mm Tektro disc rotors which fit the front wheels. The front wheels were the most expensive components so far. You need 20" rims BMX style rims so I used my LBS and ordered 2 20mm disc ready hubs, 2 double wall 36 spoke 20" rims and had them lace the wheels up. Two 6" long 5/8th" fine thread bolts will be the front axles, those needed some 5/8ths" bronze bushings and one wrap of .010 shim to make them fit the 20mm hubs nice and snug. So far I have the main part of the frame built, the wheels all ready and will be making the front arms that hold the wheels and steering. It is a step by step process. The reason for this build is one - comfort and two- i like building things and 3 - bikes, in particular electric bikes are great.

1/3
Drumulac
3 days ago

So, Rohloff Delite GX HS it was. I reached out to Chris Nolte of Propel and (at my prodding) he was kind enough to offer a modest discount on his floor model, but with the proviso that I had to wait for him to take delivery of another one before he sent the demo to me. Fair enough. Chris was good to his word re: estimated delivery time. Three weeks passed and sure enough, he got the new demo in and made arrangements to have the bike brought to my office on a Sunday afternoon (I live in a small city an hour or so north of NYC). Nice of him to go out of the way and offer to deliver as I had some personal things going on that would have kept me from picking it up within the next week or so.

First impressions: Sweet! Only 22 demo miles on the odometer. I already had a few alterations and additions in mind (guess that is the male version of "accessorizing") , but the essential core was all there - substantial frame, nice components, obviously well thought out, maybe a bit over-engineered - if that is even possible. Being purpose built exclusively as an e-bike, nothing about it has that "aftermarket-afterthought" feel. Solid as can be. No pretensions of being anything but a steady road warrior, capable of taking hard knocks and shrugging off the usual daily insults from the two ton motorized behemoths one encounters on the daily commute. Yeah, kind of a motorcycle feel, but still very much a vehicle that requires human input to motivate. Pretty heavy, but I had spent a lot of time in another life piloting touring bikes loaded down with four panniers and 50-69 additional lbs of gear, so I knew I wouldn't be phased by the weight that the two batteries and Bosch motor entailed. This thing knows it's purpose: built to bull through most stuff, on or off road, without the rider wondering if something is going to crack, snap off, or otherwise make things unpleasant.

As things go, the first week that I had it turned out to be nasty weather-wise. Record low temps, mixed precipitation. I think I clicked maybe 15 miles total over the over the first few days. On the first nice day, the following Sunday, I put 30 + miles on it. Super happy with it. Went on road and on trail. The brakes, suspension, beefy 27.5" tires, and power package all work well together. It's not a "pocket rocket", as we used to refer to certain motorcycles way back when, but the whole package works as advertised. I am liking it a lot. The Rohloff gives it an awesome low range, though I would like to get a bit more headroom at high speed ie. have pedal input over 30 mph. I did get the bike over 40 mph, but that was going down a big hill with inertia being the only motivator. In day to day riding, that really isn't a factor and I guess I could always put a smaller cog on the Rohloff at some point (but probably won't). At high speed, I had total confidence and the suspension ably handled a surprise pothole around 35 mph. Why potholes in NY in the spring should be a surprise, I don't know, but it was a substantial one nonetheless and the bike pretty much took it in stride. Power assist is just about right. At first you find yourself obsessing over the (4) available ranges, but I find myself pretty much either running it on tour or turbo mode. You definitely know that all those micro adjustments for shifting and human pedal effort are going on in the Bosch brain, but for the most part it just does that job well and it works rather seamlessly. After the first 100 or so miles, I was over any second thoughts about not having gotten a "throttle" type e-assist or opting for more power. Despite the added weight of the electric assist components, the pedal effort vs. a non-electric bike is reduced by maybe 50%, Works for me. The Intuvia controller is pretty straight forward. Almost like a typical bike computer but with power functions added. It took some getting used to not having the wealth of detailed data that the Cycle Analyst produces on my EcoSpeed trike setup, but simplicity is a good thing too. I am curious, Matt, how your Nyon is working out for you.

Time to start using the bike on a daily commuting basis. And then a few hiccups occur . . .

Drumulac
4 days ago

How's it going with everything?

Wow, how time flies! I've been looking for a chunk of time to do a comprehensive review of my GX Rohloff and it is just not happening. So, I'll just do it piecemeal as time permits.

I've had the bike for maybe 5-6 weeks. Obviously, a quality piece of machinery, which it should be considering the "investment"! This is my second juiced pedal machine - as mentioned in previous posts, I have owned a Greenspeed GTO trike for 8 yrs now and installed an EcoSpeed boom mount kit on it last year. Comparison to the Delite is kind of an apples and oranges thing - the EcoSpeed motor is 1000 + watts vs. 350 watts for the Bosch, EcoSpeed is a throttle type vs. the Bosch pedelec system, I'm using (2) 48V 20 ah batteries for the EcoSpeed vs. (2) 36V 11 ah batteries for the Bosch, and of course, I'm comparing a three wheel vs. two wheel machine. The trike weighs a bit more with both batteries but has a much smaller wind resistance footprint. No suspension on the trike (could use it!) & the Delite is fully sprung. Similarities in that both machines are fully internally geared and both have a Rohloff as the final rear gearbox. Two different animals, for sure, utilizing different approaches to electric assist. I'll try to minimize my comparisons between the two (this is an R&M forum after all), but forgive me if I do so occasionally.

Reason for buying the Delite: I've been riding bicycles for umm . . . many years now, both recreation and commuting, and self-contained long distance touring. Owned/have owned way too may bikes (just ask my wife). Recently I came to the realization that my old body just ain't what it used to be and since electric assist technology is finally getting ironed out/practical, maybe it was time to give it a shot. Besides, it looked like it would add another fun dimension to the mix. I also had stopped commuting to work due to some knee issues. Pretty good hills along the route + you have to go up 15%-20% grades for a few blocks to get back to my house. Commuting on the newly juiced trike was not an option - not a great choice for in-town travel due to visibility issues. So, I thought I'd maybe mount an EcoSpeed on one of my road bikes. The more I considered it, the better the purpose built e-assist bikes looked; and besides, it is always more fun to get a new ride (wife does not agree). All the armchair online research inevitably led to the R&M bikes and from there it wasn't too much of a jump to the Delite Rohloff. I won't repeat my previous posts re: the Rohloff choice. I simply went with the known quantity (and quality) there, based on 8 yrs. experience with one. The proverbial "no-brainer" in gearing choice for me. I did go through some changes regarding pedelec vs. throttle type. The EcoSpeed on the trike has quite a bit of torque and can jump you off the line quickly with no pedal input at all, a consideration in sketchy traffic stop light situations, etc., but . . . I had demoed a few pedelec bikes and liked that they feel more like a bicycle than a moped.

To be continued - lunch break over!

mams99
2 weeks ago

That Tandem trike is gone... (being picked up tomorrow)... Really, we could do a regular tandem, probably with electric assistance, but even the ones I see, tall riders are usually in the front? Women in back? (though it would/could be my husband and I switching back and forth). Egad... stuff is so expensive and it's a double whammy because of special needs.

Ann M.
4 weeks ago

No ebike is perfect, this is a thread dedicated to sharing known issues or problems with electric trikes from Liberty Trikes as well as any help and solutions you know of. Sometimes that means a DIY fix and other times it can mean a recall, software update or part replacement by a dealer.

Please be respectful and constructive with feedback, this is not a space for hate speech. In many cases, representatives from the company will see feedback and use it to improve their product. In the end, the goal is to enjoy riding and help each other go further and be safer.

Sally
1 month ago

Hi all. :)

I'm addicted.

I got into having an electric assist bike last fall when I purchased a pedicab just for my own personal enjoyment.

I want to share what led up to me buying the Latch:

We had a disaster last month: The battery (Rechargeable Power Energy aka: RPE) ignited and caused a serious garage fire. The contents of my garage and the bike were a total loss. It could have been worse - the garage is detached from the house (so no significant fumes got in the house) and there was no loss of life, etc. Had the fire started at a different time, it could have easily taken down the neighbor's house if the garage had blown, etc.

In the end, there is probably about $40,000-$50,000 worth of loss that happened - but think of how it could have been a million dollar house and loss of life, etc. This was *petty* in perspective to a company that supposedly does big business. But RPE could *not* be worse to deal with. Just horrible beyond belief.

This made me soooo sad!!! I truly enjoyed having the "trike"...

RPE wouldn't even discuss the situation and they avoid this issue (just rude and they hang up the phone!) by saying I was not their customer! Horrible. (and I have a packing slip from them showing they sent the battery to me!) Anyway... just had to share that.

Here was happier times...

I'm still getting another cab like this - we're picking it up next week. But to satiate my need for a little sunshine and outdoors time, I got the Latch.

Gotta say that coming off of my trike on on to a 2-wheeler was a bit of a transition!

I do not commute anywhere (I work from home) .. but I like having a bike to do little runs to the grocery store or to go to the coffee shop, etc. I try to take the bike whenever the weather is decent (dry and above 30 degrees.)

I decked out my Latch with the pannier bags. I also have a set of bungees that hold that market basket on the back. My computer bag can fit inside that basket. I also have a speaker bungee'd under the seat (pedicabber trait - tunes go hand in hand with biking) :)

I'll say that I'm spoiled by having the assist for being able to scoot across intersections, etc. The cab (it had a mid drive motor) was fun because when you pull up to somewhere and have to stop, you just *stop*, *sit*, and hang out. When it's time to get movin', you can just throw some weight into the crank and get the bike moving easier than starting on a 2 wheeler. I do love that... so going to a 2 wheeler is .. .well... getting back into having a bike instead of the trike. :) I am thinking that when the new pedicab gets here, this Latch might not get used as much. The cabs are just so fun.

But.. I bought the Latch to have some versatility. I can't easily take my cab anywhere I go without dealing with a trailer, etc... but the Latch can come with me on any trips by just putting it in the back of the SUV or my RV.

The power of the assist on the Latch really did surprise me. I am not out for speed... I'm out to enjoy the ride and get some exercise. I leave the bike on "3" (highest gear) and I usually leave the assist on 1 or 2 (it goes to 5).

So far, the longest ride/day I've had it out was about 15 miles. The display said I still had well over 50% of juice left. Not bad.

I do like the display. It indicates how much power you are pulling from the assist. So, I try to keep that down to one bar while cruisin'. :)

I've read some reviews about the Latch being heavy, etc. I personally think that's a good thing. I appreciate the way this is built.

I do like having the doggie basket on the front of my bike.. but dealing with that weight just isn't suitable for this little bike - at least for me. I don't think I'd feel safe with any weight moving around up there.

One "con"... I'm not impressed with the headlight. I feel I have avoided using the Latch at night because it doesn't feel as safe as my well-lit pedicab. I truly enjoy riding at night.. so I might try to see what other options I could use to get a better headlight on this thing.

Overall, I'm loving this bike. I know I have a weird situation... I just wanted something that would be versatile to own alongside having the pedicab around for most uses. I'm pleased with my decision. This is a great little thing to own. :)

I also want to give a plug to Blue Monkey Bikes in Salt Lake City. They were exceptionally wonderful to deal with! Being 59, a woman, and overweight... it's easy to get snubbed when you go into a bike shop. ( I went into one bike shop last year - they didn't have the bike I was thinking of - and when I said I was interested in something "priced under about 4", the dude thought I meant $400 - omg - even though the other bike I came in to see was in the $3k range. Just sayin'... :) )

The guys at Blue Monkey were awesome and didn't throw any stupid attitude. It was a great transaction.

Ognyan Bozhilov
2 months ago

Hi,

my name is Ognyan Bozhilov. I'm leading a small team, based in Sofia (Bulgaria) and we're developing a new type of small, electric vehicle for city commuting. It's called 'Narcine' - a tilting, foldable trike. We already have a working prototype and we even raced it against a car to compare real life commuting times (see the link below:))Here're the brief technical specs:

Motor:500W, direct drive
Battery: 11,6 Ah
Max. Speed : 25km/h
Range: 20km.
Weight: about 25 kg.

https://www.narcine.com/

I'd love to hear your comments on the video and on the trike in general.
Cheers,
Ognyan.

Tom899
2 months ago

I have a new Mini, less than 10 miles on it. I think the bike is great and am really going to enjoy it! Like the rest of you I think it needs higher gearing. For me it's not so much that I want to go faster than 20-24mph, I'm not comfortable at cadence speeds above 80. I have an electric pedal assist recumbent trike that I put on a Schlumpf High-Speed drive. It is great! It increases both low and high gearing dramatically. I usually just leave it in the higher gear setting because it's flat where I live. I'm wondering if one will fit in the bottom bracket of the Mini? I'm going to research it. Here's my review of it on my trike. http://www.bentrideronline.com/messageboard/showthread.php?t=126797
And here is what it is all about. http://www.schlumpf.ch/hp/schlumpf/faq.getriebe.engl.htm#A
The disadvantage is cost.
Well, in the short time researching I did a measurement on the Mini bottom bracket and it's about 100 mm wide, which I think is way to wide for any of the Schlumpfs made. So far I come up with a spec of 68 up to 72mm and BSA size.

Tom899
2 months ago

I have a new Mini, less than 10 miles on it. I think the bike is great and am really going to enjoy it! Like the rest of you I think it needs higher gearing. For me it's not so much that I want to go faster than 20-24mph, I'm not comfortable at cadence speeds above 80. I have an electric pedal assist recumbent trike that I put on a Schlumpf High-Speed drive. It is great! It increases both low and high gearing dramatically. I usually just leave it in the higher gear setting because it's flat where I live. I'm wondering if one will fit in the bottom bracket of the Mini? I'm going to research it. Here's my review of it on my trike. http://www.bentrideronline.com/messageboard/showthread.php?t=126797
And here is what it is all about. http://www.schlumpf.ch/hp/schlumpf/faq.getriebe.engl.htm#A
The disadvantage is cost.

Oilseed
2 months ago

Hi JR.

Thank you very much for the reply and links to other solutions.
I checked them both.
The liberty looks good and has the twist grip, but the wheel are too small. if we could ge the larger diameter wheels, then it could be an option.
the Pedego (the model that was reviewed) is no longer being offered. They are revamping their trike solution. The rep at Pedego said 1t batch will ship end of March.
All presold to dealers.
the next production run will be end of July.
No specs or pics on their website, so I don't have the details on this yet. if anyone 'does' have the new info, please post.

just to note (to others reading this thread) the 'intent' was to 'inform' other elderly buyers of Electric TRIKEs that IZIP does NOT offer a proper throttle for this bike.
so before you put down your hard earned cash, be sure to ask the dealer (and tell them clearly, what you want.)

cheers

J.R.
2 months ago

Checkout these two trikes with throttle on demand as standard equipment. They might be better suited to your needs, especially the Liberty.

https://electricbikereview.com/liberty-trike/electric-tricycle/

https://electricbikereview.com/pedego/trike/

Alex M
2 months ago

I'm 'sure' they could offer a twist grip throttle for an electric bike/trike. yes?)

Bummer. Poor dealer/salesperson quality.

Why, of course twist throttles exist - at least as numerous as push-button, if not more. If you already got rid of your Izip, you can buy Sun Trike for much less: https://electricbikereview.com/sun-bicycles/24-traditional-electric-tricycle/. The red button is - I believe - reverse speed for throttle. Though I don't like the mere presence of the reverse - can be confusing for some people. Your dad wants it to be something like a scooter or Tesla car for a fraction of the cost, but ebike throttle is not designed to be used at all times. Wrist can get tired of twisting. Or a thumb, if this is a trigger/button. And, most of them are "zippy", with boost increasing from zero to full with a slight twist, like half-inch movement of the wrist.

Most shops would be able to replace the push-button with a twist-grip and move it from left to right handlebar for a modest fee.

Oilseed
2 months ago

My father, (who's 87 years young) ordered and received a IZIP E3Go recently. This is a TRIKE, and due to his age, his kids felt it would be 'safer' for him to ride (more stable than a 2 wheeler). He's had an electric 2 wheel bike for 8 years now. rides it everywhere. However, his current 2 wheel bike came with (and has) a 'twist grip throttle'. Not being electric bike owners ourselves (his children) but have owned and ridden motorcycles and scooters, we made the 'assumption' that 'ALL" electric bikes/trikes or power vehicles come equipped (standard) with 'twist grip throttles'. we discovered, too late, that this is not the case.
Al that is offered is a 'push button' 'boost' control. which does not perform as a throttle (similar to a motorcycles. scooter or like a foot control on a car.)
Not having this feature is a deal breaker, for my Dad (and I suspect it would be for many elderly people who just need a form of powered transportation, not a tool for exercise).

So, for those out there looking for a TRIKE with twist grip Throttle control, this is NOT your solution.
( I'm sure IZIP could offer this, why they do not.... Is a mystery. maybe they can reply?)

Oilseed
2 months ago

I'm new to the forum, so please forgive my ignorance.
I'm writing this reply for my Father (who's 87 years young). He's had 2 wheel electric bike for 8 years now.
it was built in Taiwan (Sorry, I don't know the model or Manufacturer). he rides it frequently to the store and to Church. Because of his age, we (his kids) were concerned that riding a
2 wheel bike (at his age) was a bit too risky and wanted him to get an ELECTRIC TRIKE. After scouring the internet for solutions, we found a local dealer who offered the IZIP E3GO.
Looking at the specification, it seems to be a great fit. My Dad placed the order (with the dealer saying "if you don't want the Trike, when delivered, it's a 25% restocking fee.)
the Trike cost $2500.
When the trike was delivered to the dealer and setup, my Dad went there to pick it up. After adding some options (basket etc) he gave them a Check (yes, he still does business with Checks)
He noticed that the Trike did not come equipped with a throttle (Twist Grip, like his current 2 wheel electric bike). so he asked for this to be added.
the Dealer said "we'll have to order that it will take another 4 weeks. So we waited.... The "throttle" arrived, and was installed. then they delivered the Trike to my Dad's home.
He looked at the trike and said "where's the twist grip throttle?" they showed him the PUSH BUTTONS you use for boost (on the left side of the handle bar, no less).
He tried to use those, but it was like riding a roller coaster, speed up.... then coast down... then speed up... Not acceptable.
I contacted IZIP directly to see if they could provide a Twist grip throttle. their reply. "Sorry, no bueno"! What???
not having a twist grip throttle on an electric bike is like ordering a hot dog (from a cart vendor) and getting no Bun. :-(

Not making (or providing) a twist grip throttle control for electric bikes makes NO sense. especially for 'anyone' who is in need of a 'TRIKE".
think about it for a second. Elderly people just want to 'go'. they don't want to pedal. if they wanted to do that. they would get a regular bike, yes?
again, my Dad is 87. so before you begin flying is with rebuttals. please keep this in mind.
Suffice it to say, the IZIP E3GO is headed back to the dealer (and my dad is out $650). and we're Not happy customers, with the dealer OR IZIP.
(note: if they can put a foot throttle on an electric car (i.e. Tesla), I'm 'sure' they could offer a twist grip throttle for an electric bike/trike. yes?)
or maybe the Tesla owners, 'peddle' their cars (like the Flintstones) to get it moving?? I'm just saying....

Fdiblasi
2 months ago

Hi Ann,

Here you can find the details of the tricycle:
https://jorviktricycles.com/product/jorvik-20-aluminium-electric-trike-adults-childs-tricycle-250w-36v-e-trike/

And this is an image of the piece that is currently broken. It has the info on voltage.

I cannot get a picture of the cables but if you don't manage to find the model I will upload it asap to this post.

Thank you very much!

1/1
Fred in Seattle
3 months ago

I was looking at Brooks seats for the Rad Mini which I don't have yet. (debating between between the Mini or Mariner but leaning toward the Mini).
I'm 65 years old and usually ride an ICE electric trike. I want the Mini for it's folding capability.
Seat and back comfort is important. I'm thinking of a BodyFloat seat post and Brooks Saddle. Brooks makes many models and recommends a C19 Cambium for more upright position.
So, my question is, would the Mini be considered upright riding position? And, anyone using a BodyFloat and or Brooks saddles on their Mini?
Thanks,
Tom
I am using the body float. I'm on the short side 5'8" and get back aches when hunched over. I moved my stock seat forward and raised the hade bars . I now sit mostly upright and am comfortable after 30th + mile rides.

Matt A
3 months ago

O.K. Matt, Good idea - I'll post to this thread.

Here's the funny thing: You've ridden my new bike, I have not! Just bought it this week (as a demo) totally on faith without a test ride. As you mentioned, there isn't much out there yet re: reviews. I've been looking for an ebike with the right combination of components that would come from a manufacturer with a sterling reputation, purchased from an reputable/knowledgeable dealer. After spending this winter researching, I decided that I'd finally hit on it - contacted Propel and we made the deal. Probably the easiest sale of a high end bike that Chris has made in a while! Actually, I'm in the northern ex-burbs of NYC, so Propel is only a 1 hour drive away, so it is stranger still that I haven't been to the shop (but that's a different story). Yes, a leap of faith - or a very expensive disappointment - but I don't see how you can go wrong with an R&M. Sometimes you just have to roll the dice. Life is too short, etc.

Main motivation for getting this - daily commute and possible long distance touring. My office moved to a "commutable" location a while back. I was doing the commute on my human powered Cannondale, but eventually found it was just a bit too hilly to arrive at work without being too sweaty, etc. Plus, I'm now aged 63 (and counting!), so the body does tend to revolt. Last year, I thought I'd solve that issue by electrifying my Greenspeed trike. I purchased an EcoSpeed boom mount kit for the trike and installed it last spring. Figured that the boost would allow me to neutralize any visibility issues that the low seating position creates by being able to keep up with traffic and accelerating faster. Well, the conversion went well and riding the "enhanced" trike is a total kick (it flies!), but . . . after a few trips to work on it, I realized that I was arriving sweat free but entirely too tense - still not a real street friendly vehicle, at least with the drivers in my area (where Redneck meets the Bronx). So I'm back to using the trike for bike paths and country roads. It did sell me on the ebike concept though.

Having used a Rohloff for over 8 years, forking over the extra bucks for this option on the Delite was a no-brainer. The Rohloff on my trike has 20,000 + rough miles on it and has proven to be bulletproof, even with the addition of the powerful EcoSpeed mid-drive motor. Won't take delivery for another few weeks - Chris needs it on the floor to sell from while waiting for a new one to arrive - not a problem considering that it is 22 degrees outside at the moment (!).

And yes, I hope to eventually do some extended touring on it once I've set up the bike and gotten any kinks ironed out. Having been cross country and through Alaska on two wheels "self contained" without electric assist, this should prove to be an interesting alternative. Yeah, a few extra battery packs in the panniers might be helpful. I may just get spoiled.
I think you made a good purchase, the bike is great, and I like the orange color too. Don't worry you'll love it. I would have went with a Rohloff if I had the experience with it that you do. I just wanted the belt drive though:)

That sounds cool about the trike, I would probably be scared to ride that! I was actually riding yesterday for a few hours and it was absolutely freezing lol. It sounds like you have been on some really cool rides and I hope to take some similar ones on this bike one day. You should post pictures on here of any ebike travels you do once you get your new bike!

GX vs. GT: So Matt, I'm going to be interested in comparing your on-road experience with your GT vs. my GX. As a long time member and advocate for the Rails to Trails Conservancy, I love to get on these paths, which more often than not are ballast. Also, when touring in the West or Alaska, the more interesting roads are gravel/graded dirt. So, in addition to a comfortable commuter, I wanted a touring capable sprung bike with beefier tires. The GX fits the bill w/27.5 x 2.35 Rock Razors standard. I do expect to be swapping them out for a more street friendly tire for the daily commute - most likely Schwalbe Marathon Supreme 27.5 x 2.00 tires. The expectation is that the e-assist will even out the disadvantage of the extra rolling resistance on the road. Will see.

I have enjoyed the GT tires on there, the Super Moto-x, this edition of them has the reflective sidewalls which is great. I did like the GX tires, and with the assist you will have no problem with any tire, it just may affect the range. I did feel I could turn faster and maybe even stop faster with the GX tires, they felt more in control. The GT tires though are great for me in the city and I would take them on light trails no problem. I have ridden on some dirt/muddy trails a little bit, and the tires do fine. I definitely enjoy the GT.

Drumulac
3 months ago

... Thanks! Congrats on your purchase as well! I did try that bike out, it was great. It would be cool if you could share your experience on this thread about the bike. I think anything Delite is free game in here. I think it would be helpful to everyone here if we continue this thread with new experiences and stories, I don't think mine alone could keep this thread going :) But it's up to you, I don't want to stop you from doing your own thread either!

O.K. Matt, Good idea - I'll post to this thread.

Here's the funny thing: You've ridden my new bike, I have not! Just bought it this week (as a demo) totally on faith without a test ride. As you mentioned, there isn't much out there yet re: reviews. I've been looking for an ebike with the right combination of components that would come from a manufacturer with a sterling reputation, purchased from an reputable/knowledgeable dealer. After spending this winter researching, I decided that I'd finally hit on it - contacted Propel and we made the deal. Probably the easiest sale of a high end bike that Chris has made in a while! Actually, I'm in the northern ex-burbs of NYC, so Propel is only a 1 hour drive away, so it is stranger still that I haven't been to the shop (but that's a different story). Yes, a leap of faith - or a very expensive disappointment - but I don't see how you can go wrong with an R&M. Sometimes you just have to roll the dice. Life is too short, etc.

Main motivation for getting this - daily commute and possible long distance touring. My office moved to a "commutable" location a while back. I was doing the commute on my human powered Cannondale, but eventually found it was just a bit too hilly to arrive at work without being too sweaty, etc. Plus, I'm now aged 63 (and counting!), so the body does tend to revolt. Last year, I thought I'd solve that issue by electrifying my Greenspeed trike. I purchased an EcoSpeed boom mount kit for the trike and installed it last spring. Figured that the boost would allow me to neutralize any visibility issues that the low seating position creates by being able to keep up with traffic and accelerating faster. Well, the conversion went well and riding the "enhanced" trike is a total kick (it flies!), but . . . after a few trips to work on it, I realized that I was arriving sweat free but entirely too tense - still not a real street friendly vehicle, at least with the drivers in my area (where Redneck meets the Bronx). So I'm back to using the trike for bike paths and country roads. It did sell me on the ebike concept though.

Having used a Rohloff for over 8 years, forking over the extra bucks for this option on the Delite was a no-brainer. The Rohloff on my trike has 20,000 + rough miles on it and has proven to be bulletproof, even with the addition of the powerful EcoSpeed mid-drive motor. Won't take delivery for another few weeks - Chris needs it on the floor to sell from while waiting for a new one to arrive - not a problem considering that it is 22 degrees outside at the moment (!).

And yes, I hope to eventually do some extended touring on it once I've set up the bike and gotten any kinks ironed out. Having been cross country and through Alaska on two wheels "self contained" without electric assist, this should prove to be an interesting alternative. Yeah, a few extra battery packs in the panniers might be helpful. I may just get spoiled.

Igor Loshakov
5 days ago

....I've got these longer legs... good one :)

John Shields
1 week ago

How to pronounce derailleur https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/derailleur

Jai's Media
2 weeks ago

LMAO !!!!!! "Fairly well zip-tied" Phahahaah!!! awesome reviewing ........

DoctorNoMD
3 weeks ago

I want this trike. BAD.

Heiner Ali
4 weeks ago

Rediculas...2500 $$$...guess this CULT of ego freak eco-scammers has no limit...ha...ha...ha.
THE TEAM...ha....ha...ha...ha

Pibbles 'n Bits
4 weeks ago

13:57, this guy is a total panzy. You should be going FASTER, like over 9000!!!!!!!!!

Woodenhouses Nick
4 weeks ago

that thing is awesome!! looks like u could almost fit a passenger

Rodolfo lopes santos
1 month ago

Are you a friend of gentiles, how much does one equal yours? With the electric motor?

Nicolas L
1 month ago

The rider is positioned too far to the front. so the center of gravity is not in the right place. The rear wheel keeps lifting up the ground at the smallest bump.

jaekib
1 month ago

Really great review.

Jennifer Davis
1 month ago

If you mostly ride on paved roads with a little dirt road riding (with a little gravel), would the eco tad or the fat tad be better?

Jason Kraft
1 month ago

eco-tad is more for road riding. That said fat-tad is fun and there is a road tire upgrade for $100. You can see a video on this on electrictrike.com. we put either set on before shipping and include the other set of tires in the box when shipped.

Kyler Loewen
2 months ago

How much is this bike?

Jason Kraft
1 month ago

https://www.electrictrike.com/collections/recumbent-electric-tricycles/products/fat-tad-cxs-tadpole-electric-trike

Daryl Parsons
2 months ago

You ruin your reviews by waving you hand in front of the camera...

Eric Brooke
2 months ago

two gay retards all i have to say

Jason Kraft
1 month ago

ha! That's rude.

milliamp
2 months ago

Seems like a really reasonable price for that bike. It's cool that they are so disability friendly, I have a blind friend that would love one of these.

Morten Andersen
2 months ago

l notice 3 things that are flawed. 1. lt's too expensive, 2. l'm too poor and 3. l'd be using too much money.

Ocean Summit Jewellery
2 months ago

Cut all the dialogue!!! Skip ahead to 20 minutes and watch the ride. Describe the bike when you ride the bike, already

Get rid Of Money
2 months ago

blah blah blah blah... how the fuck fast does it go??

Melissa Madrid
2 months ago

What do you think of the Practical Pod Ride bicycle watching you guys progress for some time now really love your theories and you're different bicycles and was just curious what your opinion was on the Pod Ride?😁⭐😉

Ted Kidd
2 months ago

might be cool to have a summary video and a deep dive video for these reviews. After about 3 minutes I'm ready to see you ride it - 18 min @ still talking....

EDIT. yep, interesting vid shots. fun watching the other guy ride it. Might be time for more cameras if revenue justifies.