A2B Metro Review

A2b Metro Electric Bike Review 1
A2b Metro Review
A2b Metro 500 Watt Hub Motor
A2b Metro Rear Shock
A2b Metro Throttle And Brakes
A2b Metro Tires And Disc Brakes
A2b Metro Seat
A2b Metro Electric Bike Review 1
A2b Metro Review
A2b Metro 500 Watt Hub Motor
A2b Metro Rear Shock
A2b Metro Throttle And Brakes
A2b Metro Tires And Disc Brakes
A2b Metro Seat

Summary

  • Full suspension, forward positioned pedals and comfort seat make this bike feel like a Vespa scooter
  • High power 500 watt gearless rear hub motor provides torque and speed without a lot of noise
  • Unique frame design and extra wide tires make parking and locking the bike a bit challenging at times
  • Integrated fenders, front and rear lights and computer display work well and look great

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

A2B

Model:

Metro

Price:

$2,700 USD

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Urban, Commuting

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

5 Year Frame, 2 Year Electronics and Battery

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2013

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

72 lbs (32.65 kg)

Frame Material:

TIG Welded 6061 Aluminum Alloy

Geometry Measurements:

61" Long x 47" High x 23" Wide

Frame Types:

Mid-Step

Frame Colors:

White, Black, Silver, Red

Frame Fork Details:

Suspension

Frame Rear Details:

Spring Suspension Arm

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Alivio

Shifter Details:

Grip Twist on Left Bar

Pedals:

Aluminum Alloy Platform with Rubber Grips

Brake Details:

Avid BB5 Mechanical Disc

Grips:

Flat Rubber

Saddle:

Ultra Motor Comfort

Rims:

Alex DX32

Tire Brand:

Kenda Kraze, 20" x 3"

Wheel Sizes:

20 in (50.8cm)

Accessories:

Double Leg Kickstand, Aluminum Alloy Bash Guard, Two Chain Tensioners to Support Long Chain, Oversize Plastic Fenders, Front and Rear LED Lights, Bar-End Mirror, Optional Second Battery for Rear Rack Arm

Other:

Some Older Models Have Key on Downtube, Newer Models Have a Display Panel with Speed and Battery Capacity Near the Stem, Battery is Not Easily Removable, Maximum Weight 325 Pounds

Electronic Details

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Gearless Direct Drive Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Motor Peak Output:

750 watts

Battery Brand:

Sanyo

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11.4 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

410.4 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4 hours

Estimated Min Range:

20 miles (32 km)

Estimated Max Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Display Accessories:

Keyed Ignition

Drive Mode:

Twist Throttle

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

The A2B Metro is one of the most iconic electric bikes out there. Its unique design turns heads because unlike other electric bikes, it resembles a scooter and has full suspension. It was one of the earlier entries into the US market, arriving in September 2008, and features top of the line battery, motor and computer system… but it will cost you. The bike is powerful, ergonomic and easy to mount with the low step design which has evolved over the years. It isn’t perfect for every application but it’s one of my favorite bikes for cruising around town because it’s so comfortable and cool.

Worth noting real quick is that Ultra Motor, the UK based company that created the A2B Metro, was acquired by India based Hero Eco in January 2012. For this reason some people refer to the bike as an Ultra Motor, others by just A2B and still others as a Hero Eco. Hope that helps ;)

Back to the bike! The downsides of this design are weight, challenge in locking at bike racks and noise created by the chain running through the spring loaded chain guide. Most electric bikes weigh in around 50 pounds while the Metro is 72. This isn’t a deal killer because the motor is so strong and efficient but lifting the bike and even pedaling can be a challenge.

The vast majority of electric bikes out there use 26″ or 29″ wheels but the A2B Metro uses much smaller 20″ wheels. One benefit is increased torque and the other is lower center of gravity. The rear wheel on this bike needed room to travel up and down because of the built in shock. Had the bike been designed with larger wheels like it’s sister the A2B Velociti, the rider would have been positioned much higher and the relaxed position would have been compromised.

The wheels themselves work well but the distance between the rear hub and bottom bracket (where the pedals connect to the frame) is quite far. In order to keep the chain from falling off or whacking the frame, a spring loaded chain guide has been added and that makes a bit more noise with added friction when pedaling. I do feel like there’s one downside to the current design and that is ground clearance. Look at the picture below real quick, even though the chain is elevated way up out of the way, the kickstand still hangs down and can hit curbs and other elevated obstacles. To me this is a miss and I wish the kickstand was placed more out of the way. In my time riding this bike the kickstand also bounced when going over bumps which is annoying. I’m not a big fan of these motorcycle-style double sided kickstands. I usually take them off and replace with a side folding design but with the Metro, since weight is such a factor, it’s worth leaving on.

The tires on this bike are a blessing and a curse. The upside is that they absorb energy and shock because they are wider and contain more air than traditional tires. They corner well, grip the road and look amazing. The downside is that the increased surface area exposes them to more punctures and many riders have expressed frustration in the overall quality of the tire material itself. They work fine for streets but considering the dual suspension setup and temptation of going off road, flats could be an issue and they aren’t as easy to fix at a bike shop because the tubes are an untraditional size.

My favorite part about this bike is the seat and upright positioning. It feels a lot like riding a Vespa, and that’s a good thing! The seat is soft and comfortable, the handles are close so you don’t have to lean forward and strain your neck and back. You’re kept relatively low to the ground so leaning sideways isn’t physically demanding. Check out the picture again, see how the pedals are further forward? This makes for a more comfortable ride. Your feat easily reach the pedals and feel relaxed. None of this really helps you pedal the bike but that’s not really one of the strong suites of this model, it doesn’t even have pedal assist.

In terms of parking and locking this bike, there are a few challenges worth noting. The tires are extra large which makes them harder to squeeze into some racks. The frame is thick and doesn’t incorporate a large triangle, like most standard bicycles, which means you have to be creative and use a cable to lock up. The good news is, this bike requires a key to start and it’s heavy so that makes it much harder to steal. While we’re on the topic of keys I should note, on the first generation design of the A2B Metro the key was actually placed on the top side of the downtube vs. the handlebars. This made it susceptible to getting kicked when mounting or dismounting. The design has been changed in subsequent generations but it’s one way to tell older models apart. Now the ignition switch is positioned on handlebars and a fancy speedometer has also been added.

This bike does well on range with the stock battery which is mounted inside the downtube. This positioning helps to distribute weight evenly from front to rear and keep the center of gravity low, making it natural to handle. The downside here is that the battery is harder to remove for charging; it’s really designed to be charged on the bike. If your commute is extra long, there is an option for a second battery pack that mounts to the rear rack portion of the frame. This changes the weight distribution a little bit, and makes the shock more bouncy, but looks good and is much easier to remove for charging.

If you’re looking for a smooth ride with comfortable seating position and powerful motor, this is a great choice. The A2B Metro is a very capable bike and it’s fun to ride. The cables are all integrated into the frame, the speedometer is sleek and the keyed ignition creates good security, especially paired with the weight. If you’re shopping for a stylish, efficient transporter ,this is a good choice. But if you want to blend in a bit more and take advantage of traditional bicycle racks and accessories, this bike may not be right for you.

Pros:

  • Built in front and rear LED lights
  • Built in front and rear fenders
  • Keyed on/off switch to prevent tampering at the bike rack
  • Integrated cables for a clean design
  • Dual shocks smooth out the ride without creating flex in frame or wobbling
  • Super comfortable seat and upright riding position
  • Powerful, smooth and quiet 500 watt rear hub motor is brushless and gearless

Cons:

  • Harder to attach on bike racks or car racks
  • Larger surface area on mid-grade tires susceptible to flats
  • Pedals don’t offer as much traction as some with spikes, be careful in the rain
  • Louder pedaling because of chain guide and extended chain
  • Low hanging kickstand, bounces when going over bumps

Resources:

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Mike
5 years ago

Central Ontario Canada — 2013-01-11
Nice review… Thank you! — I would like to add that smaller diameter 20″ wheels put a lot more torque (power) on the road! :-) — I assume your review is on the much improved Gen.2 Metro? (Can’t find date on your review !?)
I always pedal assist my Metro and find it very easy/comfortable and completely silent… Here Gen.2 Metros are delivered without upper chain guide and it works just fine. I’m average weight/height 73kg/1.73m. Very happy with my Metro… just over one year and over 5000 km totally trouble free.

Reply
paul8bee
4 years ago

Had the A2B for 2 weeks now. So far so good.March 01 2014 Bike handles well and has amazing power. It will do 31-33 km/hr on the flat, and still do 24-27 km/hr on the one incline I have on the way. The seat is a bit low for me, and am looking to get an extension to make pedalling easier. I am relying on this machine to get me to work and back each day. 7.8 km x 4 trips/day. First week was just rain rain, and freezing cold. I am wondering how the machine will hold up to all that west coast Vancouver island water> The shop techs tell me the bike is sealed up pretty well. The hydrolic brakes feel a bit spongy, and I would rather have a simple cable system.

Reply
paul8bee
4 years ago

may 15. 2000 km’s in 2 1/2 months. So far so good. 250 one way trips made. The front disc pad wore out but was easy to replace by myself. I have ridden in cold, and wind and rain, rain, rain. The rain kicks up road dirt that wears down the brakes. Also the pedal assist sensor that is mounted on the crank sprocket quit. Too much road dust. Velec told me it was a design flaw, and to just leave it. I think that I need to hose the thing down more during rainy weather. This bike is my MAIN transportation, and it has to get me through the next 12 months. Thumbs up so far.

Reply
Rusty Turner
3 years ago

I’ve got almost 10,000 miles on a first-generation A2B and have had very few issues. The auxiliary battery died while under warranty, and I’m on my 3rd set of tires. I changed the brakes out for BB7s early on and have only replaced the pads a couple times. I’ve looked far and wide for alternative tires, because the originals do poorly in the wet…and it rains a lot in Portland. Thus far, I’ve found no workable replacements. Oh, and I replaced the short seat post with a longer one and fitted a Hobson seat. Now it fits AND is more comfortable. I’m VERY happy with the A2B.

Reply
Court Rye
3 years ago

Awesome testimonial Rusty, thanks for sharing. I was just checking the review of the A2B Octave (which is similar to the Metro, just re-named) and commenter “joepah” said that he was able to use 16″ moped tires to replace the stock ones that came on the bike. He said they were more durable and I found some on Amazon (the first ones, Shinko SR714) look promising. Hope this helps you out!

Reply
Erik
3 years ago

I own two first gen a2b metros that I bought used. I put around 150 miles a week on either or of these bikes and here is what I do and don’t like about them and you will see that I have more likes then dislikes but the dislikes for particularly the first generation metro’s are fairly big complaints.

LIKES
– solid feel, very comfortable I can ride them everyday for several miles and show up to work not tired or with achy joints
– 3 inch wide tires are very stable and I find they work great in the rain. I used to get a lot of flats now I use sealant in the tubes and the problem is fixed
– Great battery longevity, The batteries in both of the used first gen metros I bought hold a strong charge and they are several years old. Amazing.
– Great quality charger with XLR connection and it makes sense cause the chargers cost around 150$
– very good kickstand heavy duty durable and will stand the bike up even on sloped ground
– has handled the heat and the rain great so far. I have ridden it in over 90 degree heat and in the rain several times no issues yet
– BB5 brakes do the job great for me. Easy to adjust with the turn of a wheel. Takes like 5 seconds to adjust each one and I do it at stoplights frequently.
– wide Alex rims are good and only seem to need truing about once every 5 thousand miles
– bike looks great

DISLIKES
-first gen motor is not compatible with second gen a2b metro bikes and vise verse because the controller was relocated from the motor and put into the frame on newer metro models and the octave. First gen motors may be getting hard to find. I had to replace a hub motor on one out of two of my a2b bikes and I couldn’t get a warranty with it because its already an old part that’s not in production anymore . I think i got a cheaper price because it was a first gen motor with no warranty but not really sure what a second gen one costs. It would have been nice if they got the motor/controller design right the first time but they didn’t.
-The rear fender is a very poor design that hits against the tire on even small bumps making a lot of loud plastic slapping noises. I noticed they have a different fenders on the second gen metro and octave models which was a good move. Hopefully that one doesn’t hit the tire. I have the rear fenders off both of my bikes even riding in the rain cause i can’t stand how much (broken plastic noise) the rear fender makes when it hits the tire literally on small bumps in the road. The front fender however works great and is very tough as well.

I really like the metro’s unique style and stable robust ride. I hope that a2b keeps the new bike parts compatible with older bike parts.. For example if I buy an octave in 2015. I want to be able to still find a motor or battery brand new that will fit the bike in 2020

Reply
Court Rye
3 years ago

Great feedback Erik, thanks for sharing your experience with the A2B Metro and discussing some of the things you liked and some of the things that have been improved. I agree that it delivers one of the more comfortable and stable rides on electric bikes and even though the fenders could drag a bit on first generation, it’s nice that they fixed it for newer models because I liked the feeling that you would stay dry and could almost use it like a scooter or car to get around no matter the weather.

Reply
paul
3 years ago

Nov 01 2014. Now 8 months on the road @800/km per month (6500 km total) and have plugged the charger in 850 times to ride the 8 km x 4 trips a day to work. (1/2 charge each time @ 2 hr per/charge) (the bike shop says that is the same as 425 full charges)

So far not one mechanical Issue with the bike. Last month alone a foot of rain came down, but did not affect the bike any. My dislikes are the stock Kenda tires. I’ve had 6 flats so far (I guess I ride on a busy hy-way and lots of debries). On my bike, you have to remove the Back Shiftier/derailleur, to get the back wheel off. I’ve spoken with Parker Ross at head office http://www.wearea2b.com/en_ca/contact and he told me that they changed the back arm design, and they are working on a new Mounting bracket for the shifter. (wish they got it right the first time, but this bike is still in its pioneering stages).

Then he suggested a tire change. he wrote “One of the popular replacement tire options is a DOT rated motorcycle tire, which gives it a very hard casing and flats seem to disappear. This specific tire is a Shinko SR714 in size 2.25-16, making it narrower then stock. This tire is sized much differently because it is for motorcycles, which makes it tough to install, but is a great tire once mounted… another tire that we have used is the Odyssey Hawk in 20″ x 2.4“, which is a BMX bicycle tire. This tire has a nice sticky outer layer, great for wet conditions, and is dual ply, so highly puncture resistant. It is also narrower then stock, and can hold up to 100 psi, so it is a much smoother rolling tire…”

I ordered the shinko sr714 p-speed rating, There are two models, the L speed rating (good for 75 mph) and the P speed rating( good for 93 mph) I did not know the difference when I ordered. Hope I got the right one. I wish I had ordered the l speed tire, but I’ll have to wait and see, when the tire gets here in a week.

My next issue was the battery temperature. The weather here is getting colder, and cold seems to slow down the battery. Since I can not store the bike indoors, I bought a heat lamp and am going to make some kind of mini garage for it to get through this winter. I go to work at 3:30 am each morning and that is the coldest time of the day. I find the red battery indicator light comes on much more when the temp goes below 50 degrees F. I appreciate all comments of links that relate to this bike. This bike is my only transportation, and It just has to keep on rolling.

Reply
Court Rye
3 years ago

This is such great feedback Paul! Thank you for sharing the official tips from A2B about replacement tires, I’ve heard others express that the stock ones can get flats but your advice actually says which ones to go for. I wish you luck with the heat lamp and garage (be careful not to start a fire!) is there any way you can just remove the battery and save electricity and cost? This was one of the big negative points with the Metro, the battery in the down tube isn’t so easy to get off :/

Reply
Erik
3 years ago

Update : After a good luck run with not getting flat tires and thinking that sealant was saving the day I did start getting a number of flats shortly after. I think it is just the width of the tires, the fact they are still a bicycle tire and not really that thick especially in the lines of the tread pattern which is where i usually get punctures, and this is a heavy bike to be on bicycle tires. The sealant only seems to plug slow leaks and tiny punctures of that nature. I recently patched a couple of tubes for the metro. I will be testing them soon and hope it works, and it should work. I bought a patch kit that came with glue, 8 patches and sandpaper for 2 dollars. This will be a great way to keep the tubes alive because they do get punctured a lot. I think anyone who purchases a bike like this needs to be able to change a flat well or its not really worth it. I change a back tire flat in about 25 minutes now because I’ve done it so many times. Everything else on the bike works well and I love that they barely need any maintenance. The Avid BB5 brake pads are easy to change out. I’m glad the wheels on the metro stay in true for a while because I’m not any good at truing wheels yet. I read the post where someone said they put shinko scooter tires on the metro. I think that sounds like a good idea but scooter tires are probably going to be quite difficult to get on or off the rim and I would be a bit concerned with using steel tire levers on the A2B metro’s aluminum rims. One good thing about the Kenda Kraze bicycle tires on the metro is that they are very easy to get off the rim with a single plastic tire lever. I may still try the shinko scooter tires in the future but for now I will just stick with trying out the patches. Sometimes I ride regular road cycles to work but often times I ride my a2b metro to work only and I’m putting around 500 miles a month on it in the bike lane where there is a lot of debris so flat tires will happen. I love having electric bikes in addition to my regular bicycles.

Reply
Court Rye
3 years ago

Great update, thanks Erik! I saw your duplicate post and will delete that one :)

Reply
joe
3 years ago

Guys it good to read you have had a very reliable A2B metro. EXCEPT those g.d. Kenda Tires!

Owned mine for around 5 years and must have repaired or replaced flats 15 times. It was crazy. The distributor got so sick of hearing me complain he actually mailed me the latest double thick Kenda tires gratis.. Didn’t make one bit of difference!

Then I found out from the distributor at the time the best fix was to scrap the bicycle tires for Moped Tires.

So I bought Shinko SR714s with bicycle thorn resistant tubes.. I believe the size was 16″x2.25″… The 16″ tires were a snug fit on the A2B rims because it was a stiffer sidewall.. needed both tire irons.. 2 ply DOT tire rated for 75 MPH. Remember that MC or Moped tire size is based on the rim, while bicycle tires are based on the Tire OD.

Not only did I not have any more flats, I didn’t even need to add air any more… Downside is the tire OD is a little smaller and the width is obviously less (2.25 vs 3.0″w). Price at the time was $20 per tire… Wears like iron.

If I had a Metro today I would probably buy the Pirelli ML75 Scooter tire 2.5″width. Or go to a real motorcycle shop and ask them to fit your ebike up with something around 2.5″ wide.

Reply
Erik
3 years ago

Hey I would like to leave another follow up. I finally went and had moped tires put on one of my a2b metro’s. I visited a small scooter store that was full of everything from cheap children’s scooters to 350 cc freeway legal scooters to motorized gas bicycles. They did not have a matching set of tires so I had to settle with 2 different ones on the bike. There is a 2.75″ Hutchinson moped tire on the back and a Shinko SR 714 2.25″ on the front. I paid 15 dollars for each tire to have them put on and around 50 dollars for both tires. I think i can get the tires on myself next time but it didn’t look that easy. The moped tires are a lot heavier then the kenda’ kraze and I am noticing less range in the bike now. At least a couple of miles per battery less. Where as before I could get to work with very little pedaling if i wanted to, now I have to pedal majority of the time to make it there and back. Pedaling the a2b metro with throttle assist is still much easier work then riding a regular bicycle though. I have only put about 300 miles on the bike since I got the new moped tires put on but i have a lot of confidence in them. They are worth the sacrifice of a bit of range due to the weight. I had moped tubes installed as well and they have an all metal valve with a supporting cuff. Not only do they look more durable, they are. The shinko SR 714’s can be bought for about 20 dollars a piece. The heavy duty motorcycle tubes for around 10 dollars a piece. I also noticed they do have 3″ wide moped tires that will fit the metro as well. I’m keeping both tires at there max psi of 35 or even slightly over because I cant afford to lose anymore range then these tires have already subtracted. There is always more debris in the bike lane to cause flats but at least now Ive got motorcycle tires on my bike and they will surely be much harder to puncture then the kenda’s. Another thing to consider is that the moped tires would be very difficult to change on the side of the road if a flat occurred but I cant see many flats happening with the moped tires unless some really nasty stuff is ran over. I would like to point out something about the battery chargers. They are a good quality charging brick with a nice XLR connector but I do believe they can get too hot and stop working. I got both of my metro’s and there chargers used. One of them I used for about a year and I got a lot of use out of it. I usually put a fan over the charger but a few times i forgot. Last time i forgot to put a fan over it, and I charged both battery s back to back. I noticed the charger had shut itself off.. when I felt the charger it was very hot and this had happened before but this time it wouldn’t turn back on and its dead. Luckily I had another charger ready to go but now I feel like i need to buy a spare charger. Use a fan on your charger if its hot or even warm in your building. The charger has a small computer fan built into it but its not really up to the job of cooling this beast. It can take some abuse with getting too hot but eventually a circuit will fry. That’s just my opinion. Anyways I’ve got 2 used first gen metro bikes and they both still work. One has a replaced motor and now has about 3-4 k miles.. the other bike has the original motor and has around 5-6 k miles. Both have the original internal frame battery’s going strong. By the way 2nd gen metro’s are going down in price a lot now that the octave has been out for a while. I think this seems like a fairly hassle free bike once the tires are changed.

Reply
Court Rye
3 years ago

Great update Erik, I’m glad the moped tires are working out in terms of durability and appreciate the feedback about ~2 miles of range decrease. I’ve heard about some chargers overheating and am glad that nothing more serious happened but sorry to hear that you’re down to just one now. The Metro has always been attractive to me in terms of style and it does seem rugged. I hope you get even more miles and am impressed with the 3-4k that you report already having! Ride safe and I look forward to the next update :)

Reply
Joshua Dovey
3 years ago

Can anyone send me a wiring diagram got a bone project using the parts off a UltraMotor 500watt Metro can get power to Cycle Analyst but no power out the controller to motor not sure on make of controller either please someone email me

Reply
Court Rye
3 years ago

Hi Joshua, I wish I could help you with this but I don’t have access to the wiring diagram for A2B bikes (I actually don’t have this type of thing for most of the bikes I’ve reviewed). If you post in the A2B forums however, someone might be able to help you or direct you to a good resource. Maybe someone else owns the same bike and can offer advice. Look for Ann M. there, she used to own one I think.

Reply
Erik
2 years ago

Putting the motorcycle tires on the metro was the best upgrade to make and i wish i would have made it sooner. I have an estimated 1800 miles on these tires. Ive pulled out goat heads , a staple, and a bit of glass. All stuff that would have probably popped the kenda kraze tires like they were a balloon. These motorcycle/moped tires are available in many different widths.. they take special heavy duty tubes. These upgraded tires and tubes were actually a little bit cheaper than the kenda stuff that was failing left and right on the metro. The moped tires can be pretty difficult to get on the rim but some shops will install them. I have noticed a little bit of a decrease in range since upgrading the tires. They are way thicker and heavier tires than the kenda kraze and they add rotational weight. I would say I have noticed a loss of around 2 miles per battery charge which is about 10-15 percent. These tires have a small loss in range and a big gain in reliability.

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Great feedback Erik! I’m glad the moped tires are working well. Where did you buy them or do you know where others might find them if they want to buy online?

Reply
Erik
2 years ago

I got the moped/scooter tires at a scooter store here in San Jose but they can be ordered online from a few different sites. The guy that owns that scooter shop suggested a company called TREATLAND TV for ordering moped tires. The tires are working out so great i must have roughly 5000 miles on them now with no flats They are basically motorcycle tires and do need to be installed with steel tire levers. I just went ahead and paid to have mine installed (30 bucks). Now the only problem ive been having with my 1st gen metro is overheating on hot days and it seems to take about a full hour for the bike to be able to turn back on. I believe this problem has been fixed with the metro 2nd gen a good 3 or 4 years ago when they moved the controller from the motor to the frame and hopefully it did fix the problem completely cause it is a big one.

Like Joe up there said. Moped/scooter tires are listed by rim size. The a2b metro has a rim diameter size of 16″. As far as width of the tire goes.. The Shinko sr714 2.25″ works and is a considerably skinnier tire than the stock kenda’s but do look ok in my opinion. The Hutchinson gp1 tire that I have installed on the rear is the tire i would recommend it is 2.75″ and looks very fat (only 1/4 inch Skinner than the kenda’s) Search the “Hutchinson GP1 16×2.75″ and there are also more options than the two tire types that Ive listed.

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Awesome details Erik, the tires sound like a sweet upgrade. I think I’d also get help from a shop putting them on, glad you found one that would do it and that you’re getting great use out of your Metro :)

Reply
JuneR
2 years ago

My husband is a fairly large man, and he wasn’t happy on hills, so I inherited the Metro (purchased 11/2011-store closed in Medford, MA). I have only used it a few times-not worth selling because the value was lost, so I decided to keep it. I recently went to use it and recharged it, but the panel is “dead” so I assume the battery is dead-we hadn’t done the regular recharging required. I now find that a battery costs over $800. what a rip off. Any workarounds on batteries? Thanks for any thoughts.

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Bummer… Yeah, batteries are expensive for these things. Maybe ask around in the A2B forums? There are some shop owners who hang out there and some individuals who might have tips for you on trying to revive the pack or buying an aftermarket pack that’s more affordable.

Reply
June
2 years ago

Thanks for your reply! I’ll try removing it using the video link that Kyle at K2B sent me, and I’ll see if it can be revived. That would be the optimal solution. I was trying not to sell it since you lose such value, but if the expense is so high, it may not be worth the expense for the minimal use. Best, June

Reply
paul binder
2 years ago

Update: Its been a year since my last post. I put the Shinko sr714 tires on and they lasted 12 days before I took on a Nail. All round a great tire thou. It got me through the winter quite nicely. The Shinko’s seem to stick to black ice and were great going through the week or so of snow we had. A couple of weeks of -5 degree weather did not slow me down either. Bottom line on tires is this, “There is not one tire in the world that is immune to a NAIL” Problems started at 8000 km. The bike just went dead, then would work for a bit, on and off. We thought it was the battery so I ordered a new one. “That was believe it or not 295 days ago”.. Still no battery. First there was a problem with customs and that took 90 days t clear up, and when the battery eventually came, it was defective, so they had to send that one back. So now I am waiting for the shop to try and find some sort of replacement. They said they would put something together, but it has not happened yet. The bike has now been in the shop longer than I originally rode it for. Very disappointing to say the least. The Metro is a good reliable stable comfortable bike, but, the problem is that there is “ZERO” service. I paid $1150.00 cnd up front for the battery 10 months ago and still no battery. The bike is pretty much useless without a battery. To make matters worse I bought a second metro as a backup. This was because I did not have a drivers licence and was absolutely dependent on the bike to get to work. The new bike now has 4,500 km and I guess when this battery goes I will be stuck with 2 useless metros. Now I am into it for about $9,150.00 to cover 12,500 kms over 16 months, and basically “zero” resale value. Bottom line for me is this. The Metro was a great bike until something goes wrong and I was pretty much on my own.

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Wow, Paul… that’s a tough story to read man, you’ve got a great attitude! So sorry to hear that they haven’t delivered the battery you paid for. I’m glad the experience of riding an electric bike (that works) has been a good one for you but bummed to hear about the business support issues. There are lots of other brands to choose from and I try to select these as advertisers for the site. I trust Haibike and IZIP as well as Pedego (among others). I hope you’re able to get something that works long term if/when the battery on your second Metro expires. Maybe they’ll finally deliver on the first battery owed to you but with older models even if you get a “new” battery it can be worn down just from sitting in storage :/

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Dan Hutchinson
2 weeks ago

I also emailed magnum,
the response I got was:
"Thanks for contacting Magnum. I'm sorry to hear about your rubber cap breaking off but we don't carry any replacement caps. It isn't a terribly important port to keep covered. At the very most you might get some dust build up that you would need to blow out."
I also have this problem with my new Metro+. I don't like the idea of having to blow dust out of the port. I am thinking of finding an alternative plastic plug that fits. Or what about getting another electrical connector and using it as the cover. The battery is too expensive to leave an open port.

Dan Hutchinson
2 weeks ago

First ride on my new Metro+ today! I chose the Metro over the CCS mainly because I didn't want to wait. Turns out that the weather here in Michigan has been unusually nice and in the next week or so I plan a lot of riding.
Just 10 miles on the inaugural ride but this bike is awesome. I like the upright position and the ride was smooth and the bike responsive. Still a lot to learn!
Any other riders in Southeast Michigan?

ChasA
3 weeks ago

I'm having a problem with the battery plug-in rubber cap. It broke off easily during the 1st week and its nearly
impossible to fit it in. Sometimes 15 minutes to get it to seal. Is there a replacement or a fix? Don't want to ride
without that spot sealed. Don't want to keep using tape. Have the metro+.
I also emailed magnum,
the response I got was:
"Thanks for contacting Magnum. I'm sorry to hear about your rubber cap breaking off but we don't carry any replacement caps. It isn't a terribly important port to keep covered. At the very most you might get some dust build up that you would need to blow out."

ChasA
3 weeks ago

I'm having a problem with the battery plug-in rubber cap. It broke off easily during the 1st week and its nearly
impossible to fit it in. Sometimes 15 minutes to get it to seal. Is there a replacement or a fix? Don't want to ride
without that spot sealed. Don't want to keep using tape. Have the metro+.

Mark Peralta
3 weeks ago

Edit 1:
Male, late 20s.
150lbs, 5 ft, 8.5.
Located in US, east coast.
Health: average.
Injury: None
Pre-existing condition: very mild back pain. so, upright position is how I currently ride.

Edit 2:
At this point I am thinking a combination of some type of pedal assistance (lots of traffic stops) and throttle would be useful for hills and keeping up with traffic when needed.
Does that limit my choices?

With lots of traffic stops and the intended use all year round, you would need a hub drive for drama-free frequent accelerations (unless you have a mid drive with expensive nuvinci). A hub drive would also protect your drive train from premature wear brought about by the motor power, thus, preserving the life of your drive train.

Between direct hub drive and geared hub drive, the geared hub is smaller and lighter but has gears to wear out and is a bit noisier. Direct drive can run tens of thousand of miles with no wear and tear parts to replace, very silent, but it is a little heavier (however, you will barely notice the weight penalty for your intended commuter ride).

Aside from the previous recommendations (Bionx, stromer,..), another example of direct hub drive that I would look at is the Radcity (you can program to inc the speed limit from factory 20 mph to 25 mph).

https://electricbikereview.com/rad-power-bikes/radcity/

Another example of geared hub drive that I would look at is the Magnum metro plus.

https://www.magnumbikes.com/product/magnum-metro-plus/

daniel58
1 month ago

I almost bought the Metro +. It has a lot to offer and I think since this summer they have upgrade their battery to a 13 amp hour probably to compete with the CCS.

Ultimately I didn't go with Magnum because I couldn't find a local dealer that had the bike in stock thus being a special order. And I heard mixed experiences from dealers about their customer service in the LA area.

I happened across a local dealer in SoCal (Electric Bike Center in Fullerton) that had one of the first the CCS bikes in stock, in their store and I got it because it rode so nice and the specs are hard to beat. Not many bikes at this price point have a torque\cadence sensor.... Metro was close. Yes Metro + had better stock tires but for me it was about what I could test ride.

Not knocking anyone's experiences with Juiced... I went in with full knowledge of their customer support, but honestly I haven't had any issues. My CCS came without a light, which they shipped (from China which was slow to get here)... and I bought the specialty wrench which took a long time to get because it came from China. I have talked to them once on the phone and 2 times on the chat app through the website without issue.

But honestly how widespread is the motor burn out and spoke issues? Yes I feel bad for the forum member that it happened to and it did take waaaay to long to resolve....(not giving Juiced a pass)... but really how high is the failure rate?

Again I hope they get their act together with stock and customer service....as noted on the forums. (for my own selfish future needs)

I love this bike (CCS)... for me its a solid platform, I enjoy riding it and its fast. But a first run product is going to have hickups..especially from a small company... in this Kickstarter world you need to expect some of that....if you don't then spend $3+ on a Trek.

In a different situation if a Metro+ was on the showroom floor vs a CCS, I probably would have purchased that....

Hopefully you can vent your frustration and then enjoy riding your Metro+

best of luck riding

Andy

Andy

I have considered many potential E-Bike brands and typical E-Bike consumer pitfalls in the process of doing ones usual due diligence homework prior to purchasing an actual E-Bike; I am also not in any rush by any stretch of the creative imagination; and I usually take a very very long time in considering all the pro's and con's prior to making any kind of potential actual E-Bike purchase as much ultimately has to be considered overall; now Magnum like many other potential E-Bike offerings also offer very compelling alternatives indeed to consider; they do have a rather extensive network of bicycle dealers that are willing to not only sell but are actually also willing to do all of the potential servicing, maintaining and even the inevitable potential e-bike repair services on ones e-bike in particular during the actual product warranty period timeframe; so this is a very important primary consideration indeed in of itself; I am also not afraid to consider other excellent E-Bike brands such as RadBikes with their very competitive RadCity, RadRover, even their RadWagon($1c599) competitive E-Bike market offering starting at only $1,499; is just another choice and possibility for potential consideration especially at its rather attractive cost competitive price point for the value and performance dollar given; their are also many other choices to potentially choose from at under $2k in particular; which may even include building ones own custom E-Bike from Luna Cycle(excellent provider of E-Bike Conversion kits) also as well;

Electric Bike Center out of Fullerton, CA is definitely one of the better electric bike shops with actual extensive experience servicing and potentially troubleshooting e-bike service issue(s), along with any other related associated e-bike maintenance and/or repair issues; my main primary issue with Juiced Bikes is their lack of totally committed primary support of their chosen bike dealers whether it be in California and/or nationwide(will naturally be worse support); Juiced Bikes has a major massive ongoing verbal and written communications failure problem with both their dealers and also their paying customers that is seriously affecting the ability to deliver normal expected proper quality customer servicing that a typical paying e-bike customer should expect to get without question, expectation or even having to ask or beg in the first place; after all they have just paid the stated perceived value of the offered asking price in "total and in full"; in order so that they can actually receive and fully expect to get the full expected measure of ones actual expected total E-Bike support that is due to them even on a post purchase basis; not this alternative half baked, half thought thru and/or half measure support for any future potential customer service support issues Juiced Bikes has become so well known and famous for instead;

now if this is Juiced Bikes great marketing idea of complete and totally committed E-Bike customer support; then they will likely only have further ongoing negative customer service support issues and/or concerns going forward that will only get more complex and ultimately cause the existing relationships that they have with their bike dealers(outside California) to de-evolve and ultimately further deteriorate to the point of not being able to effectively deliver an acceptable level of paying Juiced Bikes customer service post purchase support; as an very graphic illustration how "on earth" can one actually expect a local Juiced Bikes bike dealer to actually pull spare parts off of completely working multiple Juiced Bikes store display "for demonstration purposes only" models is yet again another effective highly illustrative objective demonstration of a purely insane, illogical and also irrational in nature highly ineffective business model practices(if one ever existed at all) if ones is to actually take Juiced Bikes as a serious E-Bike company that is actually going to compete with the other major E-Bike competitive companies(HaiBike/Bulls) and also for any potential Juiced Bikes E-Bike customer to actually take seriously prior to actually purchasing a Juiced Bikes E-Bikes;

now since I have not heard of any Juiced Bikes officially taking on any new actual customer service support initiatives to actual support ongoing potential paying Juiced Bikes customers from Tora Harris himself; I will assume that it's business as usual at Juiced Bikes HQ and that their will not be anything further done for their potential paying Juiced Bikes customers with potential future customer servicing issue(s) and/or concerns in case they actually run into any potential customer service issues during the actual twelve month product warranty period time frame; I could see Juiced Bikes also taking particular advantage of a potential paying Juiced Bikes customer who at ten months into the actual Juiced Bikes product warranty might be delayed "on purpose" to a future point in time where they are actually beyond the actual initial twelve month product warranty period time frame; and also when does the actual Juiced Bikes twelve month product warranty begin exactly; from the date one places one original order; or when one actually receives and accepts ones actual Juiced Bikes product from the asian Chinese factory at ones physical address; now it's literally quite true that if it's not actually in physical writing; then Juiced Bikes might literally make up the rules as Juiced Bikes sees or even deems fit to profit handsomely from; which really does not surprise me at all at this point if it did so;

now most potential Juiced Bikes customers may in fact not ride their E-Bike for many miles other than for the occasional recreational outings with family but what if the potential Juiced Bikes customers actually uses it for actual every day E-Bike travel commuting and actual every day recreational enjoyment bicycle tour riding which does in fact start to add on and stack up substantial miles quite rapidly(where will their investment in Juiced Bikes E-Bike end up-take a wild guess); will Juiced Bikes be able to actually deliver 20,000 miles for example in a typical four years like a typical Evelo fully equipped Orion Series E-Bike(four year warranty with 20,000 miles full unquestioned product warranty coverage) for example and what can one fully expect from ones local bike dealer in terms of actual Juiced Bikes E-Bike support to hopefully resolve any potential future inevitable Juiced Bikes aggravating customer service support issues that they may experience in the first four years of potential E-Bike ownership; my confidence is not high at all based from the written testimony feedback that I have seen so far based on the objective evidence I have seen thus far in navigating the various E-Bike forums that I have intercepted and continue to collect and analyze data on; now for the time being I have put Juiced Bikes "on hold-due to lack of Juiced Bikes from taking on definitive corrective action in so far as with their current unsatisfactory customer service practices" indefinitely until they actually get their current sadly lacking "customer services" act hopefully together sooner rather than later; its rather unsurprising just how "apathetic" and "uncaring" they actually turns out to be when Juiced Bikes actually is; once it has conveniently intercepted your money and somehow mysteriously vanished on the written promised basic excellent customer service support front; which is basically an irrational logical insult to the potential paying Juiced Bikes customer who has been dis-serviced and thrown directly under the bus; which is fine so long as its not me who personally gets thrown under the bus(naturally of course..my preference).

michael mitchell
1 month ago

Thanks FredE, I actually followed up and looked into Magnum E-Bikes for a potential E-Bike future purchase consideration and they are actually well liked by E-Bike consumers for both the value they offer and the attractive up to date looks of its Magnum E-Bikes lineup and they also happen to have a very good working relationship with their bike shop dealers; now it turns out that even the bike technician's love their E-Bike's because they are really high quality requiring minimal initial set-up work to getting it to work perfectly for their potential customer's and also very minimal amount of ongoing maintenance and repair post purchase also as well; also their default included Magnum E-Bike battery is about ten percent higher in electrical capacity; and their Magnum E-Bike replacement and/or spare lithium ion batteries are also about seven percent less expensive also as well; another important consideration is their are actually not one but two local Magnum E-Bike bike shops within fifteen miles of where I live locally; the graphic user interface screen on the Magnum E-Bike is also as large as a GPS screen; the height and angle of the adjustable stem can be actually locked and unlocked with ease by using an integrated built in locking latch mechanism; the Magnum E-bike Metro Plus does come with hydraulic disk brakes, led headlight, led taillight, full fenders and a full size bike rack with included bungee cords all included; also any potential Juiced Bike paying customer can look forward to missing out on the below indicated Juiced Bikes absolutely horrific customer service experiences;

yes so no more Juiced Bikes "bait and switch" customer service tactic shenanigans, no more two or more weeks of not returning Juiced Bikes paying customers telephone calls, no more empty and useless Juiced Bikes customary promises being made to yet be fulfilled at some undetermined future date yet to be announced, no more useless usual customary Juiced Bikes excuses that we will have to see about ordering some more items from our asian chinese factory and warehouse for our next scheduled two month ocean shipping container shipment, no more daily e-mailing Juiced Bikes to get a response from them by the end of the week; no more usual customary excuses that we use the same unbranded spokes as the Giant Bikes manufacturer uses; no more bad intermittent electrical connections due to poor inprecise and inaccurate sloppy close tolerance CNC work in their snap in frame E-Bike battery modules; no more bad burnt out gear hub electric drive motors that require the Juiced Bikes customer to make a video recording of; no more legendary bad Juiced Bike customer service where they are famous and best known for first and foremost over promise and then unsurprisingly under deliver on those very same ineffective written promises made to their Juiced Bikes paying customers; no more instant messages sent and left messages often replied to days later where the first sentence automatically apparently also always includes a automatic curt but ineffective "sorry for the delay" as a matter and method of actually delivering supposed good customer service; no more less than informative, unhelpful and ineffective creative Juiced Bikes excuses "made up on the fly" and "empty/useless" written promises made to prevent the paying Juiced Bikes customer from officially lodging and potentially applying a "credit hold" written complaint with their credit card company to give them the actual leverage needed to get what they have already paid for;

now all of these things as indicated previously above "one can in fact" look forward to missing out on and also "avoiding at all costs"; by simply actually choosing Magnum E-Bikes where they seemingly actually unsurprisingly routinely stock Magnum E-Bike parts at their bike dealers to properly service and also to keep their Magnum E-Bike customer ultimately happy and actually contented even if its on a less important post purchase basis; now that actually sounds to me like a win for Magnum E-Bikes, a win for their Magnum E-Bike dealers and a win for their potential Magnum E-Bike paying customers; now the Magnum E-Bikes have a very beefy and stable attractive sporty look to them that can easily be mistaken for an E-Bike costing $3k or more while only costing $1.7K to 1.99K on average.

This seems like a troll posting an advertisement for Magnum. Are you getting paid by the word? Why is it so long? Allow me to state, that I've had zero Customer Service issues with Juiced (I got a CC Air that needed throttle replacement), but I had to file an Amazon A-Z claim against Magnum to get my money back. Soooooooo, people's experiences with these companies aren't always the same.

Andy_in_CA
1 month ago

I almost bought the Metro +. It has a lot to offer and I think since this summer they have upgrade their battery to a 13 amp hour probably to compete with the CCS.

Ultimately I didn't go with Magnum because I couldn't find a local dealer that had the bike in stock thus being a special order. And I heard mixed experiences from dealers about their customer service in the LA area.

I happened across a local dealer in SoCal (Electric Bike Center in Fullerton) that had one of the first the CCS bikes in stock, in their store and I got it because it rode so nice and the specs are hard to beat. Not many bikes at this price point have a torque\cadence sensor.... Metro was close. Yes Metro + had better stock tires but for me it was about what I could test ride.

Not knocking anyone's experiences with Juiced... I went in with full knowledge of their customer support, but honestly I haven't had any issues. My CCS came without a light, which they shipped (from China which was slow to get here)... and I bought the specialty wrench which took a long time to get because it came from China. I have talked to them once on the phone and 2 times on the chat app through the website without issue.

But honestly how widespread is the motor burn out and spoke issues? Yes I feel bad for the forum member that it happened to and it did take waaaay to long to resolve....(not giving Juiced a pass)... but really how high is the failure rate?

Again I hope they get their act together with stock and customer service....as noted on the forums. (for my own selfish future needs)

I love this bike (CCS)... for me its a solid platform, I enjoy riding it and its fast. But a first run product is going to have hickups..especially from a small company... in this Kickstarter world you need to expect some of that....if you don't then spend $3+ on a Trek.

In a different situation if a Metro+ was on the showroom floor vs a CCS, I probably would have purchased that....

Hopefully you can vent your frustration and then enjoy riding your Metro+

best of luck riding

Andy

Andy

daniel58
1 month ago

It took me 2 weeks of call after call just to get Juiced to answer a phone call. After hearing all the hurdles OP had to jump through just to get what he already paid for, a warranty replacement I will pass. A lesson for a start up. Great products are only one part of great company. You have to give great service as well. Magnum answers the phone, which is the basic 1st step of running a business. Answer the phone, call people back, be honest and transparent.

Magnum did that for me. I felt like the CCA was a better product but that does not matter much if they can't take or return call or are having supply chain issues over a year's time.

That is not a company it's a hobby.

Thanks FredE, I actually followed up and looked into Magnum E-Bikes for a potential E-Bike future purchase consideration and they are actually well liked by E-Bike consumers for both the value they offer and the attractive up to date looks of its Magnum E-Bikes lineup and they also happen to have a very good working relationship with their bike shop dealers; now it turns out that even the bike technician's love their E-Bike's because they are really high quality requiring minimal initial set-up work to getting it to work perfectly for their potential customer's and also very minimal amount of ongoing maintenance and repair post purchase also as well; also their default included Magnum E-Bike battery is about ten percent higher in electrical capacity; and their Magnum E-Bike replacement and/or spare lithium ion batteries are also about seven percent less expensive also as well; another important consideration is their are actually not one but two local Magnum E-Bike bike shops within fifteen miles of where I live locally; the graphic user interface screen on the Magnum E-Bike is also as large as a GPS screen; the height and angle of the adjustable stem can be actually locked and unlocked with ease by using an integrated built in locking latch mechanism; the Magnum E-bike Metro Plus does come with hydraulic disk brakes, led headlight, led taillight, full fenders and a full size bike rack with included bungee cords all included; also any potential Juiced Bike paying customer can look forward to missing out on the below indicated Juiced Bikes absolutely horrific customer service experiences;

yes so no more Juiced Bikes "bait and switch" customer service tactic shenanigans, no more two or more weeks of not returning Juiced Bikes paying customers telephone calls, no more empty and useless Juiced Bikes customary promises being made to yet be fulfilled at some undetermined future date yet to be announced, no more useless usual customary Juiced Bikes excuses that we will have to see about ordering some more items from our asian chinese factory and warehouse for our next scheduled two month ocean shipping container shipment, no more daily e-mailing Juiced Bikes to get a response from them by the end of the week; no more usual customary excuses that we use the same unbranded spokes as the Giant Bikes manufacturer uses; no more bad intermittent electrical connections due to poor inprecise and inaccurate sloppy close tolerance CNC work in their snap in frame E-Bike battery modules; no more bad burnt out gear hub electric drive motors that require the Juiced Bikes customer to make a video recording of; no more legendary bad Juiced Bike customer service where they are famous and best known for first and foremost over promise and then unsurprisingly under deliver on those very same ineffective written promises made to their Juiced Bikes paying customers; no more instant messages sent and left messages often replied to days later where the first sentence automatically apparently also always includes a automatic curt but ineffective "sorry for the delay" as a matter and method of actually delivering supposed good customer service; no more less than informative, unhelpful and ineffective creative Juiced Bikes excuses "made up on the fly" and "empty/useless" written promises made to prevent the paying Juiced Bikes customer from officially lodging and potentially applying a "credit hold" written complaint with their credit card company to give them the actual leverage needed to get what they have already paid for;

now all of these things as indicated previously above "one can in fact" look forward to missing out on and also "avoiding at all costs"; by simply actually choosing Magnum E-Bikes where they seemingly actually unsurprisingly routinely stock Magnum E-Bike parts at their bike dealers to properly service and also to keep their Magnum E-Bike customer ultimately happy and actually contented even if its on a less important post purchase basis; now that actually sounds to me like a win for Magnum E-Bikes, a win for their Magnum E-Bike dealers and a win for their potential Magnum E-Bike paying customers; now the Magnum E-Bikes have a very beefy and stable attractive sporty look to them that can easily be mistaken for an E-Bike costing $3k or more while only costing $1.7K to 1.99K on average.

iBikeDiane
1 month ago

It says limited quantities, but they let me buy 3, so I can tell you that 2 is not the limit ;) I think it will serve me well as a starter once the battery is right.

Here's a direct link Metro XT

iBikeDiane
4 weeks ago

[EDIT: This is a rockin' bike and a great value. Battery was ok!]

I ordered the Metro XT from ridegenesis.com last week and it arrived today. It's stated as being on sale for $599 as a pre-Black Friday deal. Unfortunately the battery is a dud. :(

The good news is they have a 30-day return policy and a 6-month warranty. Their customer service and shipping is in Secaucus, NJ, and they are friendly and helpful. Before it arrived, I bought 2 more as gifts, but I will check them out first. Their replacement battery is only $200, so it may not be a high-end battery. There were a couple of reviews that mentioned battery failures.

But the bike itself is very solid and rides well on its own. It is the perfect size for me and easy to manage at 35 lbs including the battery. Opens and closes easily, etc. I don't feel nervous that the handlebars or seat are going to suddenly collapse. Everything locks in tightly. I have to send the whole thing back for an exchange and I'm already attached to it!

However, I anticipate I will want something in the future that will allow for riding in damp conditions.

Ann M.
1 month ago

Glad you decided to get an ebike Diane; think you'll find it a fun way to feel better. Looking forward to hearing about your Metro XT once it arrives.

iBikeDiane
1 month ago

Hi all, I just bought my first electric! Recovering from major health issues and quite depleted. I wanted a foldable I could easily transport in my small car, maybe ride out for lunch from work, finally be able to ride our beautiful rail trails, nearby errands, getting around without car, etc.

Was aware of electric bikes, but didn't think I could afford one until I recently started researching. Things have really changed!

I'm petite, and went with the Metro XT from ridegenesis.com. With 30-day return and 6-month warranty, and an unbeatable price (plus free US shipping) for the impressive specs, I figured I couldn't go wrong! It looks like a standard frame that they are adapting for their own branding, but maybe some brand confusion with the Prodeco Genesis.

I'll post an update next week once received and tested...

Ann M.
1 month ago

@Sonoboy & @Eros Di Miele, Court is pretty flexible about e-scooters mixing with the ebikes on this site. It's the same Forum for both the ElectricRideReview & ElectricBikeReview.com sites. I've got several customers (well over 20 yrs old) who use electric skateboards as a way to commute to a bus or Metro Rail connection and then get around, especially in the really crowded downtown Austin TX area. The incredibly light weight and fairly powerful dual rear hub motors paired with a lithium power pack make for an impressive practical ride.

Drumulac
1 month ago

Mark - thanks for posting the trailway vids. Plans are in the works to extend this 43.7 connected Bronx-Westchester-Putnam route. My company, an engineering and land surveying firm, has been providing design services for a number of downstate NY trails, including the Hudson River Greenway on the west side of NYC that the guys rode in Court's video. We recently bid on a design/build project for Metro North Railroad which will consist of a 23 mile shared pedestrian bike trail connecting the Putnam Maybrook Trailway to the Dutchess Rail Trail. The Dutchess Rail Trail, Walkway over the Hudson, and the Hudson Valley Rail Trail will add another 18 miles of continuous paved ped/bike path and take you to the west side of the Hudson River past Poughkeepsie into Ulster County. This is all part of the Governor's initiative to build 350 miles of new trail running from the metro NYC area to Canada called the New York Empire State Trail. This would connect 750 miles of trail across and through the state by 2020. Let's hope that initiative continues to be funded through subsequent administrations. This is only going to happen if we all continue to be active advocates for alternative, healthier transportation routes.

BlondAngel
1 month ago

Hi,
While there is a youtube video on how to change the C7 display from mph to kph, it doesn't explain what all the words and numbers mean on the display. I mean, I know what PAS is but it has some icons and no explanation of what they mean. Is there an online manual for this? It has 'trip 1' and 'trip 2' but I would like to know the total number of miles -- any way to find out? How do I zero out trip 2? I was able to zero out trip 1 but not trip 2. Also the display shows 'BMS' and a number like 51.4. What does BMS mean in this context?

BlondAngel
1 month ago

So for a while I have been doing research and suffering from analysis paralysis and ebike overload. I finally bit the bullet and brought a Magnum Metro+.

BernieS
2 months ago

While I wait for the Giant Rack-It Metro E rear rack to be available, I installed a Topeak Beamrack (E-Type). I just barely had the required 2" of seat post free for the QR clamp. For a little added support I attached a piece of aluminum bar to the Topeak rack and Giant OEM rack (using one of the eyelets on the crossbar. I then added an Arkel Tailrider bag. I carry my Abus Mini U-lock and a cable in the bag. The Arkel bag is very stable on the Topeak rack. I attach a Cygolite taillight to the bag for a flashing red light in the rear. Eventually I'll include one or two panniers for grocery shopping. I'm inclined towards the Arkel Shopper or Brooks' Suffolk pannier. But with winter coming on I'm in no rush for this.

These additions are illustrated in the accompanying photos.

1/3
Bryan Gurganus
2 months ago

I have not been able to change the power setting from Power to Normal or to Eco. They switch on the display, but the Power setting returns. Not sure what's going on there. Looks like it should change. Guess I'll call Cory at Magnum and ask him. I'd like to try a lower power setting. Just doesn't seem like the settings would be there if they aren't usable. We'll see.

I have the Magnum Metro with the same C6 display. I think what is happening is that they have overloaded the function of word "Power" on the screen. When in settings mode, you see Power, Normal, and Eco with a check box next to each. Once you select any of them, the next time you go into settings, you should see that it is still selected (i.e. the selection is being registered). However, when you exit, the settings mode and are using the display, that section of the display is showing a vertical bar chart representing how much power the motor is applying and they are using the same "Power" as a label for that section. Not very a very intuitive UI choice. Also, I also find it an odd choice to prevent Power/Normal/Eco from being changed without going into a password protected settings mode. That said, I find the overall bike to be outstanding aside from these UI oddities.

Mike's E-Bikes
2 months ago

I only go by what many customers tell me, and my own eyes when I have visited those places. I was only mentioning the few ebike shops in comparison to the plethora of bike shops here, ebike only shops are still very few and far between and this area is about the same situation as the guy who started this thread, so I was agreeing that what he is seeing is not unusual in this early stage of ebikes in the US. My shop is the only true e-bike only shop in a population and metro area of over 10 million people, so that's pretty slim pickings for would be ebikers. Nobody should have to drive 2 or 3 hours to another state. Nearly every one of my customers have told me they were glad to find my shop after searching the area over, and so visiting those places you mentioned that apparently didn't satisfy their needs in terms of appropriately available product, and I have heard many mentions by people who visit my store, at the other locations lack of expertise about their own product. In due time, more e-bike only shops will come on the scene, and I welcome more shops as it adds to the awareness and legitimacy of the e-bike category, ultimately taking it from a niche to more of a mainstream form of cycling. That's great for everyone. If my shop helps people get into it sooner, and more comfortable with their choices, and provides an education toward having fun on a great mobility platform, that's the reward in doing this.

FLAXinFLY
2 months ago

Yes Kyle, that is exactly what I did….for those with a Velociti or Metro battery that refuses to charge with the original stock charger, & having a voltage below 30v, you can bypass the BMS by charging the cells from the reverse connector. This happened to me when my brand new Velociti's (2010) battery, which I purchased, sat in the warehouse for a couple of years. I did in fact tried to contact A2B service for assistance or even warranty help, but got a dead end.

You will need a cheapy 36v (Chinese) charger and a couple of small nails or paper clips. Remove the battery from rear rack. You can find the + & - with a volt meter on the "out" connector from the rear of the battery. I remember the lower left was the + & the lower right was -. You connect the charger positive and negative to the small nails inserted in each connector hole. I too connected a voltmeter, so I could watch the voltage reading. I remember allowing the charger to go to 36v before disconnecting it & then installing the battery back on to the rear of the Velociti. Then I connected the original factory charger & let it do it's business for about 4 hours.

It worked, and I've been riding this Velociti ebike the last few years without any issues…..though, I do have plans to update it's performance as a 20mph limit brings tears to my eyes.

The Shima is a great way to get around the Federal mandated 20mph limit, with throttle only! Let's see all the manufacturers have a ped assist ebike that is able to do 28+ mph.

Kyle, I've also got a collection of the older Wavecrest Laboratory Tidalforce ebikes (2005) that I ride. Originally they came with heavy front NiMH battery hubs (36v/8ah). I've upgraded the battery source to Lithium poly 46v/16ah packs & replaced the front with a 26" Shimano dyno/disc (Avid BB7) rim to power a front LED light. The performance is around 33 mph on level ground, though generally I cruise around 25mph and use the regen for most of the braking. So, I'm good for awhile, though would not hesitate for a minute to purchase the new Shima ebike if I was in the market.

Now connect me with a source to get the 800watt/48v battery that is used in the UM scooter. :))

Hi, I have read your post, but I'm a bit confused.
Did you make a video of the whole process?
I'm Italian, but I do speak English very well; if possible, I'd like to call you through Whatsapp/Skype/Facetime.
Thanks

Mark Peralta
2 months ago

Thank you! I tried both Magnum peak and Magnum metro. i was able to get to 26m with the Peak and max to 27 miles. Metro was weak. I only can get to 23 miles with the best effort. The sale person says that Magnum has instructions online to program it to Offroad mode to get max to 30 miles. But I wasn't able to find the instruction online. I also tried Stromer S1 sports. I was able to get it to 26 miles max. I felt the Peak was better than Stromer.
Also, it seems the trend is towarding to central drive. Do you think a hub drive is better to maintain a maximum speed for 17 miles one way than center drive?

Thank you! I tried both Magnum peak and Magnum metro. i was able to get to 26m with the Peak and max to 27 miles. Metro was weak. I only can get to 23 miles with the best effort. The sale person says that Magnum has instructions online to program it to Offroad mode to get max to 30 miles. But I wasn't able to find the instruction online. I also tried Stromer S1 sports. I was able to get it to 26 miles max. I felt the Peak was better than Stromer.

Anything above 20 mph, the energy consumption rises exponentially. You consume more than twice the energy at 30 mph vs 20 mph. Maintaining 28+ mph requires a lot of power, overheats the motor, and quickly drains the battery. A good compromise between speed and power consumption is 21-24 mph (average).

Your chain ring needs minimum tooth count of 46 so your cadence is at most 80 rpm when cruising at 28 mph.

Also, it seems the trend is towarding to central drive. Do you think a hub drive is better to maintain a maximum speed for 17 miles one way than center drive?

Above 20 mph, the energy efficiency between hub and mid drive is about the same but the hub drive preserves the life of the drive train (chain ring, sprockets, chain) while the mid drive accelerates the wear and tear and shortens the life of the drive train.

At low speeds, the mid drives with smaller motors tends to be more efficient (longer range per battery charge) and also has better climbing ability with less tendency to overheat due to the leverage from the drive train.

I have both hub drive and mid drive speed ebikes (>28 mph). I don't use the maximum assist level but I still hit 28+ mph on slight down hills. I just set the assist level just enough that I can maintain 22-23 mph on the flat (consuming 20 wh/mile) and then let it rip on the slightest down hills.

Hope that helps.

1/1
JamesY
2 months ago

Thank you! I tried both Magnum peak and Magnum metro. i was able to get to 26m with the Peak and max to 27 miles. Metro was weak. I only can get to 23 miles with the best effort. The sale person says that Magnum has instructions online to program it to Offroad mode to get max to 30 miles. But I wasn't able to find the instruction online. I also tried Stromer S1 sports. I was able to get it to 26 miles max. I felt the Peak was better than Stromer.

fenderstratguy
3 months ago

You said there's a battery in the frame. What is it, and can it be removed?

juan martinez
10 months ago

thanks for sharing the video?the 2011 series are good.

Ruslan Negruta
11 months ago

Este grea această bicicletă, cu un motor slab și foarte scumpă.

flitsies
4 years ago

It's a nice bike but the 2.1 is slightly better worked out, the 2.2 having the key on the handle bars means anyone can cut the cable and bypass the key.

The seat is comfortable for about 5 miles then it becomes a real pain, the problem is the front of the seat is too wide, the 2.2 has a different seat.

The latest version of this bike is called the octave why I don't know, but the lines are little smoother.

My 2.1 suffered a little bit on quality control but other than that it was ok, discovered most if not all of the issues and set about fixing them.

flitsies
2 years ago

+leefuji The metro is now called the octave pretty much the same bike but with all new bits such as hydraulic brakes, more rounded frame tubes and so on.

But with all the updates it comes at a price, I think it's now around the £3500 which will be probably around the $4000 mark, and for that price you could probably get something much faster.

But then they have always been an expensive bike, but they are something a bit special in the looks region rather than it just being a normal bike with a motor fitted this bike was purpose built and designed purely as an electric bike, work of art really.

fUjiMaNia
2 years ago

+ElectricBikeReview.com can you recommend other E-bikes that are still in production? thanks

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

+flitsies Great info! Thanks again for taking the time to share. I'm glad you saved with the 2.1 and were able to get the second battery, sounds like you're putting it to great use. If you feel like sharing pictures or just re-posting some of this great info check out the A2B forums at http://electricbikereview.com/community/forums/a2b/ there's not a lot going on as of yet but a rep from the company has dropped in and made a post. Overall the forum has a bunch of active members who are all excited about ebikes :)

flitsies
4 years ago

+Electric Bike Review The 2.1 also has pedal assist which the 2.0 didn't, to be honest between the 2.1 and the 2.2 the 2.1 is better because of the price, yes the key is in the frame but if you are worried about the key you could always cut the top fit a pin through it and flap it over giving you a fold down flat key, also for the price of the 2.2 I got 2 batteries on my 2.1 giving me twice the range.

The farthest I've ridden it in one go is around 27 miles it was hard going but fun at the same time, because I changed the seat it wasn't too bad, but why it was hard going is because I have found it to be one of those bikes you always want to push to the limit probably due to it being an EU model which is limited to 15 unless you pedal but in general you can stay up with town traffic if you pedal.

The brakes can be a pain to get right on the 2.1 and on the newer 2.2 and octave they fitted hydraulic brakes which is a definite upgrade worth doing for the 2.1.

Just a couple last things, the gears rear set tends to be a bit low in ratio so it may be worth going for a different rear set to improve pedal assist, something on the cards to try when I get the chance, quality control is a slight issue, but after sales is excellent top notch after sales from the company spoken direct to them and always very helpful providing information on request first class after sales.

Just a little add on to mention the 27 miles was not the maximum distance of the bike only the max I could handle, the bike would have gone on a lot further as there was lots and lots of charge still left in the second battery a good 2 thirds unused according to the speedo gauge.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

Good call! Thanks for the details, I've ridden this bike a couple of times and noticed the key and seat improvements. Here's my review on the newer Octave http://electricbikereview.com/a2b/octave/ with some of the updates you mentioned.

Taggerung
4 years ago

Am I missing something, or didn't you use the pedal assist? BTW, I also would like to know where the other person got the stealth kit, as well.

Taggerung
4 years ago

+Electric Bike Review No doubt! (about the frame.) Plus, you'd probably want a rear-mount motor, since a front would be VERY stressful, on shocks, if you have them! 

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

+Taggerung Small world... yeah, that's could be it? Maybe he's connected to the company somehow or has friends in the industry and was able to get one direct. Hard to say but if you do find one on eBay let me know, I'd love to hear how a custom setup with this thing would work. Make sure to use a strong frame ;)

Taggerung
4 years ago

+Electric Bike Review I read a little on that page you linked to in your recent response, and "John Bozi" was on there, so I read his review, and in it, he mentions "E-Bay". So perhaps THAT'S where he got the kit? That make sense?

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

+Taggerung Oh, got it! The Stealth Bomber uses a 25 pound 5304 Crystallite motor. Here's an overview of this motor compared with some others. I'm not sure how to get it independently or in a kit http://www.electricbike.com/crystalyte-hub-motor/

Taggerung
4 years ago

+Electric Bike Review Sorry I neglected to mention this, but another person you answered a question for on this review, named "John Bozi", had mentioned that "I got a stealth kit but not the actual bike", and I was also curious where they got it. Does that help to straighten things out? I hope so. I didn't want to seem confusing.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

Nice! I've been riding the Neo Jumper from Easy Motion and it doesn't cap out at 20mph when you're in pedal assist mode. I'm regularly cruising at 27mph and have even hit 33! How fast does your stealth kit go and where did you get it from?

John Bozi
4 years ago

nice one mate - bit slow for me - but it still would be fun. I got a stealth kit but not the actual bike.