EV Global Motors ebike SX Review

Ev Global Motors Ebike Sx Electric Bike Review 1
Ev Global Motors Ebike Sx
Ev Global Motors Ebike Sx 500 Watt Motor
Ev Global Motors Ebike Sx Battery
Ev Global Motors Ebike Sx Controller
Ev Global Motors Ebike Sx Headlight
Ev Global Motors Ebike Sx Electric Bike Review 1
Ev Global Motors Ebike Sx
Ev Global Motors Ebike Sx 500 Watt Motor
Ev Global Motors Ebike Sx Battery
Ev Global Motors Ebike Sx Controller
Ev Global Motors Ebike Sx Headlight

Summary

  • A high powered, feature rich electric bike ahead of its time designed by Lee Iacocca (the pioneering engineer behind classic Ford and Chevy automobiles)
  • Discontinued, EV Global Motor Company went out of business
  • Strong 500 watt geared rear hub motor by Heinzmann paired with capable 36 volt SLA battery
  • Full of extras and creature comforts including front and rear headlights, side mirror, fenders, a horn and a shock on the fork and seat post

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

EV Global Motors

Model:

ebike SX

Price:

$2,000 USD

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2005

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

75 lbs (34.01 kg)

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Fork Details:

Nitro DH Triple Suspension with 75 mm Travel

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7

Shifter Details:

Grip Twist

Cranks:

170 mm

Pedals:

Aluminum Alloy Platform

Brake Details:

Mechanical Disc in Front, V-Brake in Rear

Seat Post:

Suspension Shock

Rims:

26" x 1.5" Double Wall, Rear 36 Hole, Front 32 Hole

Spokes:

14 Gauge Stainless

Tire Brand:

26" x 1.95"

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)

Accessories:

Front and Rear Fenders, Front and Rear lights, Single Side Kickstand, Built-in Charger

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Heinzmann

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub (brushed)
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

8 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

288 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Sealed Lead Acid

Charge Time:

4.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

15 miles (24 km)

Estimated Max Range:

20 miles (32 km)

Display Type:

LED Console

Readouts:

Battery Level

Display Accessories:

Horn, Cruise Control

Drive Mode:

Twist Throttle

Top Speed:

17.5 mph (28 kph) (12.5 mph in Economy Mode)

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Written Review

The ebike SX was one of the higher end EV Global Motor electric bikes designed by Lee Iacocca who is famous for engineering the Ford Mustang and Ford Pinto cars. After leaving Ford he served as President and CEO of Chrysler from 1978 and as chairman from 1979 until retirement in 1992. In 1999 he became the head of EV Global Motors, a company formed to develop and market electric bikes in the US. It is said that he was inspired by innovation happening in Asian markets and wanted to bring his expertise from the automotive space to enhance bikes in America.

Powering the ebike SX is a beefy 500 watt geared brushed rear hub motor made by Heinzmann (known for their high quality systems). This is one of the more powerful motors of its time and is capable of moving larger riders. That said, motors from this time period were more prone to having gears stripped if used forcefully up hills without assistance. The motor is activated by using a trigger on the right handle bar. The left handle bar features a grip shifter which controls 7 gears on a standard rear cassette. It also features an adjustable side mirror for keeping track of passing cycles and vehicles.

The battery pack on this bike was built right into the oversized downtube and consisted of a 36 volt 8 amp hour sealed Lead-acid pack. This technology was state of the art at its time but does not rival modern Lithium-ion cells which tend to be much lighter and more capable of enduring thousands of charge cycles before losing capacity. That, compared with just ~250 estimated for the ebike SX and other bikes using SLA technology. In addition to the battery pack being located within the frame there is also a controller board and charging system. Newer ebikes tend to externalize the charger converter in a brick attached to the cord with the plug.

While the range, charge cycles and top speed on this bike are not very impressive by today’s standards, the fenders, horn, shock absorber, built in cruise control and design aesthetics still ring true. In fact, the SX and other EV Global ebike models look strikingly similar to the popular R series by Optibike. By integrating the wires, battery pack and controller into the oversized downtube, the chances of direct damage and weathering are greatly reduced. Considering the 75lb weight of this bike, the front disc brake was a welcome edition for riding in wet conditions. In terms of ride quality, this bike doesn’t feel as stiff as many newer ebikes but that’s due in large part to the weight.

The front and rear lights are ultra-bright and massive when compared with more modern offerings that often forgo lights altogether. The seat post shock makes a difference when riding over bumps and compliments the front shock well. If you see this bike at a garage sale or used bike store be sure to consider the lack of replacement parts available. Everything from the twist throttle to the controller and especially the batteries are hard to find. In the video review above you may notice the bike I was testing has a battery pack strapped onto a rear rack. This is due to the challenge of finding custom sized batteries that can fit inside the downtube. I’ve been told that if the trigger throttle on this bike breaks you can sometimes retrofit a throttle from Currie Technologies.

The ebike SX is an electric bike that led the way, inspired others to join in and ultimately proved to be ahead of its time. It’s not a very useful machine these days due to the limited replacement parts and abundance of new high-tech offerings but it’s still iconic and fun. For a collector or tinkerer this could be a worthwhile project but for most people it’s just something to be appreciated and acknowledged as a forerunner to modern ebikes.

Pros:

  • Powerful motor capable of moving larger riders and ascending medium hills with pedal assistance
  • Super bright front and rear headlights keep you safe at night
  • Front fork shock and seat post shock smooth out the bumps
  • Front and rear fenders keep dust, mud and water away
  • Front disc brake provides great stopping power in wet conditions
  • Includes a kickstand and metal bash guard on front chain ring

Cons:

  • No longer being produced, replacement parts becoming rare
  • Stock sealed Lead-acid battery was heavy and could only endure ~250 charges before losing capacity
  • No pedal assist mode, throttle only
  • Heavy bike with awkward frame that’s hard to lock up and a challenge to fit on hanging style car racks due to the lack of a top tube
  • Brushed style motors wear out faster and this older gear style may be prone to stripping if pushed too hard
  • Built in cruise control made riding over longer distances easier on the thumb

Resources:

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Hanle van Niekerk
3 years ago

We bought an Electric Bike a few years ago and struggling to get it working again. We are based in South Africa.

Can you please advise us on how to get the wiring diagram for the bike or who we can contact to assist us in this matter.

Thank you and regards,
Hanle van Niekerk

Reply
Court Rye
3 years ago

Hello Hanle, there are ways to get the ebike SX and other EV Global Motors electric bikes going again. Usually it has to do with replacing the battery but it sounds like you’re looking for help with wiring. There is a thread talking about this over on the forums at https://electricbikereview.com/community/threads/evg-ebike-upgrades.244/ and some more information at NYCeWheels http://www.nycewheels.com/ebike.html

I hope this helps you! The biggest challenge may be finding the right components in Africa to fix your existing bike. Feel free to join the discussion in the forums and ask for more advice :)

Reply
Sally Dillon
3 years ago

Hi, I have 2 ebikes in my garage. They are probably 15 years old? Need new batteries and tires. What is the best place to source these items, or to resell my bikes to other ebike enthusiasts?

Reply
Court Rye
3 years ago

That is a great question Sally… I really have no idea about this but have seen some of the older EV Global ebikes on display at shops in California and Florida just for fun (like a museum). You could always post them in the deals forum here for sale or ask around for help from other ebike enthusiasts in the EV Global Motors forum.

Reply
Eric Borcherding
3 years ago

On the EVG SX36 e-bike by Lee Iaocca. What a machine, and what a dream! One can convert these bikes to quite good performance:

1) Using the stock battery case fit in a LiNiMnCo 37V 10.8 AHr from BatterySpace (special order). At an astounding 6pds greatly lowers 15pds from L.A. 6 pack conversion of 6 x 6V * 9Ahr Powersonics (21 Pds). Big step…
2) Or try a 38.4V 15AHr LiFePO4 imotor @12pds bearing phenominal range / speed. 32KPH max, range of 60KM alone. This pack is simply, Kick-Ass. Snug fit into compartment with required BMS and connector mod; try 6 pack trailer connector. This is bested by 2 x 18.5V 18650 Lions self-build 7pd packs with a tricky BMS, dual chargers and stuffed full battery compartment fill, for more range.
3) Change 12V35W Halogen to Xenon QuteQueen LED H3mod 5W@14V, 82% energy saved for motor in night rides.
4) Alternately the Heinzmann PE speed motor at 470W vs. 500W brushed motor adds a few KPHs.
5) Choose tires with solid narrow center rubber, pumped at ~45PSI, like German made Chamberlands brown walls.
6) Keep the bike lubed and drivetrain / bearings clean, adjust brakes for no-drag.

Happy Trails… Eric

Reply
Court Rye
3 years ago

Awesome information on conversion Eric! Thanks for sharing this. I checked out your website on LED’s and found it interesting. Looks like you’re pretty skilled with electronics and hardware :)

Reply
greg znamenacek
1 year ago

Where might I find use parts for ebike LX thank greg

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

I’ve visited a couple of shops that have units in the back and they might be willing to sell you parts or the entire bike for a good price. One such shop is The Electric Bike Shop in Sacramento, California and the other is Myron’s Extreme Machines in Fullerton, California. No guarantees on either, they may or may not still have them but I have seen this unit in both shops over the past several years. Also, you could ask around in the EBR Community Forums here under For Sale or Q&A and ask for Ann M. who used to own a shop in Austin, Texas. She might know :)

Reply
GB
1 year ago

You can also get parts from: electricwheelsofflorida on eBay. They have OEM parts for the e-bike. Good Luck!

Reply

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Dewey
9 hours ago

The unlimited "off road mode" delivers 30+ mph performance. At higher speeds on street ebikes are sometimes treated under state law as a motor vehicle, but without a VIN number an ebike usually cannot be registered or titled at the DMV and not insurable, so even if it is legal to ride at those speeds in your state you may still be violating vehicle code/traffic/driving regulations that were written to require mopeds and motorcycles meet federal motor vehicle safety standards, be titled, registered, and insured, in order to be legally operable on street.

Sonoboy
9 hours ago

Here's a link discussing the elevation climb capabilities and battery draw for a Bosch Performance speed motor (not the CX).

http://www.ebikeportal.com/test-battery-consumption-after-1000-meters-of-elevation-gain-with-a-bosch-ebike

If you are using the upper ranges of the Bosch, for example SPORT and TURBO, you most definitely will need two batteries.Here is the Bosch range calculator:

https://www.bosch-ebike.com/en/service/range-assistant/

If you can afford it, get one of the Bosch powered bikes that are dual battery configured. I just got the Riese & Muller Delite with dual battery, and am still enjoying not having any range anxiety. Mine is the 20 MPH version with the CX drive. From what I've read, a speed version (28 MPH) will lose about 20% of range due to air resistance. So, there's that to think about.

scrambler
10 hours ago

It is most likely limited by software so it would follow the requirement of a Class 1 (or 2) E-bike. Read the article below to learn more about these.
https://electricbikereview.com/guides/electric-bike-classes/

The first thing is to ask the manufacturer if here is a way to lift the limitation. Some will allow it and give you the details on how to change the programming.

If not, the limitation is often triggered by a speed sensor that is somewhere on the rear wheel and frame. If so, some ways around the limitation can be to deactivate the sensor (you wont see your speed anymore), or mount some gizmo that changes the reading of the speed (your speed will be inaccurate).

read more on E-bike Tuning below
http://ebike-mtb.com/en/back-issue-e-bike-tuning/
https://www.ebiketuning.com/

Mark Peralta
11 hours ago

I have a beautiful commute through the mountains in the NW, but it is 50 miles with a 4600ft gain. Maybe I'm dreaming, but can I do this on an ebike? I have a fast Trek 520 touring bike that I could convert with a hub motor or I could just buy a new mid drive bike. Using some physics and bikecalculator.com I figured I'd need an average of 500W (plus my 120W contribution) to do the trip in 2 hours (25mph). I figured I'd need to carry a spare battery or even two. I can recharge at work. Looking for 1) acid test - should I just give up now? 2) recommended technology hub or mid drive? 3) recommended power rating 4) I don't care about starting torque. Is torque a factor near top speed or just power? 5) battery capacity and ideas - higher voltage, etc? 6) also maybe someone could check my math?
I am 190lb dressed to ride, bike is about 30lbs, 100psi clinchers, 700c wheels, nice solid touring bike.
Fifty miles, even for a car is quite a distance and would take me more than an hour , even if there are high speed sections. I recently did a 48 mile round trip on my ebike with minimal elevation changes (I assume since I did not did not check them), at a bike trail (North County Trailways, NY) and my ride time was 2 hours and ten minutes, average speed of 22 mph. My 52V 13Ah (676 Wh) battery powered up for 35 miles before I changed to my spare battery. If you ride fast at more than 20 mph, your battery consumed goes up exponentially for every mph increase in speed. Your battery consumption may vary from 15-20 wh per mile depending on speed, rider's weight, rider's effort, number of stops, and elevation changes.

Energetic James
12 hours ago

I have a beautiful commute through the mountains in the NW, but it is 50 miles with a 4600ft gain. Maybe I'm dreaming, but can I do this on an ebike? I have a fast Trek 520 touring bike that I could convert with a hub motor or I could just buy a new mid drive bike. Using some physics and bikecalculator.com I figured I'd need an average of 500W (plus my 120W contribution) to do the trip in 2 hours (25mph). I figured I'd need to carry a spare battery or even two. I can recharge at work. Looking for 1) acid test - should I just give up now? 2) recommended technology hub or mid drive? 3) recommended power rating 4) I don't care about starting torque. Is torque a factor near top speed or just power? 5) battery capacity and ideas - higher voltage, etc? 6) also maybe someone could check my math?
I am 190lb dressed to ride, bike is about 30lbs, 100psi clinchers, 700c wheels, nice solid touring bike.

Mark Peralta
19 hours ago

If the problem is not resolved after they did all the "tightening" of the ebike's integrity, then you have to get your money back! The problem is real and if they don't acknowledge it then go to the media, make a lot of noise. After that, fight it in court as a defective product. I don't know if lemon law also applies to ebikes. Make sure you video the actual shimmy from different angles so we can watch it at youtube.

hurricane56
20 hours ago

I put down an order in the batch immediately following the founders series orders. While I'm eagerly awaiting the bike to ship, I definately agree with others that Juiced needs to give a more concrete timeline for shipping and final delivery. Just having some basic information to set one's expectations goes a long way, and like Tora has acknowledged, most of the HyperFat buyers seem to be ebike/EV enthusiasts, expectations are high for the product and people are willing to wait.

The thing that sucks the most about this waiting game is the pre-order process and shifting time-table have made this purchase feel too much like a early crowdfunding campaign. I forked over more than $3k to purchase this bike hoping that Juiced had the reputation to stick to delivery timelines, but I do acknowledge that it was a risk that I took when purchasing.

Without sounding overly critical, because I really want Tora and the everyone at Juiced to succeed, I wanted to offer the following suggestions as both a customer and operations management professional.

1. Setting expectations - The bike was still under development when you started accepting pre-orders. I feel that most people knew there were working prototypes, but the scale of the component integration challenges should have been highlighted much more clearly early on. Also, I would find it difficult to believe that you'd be willing to ship an entire batch of bikes by air cargo. Are you willing to actually do this for all of the bikes in the first couple of batches?
2. Communications - The frequency of communications on social media, forums, website was not frequent enough. It would have been nice to get at least a bi-weekly update. The other thing that seemed to come at the wrong time was a few videos released on YouTube (model riding CrossCurrent Air, and Easter Egg video). It gave me the impression that your communications people would rather make hokey videos instead of communicating with customers that had paid in full. Many of the videos that you made yourself highlighting the bike components and features were a lot better than watching a cheesy infomercial, etc.
3. Pre-orders and payment - If you decide to collect pre-orders again it really should be for a reservation retainer instead of payment in full. Unless you can guarantee a solid delivery timeline, full payments shouldn't be expected from customers.

Best of luck out there and I'm looking forward to receiving my bike in October!

Hanz
20 hours ago

Any e bike riders around Pittsburgh, PA? I'm a 58 yr old / 260 lbs disabled rider and just started to ride again thanks to my new radrover ebike. Love this thing. I ride mostly with my wife. Pittsburgh has several nice rides coming up.
Looking for riders close to me. Monongahela, PA 15063

Thomas Jaszewski
1 day ago

E-Mtb should be able to be used on trails. I find myself giving way for other cyclists and hikers because It's easier to gain momentum. I often turn assist off if wishing exercise or on for riding with my much faster friends. I use a class I pedelec, I agree throttle e-bikes should not be allowed.
Unfortunately the lack nes berween motorcycle and ebike are being blurred. The 72w 3kw 45 mph "ebike" have no place on mtd trails deveoped, paid for and maintained by mtb clubs.

Rooster
1 day ago

I have the same dalema, I too bought the ocean current and now I'm seeing all the upgrades wishing I had waited but they promised me they were going to let me know when the LCD display and the controller that should have been put on these bikes in the first place are available but I figure they're telling me what I want to hear. I'm keeping my fingers crossed but not holding my breath. It would be nice if they would remember the one's that bought the early models and actually helped they're business grow but we'll see. I don't think I mentioned that I also ordered mine with the LCD display and was given a refund because they screwed up, I wouldn't have bought the bike had I known that. Anyway, WE WILL SEE HOW IT WORKS OUT?
The only advice I can give anybody who is looking for a descent ebike is, BUILD IT YOURSELF.

Perseus
2 days ago

I thought I should post an update on "my friend's" bike.

1) The bikespeed RS has performed flawlessly and to speed has been 70kph - I think it could have gone faster except "my friend" didn't want to push his limits - a stack at that speed would not be pretty. When I, sorry, I mean he took his bike to have the eMTB software update done recently, he removed it prior to the service and the diagnostic software could not detect it had been fitted (He was standing with the mechanic when he was doing the upgrade and the tech told him if it had been detected he would have to note it on the service record but that nothing had come up) Bikespeed RS claim that there is no need to physically remove it - switching it off via a key sequence will render it undetectable. My friend erred on the side of caution but will probably leave it in next time and just disable it for the service.

2) On the subject of whether chipping an engine will damage it, my research is that the 350w motor used in the s-pedelecs and the 250w motor are identical except for the programming see https://www.e-bikeshop.co.uk/blog/post/whats-the-difference-between-the-250w-350w-bosch-ebike-motors-explained/. Given that, I'm pretty confident that my friend will not damage his engine with his dongle.

However, to cater for the higher speeds and eliminate the high cadence and constant gear shifting as per Nobby's post, he has modified his bike pretty extensively. I will post a full description with Pics when I have time later this weekend, but the main mods are:

Swapped the Shimano drivetrain for the SRAM EX-1 drivetrain which has been especially designed for e-bikes. Very happy with the new drivetrain and worth every cent. http://www.bikeradar.com/au/mtb/news/article/sram-launches-e-mountain-bike-specific-ex1-drivetrain-and-guide-re-brake-47061/http://reviews.mtbr.com/sram-ex1-e-bike-drivetrain-reviewhttp://ebike-mtb.com/en/sram-ex1-review-8-gear-drivetrain-e-mtbs/ He is running an 18t sprocket on the front.

Upgraded the brakes to SRAM Guide RE with 200mm rotors front and back. No issues or worries about having the power to stop when he needs to. http://ebike-mtb.com/en/sram-guide-re-review-new-e-mtb-specific-brakes/

Replaced the Intuvia display with a Bosch Nyon computer

Fitted a Bikespeed RS Dongle - Absolutely no issues and correct speed displayed etc. A mate has the ASA dongle and by comparision, the fitting is more complex, it doesn't appear as well made, crappy connectors and appears to limit him to 50kmh. here is a video he posted on youtube on his daily commute: More info: http://www.bikespeed.de/RS_en.html

Other mods and accessories:

Fitted a Supernova M99 Pure front light. Upgraded to a Supernova M99Pro with high beam (p.m. me if anyone is interested in the M99 Pure) Simply brilliant lights in my view

Hornit 140DB Bike Horn - sorry, some dinky bike bell just doesn't cut the mustard at speed: https://www.thehornit.com/

Mudhugger Mud Guards https://www.themudhugger.co.uk/

Spare Bosch 500Wh eBike PowerPack Battery

He is pretty happy with the setup now and uses it most days to commute to work -around 25km each way and longer rides (up to 80km on weekends).

Chris Nolte
2 days ago

I'm not sure if you found what you were looking for, but I recently sold one of these bikes and I think I might be able to provide some insight.

1. For the lights. I would check out this recent thread here, you should be able to use any ebike lights that accept a 6v DC lead. Here is a thread I started to give you some background.

2. I installed a set of Specialized Roll Fenders on the bike here and I think it came out really nice. They match the satin black finish well. I didn't get too many pics, but I listed one below. I had to notch out the rear fender at the seat stays a bit and I also drilled a hole to install the screw at the seat stay bridge, other than that it was pretty straight forward.

3. We usually recommend Busch & Muller Mirrors, they are German made and many are made specifically for ebikes. I plan to make a post about mirrors eventually, but let me know if you need help sourcing one. Peter White Cycles is the main distributor in the US, but we stock every style.

4. The Topeak rack is a nice choice. Recently we have been experimenting with the Ortlieb QL3 racks, it's a really nice system if you're planning on adding panniers. It's a cleaner look too.

5. The chain guard is going to be tough, but you could try the SKS Chainboard or something similar. They have a lot of products, but they're not all available in the US.

I hope this helps.

1/1
rich c
2 days ago

Two of my ebikes have body floats with comfort saddles. The springs in the comfort saddles add another 1 inch of travel on top of the body float's travel. The comfort level is as good as my full suspension ebike. On the really rough successive bumps, I am still comfortable on the saddle while my feet are already bouncing off the pedals.

I must be doing something wrong, but my suspension seat post and spring front fork is not close to being in the same class as my air shock full suspension emtb. Must be the suspension saddle!

Rincon
2 days ago

They should for a 10K ebike.
That's the ST2S. The ST2 is the down market version. But I wouldn't park either one in a public rack while I went to work.

J.R.
2 days ago

I have BodyFloat on 1 ebike and Thudbuster LT on another. BodyFloat wins for me, hands down.

Mark Peralta
2 days ago

(haven't tried a suspension post combined with a comfort saddle).
Two of my ebikes have body floats with comfort saddles. The springs in the comfort saddles add another 1 inch of travel on top of the body float's travel. The comfort level is as good as my full suspension ebike. On the really rough successive bumps, I am still comfortable on the saddle while my feet are already bouncing off the pedals.

1/1
jazz
3 days ago

I agree if you can't afford to lose it don't let it out of your sight. More locks may deter thieves to a point but because they already know ebikes are expensive they're going to be more of a target and thieves may be more determined to take them even with added protections.
Stromer incorporates cellular, GPS, and remote wheel lockout into their ST2 bikes. You can lock the motor when you park the bike, or later remotely via the app if it is stolen. Google Stolen Stromer for some amusing stories.
They should for a 10K ebike.

rich c
3 days ago

How did you short circuit the old battery. Many of those have fuses in them, and that be all that needs to be replaced. You don't know if the battery is supposed to be 48v? It should say right on it. Batteries directly from China are notorious for being poor quality. Hard to suggest what is going on because you give so little information. I suggest you find a local ebike mechanic.

Stu
3 days ago

Just got on the forum. I rebuilt my old Raliegh last year into an ebike. First one for me What a ride I love it and plan on building another soon. I'll get ride of those old bikes sitting in my garage.
Intro: I am fstued , Stu from San Diego been riding forever just went Electric the wave of the future.

DBentz
3 days ago

Thanks for all the great, interesting responses. The explanations are satisfying for custom self built bicycles but seems like manufacturers less dependent on pre-existing components would have more latitude to market internally geared hubs mated with belt drives. I wonder if the advantages of a belt drive just don't delever that dramatic a payoff. Also, I found this interesting answer from Larry Pizzi at:

https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/belt-drive.123/ :

"One of the reasons more ebikes don't use belt drives vs. chain drives, is torque sensing systems on many hub motors which is done on the axle or the drop-out. If you use a belt, it needs to be under high tension for this type of torque sensor to function properly which causes the belt to wear our more quickly then a chain. There are bottom bracket torque sensors available but they are comparatively much more expensive.

The best combo for a belt drive bike is a center motor system, like Bosch and an internally geared hub. You will see these as the eBike market continues to expand."

jazz
3 days ago

The only thing you can do for 100% security is never let it out of your sight which is exactly what I do. I never leave any of my ebikes unattended. If I have to go somewhere, I bring it into the business itself. Most businesses in my area know bike theft is rampant and usually allow it no questions asked. I usually ask first as a courtesy and have yet to be told no.

If you have to leave it unattended know just understand there is a strong possibility it will be stolen regardless of what lock or fancy tracker you have on it. If you can accept that (and possibility of not having an ebike any more), then go for it. It's harsh but reality.

A $25 angle grinder from Harbor Freight can cut thru any lock in 60 seconds or less.

James Lauther
3 days ago

Unfortunately, two days ago, my 2017 Rad Rover eBike was stolen while parked and locked at my local public library. The cable lock I used was no match for the cutters that were used to remove the lock and as witnesses reported, it did take long for the thief to free my RadRover and ride off in plain sight of others...

This incident got me thinking of ways to protect my next bike. Other than a stronger lock and paying attention to where you leave your bike, I'm thinking that incorporating a hidden GPS tracking device into the bike would provide an additional level of security and might provide owners and law enforcement a way to locate and recover the bike. I don't think it would be too expensive to add the hardware and would be a desirable feature.

It could be powered from the bike's battery pack, or have its own battery and be integrated into the controller or display unit. An alternative to a built-in tracker might be an add-on accessory which could be installed somewhere inconspicuous. I don't know if such an accessory is currently available?
What are others doing to prevent the theft of their ebikes which are very attractive to thieves ?

Sincerely,

Marc[/QUOTE
Unfortunately, two days ago, my 2017 Rad Rover eBike was stolen while parked and locked at my local public library. The cable lock I used was no match for the cutters that were used to remove the lock and as witnesses reported, it did take long for the thief to free my RadRover and ride off in plain sight of others...

This incident got me thinking of ways to protect my next bike. Other than a stronger lock and paying attention to where you leave your bike, I'm thinking that incorporating a hidden GPS tracking device into the bike would provide an additional level of security and might provide owners and law enforcement a way to locate and recover the bike. I don't think it would be too expensive to add the hardware and would be a desirable feature.

It could be powered from the bike's battery pack, or have its own battery and be integrated into the controller or display unit. An alternative to a built-in tracker might be an add-on accessory which could be installed somewhere inconspicuous. I don't know if such an accessory is currently available?
What are others doing to prevent the theft of their ebikes which are very attractive to thieves ?

Sincerely,

Marc

Dewey
3 days ago

It seems like not many electric bicycles have belt drives. Motorcycles have more engine vibration but still, are there not noise, weight, and vibration advantages to a belt drive that would benefit electric bicycles? But if so, why do they seem rare?

Belt drives don't work with derailleurs.

The cheapest belt drive ebikes would be either an IKEA Sladda 2-speed, or a Priority Classic single speed or 3-speed, converted with a front wheel hub motor.

eVox is a Quebec subsidiary of Miele, a German washing machine company with experience designing belt driven motors, their Dyname drive uses a flywheel and belt on the left side separate from the chain and gears and is considered robust enough to have found application in some bikeshare systems. Court reviewed the City and KAB models.

Gates has a list of pedal bicycles and ebikes that use their belt drive, and earlier this year boasted their technology is used by 500 bicycle manufacturers. If you wanted to convert a belt drive equipped pedal bicycle some might be suitable for front wheel hub motor conversion which would be the simplest way to do it, otherwise I don't know how easy it is to find parts to make a belt drivetrain work with a mid-drive or rear hub motor. Typically a mid-drive replaces the front chainring while rear wheel hub motors accept an IGH chain sprocket, you would need to find belt adapters to work with the motor and rear hub plus the right length belt. A more radical conversion involving cutting the frame on a standard IGH bike has been attempted by some belt drive conversions.

mrgold35
4 days ago

I would review EBR for both Voltbike and Radrover to look at the fine details of both bikes. I was on the fence a year ago trying to decide between the same two bikes for the same $$$ (cheaper shipping with Volt). What I liked about the Radrover was it was a fat tire bike with ebike components added. I could repair/replace as needed any parts once the warranty ran out. I can even transfer all the ebike components to another fat tire bike and convert the Radrover into a regular pedal bike. Because the battery is standard, I can also upgrade up to 52v/13.5ah version for more power and range from Luna Cycle because the standard Dolphin battery pack fits into the Radrover battery tray. What also pushed me towards the Radrover was:

- riding position was more upright with a shorter handlebar stem
- had ergonomic grips for added comfort
- has a twist throttle with on/off switch, later added an aftermarket thumb throttle attachment I use when trail riding
- throttle is available with full 750 watts of power in PAS 0-5, comes in handy if you need to walk your bike up inclines or stairs
- the controller is made to deliver full power you are set for until power is depleted (kinda like a car giving you full power until you run out of gas).
- front suspension has a lock-out feature
- 180mm brakes front and back
- neoprene slap guard for chain
- three built-in water bottle mounts (either side of upper top tube and one on down tube facing the ground)
- two different colors for his and her ebikes
- standard rack ready connections (went with Topeak fat tire rack)
- more comfy standard seat
- option for PAS 0
- quick release on front wheels
- I can add a triangle bag to cover the battery to dry, dust free, and warmer during winter rides
- you can adjust the motor cut off speed in the LCD screen setup, you can set the RR from 7 to 24.8 mph motor cut off.

This was a year ago and I'm sure Voltbikes has made upgrades since then.

Michigan Mister
4 months ago

'ol Lee didn't do much before saving Chrysler's behind. (K-cars)(except for designing the Mustang) Court, I believe these retailed for around 500.00. a lot for a bike back then, but ahead of it's time for sure.

Highway Star
1 year ago

Also I restored the original battery by running a razor along the top edge of the plastic lid then popping it off exposing the battery fill cells that have rubber caps that pop off with a screwdriver then filled with battery acid from the local auto parts and it works great again after 12 years of sitting. Plenty of videos on restoring sealed battery's on youtube.

Highway Star
1 year ago

got me a new 36V BATTERY from Jerry and it fits perfectly into the case, but it does not have screw in terminals only lead tabs. So I didn't want to cut the original wires so I made 2-2 inch jumpers and soldered them to the eye leads then plugged them to the battery works great with no chopping....

Highway Star
1 year ago

got me a new 36V BATTERY from Jerry and it fits perfectly into the case, but it does not have screw in terminals only lead tabs. So I didn't want to cut the original wires so I made 2-2 inch jumpers and soldered them to the eye leads then plugged them to the battery works great with no chopping....

Cyclo TeChTwIsTeR
2 years ago

This is the man that has all the parts you will need and yes a battery to fit inside as it should.
http://www.ebay.com/usr/electricwheelsofflorida?_trksid=p2047675.l2559

He also has the bikes For sell
Jerry
Call 305 687 8484 for Free Tech SupportWe have the largest inventory of original parts for the EVG EBikes.

David Clein
2 years ago

The controller is not in the battery case. it is housed in the body. Lead acid is available (36v 9Ah) to rebuild the original battery pack. putting the primary battery pack on the rear rack is stupid.

David Clein
2 years ago

+ElectricBikeReview.com Six 6 volt / 9 AH (5.95" x 1.34" x 3.70") SLA batteries with F2 terminals wired in series fit into the battery box. With a little crimping and soldering these are the closest thing to a drop in replacement for the original discontinued 36V "Long" battery. With this set-up expect range of 8 miles in full power mode with little to no pedaling and 15 miles in low power mode.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+David Clein Great feedback David, thanks for chiming in! I was doing my best to piece together the facts about this bike but was doing it with limited input. You're welcome to share your expertise here anytime :)

wolfman9999999
2 years ago

I have the 24 volt version, and I'm trying to figure out what some of the switches do on the left side of the handlebar.  Battery pack can be refurbished with UPS batteries.  I did it to mine

Adam Feathers
2 years ago

I bought 2 eBikes in 1999 at a Oldsmobile Dealer in central Pa. and put them away in 2001 after one fell down and broke the key switch . They both look like brand new but I'm not sure what to do with them since I don't know if they're is any place to get parts or the repairs done (in Pa.). When I put them away I replaced both batteries (probably shot now). It would be a shame to just junk them . I would like to get them repaired this spring and use them again, they were great and a lot of fun to ride !

Michigan Mister
4 months ago

I saw another vid just today about this bike. the fellow being interviewed said there' a place in so cal that has lots of parts.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Adam Feathers Hi Adam! Sounds like a fun project. I'm sure there are people who will collect these someday, even a few who want parts or originals right now. You could just keep them stored and eventually sell them on eBay or the forums: http://electricbikereview.com/community/forums/for-sale/

Ron Warrick
3 years ago

I bought a 24v about ten years ago for $650 and it is still going, but I really need to upgrade to make it faster and also get away from SLA's.  Any ideas appreciated. 

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Hi Ron! So glad to hear the eBike worked well for you. As for your next bike, I guess it depends on what your cycling needs are. I've created a full list of some of my favorite bikes in each category including one value and one performance here: http://electricbikereview.com/top-10-electric-bikes/ check it out, each review has a video and all the specs, chime in if you have any comments, there's also a forum to discuss with other riders and owners: http://electricbikereview.com/community/

HostileHST
4 years ago

On the throttle, almost any 5k ohm potentiometer controlller will work on these ebikes.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

Thanks for the great tips +HostileHST 

HostileHST
4 years ago

I had the 24 volt version that would only go 12 mph under power, but it sure did help going up hills. The 36 volt version I believe would go around 18 mph and if you pushed into the 48 volt range (controller needs replaced or modified), you could see about 23 mph. 36 volt packs can easily be made with some soldering abilities. The batteries to do this are still being made.

Kit Babcock
3 years ago

Ron....the 24v heinzmann rear hub can be over volted to 50v, though using a stock EVG ebike 36v controller starts to get hot and "beeps". Shutting off the power and back on again resets it, but I'm running 46.2v's and it's fine.

DON'T over volt the stock EVG ebike 24v controller, as it has a max voltage around 29v before it blows the 26v range capacitors! If done, the lights will still work, but you get NO throttle response!. This was a common error when a 36v SLA battery box was put in a 24v ebike. I'm using the 24v/400watt rear hub on a 36v setup bike. Because of spun one-way stock bearings in the 36v hubs. Or I'm swapping in 36v motors into the 24v hubs that don't have spun bearings.

The 400watt hubs are setup for speed and not torque like the 36v 500watts hubs.

Though understand that there is a design flaw in the hubs as they use a pressed on one-way bearing. BIG guys riding these bikes and giving them full throttle can spin them! The motors works, but your now stuck in "mud" and slipping.  :-)

Here is an article on ES for the spun bearing:

http://endless-sphere.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=4190&start=25

I'm looking into using a laser welder to fix this problem. You want low heat as the sealed bearing has a plastic cap to hold in the grease. Your welding the bearing to the axle.

Made sense?

Ron Warrick
3 years ago

+Kit Babcock   Good stuff.  Can you clarify whether you are talking about converting a 24 v, or a 36v?  It sounds like you are shooting for 40 volts or so here.  Mine is 24v, so I don't want to burn it out.  Thanks.

HostileHST
3 years ago

Oops, didn't see that was for Kit, but it's all good info he shares and I would have gone that way, but had to sell mine so we had money to move a little over a year ago. Wish I could get another one, but haven't seen one for sale recently.

HostileHST
3 years ago

NP at all, always trying to help when I can. Glad you put it on the forum.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

+Kit Babcock Kit, this is awesome! Thanks for the tips. If you don't mind, I also shared your words on the forum where another individual was trying to figure out how to replace his 24v battery for an EV Global Mini http://electricbikereview.com/community/threads/ev-global-mini-ebike-battery-replacement.262/ feel free to amend or add your voice there as well. I referenced your comment and linked here so he might reply as well.

SuperPapadzul
4 years ago

It reminds me of a Velosolex, but cooler because it is electric.

BiknutProductions
4 years ago

Sort of resembles an early caveman version of an Opti Bike. Obviously ahead of it's time.

Aaron Martin
4 years ago

Ya in 2002 i did not know that there was a e-bike for sale.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

I agree Aaron, this thing was full of neat features and way ahead of its time. With a lighter weight battery it could be on-par or even at the leading edge of more modern bikes.

Aaron Martin
4 years ago

That is a cool bike.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

Yep, it's one of the first ebikes ever in the US and... you are the first to comment ;)

Vũ Nguyễn
4 years ago

First