EV Global Motors ebike SX Review

Ev Global Motors Ebike Sx Electric Bike Review 1
Ev Global Motors Ebike Sx
Ev Global Motors Ebike Sx 500 Watt Motor
Ev Global Motors Ebike Sx Battery
Ev Global Motors Ebike Sx Controller
Ev Global Motors Ebike Sx Headlight
Ev Global Motors Ebike Sx Electric Bike Review 1
Ev Global Motors Ebike Sx
Ev Global Motors Ebike Sx 500 Watt Motor
Ev Global Motors Ebike Sx Battery
Ev Global Motors Ebike Sx Controller
Ev Global Motors Ebike Sx Headlight

Summary

  • A high powered, feature rich electric bike ahead of its time designed by Lee Iacocca (the pioneering engineer behind classic Ford and Chevy automobiles)
  • Discontinued, EV Global Motor Company went out of business
  • Strong 500 watt geared rear hub motor by Heinzmann paired with capable 36 volt SLA battery
  • Full of extras and creature comforts including front and rear headlights, side mirror, fenders, a horn and a shock on the fork and seat post

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

EV Global Motors

Model:

ebike SX

Price:

$2,000 USD

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2005

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

75 lbs (34.01 kg)

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Fork Details:

Nitro DH Triple Suspension with 75 mm Travel

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7

Shifter Details:

Grip Twist

Cranks:

170 mm

Pedals:

Aluminum Alloy Platform

Brake Details:

Mechanical Disc in Front, V-Brake in Rear

Seat Post:

Suspension Shock

Rims:

26" x 1.5" Double Wall, Rear 36 Hole, Front 32 Hole

Spokes:

14 Gauge Stainless

Tire Brand:

26" x 1.95"

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)

Accessories:

Front and Rear Fenders, Front and Rear lights, Single Side Kickstand, Built-in Charger

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Heinzmann

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub (brushed)
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

8 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

288 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Sealed Lead Acid

Charge Time:

4.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

15 miles (24 km)

Estimated Max Range:

20 miles (32 km)

Display Type:

LED Console

Readouts:

Battery Level

Display Accessories:

Horn, Cruise Control

Drive Mode:

Twist Throttle

Top Speed:

17.5 mph (28 kph) (12.5 mph in Economy Mode)

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Written Review

The ebike SX was one of the higher end EV Global Motor electric bikes designed by Lee Iacocca who is famous for engineering the Ford Mustang and Ford Pinto cars. After leaving Ford he served as President and CEO of Chrysler from 1978 and as chairman from 1979 until retirement in 1992. In 1999 he became the head of EV Global Motors, a company formed to develop and market electric bikes in the US. It is said that he was inspired by innovation happening in Asian markets and wanted to bring his expertise from the automotive space to enhance bikes in America.

Powering the ebike SX is a beefy 500 watt geared brushed rear hub motor made by Heinzmann (known for their high quality systems). This is one of the more powerful motors of its time and is capable of moving larger riders. That said, motors from this time period were more prone to having gears stripped if used forcefully up hills without assistance. The motor is activated by using a trigger on the right handle bar. The left handle bar features a grip shifter which controls 7 gears on a standard rear cassette. It also features an adjustable side mirror for keeping track of passing cycles and vehicles.

The battery pack on this bike was built right into the oversized downtube and consisted of a 36 volt 8 amp hour sealed Lead-acid pack. This technology was state of the art at its time but does not rival modern Lithium-ion cells which tend to be much lighter and more capable of enduring thousands of charge cycles before losing capacity. That, compared with just ~250 estimated for the ebike SX and other bikes using SLA technology. In addition to the battery pack being located within the frame there is also a controller board and charging system. Newer ebikes tend to externalize the charger converter in a brick attached to the cord with the plug.

While the range, charge cycles and top speed on this bike are not very impressive by today’s standards, the fenders, horn, shock absorber, built in cruise control and design aesthetics still ring true. In fact, the SX and other EV Global ebike models look strikingly similar to the popular R series by Optibike. By integrating the wires, battery pack and controller into the oversized downtube, the chances of direct damage and weathering are greatly reduced. Considering the 75lb weight of this bike, the front disc brake was a welcome edition for riding in wet conditions. In terms of ride quality, this bike doesn’t feel as stiff as many newer ebikes but that’s due in large part to the weight.

The front and rear lights are ultra-bright and massive when compared with more modern offerings that often forgo lights altogether. The seat post shock makes a difference when riding over bumps and compliments the front shock well. If you see this bike at a garage sale or used bike store be sure to consider the lack of replacement parts available. Everything from the twist throttle to the controller and especially the batteries are hard to find. In the video review above you may notice the bike I was testing has a battery pack strapped onto a rear rack. This is due to the challenge of finding custom sized batteries that can fit inside the downtube. I’ve been told that if the trigger throttle on this bike breaks you can sometimes retrofit a throttle from Currie Technologies.

The ebike SX is an electric bike that led the way, inspired others to join in and ultimately proved to be ahead of its time. It’s not a very useful machine these days due to the limited replacement parts and abundance of new high-tech offerings but it’s still iconic and fun. For a collector or tinkerer this could be a worthwhile project but for most people it’s just something to be appreciated and acknowledged as a forerunner to modern ebikes.

Pros:

  • Powerful motor capable of moving larger riders and ascending medium hills with pedal assistance
  • Super bright front and rear headlights keep you safe at night
  • Front fork shock and seat post shock smooth out the bumps
  • Front and rear fenders keep dust, mud and water away
  • Front disc brake provides great stopping power in wet conditions
  • Includes a kickstand and metal bash guard on front chain ring

Cons:

  • No longer being produced, replacement parts becoming rare
  • Stock sealed Lead-acid battery was heavy and could only endure ~250 charges before losing capacity
  • No pedal assist mode, throttle only
  • Heavy bike with awkward frame that’s hard to lock up and a challenge to fit on hanging style car racks due to the lack of a top tube
  • Brushed style motors wear out faster and this older gear style may be prone to stripping if pushed too hard
  • Built in cruise control made riding over longer distances easier on the thumb

Resources:

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Hanle van Niekerk
3 years ago

We bought an Electric Bike a few years ago and struggling to get it working again. We are based in South Africa.

Can you please advise us on how to get the wiring diagram for the bike or who we can contact to assist us in this matter.

Thank you and regards,
Hanle van Niekerk

Court Rye
3 years ago

Hello Hanle, there are ways to get the ebike SX and other EV Global Motors electric bikes going again. Usually it has to do with replacing the battery but it sounds like you’re looking for help with wiring. There is a thread talking about this over on the forums at https://electricbikereview.com/community/threads/evg-ebike-upgrades.244/ and some more information at NYCeWheels http://www.nycewheels.com/ebike.html

I hope this helps you! The biggest challenge may be finding the right components in Africa to fix your existing bike. Feel free to join the discussion in the forums and ask for more advice :)

Sally Dillon
3 years ago

Hi, I have 2 ebikes in my garage. They are probably 15 years old? Need new batteries and tires. What is the best place to source these items, or to resell my bikes to other ebike enthusiasts?

Court Rye
3 years ago

That is a great question Sally… I really have no idea about this but have seen some of the older EV Global ebikes on display at shops in California and Florida just for fun (like a museum). You could always post them in the deals forum here for sale or ask around for help from other ebike enthusiasts in the EV Global Motors forum.

Eric Borcherding
3 years ago

On the EVG SX36 e-bike by Lee Iaocca. What a machine, and what a dream! One can convert these bikes to quite good performance:

1) Using the stock battery case fit in a LiNiMnCo 37V 10.8 AHr from BatterySpace (special order). At an astounding 6pds greatly lowers 15pds from L.A. 6 pack conversion of 6 x 6V * 9Ahr Powersonics (21 Pds). Big step…
2) Or try a 38.4V 15AHr LiFePO4 imotor @12pds bearing phenominal range / speed. 32KPH max, range of 60KM alone. This pack is simply, Kick-Ass. Snug fit into compartment with required BMS and connector mod; try 6 pack trailer connector. This is bested by 2 x 18.5V 18650 Lions self-build 7pd packs with a tricky BMS, dual chargers and stuffed full battery compartment fill, for more range.
3) Change 12V35W Halogen to Xenon QuteQueen LED H3mod 5W@14V, 82% energy saved for motor in night rides.
4) Alternately the Heinzmann PE speed motor at 470W vs. 500W brushed motor adds a few KPHs.
5) Choose tires with solid narrow center rubber, pumped at ~45PSI, like German made Chamberlands brown walls.
6) Keep the bike lubed and drivetrain / bearings clean, adjust brakes for no-drag.

Happy Trails… Eric

Court Rye
3 years ago

Awesome information on conversion Eric! Thanks for sharing this. I checked out your website on LED’s and found it interesting. Looks like you’re pretty skilled with electronics and hardware :)

greg znamenacek
1 year ago

Where might I find use parts for ebike LX thank greg

Court Rye
1 year ago

I’ve visited a couple of shops that have units in the back and they might be willing to sell you parts or the entire bike for a good price. One such shop is The Electric Bike Shop in Sacramento, California and the other is Myron’s Extreme Machines in Fullerton, California. No guarantees on either, they may or may not still have them but I have seen this unit in both shops over the past several years. Also, you could ask around in the EBR Community Forums here under For Sale or Q&A and ask for Ann M. who used to own a shop in Austin, Texas. She might know :)

GB
1 year ago

You can also get parts from: electricwheelsofflorida on eBay. They have OEM parts for the e-bike. Good Luck!

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Alex M
4 hours ago

... if you locate to an area where you can travel to your work and shopping on a protected path for most of the trip, and the weather isn't too extreme, you can definitely give {ebike} a serious try.
... and even under these conditions there will still be limitations of the time of the year. In most of the US and Canada, even if the weather isn't really extreme, the winter is either cold or rainy or both. Or if you live in Arizona, it's summer that can be a problem. And limitations of how fast you need to get there, and how far, and your health condition. And theft: any bike is (normally) easier to steal than a car, and in some places you can't even lock it to anything.

Yes, it can "replace" a car... sometimes, for some people, in some situations. It's like asking whether a felt marker can replace a pen, or vice versa.

Over50
6 hours ago

Thanks, Over50. I did see some of the locking threads and there do seem to be some good options out there. I was mostly curious if there were those who are taking the risk of leaving their beautiful ebike out there and exposed for the day...and what methods (locks, motion sensors, etc) they use to deter. What has your experience been? I must have a little PTSD in this area as I had my beautiful mountain/road hybrid bike that I loved dearly stolen at a bus station years ago - it's painful to think about 20 years later. :)

That is a bit of a different situation (having to leave all day sight unseen). I am parking in front of two different office buildings. Both are high traffic and have security teams. Which isn't to say that I have a lot of confidence they are monitoring the bike racks. The one in front of my office is a hangout for the office smokers so from 8am to 5pm there is generally someone standing close by. And me being paranoid I check on it about 10 times per day. The other office building I use about 50% of the time because the racks are covered- but it is 3 blocks from my office. So I can only check on the bike a couple of times per day. I had the Boomerang GPS but the unit failed and I haven't worked out a replacement yet. Your situation is why I wasn't commuting by bike prior to getting the ebike. I did have the option of riding my regular bike to a bus stop about 5 miles from my house and taking the bus to work. But I didn't feel there was a safe place to lock the bike for the entire day. The ebike gave me the ability to ride all the way to work and back. I would have a tough time leaving either my ebike or my human powered city commuter locked up for the entire day in any of the areas around my office or even my home if I couldn't check on it from time to time. I probably have too much separation anxiety for that...

riverrat61265
8 hours ago

thanks. just got my first 10 miles on it and its a blast. to those who would claim you dont get a workout from a e bike should try one im pooped. lol.
Have started adding accessories a couple water bottles. iberra rear rack and bag system, which is quite nice at the price and the rack is a perfect paint match for my black rover plenty of room for camera gear or whatever in the bag.. added a phone holder to the handle bar, not much room there though a extra powerfull clamp on light might still fit. ordered a pump and have a tire kit. Thinking that at some point the better half is going to want a ebike or conversion for her Giant Suede bike, though its a tough one to find a rear rack for "for the battery" no threaded bosses for one. and the only bosses on the down tubes are on top.

Ann M.
8 hours ago

Glad to hear that Chawn and the Accell/Izip team took good care of you :); that's important. I've been working with Chawn for a lot of years with their Currie Tech/IZip/Accell ebikes and he's very knowledgeable and a pretty nice guy!

@Jdgolf60, post some pics and experiences with your ebike in the Garage forum or IZip forum. We would all enjoy hearing a little more about your rides and bike.

Javagenki
11 hours ago

Thanks, Over50. I did see some of the locking threads and there do seem to be some good options out there. I was mostly curious if there were those who are taking the risk of leaving their beautiful ebike out there and exposed for the day...and what methods (locks, motion sensors, etc) they use to deter. What has your experience been? I must have a little PTSD in this area as I had my beautiful mountain/road hybrid bike that I loved dearly stolen at a bus station years ago - it's painful to think about 20 years later. :)

Over50
11 hours ago

I'm about to make a purchase of a RadRover. I would like to be able to use it to ride to my park and ride a few miles away where I would lock it an leave it for the workday but I am very concerned about theft or vandalism...even with a secure lock. Is anyone else doing this and what methods and tools are you using to deter theft and/or vandalism?

Thanks!
There are some threads going on security and locks. I'm commuting on my ebike and locking it at public racks in a busy downtown area. You can check this thread where I talk about technique and locks used:
https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/security.13572/#post-107952

This active thread, particularly one of the last postings, has a link to an eye opening review of some of the top locks:
https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/litelok-some-early-user-experiences-with-this-bikelock.5085/page-2#post-109337

Javagenki
11 hours ago

I'm about to make a purchase of a RadRover. I would like to be able to use it to ride to my park and ride a few miles away where I would lock it an leave it for the workday but I am very concerned about theft or vandalism...even with a secure lock. Is anyone else doing this and what methods and tools are you using to deter theft and/or vandalism?

Thanks!

Ann M.
11 hours ago

@Steven Taylor, your battery is in "sleep mode". Without periodic charging the voltage has dropped too low and the Battery Management System, BMS, is doing it's protective thing and shut down the battery. Do you have a local ebike shop you can take the pack and charger to? They may have the ability to restart the battery if they've had experience doing this. It's not a process I recommend you try on your own since it's risky.

Once you get the battery restarted you will need to ride the bike right away and run the battery down, then charge to make sure there's no other damage. After that, use a digital timer inline with your charger & battery and set it to charge about once a month to prevent the battery from degenerating. A Cycle Satiator by Grin Technologies is a good choice for most Lithium batteries since you can select how much charge to put on the battery. Research shows that a battery in storage should be kept at approx. 60 to 80% charge for long storage. Storing at 100% charge seems to shorten the lifespan of most Li Ion batteries.

bob armani
13 hours ago

Oh dear, that would be annoying.

One issue I've had is with lifting and storing a heavy duty ebike rack. This hitch rack valet would be useful if you have a garage.

Dewey-This is a great solution as a back saver. I have a garage, so I store my rack near the back of my vehicle on wall hooks, so I do not have a long amount of travel between the bike rack and the back of my receiver. Would be nice if there were some simple hydraulics to aid in the lift to the receiver IMHO.

bob armani
13 hours ago

thanks Bob for the info. Genious hack! Is your rack old? do you know which model it is? and how much does your bike weigh?

american94- Thanks for the kind words. I am no genius (LOL), however, I was thinking, where can I get a ramp that is stable and will hold heavy hooks. I was at my home center and I noticed these gutter splashes that lie down on the ground. Then it hit me that this would act as a ramp for my ebike due to the thick but light weight construction. Back and forth in my tool work station and I finally got the hook angles to line up when placing the ramp against the hoop. Wala, it worked. I also coated the hooks with liquid rubber to protect the powder coat on the hoops.

My rack is over 10 years old and is similar to this one https://www.etrailer.com/Hitch-Bike-Racks/SportRack/SR2910.html

My bike weighs approx 46lbs without the battery and 51lbs with. I always load the ebike without the battery on the rack. I do not believe my model is available, however, the one indicated above looks compatible. It is an upgraded version with locking hooks (nice!). My rack is very basic but folds nicely, so I keep it on my vehicle all season long. I spot check it making sure there are no cracks or bends.

Weight capacity: 45 lbs per bike for this rack above from etrailer.

I see you are in Quebec, Quebec. What a beautiful place and a lot of French culture. Like going to France for a weekend for me living in the midwest.

Hope this helps!

Stephen E. Meeks
17 hours ago

My foldable ebike will be mainly for street use, including hills.
Will be used primarily for exploring and recreational use in foreign travel.
I am a male, 5’ 7”, and weigh 150 pounds.
My budget is $2,000 but have some flexibility.

There are many mass-produced foldable ebikes to choose from on the market. This ebike could either be built from scratch, or modified from such a commercially-made foldable ebike. The regen braking system is an important feature for me, as well as the PAS system, and throttle.

I’m flexible about details such as the size and specs of the motor and battery, but incorporating as many as the following features would be more of a priority – listed in order of importance:

• ~5-level PAS system
• Has a throttle
• ~4-level regen braking system (focussing on its braking capabilities, not on its generating electricity capabilities)
• Comfortable, smooth ride - won’t feel every bump on the road
• Shifter shifts quickly, easily and is simple to use - I favor the Shimano Tourney Shift Lever SL-TX50 (shifts either 6 or 7 gears) or some similar-type shifter
• Gears: lowest gear is quite low; and the highest gear is quite high: would like to climb steep hills with less strain on battery and like to pedal slowly when on the flats. The actual number of gears isn’t that important.
• Durable / Low-maintenance: I’m not much of a fix-it guy and in many foreign countries it’s hard to get repair help for ebikes, in addition to dealing with the language barrier
• Ebike is lightweight or at least on the lighter side
• Electric horn wired into the electrical system of the ebike - loud motorcycle-type horn beep, not a warbling-type sound
• Folds up easily and well (I’ll be travelling overseas so it will be opened & folded up a lot)
• Electric turn signals, front and rear, wired into the electrical system of the ebike
• Difficult one (only if possible): The ebike is easily transportable on planes and its battery is able to pass airport security

Thanks!
I am new to the ebike world. I am buying 2 of Green Bike USA's G5 500 models. These are the better of many I checked out and their dealers' and builders' reps are very helpful. The 500 watt 48 volt 13.5 amp hour version I am getting should work for my wife and I in Atlanta. Check these out and maybe this group will actually do a review of the new model 500 for the site some day soon. I will let you all know how I feel after a few weeks of use.

Larry Ganz
21 hours ago

Your rides could be easier with a mid-motor, but I don’t think you’ll find an OEM bike for less than $2K in the current market. It could be accomplished within that price range by retro-fitting a Bafang mid-drive kit to an existing bicycle. Some mid bikes weigh in the 45# range.

If you go for a hub, a geared hub will produce more muscle per pound than a direct-drive and in a more compact package, and won’t cog/drag when the power is off.

Fatbike tires are the ticket for soft sand and mud but create a lot of drag on harder surfaces. Drag adds significant effort to pedaling and has a high appetite for battery energy. For your application around the camp ground and on paved and dirt roads, standard 2.00” tires would be a lot more practical, and offer more tread choices.

Because you will be frequently putting the bikes onto a rack, and the rack will be supporting the load, overall bike weight with the battery removed should be a consideration. Test lift during a test ride.

The Voltbike Enduro is a 55.7lb Bafang motor mid drive factory eBike with dual suspension, with 2" tires and currently priced at $1799 + about $50-60 shipping. My $429 Yakima Hold Up bike rack is rated for two 60lb eBikes.

So that should all work in their budget, however I think it only comes in one size with a 29" standover height.

https://electricbikereview.com/voltbike/enduro/

Ravi Kempaiah
1 day ago

Just came back from the Ebike expo. I had a blast! I was surprised at the number of bikes that fit me. Though the following bikes fit me, I eliminated them for various reasons one izip, two Raleigh bikes, gazelle, trek Neko, bulls cross lite, and the Electra townie (so comfortable!). I did like the trek lift+, smart motion Ecity, and the bulls lacuna evo E8. They did not have a Kalkhoff Agutta B7 but I did discover that the Bosch high performance motor that comes with it is amazing! Comments on my final four are welcome. You guys have been a big help in my search for a bike. Your time and expertise is much appreciated. Thank you!

Townie Go
Lacuba EVO E8
Crosslite-E with the new Bosch CX motor.

All great bikes. Glad the bike expo was useful.

Since kozy's carry a lot of the bikes you mentioned, you should visit them.

Linda Baer
1 day ago

Just came back from the Ebike expo. I had a blast! I was surprised at the number of bikes that fit me. Though the following bikes fit me, I eliminated them for various reasons one izip, two Raleigh bikes, gazelle, trek Neko, bulls cross lite, and the Electra townie (so comfortable!). I did like the trek lift+, smart motion Ecity, and the bulls lacuna evo E8. They did not have a Kalkhoff Agutta B7 but I did discover that the Bosch high performance motor that comes with it is amazing! Comments on my final four are welcome. You guys have been a big help in my search for a bike. Your time and expertise is much appreciated. Thank you!

Blisandt
1 day ago

Raleigh Retroglide iE 2017

It's Red. I have had this bike for 60 days. I just had it tuned up and it is a gem! I am selling because I want to do MORE biking than I could have imagined, but this is a GREAT commuter bike! Not a thing wrong with it!

Raleigh's Retroglide iE sports classic retro styling with a modern, technological twist. A classically styled aluminum frame is morphed with a pedal-assist motor that helps you go farther, faster, and with less effort.

Whenever you need a boost, the Currie Electro-Drive Centerdrive motor lets you zip along at up to 20 miles per hour, for up to 35 miles! Sturdy wheels, and a smooth-shifting 7-speed drivetrain to help on the hills, the Retroglide iE is ready for endless cruising. Keeping with the throwback theme, there's a springer seat for superb comfort on every adventure, fat balloon tires, cool fenders, and a stamped Raleigh chain guard to add to the classy looks. And a COMFY SEAT!

Pictures available upon request.

Selling with no sales tax... $1500 It's located in BOSTON Area and I will not ship it... but we can meet if you are in N. E. It's in "excellent used" condition because my pannier and basket have made marks on the paint job. Those are the only blemishes!

Additional Information
FRAME Aluminum 6061, Comfort Geometry
FORK High Tensile Steel w/Fender Mounts
MOTOR SPECS Currie Electro-Drive Centerdrive 350W
DRIVE SYSTEM Currie Electro-Drive Centerdrive 350W
BATTERY TYPE/WEIGHT 48V Lithium-ion, 8.7Ah, 417Wh
RANGE ON FULL CHARGE 16-35 miles
MAX. ASSISTED SPEED 20 mph (32 kph)
RIMS/WHEELS Weinmann XTB26 Double Wall 36h
HUBS Modus 36h w/QR
TIRES Kenda 26×2.25", 30TPI
CRANKSET Centerdrive
CHAINRING 42T
REAR DERAILLEUR Shimano Altus
REAR COGS Shimano 7spd (12-32t)
SHIFTERS Shimano SL-TX50 7spd
BRAKES Tektro Linear Pull
HANDLEBARS Alloy 25.4, W:630mm
TAPE/GRIPS Raleigh Grips
STEM Alloy quill, 80mm
SADDLE Velo Raleigh
SEATPOST Alloy 27.2x350mm

Over50
1 day ago

... The problem occurs when trying to then relock using the key to set the metal tabs into place. Maybe there is a spring out of alignment?... Additionally, lubricating the lock to get things working did not appear to help. Will be reaching out to Litelok shortly...On other notes: I found this review on Sweethome Article (the best bike lock) http://thesweethome.com/reviews/best-bike-lock/
At the bottom of the article they mention that bolt cutters can defeat the lock quite easily at the keyed point, which is a bit disappointing, but it makes sense when you look at the metal locking tabs on the interior. I hope they find a way to make this more hardy in future versions...

Ugh. Now you've gone and ruined my day. According to the article you linked, all of my expensive locks are crap. I have 3 Abus locks (Bordo, Granite Extreme... and Mini) and it sounds like they are easily defeated. And furthermore, as you point out, the Litelok is easily defeated. And in addition my Boomerang GPS Tracker failed. I've been locking my ebike in a busy downtown area with 2 of the Abus locks. Now come to find out a novice bike thief could probably defeat them? Argggh.

I haven't used my Litelok much and I was thinking of posting it here for sale. Now the value is probably nil thanks to this news.

The Litelok's mechanism was really sticky for me when I first received it but a small drop of oil solved that. Sounds like that solution didn't work for you.

Ann M.
1 day ago

Opimax, it would not be for you to chase the other manufacturers, that's the responsibility of the dealer who sold you the bike. Sometimes the ebike manufacturer will have a handful of standard bike parts to facilitate the warranty issue but some component manufacturers are becoming much more strict on how warranty issues are dealt with.

I know of one case a few years ago when Avid had issues with one of their disc brake systems at installation and sent techs & reps to all of the different shops to fix the issue since it was systemic. That brake model does not exist any more! Perhaps this is what is happening with these cranks; I won't know the specifics until I speak with Juiced about this.

Brad Ersly
1 day ago

@Brad Ersly, Juiced Bikes is a very reputable company and would not just stop honoring warranty. I will contact Juiced and suggest that @oman do the same for more information. They are not hard to reach.

What you and these shops may not understand is that non-electric bike components sometimes are covered by a warranty from that particular manufacturer that is separate from the ebike warranty. For instance, a problem with a Shimano component may require contacting Shimano rather than the ebike manufacturer. That should be clearly spelled out in the warranty or known with a quick call or email to the ebike manufacturer.

Well said, Juiced is a quality company that stands behind their product

Ann M.
1 day ago

@Brad Ersly, Juiced Bikes is a very reputable company and would not just stop honoring warranty. I will contact Juiced and suggest that @o-man do the same for more information. They are not hard to reach.

What you and these shops may not understand is that non-electric bike components sometimes are covered by a warranty from that particular manufacturer that is separate from the ebike warranty. For instance, a problem with a Shimano component may require contacting Shimano rather than the ebike manufacturer. That should be clearly spelled out in the warranty or known with a quick call or email to the ebike manufacturer.

Ann M.
1 day ago

Sorry to hear this @Court. Whether you run an ebike shop as I do, or you're an ebike owner, the integrity of the manufacturers is important.

america94
1 day ago

american94-

My 2 cents- I have a Sport Rack fitted on a 1 1/4 inch receiver for my ebike with the same weight ratings as you have mentioned. My rack has hoop holders for the tires. I did not want to keep lifting the bike on and off, so I jimmy rigged a ramp system using a plastic gutter Down Spout Splash and attached some metal conduit hooks on the end of it. I then hook it on the end of the tire hoop and it allows me to roll the bike on and off of the bike rack. So far, a very efficient system. The rack looks very stable and very well built, so I do not have any concerns st this point. I do not drive on the highway or very far distances, just to city local trails. Hope this may help!
thanks Bob for the info. Genious hack! Is your rack old? do you know which model it is? and how much does your bike weigh?

Velome
1 day ago

A quick copy and paste into Google indicates it's Minnesota law. Penn Cycle and Fitness claim to be the largest Trek dealer in that state and they carry the Trek XM700+ Federal CPSC regulations govern the sale so it's possible to legally purchase this ebike in Minnesota but the law means speed pedelecs are not classed as an "electric-assisted bicycle" but as a "Motorized bicycle" and you would need to title and register it at the DMV, and get liability insurance. If you have a driver's license it doesn't appear they make you get a moped permit or take the moped test. You aren't permitted to ride it in bicycle lanes, paths or trails. The 2bhp motor size suggests you can ride a 1500W ebike but in order to get liability insurance from Markel insurance company they only insure ebikes up to the CPSC limits of 750W and 20mph which rules out speed pedelecs. Unless you can find an insurer willing to provide liability insurance it may be this last detail that in practice makes speed pedelecs legal to buy but illegal to operate/ride in Minnesota. My opinion does not constitute legal advice.
A quick copy and paste into Google indicates it's Minnesota law. Penn Cycle and Fitness claim to be the largest Trek dealer in that state and they carry the Trek XM700+ Federal CPSC regulations govern the sale so it's possible to legally purchase this ebike in Minnesota but the law means speed pedelecs are not classed as an "electric-assisted bicycle" but as a "Motorized bicycle" and you would need to title and register it at the DMV, and get liability insurance. If you have a driver's license it doesn't appear they make you get a moped permit or take the moped test. You aren't permitted to ride it in bicycle lanes, paths or trails. The 2bhp motor size suggests you can ride a 1500W ebike but in order to get liability insurance from Markel insurance company they only insure ebikes up to the CPSC limits of 750W and 20mph which rules out speed pedelecs. Unless you can find an insurer willing to provide liability insurance it may be this last detail that in practice makes speed pedelecs legal to buy but illegal to operate/ride in Minnesota. My opinion does not constitute legal advice.

That being the case there must be quite a few pedelecs being operated illegally, if I understand your statement correctly.

mams99
1 day ago

Tried the Pedego Stretch - it wins. I cannot even express how fun and easy it is to ride. By myself, up a moderate hill, I "could" ride it without assist on my own, with assist 1 assist it was great. Working, but not dying. I didn't need a throttle. I did up and down hills for about a mile on rough roads in B'more. Then I rode that same stretch with my 5'10", 130 pounds son on the back. The throttle start with the weight was amazing. For me, I felt nothing different in how it drove, except for normal riding I needed a 1 assist and for hills for a comfortable feel a 3 assist. And that was with the smaller battery...

What tipped it in my favor for me was:

1. With all the accessories needed, the Pedego was a little cheaper (shocked?)
2. It has more of a step-through frame which I LOVE.
3. It's faster and easier to adjust for different size riders. I'm 5'6" spouse is 6'1", Adult son who might ride is 6'2.
4. More comfort for adult passenger - better seat pad for rider and a backrest for rider (making my son feel more secure). My son felt safe and comfortable and he loved it. We had a shared buddybike and this is way better (though he's a bystander - not actively helping me ride).
5. Options for changing racks around.
6. Aesthetics - It is one gorgeous looking bike - not feminine or masculine - just beautiful lines and thought went into it.

Now to decide if I should pay the extra 300 for the larger capacity battery. Max ride I can imagine is 6 there and 6 back... Basically around town bike. I won't be commuting on this bike. My husband commutes one direction 19 miles. I commute the opposite direction 20 miles. If I really get into riding, I'll get a smaller folding ebike for around my work area and close in commuting by parking my car a bit out to avoid the worst of the traffic (I work at tip-top of DC... so that Silver Spring and DC traffic is a bottleneck in and out.)

Lost
1 day ago

Added fenders, and a stem extender to raise the handlebars, and an axiom rack since this picture. Now have over 300 miles on it, and am totally loving this thing. Perfect ebike for me so far. So far about 15 to 20% more efficient than the Rover, which I hope to sell now.

1/1
Michigan Mister
2 months ago

'ol Lee didn't do much before saving Chrysler's behind. (K-cars)(except for designing the Mustang) Court, I believe these retailed for around 500.00. a lot for a bike back then, but ahead of it's time for sure.

Highway Star
1 year ago

Also I restored the original battery by running a razor along the top edge of the plastic lid then popping it off exposing the battery fill cells that have rubber caps that pop off with a screwdriver then filled with battery acid from the local auto parts and it works great again after 12 years of sitting. Plenty of videos on restoring sealed battery's on youtube.

Highway Star
1 year ago

got me a new 36V BATTERY from Jerry and it fits perfectly into the case, but it does not have screw in terminals only lead tabs. So I didn't want to cut the original wires so I made 2-2 inch jumpers and soldered them to the eye leads then plugged them to the battery works great with no chopping....

Highway Star
1 year ago

got me a new 36V BATTERY from Jerry and it fits perfectly into the case, but it does not have screw in terminals only lead tabs. So I didn't want to cut the original wires so I made 2-2 inch jumpers and soldered them to the eye leads then plugged them to the battery works great with no chopping....

Cyclo TeChTwIsTeR
2 years ago

This is the man that has all the parts you will need and yes a battery to fit inside as it should.
http://www.ebay.com/usr/electricwheelsofflorida?_trksid=p2047675.l2559

He also has the bikes For sell
Jerry
Call 305 687 8484 for Free Tech SupportWe have the largest inventory of original parts for the EVG EBikes.

David Clein
2 years ago

The controller is not in the battery case. it is housed in the body. Lead acid is available (36v 9Ah) to rebuild the original battery pack. putting the primary battery pack on the rear rack is stupid.

David Clein
2 years ago

+ElectricBikeReview.com Six 6 volt / 9 AH (5.95" x 1.34" x 3.70") SLA batteries with F2 terminals wired in series fit into the battery box. With a little crimping and soldering these are the closest thing to a drop in replacement for the original discontinued 36V "Long" battery. With this set-up expect range of 8 miles in full power mode with little to no pedaling and 15 miles in low power mode.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+David Clein Great feedback David, thanks for chiming in! I was doing my best to piece together the facts about this bike but was doing it with limited input. You're welcome to share your expertise here anytime :)

wolfman9999999
2 years ago

I have the 24 volt version, and I'm trying to figure out what some of the switches do on the left side of the handlebar.  Battery pack can be refurbished with UPS batteries.  I did it to mine

Adam Feathers
2 years ago

I bought 2 eBikes in 1999 at a Oldsmobile Dealer in central Pa. and put them away in 2001 after one fell down and broke the key switch . They both look like brand new but I'm not sure what to do with them since I don't know if they're is any place to get parts or the repairs done (in Pa.). When I put them away I replaced both batteries (probably shot now). It would be a shame to just junk them . I would like to get them repaired this spring and use them again, they were great and a lot of fun to ride !

Michigan Mister
2 months ago

I saw another vid just today about this bike. the fellow being interviewed said there' a place in so cal that has lots of parts.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Adam Feathers Hi Adam! Sounds like a fun project. I'm sure there are people who will collect these someday, even a few who want parts or originals right now. You could just keep them stored and eventually sell them on eBay or the forums: http://electricbikereview.com/community/forums/for-sale/

Ron Warrick
3 years ago

I bought a 24v about ten years ago for $650 and it is still going, but I really need to upgrade to make it faster and also get away from SLA's.  Any ideas appreciated. 

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Hi Ron! So glad to hear the eBike worked well for you. As for your next bike, I guess it depends on what your cycling needs are. I've created a full list of some of my favorite bikes in each category including one value and one performance here: http://electricbikereview.com/top-10-electric-bikes/ check it out, each review has a video and all the specs, chime in if you have any comments, there's also a forum to discuss with other riders and owners: http://electricbikereview.com/community/

HostileHST
4 years ago

On the throttle, almost any 5k ohm potentiometer controlller will work on these ebikes.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

Thanks for the great tips +HostileHST 

HostileHST
4 years ago

I had the 24 volt version that would only go 12 mph under power, but it sure did help going up hills. The 36 volt version I believe would go around 18 mph and if you pushed into the 48 volt range (controller needs replaced or modified), you could see about 23 mph. 36 volt packs can easily be made with some soldering abilities. The batteries to do this are still being made.

Kit Babcock
3 years ago

Ron....the 24v heinzmann rear hub can be over volted to 50v, though using a stock EVG ebike 36v controller starts to get hot and "beeps". Shutting off the power and back on again resets it, but I'm running 46.2v's and it's fine.

DON'T over volt the stock EVG ebike 24v controller, as it has a max voltage around 29v before it blows the 26v range capacitors! If done, the lights will still work, but you get NO throttle response!. This was a common error when a 36v SLA battery box was put in a 24v ebike. I'm using the 24v/400watt rear hub on a 36v setup bike. Because of spun one-way stock bearings in the 36v hubs. Or I'm swapping in 36v motors into the 24v hubs that don't have spun bearings.

The 400watt hubs are setup for speed and not torque like the 36v 500watts hubs.

Though understand that there is a design flaw in the hubs as they use a pressed on one-way bearing. BIG guys riding these bikes and giving them full throttle can spin them! The motors works, but your now stuck in "mud" and slipping.  :-)

Here is an article on ES for the spun bearing:

http://endless-sphere.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=4190&start=25

I'm looking into using a laser welder to fix this problem. You want low heat as the sealed bearing has a plastic cap to hold in the grease. Your welding the bearing to the axle.

Made sense?

Ron Warrick
3 years ago

+Kit Babcock   Good stuff.  Can you clarify whether you are talking about converting a 24 v, or a 36v?  It sounds like you are shooting for 40 volts or so here.  Mine is 24v, so I don't want to burn it out.  Thanks.

HostileHST
3 years ago

Oops, didn't see that was for Kit, but it's all good info he shares and I would have gone that way, but had to sell mine so we had money to move a little over a year ago. Wish I could get another one, but haven't seen one for sale recently.

HostileHST
3 years ago

NP at all, always trying to help when I can. Glad you put it on the forum.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

+Kit Babcock Kit, this is awesome! Thanks for the tips. If you don't mind, I also shared your words on the forum where another individual was trying to figure out how to replace his 24v battery for an EV Global Mini http://electricbikereview.com/community/threads/ev-global-mini-ebike-battery-replacement.262/ feel free to amend or add your voice there as well. I referenced your comment and linked here so he might reply as well.

SuperPapadzul
4 years ago

It reminds me of a Velosolex, but cooler because it is electric.

BiknutProductions
4 years ago

Sort of resembles an early caveman version of an Opti Bike. Obviously ahead of it's time.

Aaron Martin
4 years ago

Ya in 2002 i did not know that there was a e-bike for sale.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

I agree Aaron, this thing was full of neat features and way ahead of its time. With a lighter weight battery it could be on-par or even at the leading edge of more modern bikes.

Aaron Martin
4 years ago

That is a cool bike.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

Yep, it's one of the first ebikes ever in the US and... you are the first to comment ;)

Vũ Nguyễn
4 years ago

First