2015 IZIP E3 Dash Review

2015 Izip E3 Dash Electric Bike Review 1
2015 Izip E3 Dash
2015 Izip E3 Dash Gearless Hub Motor
2015 Izip E3 Dash Battery Pack
2015 Izip E3 Dash Display Pad Throttle
2015 Izip E3 Dash Suspension Fork
2015 Izip E3 Dash Control Pad
2015 Izip E3 Dash Chain Ring
2015 Izip E3 Dash Cassette
2015 Izip E3 Dash Battery Level
2015 Izip E3 Dash Electric Bike Review 1
2015 Izip E3 Dash
2015 Izip E3 Dash Gearless Hub Motor
2015 Izip E3 Dash Battery Pack
2015 Izip E3 Dash Display Pad Throttle
2015 Izip E3 Dash Suspension Fork
2015 Izip E3 Dash Control Pad
2015 Izip E3 Dash Chain Ring
2015 Izip E3 Dash Cassette
2015 Izip E3 Dash Battery Level

Summary

  • High performance city style electric bike that offers throttle mode up to 20mph and pedal assist up to 28mph
  • Comfortable ride with oversized 700x45c tires, suspension fork with lockout and updated Velo Street saddle
  • Available in three frame sizes for improved fit, quick release on both wheels, excellent warranty and support

Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

IZIP

Model:

E3 Dash

Price:

$2,900 USD

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Commuting, Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedelec (Class 3), Speed Pedelec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

Lifetime Frame, 2 Year Motor, 1 Year Battery

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2015

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

49 lbs (22.22 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy, Integrated Wire Channels

Frame Sizes:

15.7 in (39.87 cm)17 in (43.18 cm)19 in (48.26 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

(Wheelbase 1098 mm, 1115 mm and 1125 mm, Stand Over Height 745 mm, 770 mm and 810 mm)

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Matte Black with Gloss Black Accents

Frame Fork Details:

SR Suntour Suspension NCX D-EB LO with 63 mm Travel and Lockout

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

10 Speed 1x10 SRAM X7, 11-36T

Shifter Details:

SRAM X7 Triggers on Right Bar

Pedals:

Wellgo Aluminum Alloy Platform, Black

Headset:

VP Semi-Integrated Ahead

Stem:

TranzX 3D Forged

Handlebar:

TranzX Low Rise

Brake Details:

Shimano M375 Mechanical Disc with 180 mm Front Rotor and 160 mm Rear Rotor, Levers with Motor Cutoff Switch

Grips:

Velo Dual Density

Saddle:

Velo Street

Seat Post:

TranzX Microadjust

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

31.6 mm

Rims:

Alex DH19 Doublewall with Eyelets

Spokes:

Stainless Steel

Tire Brand:

CST Hybrid, 700 x 45c

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tube Details:

Presta Valve

Accessories:

Chain Guide, Matching Kickstand, Optional City Kit with Fenders and Lights, LED Power Level Display on Battery

Other:

Light Sensor on LCD Display for Automatic Backlighting, Removable Battery Pack, Quick Release Wheels Front and Rear

Electronic Details

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Gearless Direct Drive Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

8.7 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

417.6 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

20 miles (32 km)

Estimated Max Range:

35 miles (56 km)

Display Type:

Backlit Monochrome LCD, Fixed with Swivel Adjust

Readouts:

Speed, Odometer, Battery Capacity, Assist Level

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad on Left Bar

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist, Twist Throttle

Top Speed:

28 mph (45 kph)(Up to 20 mph Throttle Only)

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Written Review

This is a review for the 2015 IZIP E3 Dash, in 2016 the motor was changed from a gearless direct drive hub to a mid-drive improving frame stiffness and efficiency, it dropped the twist throttle in favor of an optional $50 “boost button” that could be installed by dealers, read the full review here.

The first generation E3 Dash launched in 2014 and was well received because it offered a large powerful motor and battery system that could easily reach 28 miles per hour in “speed-pedelec” pedal assist mode. The bike was relatively comfortable and efficient to ride with oversized slick tires and a suspension fork with lockout and it offered a solid warranty with industry leading support from Currie Technologies that has one of the largest networks of dealers in the US. These benefits remain true with the updated second generation version shown in this review and it improves on the original in several key ways. Those improvements including a sturdier display panel, sleeker control pad that’s easier to reach, a fancier paint job, higher end drivetrain components from SRAM and a reinforced motor assembly. It performs best on paved streets but is capable of handling light trail riding and is a bit more aggressive than the other upright cruiser style city bikes from IZIP including the Path+ and Zuma.

Driving this electric bike is a powerful 500 watt gearless direct drive hub motor located in the rear wheel. It’s powerful, fast and extremely quiet to operate but doesn’t offer regeneration modes as some other models do. I’m a bit torn on this because I realize regenerative braking systems add complexity and expense without much improvement in range but they do limit hand fatigue and wear on brake pads, especially when coasting down large hills. One highlight here is that both the front and rear wheels feature quick release which makes changing flats and servicing rims and spokes much easier. The power cable that connects the motor to the control system has its own little quick release point just below the left chain stay. One downside that most gearless direct drive motors suffer from, including the Dash, is cogging. This happens when the permanent magnets lining the outside of the hub motor repel the electromagnet stators when the system is not operating under power (this is demonstrated in the video review). Still, gearless hub motors are known for being reliable because they contain fewer moving parts than geared motors. For this second generation of Dash ebikes IZIP made some improvements in the glue and hardware used to build the motor after several bikes had issues in 2014. These bikes were all serviced under warranty and Currie Technologies acknowledged the problem which was great.

The battery powering the 2015 IZIP E3 Dash offers 48 volts of power with ~8.7 amp hours of capacity. Many electric bike companies are switching to 48 volt systems like this because they deliver electricity more efficiently (extending range) and offer a zippier ride experience. The actual cells used here are 18650 sized and contain a Lithium-ion chemistry which is known for being light weight and long lasting. The pack itself locks to the downtube when riding but can be charged on or off the bike. Having a removable battery like this is convenient for times when you need to transport the bike and want to reduce its weight or those times when you just need to top the battery off without bringing the entire frame inside. Ultimately, the downtube location of the pack keeps weight low and center which balances the frame but it does take up the spot where a water bottle cage might otherwise mount. As far as range, you can expect at least 25 miles per charge all the way up to 45 if you rely on lower levels of pedal assist and help the system out. Air resistance begins to have a significant impact on bicycles and their riders when operating above 20 miles per hour and since this is a speed pedelec, capable of reaching 28mph, you can extend range by choosing to ride a bit slower.

One of the big improvement areas on this second gen IZIP Dash is the display panel which now mounts to the center of the handle bars with two arms instead of just one. On the one hand it feels sturdy but it can also easily be adjusted, swiveling forward and back, to reduce glare. The display panel itself is not removable which is a bit of a drawback if you plan to store this outside frequently or in sketchier neighborhoods but as a result you may experience fewer connection issues that have to do with contact pads wearing out. The display shows remaining battery capacity, speed, pedal assist level or throttle mode indicator, distance traveled and range expected with the remaining battery level. There’s also neat light sensor built right into the upper left corner of the display that activates backlighting for use at night. The display itself does not have any buttons built into it, instead there’s a nice little control pad that sits right up against the left grip and this has also been improved for 2015. The new design is easier to reach than the old one and seems to be sealed against water and dust better thanks to a seamless rubberized coating. The pad lets you power on the bike, navigate through four levels of assist up to throttle mode and engage cruise control.

For people who are interested in a sportier ride with higher top speeds that’s best suited for city and neighborhood use the IZIP E3 Dash is a solid choice. The new design looks beautiful, operates very smoothly and benefits from excellent customer support and warranty terms offered by Currie Technologies. You can pay a bit extra for a fender kit or lights directly from IZIP that operate off the main battery pack and there are threaded eyelets on the seat stays for adding your own aftermarket rack. With ten speeds to choose from it’s easy to climb or accelerate with this bike and the updated SRAM X7 cassette, derailleur and trigger shifters work flawlessly. The price on this bike is about right given the mix of larger motor and high powered battery with mid-level components. You get mechanical disc brakes vs. hydraulic and the front rotor is larger than the rear (keep that in mind if you need to replace them). The brake levers are upgraded and do cut power to the motor which is nice and the saddle has also been upgraded to offer a bit more comfort. Any electric bike can feel jarring with extended use and with speed pedelecs like this that is especially true. For this reason I really appreciate the suspension fork and oversized tires but might also consider a suspension seat post if you have back and neck issues.

Pros:

  • Front and rear wheel feature quick release system for easier wheel and tire maintenance, quick-disconnect point on cable for rear hub motor
  • LCD display has a built-in daylight sensor that automatically activates backlighting when it gets dark out
  • Battery pack locks to downtube, is keyed to deter theft and is removable for safe storage or charging off of the bike itself – this also reduces overall frame weight for easier transport
  • Battery pack weight is kept low and center on the frame for improved balance and maneuverability
  • 500 watt gearless direct drive hub motor is extremely quiet, durable and fast reaching ~28 miles per hour in pedal assist mode four
  • Pedal assist is activated through a combination of torque and speed sensing for smooth, fluid activation
  • Updated button pad on left handlebar activates the bike, initiates cruise control, navigates four levels of assist and changes display from speed, distance and estimated range
  • Twist throttle activates the motor up to 6 miles per hour in pedal assist mode or 20 miles per hour in throttle mode
  • Frame is available in three sizes (small 15.7″ / 40cm, medium 17″ / 43cm, large 19″ / 48cm) for improved fit
  • Suspension fork offers basic travel adjustment and lockout for improved efficiency on smooth, flat terrain
  • Solid aluminum alloy Wellgo pedals offer great traction in wet or dry conditions but feel a bit narrow at times
  • Aluminum alloy chain guide keeps the chain from falling off and doubles as a bash guard to protect the front chain ring
  • Threaded eyelets on chain stays and near rear dropout for adding a rack or fenders (optional lights and fenders available from IZIP)
  • Solid 12 month warranty on the battery and frame, two year warranty on the motor
  • IZIP is a large nationally distributed brand (part of Currie Technologies) making it easier to find a dealer, take a test ride and get service

Cons:

  • Gearless direct drive motor doesn’t offer the same feeling of torque and climbing as equivalent sized geared options, does not offer regenerative braking and also experiences some cogging due to internal magnetic resistance
  • The first generation E3 Dash was introduced in 2014 and several customers reported motor issues (which were resolved by IZIP and corrected with a materials improvement including a stronger adhesive). All 2015 models feature the stronger materials and many 2014 Dash’s have been retrofitted
  • LCD display panel is not removable for protection or storage but does swivel to reduce glare when riding
  • No built in water bottle mounting points, space on the downtube is taken up by the battery pack, consider adding an after market adapter

Resources:

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Comments (28) YouTube Comments

Ben Harapat
5 years ago

What an excellent job reviewing this bike. Wow. The bike looks great but you did an amazing job. thanks! Ben

  Reply
Court Rye
5 years ago

Sure thing Ben, I’m glad it helped you and I really appreciate the compliment! I’ve been reviewing ebikes now for a couple of years and am trying my best to be fair and complete. The E3 Dash is one of my favorite models for the price so this review was easy and fun :)

  Reply
Ben Harapat
5 years ago

Court, I must have seen every review you posted in the last 2 years. That is a LOT of reviews. Your work and attention to detail is very impressive. . Would you mind answering a question? I have not ridden any of these bikes and probably won’t get a chance to as there are no e-bike stores near me. However from my research, mostly composed of watching your reviews, I am down to 3 models including: Izip E3Dash, E Motion Neo Cross, E Motion Nitro Cross. Since I will not get a chance to ride any of these before I buy, is there a recommendation you could make based on your physical experience? My main criteria are speed, handling, and reliability. Thanks Court and keep up the great work! PS I understand that you can’t publicly favour one brand over another, but since I can’t ride them, I am appealing to your experience! Ben

  Reply
Court Rye
5 years ago

Hi Ben! Glad to hear the site has helped you get excited about ebikes and narrow down to a few different models. All of the bikes you specified here are great… I think my two favorites are the E3 Dash (both 2014 and 2015 models are awesome) and the Easy Motion EVO Cross (the Neo Cross is good too but I prefer the little upgrades on the Evo line which is new for 2015 and that’s also why I prefer it to the Nitro bikes even though they go faster). The big tradeoff here is top speed, the E3 Dash can reach ~28 pretty handily while the Evo Cross can hit ~23 or so. With the Evo you get a throttle that goes up to 20 mph while the Dash cuts out around ~7 mph unless you pedal along. I like the smooth silence of the direct drive hub in the Dash but it is heavier and of course the Neo and Evo lines both look more beautiful with integrated motors. It’s very close in my mind, might come down to having a dealer for one brand nearby? I always try to buy locally first so I can get free tuneups and have the bike fitted properly from the start. Both bikes have a decent suspension fork but I also recommend something like the Thudbuster to smooth it out more if you plan to ride at these higher speeds and for long distances. Hope this helps :)

  Reply
Dan
5 years ago

Hey Court!

Like everyone else on here I’ve read and watched so many of your reviews! Originally I wasn’t convinced by the Dash nor other Izip products so I was looking toward Specialized and Felt. As time progressed I saw the review on the copenhagen wheel and I thought that would fit the bill. With no further updates and a promise of release in the spring I was growing disheartened as we’re in the middle of spring and no word.

As luck would have it I drove past the bike shop where I got my very first bike and there was the Izip van. I rode the Dash first then the Path+ and finally the Zuma. As a road cyclist I’m needlessly addicted to speed and hitting 31 mph and getting from 0 to 24 in a half of a block on the Dash on a size small while I’m 6’4″ 190 (sprinter build) was impressive to say the least! I was a bit skidish when I saw the cop pull out of the back lot behind the bike shop because I was going a little fast. He just stopped looked at the bike nodded and drove off. The shop owner and I both decided that the Dash was the bike!

College Cyclery in Reno is going to start carrying Izip, I cancelled my preorder of the copenhagen wheel and we’re going with the Dash. The Izip rep was helpful especially when he noted that they carry legacy replacements back from when they first opened four owners ago. This tied with all of the regular bike parts are just that and the price point were the selling points. Oh and its SUPER fun to ride especially for the price.

The Zuma was fun and the torque of the line was awesome! But no where near as responsive as the Dash. The Path+ is a very nice calm ride and does suite many folks. The Dash is the bike you ride if you want to keep pace or pass traffic (ride safely folks!) or as many others have said in pedal assist 1 or 2 get massive range and maintain 20ish mph.

A fun aside, talking with the Currie rep did mention, for those of you inclined to have higher speed but mid drive bikes, that Haibike carries the only two iterations of the bosch system with a 28 MPH top speed all of the rest from Felt and others are capped at 20. A little rich for my blood especially for my first pedelec bike. (I think you mentioned this Court but hey)

Court thanks so much for the insight on all of your videos! Without it choosing the right bike would’ve been very daunting to say the least! To all of the EBR contributors who have shared your experiences you too have GREATLY helped many people choose wisely!

Sincerely, Dan.

  Reply
Court Rye
5 years ago

Hi Dan! It’s always nice to hear that my work has helped someone and your feedback here will surely help others who are on the fence! Sorry to hear about the Superpedestrian delay… I’ve heard a few other upset pre-order customers and it’s just a bummer. I think you chose well with the Dash in terms of price, speed and good support. I think eZip and IZIP used to be lower quality and have some issues but lately their stuff has really improved and the Dash is one of the best in my opinion :)

  Reply
Chris
5 years ago

I just stumbled across this site looking for parts for my iZip Dash. So far I love the bike, I am looking to purchase additional hardware to make my rides more enjoyable, is their a thread already dedicated to parts for this bike ? Thanks ~ Chris

  Reply
Court Rye
5 years ago

Hey Chris! I’ve created a special forum just for IZIP and there have been a few threads about accessories (people have really gone to town outfitting them with racks, lights etc.) just scroll through the different threads here (the most recent are at the top).

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Andy Fisher
4 years ago

Got the E3 Dash a few months back. Great ride! Really need the “umph” of the 48 V motor to get up a steep hill to work, even with me pedaling and gear set low, and this bike does not disappoint. Also like components, suspension, shifter, low center of gravity, can charge with battery on bike, etc. I added a rack, paniers, front and rear lights (USB), a bell. We’ll see how it does over time, but so far it is the nicest bike I’ve had, makes riding to work a joy. Last ebike was an 2001 EVGlobal 36V, which I nursed along, and this feels like a major step up. The E3 Dash is quiet, powerful, stable. Only issue is the assist can feel “surge” at times…but not consistently, and I’ve gotten used to it. Thanks or this website, the commentary, etc. Very helpful. FYI, rode about 5 other bikes, including some nice “city” style bikes with internal hub. Glad I went for the Dash.

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Court Rye
4 years ago

Nice, glad to hear you’re enjoying it Andy! Did you have the shop install a rack, fenders and lights directly from IZIP or did you buy some online yourself? I’d love to hear which ones and how they’re working for you. Those old EVGlobal eBikes were pretty cool but I agree the Dash is a big step up, the lower weight for one thing is a huge difference! Lithium-ion batteries are so much better than the old Sealed Lead Acid… Enjoy the E3 Dash and ride safe out there :)

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Jack
4 years ago

Court, I’m working my way through all your pertinent (to me) reviews as well as mining the Community posts. Continued thanks to you and the many contributors here! Several A’s to my Q’s, please: Trying to blend a modest budget with the best blend of features, the E3 Dash struck me as a strong contender. I’m 6′ and 170#, riding in/around Bozeman MT with hilly contours and lots of in-town bike trails. Q: Given the rider this bike is designed for, why lock out the front fork? Q: How suitable is this bike for “improved” trail riding (vs. mountain trails in the nearby forests)? Can it take the ruts, bumps, etc? And last Q: I’d love to buy local; that’s a Big Thing here in Bozeman which has a economically healthy, vibrant downtown for that reason. But there are no ebike retailers I can find. Is it feasible & reasonable to order direct and work with a local shop given the features, complexity, etc. of the Dash? This review in particular (28 mph one handed) made me want to spin your safety cautions back at you. You be careful out there, buddy!

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Court Rye
4 years ago

Hi Jack! Great questions… I’m glad you’ve enjoyed the site and I appreciate your concern, I have wrecked a few times but always wear that helmet and try to avoid people and precious property. I once hit a parked car while filming and that was no fun :(

Here’s some feedback around your questions: I think they simply chose a mid-level suspension fork that would be affordable and it happened to have lockout. It’s a nice feature in my opinion because the Dash has wider wheels with narrow hybrid tires and can be used as a road or city bike which rarely have suspension. The Dash can do a lot of things but it’s really most at home on pavement… which leads us to the next answer! I wouldn’t take this bike off-road much because it will feel bumpy and the wheelset and tires just aren’t that beefy or grippy. You can do it on gravel and packed trails but ruts, rocks and sticks won’t be much fun. For that I’d suggest the IZIP E3 Peak which has very similar specs but a better suspension fork, larger tires and a mid-drive for improved low speed torque. I personally prefer the Dash because it’s quieter and has a throttle mode up to 20 mph but the Dash is decent, the throttle just cuts out at 6 mph. As for your last question about buying local, yeah that’s tough. I used the dealer search tool and came up short for even 100 miles around Bozeman. There are a few great shops that ship nationally and offer good support. I’ve visited Propel Bikes in New York and I believe they carry IZIP and will offer good support ongoing. I hope this helps, feel free to chime in again and continue the conversation about the type of riding you really want to do. I like that the IZIP bikes offer multiple sizes with some of their models but you could also consider upgrading to a Bosch powered Haibike for increased range, power and ruggedness if you’re willing to forego the throttle.

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Jack
4 years ago

One follow-up, Court: I’ve begun using your Comparison tool and, altho’ you offer a Izip/E3 Dash 2015 review, I’m only offered the 2014 review when trying to place it on the Comparison tool. Perhaps you can tweak that a bit? Best wishes!

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Court Rye
4 years ago

Thanks for the feedback Jack! There are several errors with the compare tool right now… the search tool doesn’t work in t he drop-down widget and some ebikes aren’t showing up to compare. You can edit the URL manually by adding the review ID which is 7670 for model year 2015 and 7803 for model year 2014. An example URL where I compare the 2015 Dash with the 2015 Peak would be: https://electricbikereview.com/compare/7670n10018

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Dan
4 years ago

Here’s the 868 mile update on my dash. Great bike! Even convinced the President of my company to get the 2016 model. I will say that the tires are prone to flats, that said I do have to ride on sides of roads that aren’t cleaned regularly. My other gripe has to be the right hand brake, the adjustment screw kept coming loose until I applied loctite. That in and of itself doesn’t sound bad but once the limit screw pushes the lever far enough in, the brake switch reads as if the brake is applied. The great thing about these bikes when you squeeze the brakes the switches cutoff the motor, the bad thing is when the adjustment screw pushes the lever far enough back you no longer have full power. The bike goes into its default mode. I found this out one rainy windy day, that was less than fun. After fixing that and doing basic bike maintenance, and a few flats the bike is awesome! I’m in great shape thanks to this bike and I have many more miles to go! If any of you are wondering about cold, heat and long term battery life I’ll just say this don’t worry I haven’t lost any range on this bike due to nearly 1000 miles, riding in zero degree weather or 105 degree weather. I typically find even on my 1500 ft of climb back up to my house that level 1 is more than enough to get me where I need to go and to ensure I don’t need a gym membership. I only jump to level 4 when I need to get up to 28 mph quick! Typically when merging onto a 35 zone lane. No I don’t block traffic and typically I pass a car on the 1/6 mile section I use level 4, the strange looks I get as I pass cars on a bike is well worth the purchase. Again I don’t block traffic and I ride in bike lanes yielding to lower speed traffic. Those of you who are taller out there, I’m 6’4″ and I ride many bikes. I ride a large dash and I lament there isn’t an XL BUT I did get a 400mm length seatpost and that did the trick! The bike is in a more aggressive stance and I’m not as upright as the designers intended but it fits great this way! Almost the same geometry as a relaxed road bike. I’m sure since I mentioned flats people will question are they hard to fix? The answer is no, they aren’t hard to fix they do take a bit longer but I can change a tire in 5 minutes on this bike which is about 2 minutes slower than my road and mt bikes.

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Court Rye
4 years ago

Good call with the loctite, I’ve used loctite blue on some of the tiny screws that hold together my laptop when they started getting loose from traveling so much and it has worked great! Excellent feedback about size and the longer seat post, where did you get that? It’s awesome that the President of your company is interested now too and that you’re feeling like it keeps you in shape. Really appreciate the update Dan! Any tips about helmets, lights or other accessories you’ve got that work well?

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Izk
4 years ago

I am nearing one year on my 2015 Dash with 2900 miles ridden. I commute about 9 miles each way (through this terribly rainy Seattle winter).

Bike is great due to its speed, acceleration, and somewhat seamless response. It makes it possible to ride both ways in pouring 40 degree rain both ways all week and still be excited for the weekend activities. 4 assist levels are good for throttling down on bike paths to self limit to 15mph to avoid complaints from others. Fork is OK and has been nice when pounding through unseen potholes in the dark along with the big wheels. Drivetrain has been great. Microshift is needed to be able to shift so fast when accelerating. Biggest problem has been with brakes. I posted below to another review for the Diamondback equivalent. Mechanical discs really should be replaced for hydraulic once pads and discs are worn out. The originals are really inadequate.

So the brake problem is not really a model problem, but is an issue with most of the mechanical disc brakes that have pad compensation done from the other side of the wheel through the spokes. You will experience this with most ebikes with discs either front or rear. Since the hub motor is so big, it makes this adjustment not possible without removing the wheel. To make matters worse, the Shimano resin pad brakes wear out really fast. I was going through a set every 4-6 months. I was also really hard on the cables and snapped two of them within 8 months. All in all, mechanical discs are not really up for the task of stopping such a fast and heavy bike if you put in a lot of miles.

You really need to upgrade the brakes to hydraulic with metal pads and rotors that support them. I did this recently with Shimano SLX and they seem to work great (except handle bar clamp limits microshift location) I just taped magnets to the brake sensors and removed them from the old cable levers. You really don’t need them with hydraulics since they are so much better (they easily stop the motor if you turn the throttle and want to stop with the brake).

Good luck with an upgrade and you will love the bike that much better. I still smile every day that I am on it.

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Court Rye
4 years ago

Great feedback Izk, glad the E3 Dash is working well for you and stoked to see IZIP improving the model in most of the ways you mentioned for 2016… They completely swapped motors to a mid-drive and now have hydraulic brakes. I think the balance of the new version is good and love the accessories they include now but you have to pay $50 for a button throttle vs. the twist throttle from 2015. For people who prefer the zippy feel of a hub motor the 2015 is still very solid and I think your comments and tips will help :)

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Bill
3 years ago

I made use of your excellent website to research my first electronic bike purchase in July of 2016. I settled on the 2015 IZIP E3 Dash because of the silent nature of the direct drive and the fact that the bike can hit speeds greater than 20 miles an hour. I was also able to find an excellent price online given the the fact the bike was last years model and the 2016 E3 enjoyed numerous improvements. I had the bike for three days before the engine stopped working and the back wheel seized up. The closest IZIP repair shop was 90 minutes away and I was grateful they agreed to repair the bike under warranty as I did not purchase it from them. I was told the back wheel needed to be replaced and I am also grateful IZIP agreed to send the parts needed for the repairs at no cost under the warranty. The defect in the engine was the same one you outlined as an issue with the 2014 model. I will be without the bike for two weeks, I will have to drive a total of six hours and I will have to pay the labor costs for the repairs. I wanted to share my situation with you and your readers.

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Court Rye
3 years ago

Hi Bill! Ouch… what a bummer, that’s no fun at all and I’m so sorry to hear about your situation. At least IZIP has acknowledged the issue and is providing parts but time is worth a lot and being without transportation and having to drive like that (and pay the service costs) must be so frustrating. I’m really sorry to hear about this and I appreciate you sharing the situation so others can consider the risks involved :(

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Sam
3 years ago

is that torque figure correct? 5.8?! seems small. many bikes now seems to have 50-70 like the Flx or Haibike etc. Am i missing something?

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Court Rye
3 years ago

Great question Sam! I think you’re correct… that’s an error definitely. My guess is the torque hovers around 40 Nm or maybe up to 50. With all of the site updates lately maybe this field got swapped accidentally. In any case, I have removed it entirely since I don’t know for sure :)

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Adam
3 years ago

Does anyone know if this battery is LiFePO4 or Manganese chemistry?

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Court Rye
3 years ago

Hi Adam! I’m guessing it’s Lithium Manganese Cobalt of some kind. Very few batteries are Lithium Iron Phosphate because they cost more, don’t come as readily in the standard 18650 cells (from Samsung and Panasonic) and although they can be more heat resistant and last for more charge cycles the existing standard Lithium ones also do great when a good battery management system is used. Again, just a guess here. Hope it helps!

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Patrick McDonald
3 years ago

I have a Dash 2015, I’ve had it over a year now. Mine has developed an annoying habit. My daily round trip commute is 16 miles on fairly flat road. In the morning the bike rides as expected, it’s fast and fun to ride. However on the way home, it loses power and regains it, this occurs in fast intervals making the ride jerky and it only happens on assist level 1. Has anyone else experienced this?

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Court Rye
3 years ago

Interesting… maybe this has to do with the different heat levels and the torque sensor used to activate the motor? Does it happen with the throttle engaged too or just with pedal assist? Maybe the morning is cold and the evening is hotter so it’s stretching the sensor or something. Not really sure but maybe someone else will chime in to help too :)

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Jake
2 years ago

Hey Court!

As a present, I received a 2015 Izip E3 Dash since Christmas of 2016. When I got the bike, I loved it. It was insanely fast! I’m 5’11” and have a 19″ frame.

However, a month after I had the bike, I began noticing that when I was cruising at 20 mph-ish on PAS 1, I was only getting 20 miles of range! Being that I purchased the bike for $1,500, I thought I had wasted my money. Thankfully, I found a trick to getting good range; don’t go 20 on PAS 1! If I keep the speed at 15 miles per hour, I can even exceed 40 miles and touch 45 miles of range!! So, it seems that the ideal speed for PAS 1 is 15 miles per hour. I also did this “test” with PAS 2; 18 miles per hour is an ideal speed that will get you a tad over 30 miles of range. I haven’t tested it with PAS 3 and 4…yet.

45 miles of range is extremely impressive considering the pretty small 417 Wh battery. However, this is my first e-bike. I soon plan on getting an alumminum road bike with no electric assist, which will go just as fast as the Izip. But I won’t stop riding this thing! I’ve already put 1,300 miles into it as of 10/26/17.

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Court Rye
2 years ago

Fantastic! Thanks for the real-world feedback Jake. I have noticed that speed makes a big difference in efficiency (especially above 20 mph) but good to hear that 15 vs. 20 mph made the IZIP E3 Dash work for you. Again, knowing your height and frame helps to make this relevant to more people so thanks, if you feel comfortable sharing weight as well that can make it even more useful but no pressure, I don’t mean to target anyone, just help to clarify and make it relevant. I’m on the light side at ~135 lbs myself :)

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