Jetson Electric Mountain Bike Review

Jetson Electric Mountain Bike Review
Jetson Electric Mountain Bike
Jetson Electric Mountain Bike Tourney Tx 500 Motor
Jetson Electric Mountain Bike Removable Battery Pack
Jetson Electric Mountain Bike Display Panel Shifter
Jetson Electric Mountain Bike 6 Sensor Pedelec
Jetson Electric Mountain Bike 180 Mm Disc Brake Rotor
Jetson Electric Mountain Bike Kickstand
Jetson Electric Mountain Bike Monochrome Lcd
Jetson Electric Mountain Bike Review
Jetson Electric Mountain Bike
Jetson Electric Mountain Bike Tourney Tx 500 Motor
Jetson Electric Mountain Bike Removable Battery Pack
Jetson Electric Mountain Bike Display Panel Shifter
Jetson Electric Mountain Bike 6 Sensor Pedelec
Jetson Electric Mountain Bike 180 Mm Disc Brake Rotor
Jetson Electric Mountain Bike Kickstand
Jetson Electric Mountain Bike Monochrome Lcd

Summary

  • Powerful motor combined with a large battery pack for distance and climbing, frame flexes under weight and pressure
  • Lower end components (suspension and drivetrain) with a basic pedal assist sensor that isn't as responsive as I'd like for actual trail riding on loose terrain where precision becomes important
  • Attractive price point, limited availability in the USA, questionably high pedelec top speed ~30 mph pushes legal limits
Warning, in some configurations this electric bike is classified as a moped or motorcycle and may not be ridden on cycling trails or paths. It may require licensing, insurance and lights when used on public roads.

Video Review

Introduction

Make:

Jetson

Model:

Electric Mountain Bike

Price:

$1,999 USD

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Trail

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedelec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States, Canada

Model Year:

20142015

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

65 lbs (29.48 kg)

Battery Weight:

10 lbs (4.53 kg)

Motor Weight:

20 lbs (9.07 kg)

Frame Material:

Aluminum Alloy

Frame Types:

Mid-Step

Frame Colors:

Black, Red, White

Frame Fork Details:

SR Suntour XCM Suspension

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Tourney TX

Shifter Details:

Shimano SIS Index Shifter on Right Bar

Cranks:

Lasco

Pedals:

Black Wellgo Aluminum Alloy Platform

Handlebar:

Flat

Brake Details:

Mechanical Disc with 180 mm Rotor on Front and 160 mm Rotor on Rear, Tektro Levers with Motor Cutoff

Grips:

Black Leather, Ergonomic

Seat Post:

Suspension Shock

Tire Brand:

CST Caballero, 29" x 2.26"

Wheel Sizes:

29 in (73.66cm)

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Side Mounted Kickstand, Plastic Chain Guide

Other:

Keyed Removable Battery Pack, Six Magnet Pedelec Sensor

Electronic Details

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

17 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

816 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Estimated Max Range:

40 miles (64 km)

Display Type:

Monochrome LCD on Left Bar

Readouts:

Speedometer, Odometer, Battery Meter, Assist Level (1-5)

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Twist Throttle

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)


Written Review

The Jetson Electric Mountain bike is the first bicycle-style ebike I’ve seen from the company which is traditionally known for scooter-style designs. This new model offers plenty of power, decent weight distribution and both pedal assist and throttle mode for a relatively low $2K but skimps on component quality and pushes the legal limit of “speed pedelec” designation riding at 30+ in assist mode. This means that it could potentially put the rider in a bad spot if they were to accidentally damage property or harm another person while riding. Beyond legal ramifications, the unique beam-frame flexes under the weight of the extra-large integrated battery packs and the basic six-magnet pedelec sensor does not provide as much sensitivity and responsiveness as I’d prefer for actual trail riding. It’s a bike that feels most at home on streets and paved paths but is marketed as a mountain or trail product where handling may become more difficult.

The motor used with the Jetson Mountain Bike is a 500 watt geared rear hud design that keeps weight and size down. It delivers high torque for climbing and accelerating but also produces more noise than a gearless setup and may wear faster. Compared with a mid-drive it’s less efficient but much more affordable and less complex. There’s a nice cable quick-disconnect point near the left chain stay which makes removing the rear wheel easier for maintenance but you still need traditional tools, no quick release here. Keep that in mind if you’re riding this off-road and may encounter a flat tire – bring some wrenches. Being a geared design, this motor freewheels nicely and does not produce any drag. It also blends in nicely with the rear cassette and overall bike with its black paint job and smaller size.

The large battery pack powering this ebike is actually two regular sized packs that mount to either side of the primary tube. They look pretty nice when attached and do have keyed locking points for security. In total, they offer 48 volts of power and 17 amp hours of capacity which is nearly double what traditional 48 volt systems provide. That means you can go further but also have to deal with added weight. I misspoke during the video review stating this bike weighs ~50 lbs (that’s the information I was provided by the reps at Interbike) when in actuality the bike weighs closer to 65 pounds. A lot of this extra weight comes from the large battery and this also contributes to a bendy feeling when maneuvering the frame. The unique beam design just isn’t as stiff as a traditional triangle setup. The cells used on these batteries are Lithium-ion which is known for aging well and the comprehensive one year warranty from Jetson is nice, though getting service may be difficult with limited outlets selling the bike.

Operating this bike is a bit more tedious than some other models I’ve tried. It requires that both batteries are charged and connected to the frame and that a key be inserted into the ignition slot on the extended seat tube. One grip here is that the key slot seems dangerously close to where your feet go when pedaling and could present a snag-hazzard. I’ve bent keys off before and snagged my pants on bottle cages and other protrusions so this caught my attention. It also means that if you have multiple keys on a chain, there could be some added clinking noises or chipped paint over time as they swing around. So once the power systems are all in place and the key is in the on position, operation is as simple as activating the display and either twisting the throttle or choosing one of five assist levels and then pedaling. The display itself is relatively easy to reach and provides a monochrome readout of speed, battery level, odometer and assist with rubberized buttons to switch levels. It’s a generic display that is not removable but it gets the job done.

All things considered, this is a functional electric bike at a very attractive price point. I can see why many people would be drawn to it and while there’s only one frame size to choose from, the mid-step configuration makes it easier to approach and the suspension fork, seat post and ergo grips offer comfort. Compared with something like the ProdecoTech Outlaw SS which also goes for power, speed and affordability I prefer the balance of this Jetson but there are still many design issues and potential legal ones to consider. depending on your location it may also be difficult to test ride this bike though it is sold on Amazon and can be delivered to many different locations in the US and Canada.

Pros:

  • Several nice ergonomic enhancements that smooth out the ride including leather ergo grips, suspension seat post and basic suspension fork
  • One of the more affordable electric bikes with large 29″ wheels, offers a higher attack angle for rolling over obstacles, improved rolling momentum, less maneuverable than a smaller 26″ or 27.5″
  • Multiple drive mode options including twist throttle and cadence sensing pedal assist which extends range and reduces strain on battery when climbing
  • Motor cutoff switch is built into both Tektro brake levers and may come in very handy to deactivate the system when riding off-road given the less responsive pedal assist setup
  • Mid-mounted battery pack spreads weight across the frame vs. a rear rack, it’s removable for convenient charging or to reduce weight when transporting the bike

Cons:

  • Due to the unique frame there are no rear rack bosses, fender bosses or bottle cage bosses so adding accessories may be difficult
  • Relative to traditional triangular geometries this bike feels less stiff, the frame sort of bends and flexes when the bike is maneuvered quickly
  • Lower end components including SR Suntour suspension fork with basic rebound adjust and no lockout, Shimano SIS index shifter vs. Microshift triggers, mechanical disc vs. hydraulic
  • Only available in one frame size however, the frame is a bit easier to mount given the mid-step design
  • Cadence sensing pedal assist is not as responsive or fluid as a torque sensor or a multi-sensor setup, with just six magnets on the sensor ring (vs. 12 on many new ebike models) this bike is less responsive and may prove more difficult to manage precisely when riding off-road
  • Even though the battery is mounted on the downtube/top-tube here, it’s still relatively high compared to some other off-road models which is less ideal for balance, the frame itself may be more difficult to mount on some racks given the oversized, slanted tubing configuration
  • The key must remain in the bike in order to activate electric drive but is positioned in a place where it may get bumped and cause damage, it may also create jingling noise if you’ve got other keys on a keychain

Resources:

Comments (18) YouTube Comments

5 years ago

I just bought this bike and my first ride was with just using thr throutell no peddle assist and it only lasted 8 miles. The next time I road with peddle assist on level 2 for 8 miles then went to throutell mode and it only last for 10 miles then would shut off. The battery life indicator both times showed half life left, but would just shut off like it was dead. I weigh 195 lbs and I was riding on a paved park path with tires fully inflated. It is advertised to 40 miles, but I was no way close to that, is this normal length of time for this ebike or should I have this bike checked out?

  Reply
Court Rye
5 years ago

In my opinion 40 miles is a huge stretch unless you’re in the very lowest assist level and the bike is brand new and perfectly tuned… and you weigh ~170 or less. I’m sorry to hear that you only got 8 miles, riding slower can help but yeah… I’m not surprised with the short range given that this model is at the end of its year and the weight is a bit higher. Thanks for sharing your experience here, it might help to temper the expectation of others. I put 25 to 40 mph in my review notes (I try to recognize company stats but also estimate on my own as I usually cannot ride a full range test). Your tip here helps a lot.

  Reply
Dudeman
5 years ago

Yes, this is somewhat correct; if using straight throttle no pedaling you will get around 10 miles. I do rides where I pedal assist on hilly trails, just to get a half decent workout and the longest I have gone is about 24 miles. I have not done a test on straight throtlle yet, but my son who is 110lbs took it one day and got about 12 miles on straight throttle. I think this is a battery issue and not a motor issue; any bike with these specs for wattage and voltage will most likely be the same outcome.

  Reply
Patti Bowman
4 years ago

Having battery issues. It was in garage all winter and covered up. Seems like it is not charging. Assist mkde is extremely week. Tried different outlets, lengthy periods. I am not sure what kind of charger to use if I brought them inside. The moter is really loud from the start of purchasing it last fall here i Colorado. Do not know where to take it. I live in Parker. Thanks Patti Bowm.

  Reply
Court Rye
4 years ago

Ouch… I hate the be the bearer of bad news Pattie but it sounds like the battery is ruined. It’s best to store them away from extreme temperatures like heat and cold and test and top them off every couple/few months. I grew up in Colorado and know just how cold it can get. Most ebikes have removable batteries to make charging and storing separately easier and I think that’s the case with the Jetson as well. At this point I’m not sure you can get replacement packs or fix the ones you’ve got. Honestly, I’d recycle the batteries, donate the bike and get a nicer model next time and take better care of it. Here’s a forum post with tips and advice (including a video with Elon Musk) talking about how to care for batteries :)

  Reply
Larry
4 years ago

I am curious how it handles as a bicycle? When the battery is dead and you have to peddle the 65 pound bike? I am also looking to use it at the 25 mile range to / from work… sounds like i may be disappointed it its actual range? Thanks

  Reply
Court Rye
4 years ago

Yeah, I hate to say it Larry but this probably wouldn’t be my first choice for an ebike… it’s difficult to come by, has a flexy frame and might not be as efficient for long range riding as some of the other options, specifically mid-drive bikes.

  Reply
Larry
4 years ago

Any reviews or thoughts and suggestions in regards to the E-Go Seagull?

  Reply
Court Rye
4 years ago

It probably wouldn’t be my first choice either, this design just doesn’t feel good even though it looks unique. The other drawback is transport, there’s no top tube to hang it on racks. E-Go isn’t a company I’m super familiar with so I can’t say much more but I can see why you asked about this one, it looks very similar to the Jetson :)

  Reply
Court Rye
4 years ago

I can see why you’re curious about this model, it looks very similar to the Jetson Mountain Bike. I can’t say much about it because I haven’t tested it and have not heard of the company before. My guess is that the frame would be flexy and you’d get even less support than going with Jetson :/

  Reply
Larry
4 years ago

Thanks for the response, I wanted to give you and your readers an update… I found the Jetson bikes on Walmart.com and for the price I could not pass it up. They were listed for $1,770-$1,999.00, depending on color… Ordered the black one for $1,770 and they had two price reductions while I waited for it to be shipped the final sale price was $1,587.00. The order was 2 days late so Walmart gave me another 5% off! I ended up paying $1,497.
Anyway, I took the bike out and got 20.3 miles on the 5 of 5 power pedal assist mode, I weigh 215 pounds, peddling the whole time and averaged a speed of 18.9 MPH, and a top speed of 34 MPH. I had to go 3 more miles with no battery power… not very easy, I averaged about 7 MPH for those miles. I tested the throttle only mode and rode it on battery for 17.5 miles, mostly flat but a few short climbs. No more than 1-2% peddling the whole time… I am going to try a long ride again in peddle asset mode and try to get a little better range.

  Reply
Court Rye
4 years ago

Wow! Sounds like you got a screamin’ good deal Larry :D thank you so much for listing the range you got, your weight and the top speed. That’s information that a lot of people want and I can’t always get. Sounds like those last three miles were a bit tricky, I think using assist more will extend the range and would love to hear back about what results you achieve :)

Daniel
3 years ago

Hi, glad I found your site. I traded equipment and got a Jetson Mountain Bike as part of the deal. I want to share that I have almost the exact same statistics as Larry (I’m 215, used assist for about 15 miles and parked it but it still had life in battery).

When I found your website I learned that assist had to be off to make throttle work lol and tried it out right away… when it ran 21.9 mph on the flats. I also discovered something I haven’t seen mentioned; that if you hold the button opposite to the power button for a few seconds, it will turn on a 6 mph cruise mode that only goes off when I hit the break :-)

Anyhow, I feel fortunate that I seem to have gotten good batteries and after reading your site I will be sure to maintain them well. Cheers, Daniel

  Reply
Court Rye
3 years ago

Interesting, it sounds like you discovered a sort of slow throttle or walk mode? Thanks for sharing this Daniel. I’m glad to hear the Jetson Electric Mountain Bike is working out well for you :)

  Reply
steve m
2 years ago

I have put over 500 miles on mine so far …and while it is nowhere nimble as my mountain bike, it is an awesome hill climbing beast! I have never come close to running out of battery power. Yes I would like to have a 5k bike that does it all but since I live in a very hilly area this bike greatly increases my ability to go anywhere. I have put a single clamp quick-release rack with panniers and a handle bar water bottle cage so now I am unstoppable (until it rains)

  Reply
court
2 years ago

Hi Steve! Thanks for sharing your experience with this bike :) here’s to more great rides and many clear skies!

  Reply
David
2 years ago

This drive work perfectly, 3 years using this. Still drives the same. It’s the best bike I purchased! Batter life was great.

  Reply
Court
2 years ago

Thanks for your quick testimonial, David. I hope the Jetson Ebike continues working great for you :D

  Reply

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