Stromer ST1 Elite Review

Stromer St1 Elite Electric Bike Review
Stromer St1 Elite
Stromer St1 Elite Hub Motor
Stromer St1 Elite Pedal
Stromer St1 Elite Lcd Computer
Stromer St1 Elite Disc Brake
Stromer St1 Elite Electric Bike Review
Stromer St1 Elite
Stromer St1 Elite Hub Motor
Stromer St1 Elite Pedal
Stromer St1 Elite Lcd Computer
Stromer St1 Elite Disc Brake

Summary

  • High performance components, beautiful aesthetic, pedal assist only
  • Strong 500 watt gearless hub motor with regenerative braking
  • Fewer gears, lower top speed and no shock option as compared with the Stromer ST1 Platinum
  • Heavier and more expensive than comparable electric bikes

Search EBR

{{title}} {{distance | number:2}} miles away

{{excerpt}}

Video Review

Trusted Advertisers

Introduction

Make:

Stromer

Model:

ST1 Elite

Price:

$3,599 USD

Body Position:

Forward Aggressive

Suggested Use:

Urban, Commuting, Road

Electric Bike Class:

Pedal Assist (Class 1)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Battery (Or 1,000 Full Charge Cycles), 2 Year Motor, 3 Year Frame

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

20132014

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

62 lbs ( 28.12 kg )

Battery Weight:

6.6 lbs ( 2.99 kg )

Frame Types:

High-Step, Step-Thru

Frame Sizes:

16.5 in ( 41.91 cm )20 in ( 50.8 cm )

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Colors:

Black, White

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid, Carbon Fiber

Attachment Points:

Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

9 Speed 1x9 Shimano Sora, 11-32T

Shifter Details:

Rapid Fire on Right Bar

Cranks:

42T or 52T Depending on Motor

Pedals:

Wellgo Aluminum Alloy Platform

Handlebar:

Low Rise

Brake Details:

Magura MT2 Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Rotors and Motor Cutoff Sensor

Grips:

Semi-Ergonomic

Saddle:

Stromer Special

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Big Ben, 26" x 2.125

Wheel Sizes:

26 in ( 66.04 cm )

Tire Details:

Reflective Sidewall

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Single Side Kickstand, Optional City Kit with Front and Rear LED Lights (B+M Lumotec IQ Fly/Supernova E3 Front and B+M Toplight Mini Rear), Fenders and Rear Carry Rack by Racktime

Other:

TMM4 Torque Sensor, Regenerative Braking

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

TDCM (Mountain 33" Model)

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Gearless Direct Drive Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Motor Torque:

40 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11 ah (Optional 14.5 ah)

Battery Watt Hours:

396 wh (Optional 522 wh)

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium Manganese

Charge Time:

4 hours

Estimated Min Range:

30 miles ( 48 km )

Estimated Max Range:

45 miles ( 72 km )

Display Type:

Backlit Monochrome LCD on Right Bar

Readouts:

Speed, Odometer, Trip Time, Battery Level, Assist Level (4 Modes), Regeneration Level (2 Modes)

Drive Mode:

Torque Sensing Pedal Assist

Top Speed:

20 mph ( 32 kph )

Trusted Advertisers



Written Review

The Stromer ST1 Elite is one step down from the Platinum and offers fewer gears, a lower top speed, no front shock option and one less color choice… but you save $600. This is a well designed bike that rides smooth and looks amazing. It does not offer twist throttle mode which means you’ll have to pedal continuously to activate the motor, but that reduces complexity in the system. On the upside, this bike offers regenerative braking and the motor is activated via torque sensor vs. the simpler pedalec system. It truly feels like you’re flying when you ride this bike but the price tag is pretty steep.

Driving this bike is a gearless 500 watt motor rated at 600 watts which basically means you get extra power. Gearless motors coast silently and in this case, offer regenerative braking which extends range and reduces wear on the brakes. The brakes themselves are oversized hydraulic discs that work exceedingly well. The system is clean with minimal wires and cables that are integrated seamlessly below the downtube. It’s easy to fall for the aesthetic of this bike and forget it’s electric at all.

The battery pack driving the motor offers 36 volts of power and 10 amp hours of range in the form of Lithium Nickel Metal Hydride. Stromer offers an amazing three year warranty on this battery and you can also buy a second one to extend range for $700. All in all, this battery pack is average in terms of size and power but that keeps it light and dare I say, more affordable? The LCD computer system that connects the battery with the motor is intuitive, sleek and well protected offering the standard speed, capacity and power settings you’d expect.

The truth about this bike is that it works much better than some of Stromer’s older designs like the Sport but it’s not perfect. For one thing, it’s heavy! weighing in at 62 pounds. That’s due in part to the gearless hub motor which enables the regenerative braking. If you compare this bike with the Easy Motion Neo Race, you spend $400 less and have a 42 pound bike! Now you won’t get regenerative braking and large cushy tires… but the ride will be comparable and you’ll get twist throttle support.

Overall I’m very impressed with the ST1 Elite. It’s fun to ride, looks great, comes in multiple sizes for a good fit and the battery warranty is amazing. Stromer has been around since 2010 and continues to refine their bikes. They now offer a City Kit with integrated lights, fenders and a rear rack + basket system. You can even have your company logo painted onto the frame. If you’re looking for a solid performer and can spare the extra cash this is a great choice.

Pros:

  • Clean, focused design with limited clutter and complexity
  • Awesome regenerative braking system, extends range and reduces wear on brakes
  • Strong 500 watt motor 36 volt battery combination, battery is removable
  • Sturdy, oversized tires are puncture resistant and provide shock absorption when riding
  • High quality “City Kit” upgrade includes lights, fenders and rack + basket
  • Multiple frame sizes, including step-through, and two colors to choose from (black and white)
  • Awesome three year warranty on the battery pack
  • Ability to customize graphics on the frame if you pay extra

Cons:

  • Only offers pedal assist whereas other ebikes also offer throttle mode
  • Bike is heavier than comparable ebikes, partially due to gearless hub motor vs. geared
  • Expensive as compared with similarly specced electric bikes
  • Only available with a carbon fork vs. shock absorber (have to upgrade to the Platinum to get the shock)

Resources:

Trusted Advertisers

More Stromer Reviews

Stromer ST1 X Review

  • MSRP: $4,999
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A more affordable Stromer electric bike that still offers regenerative braking and speed pedelec performance with ~28 mph top speeds, available in high-step and mid-step frames. Beautifully integrated touch display and companion mobile app can be used to track the bike…...

Stromer ST1 Limited Edition Review

  • MSRP: $3,990
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A limited run (only 399 produced) speed pedelec with premium integrated lights from Supernova and Toplight, Aluminum fenders, rear carry rack from Racktime and Magura hydraulic disc brakes. High end Shimano Deore XT drive train with nine sprockets geared for 28+ mph riding…...

Stromer ST2 S Review

  • MSRP: $9,999
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016, 2017

An urban racer with smooth electronic shifting, app-driven performance tuning, ultra-bright dynamic lighting that responds to braking, five levels of power regen and regenerative braking. Available in three high-step frame sizes for improved fit, impressive weight distribution for a hub-powered…...

Stromer ST1 S Review

  • MSRP: $4,790
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A high speed urban electric bike emphasizing sport riding (flatter handle bar, no rack) available in two frame sizes, one high-step style and one color (metallic lime green). Carbon fiber fork reduces weight and dampens vibration, oversized road tires cushion the ride and…...

Stromer ST1 T Review

  • MSRP: $4,790
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A solid, high speed city ebike with purpose built Aluminum frame, custom fenders and minimalist rack, premium integrated lights and hidden downtube battery. Available in two frame sizes and with an optional suspension fork for $350 more, the…...

Stromer ST2 Review

  • MSRP: $6,999
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015, 2016, 2017

Extremely polished, high performance urban style electric bike available in two frame sizes and configurations. One of the most responsive and satisfying electric bikes I've tested, speed pedelec can reach…...

Stromer ST1 Platinum Review

  • MSRP: $4,399
  • MODEL YEAR: 2013, 2014

High quality components, beautiful clean aesthetic, pedal assist only. Powerful 500 watt gearless rear hub motor with regenerative braking...

Stromer Sport Review

  • MSRP: $3,399
  • MODEL YEAR: 2012, 2013

Beautiful design integrates the battery, controller and wires while evenly distributing weight from front to rear. Powerful, near-silent, 500 watt gearless rear hub motor can reach 25 mph in pedal assist…...


Jason in Modesto
1 year ago

Stromers, including the ST1 Elite, have a Boost mode which requires no peddling. By default it will only go to 12.5mph, but can be configured with the controller code 3775 setting to go to 20mph.

https://electricbikereview.com/community/threads/stromer-st1-codes.1521/

Court Rye
1 year ago

Wow! This is really cool Jason, thanks for sharing and providing a link to the different codes. How does the boost work exactly? Do you hold down on the up arrow or something?

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Steve Plattner
4 days ago
Wanderlust
Good morning,

I recently left my job and so I figure there's no better time than now to fulfill my bucket list item of completing a long distance bicycle tour. I've done a 6 day trip on my non-electric bike, and decided that if I were to do a long tour, I would need to do it on an ebike. My route would be from Mississippi to Florida to Maine. I'll start heading east from Mississippi and then from Florida north similar to the proposed East Coast Greenway with some modifications - such as visiting friends/family along the Delmarva peninsula instead of DC/Baltimore, and heading to the Poconos instead of NYC.

I'd like to do the trip slowly, I would plan on averaging about 30 miles per day, mostly road, but some gravel/dirt paths may also be necessary. The ECG sections are mostly flat, but my detours will bring me into more mountainous terrain. My budget will be very tight, so I intend on camping as much as possible, which means I would like to get as long a distance as possible on a charge, I plan to buy a spare battery to extend my distance. Disc brakes and a good range of gears are on my list of requirements. I am also looking for an ebike that will be reliable, because my mechanical skills are limited. Also, to make things more challenging, I am 5'4", weigh 220lbs (+~40 lbs in gear), and need a step-through design due to some extra metal bits I have in my body. I figure I can spend up to $4000 on the bike + spare battery, but spending less will enable me to purchase better/lighter camping equipment.

Can you suggest an ebike that would be suitable for my tour? I'm also open to any other related advice.

Thanks!
Wanderlust, I love what you intend to do. Like everything else in life, the devil is often in the details, so thinking about everything and planning now can make your journey much more enjoyable.

I have a Stromer ST-1. They aren't cheap, but you can find good deals on them. I had the Elite, but it had issues and Stromer replaced it with the Platinum model. I am 6'2, 205 lbs. and in many ways I preferred the Elite--while it has a top assisted speed of 20 mph, it has better torque for hill-climbing and consumes slightly less power, give you better range. But the Platinum is fine too.

I have done trips up to 350 miles, from a few hours to six days. I have three batteries, and when on a long trip, carry a fair amount of stuff. On three batteries, riding 14-15 mph on average on mostly level or slight incline routes, stopping here and there, I can cover 85-90 miles before I am out of power. I do a lot of rails to trails, and while I would like to spend a lot less and camp much more, the issue comes down to recharging your batteries. You don't want to miscalculate and get stuck in the middle of no where without a functioning battery. I have done shorter out and back overnight trips and have camped on those, but didn't go further than my three batteries combined would allow. You can sometimes pull over and charge your battery(yes) if you think you're going to run out of juice before you arrive at your destination--I've gotten pretty good at find 120V outlets along my routes.

Besides power, I would say there are two other major concerns--getting really comfortable on whatever bike you choose, and figuring out how to carry your belongings.

Adding a Cane Creek Thudbuster with a broken-in Brooks B-67 seat and a good pair of padded biking pants will make you much happier and more willing and able to go the distance day after day. If your shoulders and arms get sore from the road, I would also recommend the Redshift Sports Shockstop replacement stem for your handlebars--it provides shock absorption taking the wear and tear off your upper body while still giving you good road feel and complete control.

As far as carrying your stuff--I've gone two routes: pulling a BOB Trailer (Ibex model) vs. two Ortlieb waterproof panniers on an Axiom rack with a third rack (Ortlieb, waterproof) top bag for camera, keys, maps, phone or whatever.

The BOB makes the bike a little less top heavy, but it can be difficult to turn around, and unless you lean everything carefully up against a tree, fence or bench when you stop or you have a really good, strong kickstand, the whole rig has a tendency to fall over and it isn't fun to get it back up in a vertical position. It's also quite long--probably 9' or so--sometimes feels like you are riding a semi, not just a bike with trailer. But it can carry up to 70 lbs. and pulling stuff in a trailer supported by a rear wheel takes a lot of the weight off the bike. The BOB yellow duffel style bag is a great thing--you can put everything in it and it will stay dry during even the worst downpours. The Ortliebs are expensive, but strong and durable. I have a matched pair and I have taken everything I needed--clothing, computer, two spare batteries, charger, a tool or two, Marmot Starlight 2 tent with fly and footprint, and a 30 degree rated sleeping bag and some food and other assorted stuff on rides using just the two bags. The Ortliebs clip on to your rack securely and mine have held up on over 1500 miles of smooth to pretty rough bike paths. I bought mine cheap 2 years ago on-line for about $110/pair--they are normally about $180. There is a store in Tucson specializing in bike bags--good people and a good resource I've used on several occasions.

Last of all, if you have a cell phone Strava can be fun to use. It documents every foot of your trip, tells you have much elevation and distance you've gained, and you can share the data on line.

Sounds like your on the right track and going to have a great trip.
flymeaway
2 months ago
George S.
Was wondering where your Chinese LiFePos have ended up?
They're still functioning.....the bike with the most charge cycles is the Cafe" Latte'. 48V 750W BBS02. That was the bike I converted in the Spring of 2015. I rode it as my primary commuter in 2015 and when I switched to the converted Titanium this May it became my wife's primary bike. Until then she was mostly riding the original Elite 36V 500W bike. The batteries are still going strong and even though I don't keep track of charge cycles the 48V pack must be somewhere north of 400. But they are heavy bricks!

Court J.

PS...yeah the rack and pinion steering is probably overkill but it does make an exceptionally stable steering system.
James Kohls
2 months ago
Ling
The information here is invaluable, I really appreciate the hard earned pearls of wisdom!

What are you using to record the video? I'm interested in recording my ride in case something does happen one day.
Thanks. I use a Garmin Virb Elite. I actually have two...one pointing forward and one pointing backward. Got mine refurbished on amazon. Works great.
Ravi Kempaiah
4 months ago
Ed I
Just bought one. Is this a real stromer? What racks fit? Can lights be wired in? Not much info on the sport. Mine has suspension front fork and single chain ring. The LCD screen is hard to see. I put a suntour suspension seat post on it. It rides real nice. I will post a few pics when I can
It's a special model by Stromer.
When they released their Stromer Sport model back in 2012, it had some electrical problems and I guess they had lots of frames in their warehouse. So, they put the ST1 Elite motor and battery to make it very affordable for customers. High volume dealers like Lenny's have them in stock.
The V1 Sport comes with Mountain 33 motor, 11Ah battery, Tektro mechanical disc brakes, retails for $1500
The V1 Elite comes with Mountain 33 motor, 14.5 Ah battery, Hydraulic disc brakes and retails for $1990.

They ride just like ST1 and do come with suspension forks. It has very good PAS system, integration, and features.
russ moir
4 months ago
Limber 48V ~$1800 in Vic, $1600 on the web from Canadian dealers.
Stromer ST1 Elite ~$3850 from Scooteretti Ottawa, with gold (large capacity) battery. Vic dealer stocks the Platinum for quite a bit more.
I'm sure there's a Specialized dealer on the island, and the turbo has great reviews, though is priced up with the ST1
George S.
4 months ago
I googled Marathon Plus Mountain in the spring and came up with Chain Reaction as just about the only supplier. I never ran anything else on the bike, so can't compare. These MB Marathons are easy to get through my heavy gravel driveway and they are fun on dirt trails, which I rarely find.

Seems like right now Amazon is at $65 (third party seller) and Chain Reaction is at $32. I would like to swap the street tires for mountain bike tires on my Bikes Direct Elite with a front Mac. The MB tires are listed at 30# which might soften the ride. I have a Trek 820 with a rear Magic Pie, and the ride is very decent over the roughest roads. The Trek has a very basic front suspension but like the guy at the bike shop said, something can be a lot better than nothing for standard road bumps, if not off road.

(Edit: Chain Reaction was the source)
MLB
5 months ago
Kenny,
Don't know about the Pedego but Kalkhoff makes very high quality bikes that are lust-worthy. I'd be interested in anything they make.
The Pedego looks nice, but I hate tail mounted batteries. The 2 I've ridden both "wagged their tails" (flexed the frame) when cornering at any speed. Just a bad place for extra weight.
Add the mid drive over front hub motor if you have any hills and to me it's a no-brainer for the Kalkhoff.
To me Kalkhoff comes in the elite group of expensive and very well made bikes that are actually worth the extra money over some less expensive but still nice bikes. Lots of expensive, nice little details on them.
In this case $1,000 of a barely used demo is a screaming deal better than the Prodeco at $150 off list. JMO!
You may disagree
looker
5 months ago
Hello members,
I finally take delivery of this beautifully integrated Bulls enduro.
one thing I want to add into Court's detailed review is the Boost rear wheel.
Not the front wheel. ITs good that you can use wider tires ,not so if you want to upgrade to a light wheel ,which can cost for this mismatch (Boost).
Form my view point ,very much like Court.
1.very quiet as I took it to the trail up and down right next to other cyclist ,none has take any notice ,unlike the Haibike FS xduro I had for a year ,and still running trail very well ,however , every other cyclist (front and back)noticed that was an electric bike because they can hear the hi winding motor sound),even if I peddle with the matching gear.
As for the bulls there is a sweat ,quiet gear that match the right Cad.then you will not hear any noise at all!(you only feel it ,smooth power)
2.Though only 3 level assist is a good thing , as I find out through out the entire trial ride ,I set it 2nd level and I can ride the course climb up and down ..just simply shifting/ changing gear without worry changing power level(still makes through some very steep slope. This is not true to Haibike with Borsch motor which I have to change power level more time to adjust to right Cad.or it makes too much noise, or not enough assist. I think that is where the 90N come from yet the power assist- delivery very smoothly.
3.Non removable battery could have 2 good things.
I have so many time driven to the trailhead, then realized I had forgotten my battery! That cuts my riding short.
One less thing to setup and worry that may be damaged or knock off when you crash.(and I did so many times, even broken off the brake lever and peddles!)
4. The spec that come with the bike are so good .Just understated ,eg.
The e13 chainguide is very special, because you can remove your chain if it's jammed .
Finally I have to say Bulls do know very well and test ride this bike because of the spec they have chosen so purposely (that turn into weight punishment at 49.5Lb )
Fortunately , I am able to upgrade & down grade them to 46Lb & once I get hold of a rear boost crossmax elite wheel it will be even less.
one last comment on Brose motor vs Yamaha and Bosch is refinement .
Brose win ,however Bosch motor is very reliable at this point (1 year of rough trail use ).
also notice on a tec-jump ,once airborn for a few sec of freewheel ,it seems fool the bike sensor ,the motor will power up and down (assist)slightly ,If I am descripting correctly? However ,returns to normal a few sec after.Just need to hold on your Siant brake.

John46
5 months ago
George S.
I put a Magic Pie on the Trek. I wanted a steel frame. The weight of the MP is 20 lbs, and the frame on the Trek is heavy. It works, as an ebike, but it's heavier than most people would want. I don't recall finding a decent steel bike at BD. I bought a cruiser with a CrMo fork, from them, put a front Golden Smart Pie on it.

I believe the Mac is around ten pounds. Half the weight and similar performance (some noise). I'd rather have a Mac back there, but it's a very close call. The MP is silent and the DD means no real wear parts at all. The Mac is very serviceable, and it's a price class where you can start to write it off after a couple of years. The Mac is a great compromise over the Golden DD's because of the weight, plus they are smaller across, but the MP is elegantly slender, which helps with disk brakes and other fitting issues. The Mac has a better throttle, not jumpy or hard to modulate.

I don't think I want a mid-drive, so I am not in the mainstream of DIY. I climb decent hills, maybe 7%, and it's not a problem. I can ride without shifting, just using the throttle to start and get up to speed, then pedaling normally.

The Trek has basic brakes, but I tend to go 18 mph on the flats. Steel bikes tend to be cheap with basic parts. BD will upgrade parts, up to a point. You can find older stuff or find a bike or shop and get disk brakes. I think I have those basic Tektro disks on my Elite. They are OK, nothing special. I had some Avid hydraulics on another bike. I miss them. The Trek front suspension work pretty well for me. It's a bike shop bike so you can test it.

You don't want to push a $400 bike too far. That's a bike designed to be ridden 16mph by a fit rider. A true mountain bike, even a 'value' mountain bike ($1500+) is going to be designed to take more abuse. You don't see reports of problems converting $400 bikes, but I would at least go with ebike speed rated tires and run real brake tests.
George thank you for your comments. What is it you do not like about mid-drive? This is this the question I am wrestling with.
George S.
5 months ago
I put a Magic Pie on the Trek. I wanted a steel frame. The weight of the MP is 20 lbs, and the frame on the Trek is heavy. It works, as an ebike, but it's heavier than most people would want. I don't recall finding a decent steel bike at BD. I bought a cruiser with a CrMo fork, from them, put a front Golden Smart Pie on it.

I believe the Mac is around ten pounds. Half the weight and similar performance (some noise). I'd rather have a Mac back there, but it's a very close call. The MP is silent and the DD means no real wear parts at all. The Mac is very serviceable, and it's a price class where you can start to write it off after a couple of years. The Mac is a great compromise over the Golden DD's because of the weight, plus they are smaller across, but the MP is elegantly slender, which helps with disk brakes and other fitting issues. The Mac has a better throttle, not jumpy or hard to modulate.

I don't think I want a mid-drive, so I am not in the mainstream of DIY. I climb decent hills, maybe 7%, and it's not a problem. I can ride without shifting, just using the throttle to start and get up to speed, then pedaling normally.

The Trek has basic brakes, but I tend to go 18 mph on the flats. Steel bikes tend to be cheap with basic parts. BD will upgrade parts, up to a point. You can find older stuff or find a bike or shop and get disk brakes. I think I have those basic Tektro disks on my Elite. They are OK, nothing special. I had some Avid hydraulics on another bike. I miss them. The Trek front suspension work pretty well for me. It's a bike shop bike so you can test it.

You don't want to push a $400 bike too far. That's a bike designed to be ridden 16mph by a fit rider. A true mountain bike, even a 'value' mountain bike ($1500+) is going to be designed to take more abuse. You don't see reports of problems converting $400 bikes, but I would at least go with ebike speed rated tires and run real brake tests.
John46
5 months ago
George S.
I've run a Mac motor for 18 months. It's a great compromise. The price is low, but it's a geared hub with a clutch. It's more premium than the basic Ebay stuff. I like the 10 pound weight, and it climbs pretty well up to 10% grades with some pedal effort. The composite gears may be the best around and you can buy kits for the gears and the clutch for under $100.

I noticed they have a page on Alibaba. Compared to Bafang, this is a tiny, tiny company, like 30,000 units a year, mostly for export. I got the motor from Paul, EM3ev, but eventually I would expect Mac to try to sell directly off Ali.

It might help if they could integrate a torque sensor, or maybe allow the motor to be programmed with Bluetooth. These hubs are great, DD or geared, because they are simple. You bolt the motor onto the frame, wire it up, and ride. Hubs mean less maintenance on chains and gears. My three hub builds seem to require little or no maintenance.

https://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/class-leading-bicycle-electric-motor-ebike_325172247.html?s=p

You can tab over to a company profile. This is why I think Alibaba has a decent future. There must be stuff out there that no one in the US wants to build up as a product line.
Hi George: I am still on the fence between a Mac (rear wheel) and a bbso2 750 w. I know that in the end I need to make the call but from what I have read, and I have read plenty, I like them both. Maybe you can sway me. For all intents and purposes they are the same price, at least they are from em3ev after you put on a pedal sensor, torque arm, ect. My biggest concern is the effort it takes to fit a flat. I don't need torque because I live in a flat area, I am not commuting only pleasure riding. I don't like the size of the dd hub motors but the geared are more stealth. It is really a tough call but one that I don't want to regret. On another note I am looking for some advice one a bike, but i may need to create a new post to get some opinions. I can get a Trek 820, no disc brakes at my lbs for $369 plus tax or I can get a Motobecane Elite or the Motobecane 400 HT mtn bike for similar price and they have disc brakes. Any thoughts. John
John46
5 months ago
George S. do you like the Elite, I was also thinking of the model with the disc brakes. I looked at the units from em3ev and they really appear to be good quality. There are so many variables. rear drive more complicated if you need to change a tire. Although it seems to me that is nothing more than ordinary after you disconnect some wires. The gearing with the 8Fun is kind of nice, but the free wheel with the Mac is also nice. See my delima? First thing is the bike I suppose.
George S.
5 months ago
I have a Mac on an Elite. The newer rear Mac is around 1200 watts and you can get a speed winding from EM3ev. Best if you don't have any serious hills. The BBS02 could be configured for a speed chainring. You can find a restrained discussion of the chainrings here.

Everything DIY seems to run on 48 volts. The big batteries give decent range, much less at higher speeds. The pedal assist is something you need to add for a Mac, included with the Bafang. The throttle/cruise control work OK on the Mac. Cruise locks in the speed so you don't use the throttle.

For any speed in the 20's I would want solid disk brakes and a reasonable front suspension.
elbikefun
5 months ago
britannic
I've used an Oberon StreetFighter black bar end mirror on both my ST1 Elite and ST2S. They are rock solid and have never vibrated loose in 2000 miles. The mirrors are actually designed for motorbikes, but work great for e-bikes as well.

View attachment 8907
That looks like a solid mirror ! Your body does not reduce rear-view ?
I got the mirror which came with the bike (standard in Germany). But if I were to have a new one; the one you showed would be the type I would look for.
britannic
5 months ago
I've used an Oberon StreetFighter black bar end mirror on both my ST1 Elite and ST2S. They are rock solid and have never vibrated loose in 2000 miles. The mirrors are actually designed for motorbikes, but work great for e-bikes as well.

View attachment 8907
Dej
6 months ago
Undercover Brother
Personally, it's not worth the risk to put a 48v Nitro battery into a 36v NEO bike for the reasons Ravi stated. Go with a 12ah battery, unless you need extra torque and speed. If you want to put a 48v Nitro battery in a NEO just remember you know own a "kit" bike w/o a warranty. For some that's fine, but for most it's too much risk. Take that from someone who has been modding motorcycles, cars and other toys for over 30 years. It's a heap of fun, but you do so often with considerable risk ($$$ and safety). Just because something appears to work, doesn't mean it will stand the test of time.

What I have to often remind folks is that we are talking about bicycles here. If you can't get up a hill w/o more effort than whats needed on one of our bikes, it might be time for a motorcycle or scooter. Having measured a 730w continuous output at full boost on our "350w" motor, I'd say by most folks standards, that's pretty decent. Maybe that's why I have outclimbed a Specialized Turbo, Lapierre Bosch mid-drive mountain bike, Currie E3 Peak, and Stromer Elite on our 650b Jumper and with more comfort. Anyway, everyone has to find what works best for them.

Will technology improve, absolutely! Will battery capacity and motor efficiency also improve, certainly. When that happens I hope to be the first in line. In the meanwhile, there are some great choices our there, so find (or build) the best bike for you...and enjoy the ride seeing as today is all we have!

Peace.
Hey Undercover bro are you still on this forum ,I have a question for you ?
grench
7 months ago
Here is todays ride. Very similar to the above with no gravel.

I figured out how to sync my cadence and heart rate monitors to the camera. This is a good video for conversations about if you get a workout on an ebike. My heart rate climbs to 162 on one of the hills. There is a little error in the numbers but viewed as a whole I think you get a good idea.

Camera: Garmin Virb Elite
Cadence Sensor: Wahoo Speed and Cadence
Heart Rate Monitor: Vivosmart HR -Wrist band with optical sensor

smitty
7 months ago
Steve Plattner
I have had two Stromer--both ST-1's--first the Elite, and now the Platinum. Both have occasionally suffered from the safe problem--using different batteries always with 50-75% power remaining--when I went to start the bike after pausing from riding for 5-10 minutes--it wouldn't start up. The only way to get it going is to unplug the LCD control unit for about a minute, then reconnect it. It worked fine after that.

Any idea what is causing this? Have others experienced it? Any solutions?
interesting...the electric gremlins are always with us I think. My first thought when they appear is to remove the battery, then reinstall it. Needless to say, I always carry the key with me on rides. My other thinking in this regard is that if I get stuck with an electrical problem out on the road, and the chase care was not available, I could remove the battery and hide it to peddle home with 8 or 10lbs less weight. Hope that I never have to do that...
JBJO
7 months ago
Steve Plattner
I have had two Stromer--both ST-1's--first the Elite, and now the Platinum. Both have occasionally suffered from the safe problem--using different batteries always with 50-75% power remaining--when I went to start the bike after pausing from riding for 5-10 minutes--it wouldn't start up. The only way to get it going is to unplug the LCD control unit for about a minute, then reconnect it. It worked fine after that.

Any idea what is causing this? Have others experienced it? Any solutions?
antimirov
Guys, is there a battery inside the display of ST1? If so, why does is then reset date/time every time I'm removing the main battery to charge it home?
Yes there is a battery in the display.. And be very careful when you remove the display and then put it back on.. It seems as if the plastic on these displays have the structural integrity of cheese.. They snap very very easily..
Steve Plattner
7 months ago
You mean replace the battery in the display? I had my Elite for a year, and the Platinum for about 7 weeks so that battery at least is almost new. If that's what you are suggesting I will try it.
InversionEnabled
3 years ago

It seems relatively quiet

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Yeah, the direct drive (gearless) hub motor is pretty quiet indeed :)

Aubrizzle
3 years ago

Any news about the st2?

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

I've heard a couple people talk about it but haven't seen or heard much
myself. You could create a thread in the Community and maybe get some input
from other Stromer fans
http://electricbikereview.com/community/forums/stromer/ If I see you there
I'll dig in a bit and post what I've heard :)

mo jooly
3 years ago

Laws R made 2 B steped on

Joe Pah
3 years ago

You're making me nervous riding like that on a city street! Get a cheap
mounter camera.. Please..

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Thanks for the concern Joe, this was one of the busier test locations I've
been at. I try to keep my helmet handy and use common sense but a different
camera setup might also help :)

mike willis
3 years ago

great review i think u really need to invest in a go pro cam so u can do a
longer better safer drive test and it would mos def help your channel
grow!!

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Thanks for the suggestion, I've been considering it and have actually
updated my filming technique a bit recently. Still trying to get it right ;)

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Cool, thanks again for calling this out and the tip :)

tobbe lerone
3 years ago

seems to be a throttle, this guy got it reviewed: NYCeWheels, search for
his video over here

MRTHAKKAR123
3 years ago

How much does this cost?

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Thanks for calling this out and providing the solution here! When it's in
boost mode, how do you actually "throttle" the bike? Is there another
button or a lever or twister?

tobbe lerone
3 years ago

also, it would be great to see some maybe daily vlogs on the interbike ;)
cheers

tobbe lerone
3 years ago

i already figured it out, in the manual it says you have to long press the
selection button to get in the boost mode. it will support riding without
pedaling between 3 and 20 km/h. i think most people get this wrong, also in
the shops because you have to read as it isnt obvious.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Great catch, to be honest I'm not really sure? I didn't see a throttle or
setting for that on the bike but maybe it's buried in the computer system?
I tried these bikes at a shop and the manager had said the were only pedal
assist... Maybe a newer model has come out? I'll ask the reps at Interbike
this next week and try to get back to you with the info here :)

tobbe lerone
3 years ago

are you sure you got your facts right?? because on the stromer site it says
the following: The support mode can be selected from four different output
modes. In addition, the Stromer has a boost mode (riding mode without
pedaling support) and push assistance. So, to my understanding the boost
mode is a mode where u can use a twist throttle? right or wrong, did you
test these modes?

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Good call, everyone keeps asking me about Prodeco bikes but I just haven't
had the chance to review them yet. I rode one at Interbike last year and
was unimpressed due to the geometry. It rode like a downhill bomber and I
didn't like the rear rack. I really like what Easy Motion is doing, they
have bikes that offer everything this Stromer does at a fraction of the
price and they can go above 20mph too! I mention this in the full review of
the Stromer Platinum on the site.

george04b
3 years ago

if this bike had a throttle it would be in my house now, even with the
almost 4000 price tag. i love the 28mph but there is also the prodeco ss
wish is almost half the price and has a throttle but im saving and will
wait for interbike :) tho i saw your pics on fb and i saw that they are
rasing the prices....