Stromer ST1 Elite Review

Stromer St1 Elite Electric Bike Review
Stromer St1 Elite
Stromer St1 Elite Hub Motor
Stromer St1 Elite Pedal
Stromer St1 Elite Lcd Computer
Stromer St1 Elite Disc Brake
Stromer St1 Elite Electric Bike Review
Stromer St1 Elite
Stromer St1 Elite Hub Motor
Stromer St1 Elite Pedal
Stromer St1 Elite Lcd Computer
Stromer St1 Elite Disc Brake

Summary

  • High performance components, beautiful aesthetic, pedal assist only
  • Strong 500 watt gearless hub motor with regenerative braking
  • Fewer gears, lower top speed and no shock option as compared with the Stromer ST1 Platinum
  • Heavier and more expensive than comparable electric bikes

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Stromer

Model:

ST1 Elite

Price:

$3,599 USD

Body Position:

Forward Aggressive

Suggested Use:

Urban, Commuting, Road

Electric Bike Class:

Pedal Assist (Class 1)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Battery (Or 1,000 Full Charge Cycles), 2 Year Motor, 3 Year Frame

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

20132014

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

62 lbs (28.12 kg)

Battery Weight:

6.6 lbs (2.99 kg)

Frame Types:

High-Step, Step-Thru

Frame Sizes:

16.5 in (41.91 cm)20 in (50.8 cm)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Colors:

Black, White

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid, Carbon Fiber

Attachment Points:

Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

9 Speed 1x9 Shimano Sora, 11-32T

Shifter Details:

Rapid Fire on Right Bar

Cranks:

42T or 52T Depending on Motor

Pedals:

Wellgo Aluminum Alloy Platform

Handlebar:

Low Rise

Brake Details:

Magura MT2 Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Rotors and Motor Cutoff Sensor

Grips:

Semi-Ergonomic

Saddle:

Stromer Special

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Big Ben, 26" x 2.125

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)

Tire Details:

Reflective Sidewall

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Single Side Kickstand, Optional City Kit with Front and Rear LED Lights (B+M Lumotec IQ Fly/Supernova E3 Front and B+M Toplight Mini Rear), Fenders and Rear Carry Rack by Racktime

Other:

TMM4 Torque Sensor, Regenerative Braking

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

TDCM (Mountain 33" Model)

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Gearless Direct Drive Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Motor Torque:

40 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11 ah (Optional 14.5 ah)

Battery Watt Hours:

396 wh (Optional 522 wh)

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium Manganese

Charge Time:

4 hours

Estimated Min Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Estimated Max Range:

45 miles (72 km)

Display Type:

Backlit Monochrome LCD on Right Bar

Readouts:

Speed, Odometer, Trip Time, Battery Level, Assist Level (4 Modes), Regeneration Level (2 Modes)

Drive Mode:

Torque Sensing Pedal Assist

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

The Stromer ST1 Elite is one step down from the Platinum and offers fewer gears, a lower top speed, no front shock option and one less color choice… but you save $600. This is a well designed bike that rides smooth and looks amazing. It does not offer twist throttle mode which means you’ll have to pedal continuously to activate the motor, but that reduces complexity in the system. On the upside, this bike offers regenerative braking and the motor is activated via torque sensor vs. the simpler pedalec system. It truly feels like you’re flying when you ride this bike but the price tag is pretty steep.

Driving this bike is a gearless 500 watt motor rated at 600 watts which basically means you get extra power. Gearless motors coast silently and in this case, offer regenerative braking which extends range and reduces wear on the brakes. The brakes themselves are oversized hydraulic discs that work exceedingly well. The system is clean with minimal wires and cables that are integrated seamlessly below the downtube. It’s easy to fall for the aesthetic of this bike and forget it’s electric at all.

The battery pack driving the motor offers 36 volts of power and 10 amp hours of range in the form of Lithium Nickel Metal Hydride. Stromer offers an amazing three year warranty on this battery and you can also buy a second one to extend range for $700. All in all, this battery pack is average in terms of size and power but that keeps it light and dare I say, more affordable? The LCD computer system that connects the battery with the motor is intuitive, sleek and well protected offering the standard speed, capacity and power settings you’d expect.

The truth about this bike is that it works much better than some of Stromer’s older designs like the Sport but it’s not perfect. For one thing, it’s heavy! weighing in at 62 pounds. That’s due in part to the gearless hub motor which enables the regenerative braking. If you compare this bike with the Easy Motion Neo Race, you spend $400 less and have a 42 pound bike! Now you won’t get regenerative braking and large cushy tires… but the ride will be comparable and you’ll get twist throttle support.

Overall I’m very impressed with the ST1 Elite. It’s fun to ride, looks great, comes in multiple sizes for a good fit and the battery warranty is amazing. Stromer has been around since 2010 and continues to refine their bikes. They now offer a City Kit with integrated lights, fenders and a rear rack + basket system. You can even have your company logo painted onto the frame. If you’re looking for a solid performer and can spare the extra cash this is a great choice.

Pros:

  • Clean, focused design with limited clutter and complexity
  • Awesome regenerative braking system, extends range and reduces wear on brakes
  • Strong 500 watt motor 36 volt battery combination, battery is removable
  • Sturdy, oversized tires are puncture resistant and provide shock absorption when riding
  • High quality “City Kit” upgrade includes lights, fenders and rack + basket
  • Multiple frame sizes, including step-through, and two colors to choose from (black and white)
  • Awesome three year warranty on the battery pack
  • Ability to customize graphics on the frame if you pay extra

Cons:

  • Only offers pedal assist whereas other ebikes also offer throttle mode
  • Bike is heavier than comparable ebikes, partially due to gearless hub motor vs. geared
  • Expensive as compared with similarly specced electric bikes
  • Only available with a carbon fork vs. shock absorber (have to upgrade to the Platinum to get the shock)

Resources:

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Jason in Modesto
1 year ago

Stromers, including the ST1 Elite, have a Boost mode which requires no peddling. By default it will only go to 12.5mph, but can be configured with the controller code 3775 setting to go to 20mph.

https://electricbikereview.com/community/threads/stromer-st1-codes.1521/

Court Rye
1 year ago

Wow! This is really cool Jason, thanks for sharing and providing a link to the different codes. How does the boost work exactly? Do you hold down on the up arrow or something?

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Matt A
1 week ago

Yeah Matt, I certainly would have preferred the belt. The only experience I've had with a Gates belt drive was on a Harley I once owned. Apples and oranges, I know (motorcycle vs. bicycle), but it was a great improvement over chain lines. That said, I don't have an issue with a chain with the Rohloff. I've been using White Lightning chain lube for 20 + yrs on all my bikes. It is a wax based lube. It will still tattoo you if you haven't cleaned the chain in awhile, but generally it is still much cleaner than petroleum based lubes. Only problem is that it does tend to cake up on components such as derailleurs and tensioners, so you occasionally need to take care of that + I tend to use a lot of it since it is designed to flake off with the contaminants as you ride. The thing with the Rohloff is that you are not continually bashing the chain against the cogs every time you shift. It simply runs from front to rear sprocket, no side to side movement jumping up and down on a rear cassette + front chainrings. Chain life, with a little attention, is probably triple that of a derailleur. The sprockets will eventually need replacement, but not for a long time. Also, the Roloff has a reversible sprocket. You simply spin it off and turn it around, so you get twice the life. Just did that on my trike Rohloff after getting maybe 10K miles on the one side. Only the second sprocket I've had on the trike in over 20K miles.

Oh man, that's an age-old problem with no good answer. My thoughts on that: the bicycle, by design, is a bit of a torture device. You are forced to bend over like a pretzel while getting a seemingly postage stamp size saddle ("so called support") up your butt. I don't know if anyone totally beats that issue. I think we just minimize the problem. When purchasing a new bike, my LBS has allowed me to take a saddle and try it out for a few rides, then return it an try another if that isn't working out. I've heard of shops that will accept a deposit, then do the same thing. The thing is, everyone is built differently and each bike has different geometry. Getting the right saddle for yourself is a black art - and certainly there are no pat answers. You will find that very slight tweaks in handlebar and seat height, or the forward/backward pitch of the saddle, can make a huge difference. Everyone is different. I find the Terry Men's Liberator:

http://www.terrybicycles.com/Saddles/Mens-Saddles/Liberator-Y-Elite

works great for me - all day riding with no pain - but I have friend who thinks it sucks. He is a Brooks guy. Retro-grouch. I did buy a Brooks about 15 years ago and lived with if for maybe 2000 miles. Beautiful workmanship, but it never broke in to my satisfaction. To each their own. I have never tried the Ergon saddle (same as yours) that comes with the GX, but I'll certainly give it a shot before switching it out. The Bisaddle looks very interesting. I'm guessing that you'll end up with one, so please let us know your impressions. The immediate - though not elegant - solution for you may be to get a gel cover for the Ergon, at least until you figure out the best solution. My wife has a saddle that the guys at my LBS call "the sofa". Super wide, looks like it is made for a stationary trainer (probably is). She has a gel cover on it and it got her through thousands of touring miles. Like I said, all of us are different and the combinations/solutions are endless . . . One reason I bought a trike was that those issues totally go away: you are pedaling in a relaxed, laid back recumbent position while sitting on what almost amounts to a lawn chair.

Matt: it is great to hear that you are so enjoying your bike. Makes me super eager to get a hold of my Delite and start riding. Kind of glad I have been forced to wait a few weeks for delivery though - at the moment in NY it is windy and cold for the foreseeable future. Snow today, super cold over the weekend, and more snow predicted for next week. If I had the bike now, like you, I'd be out there courting frostbite, for sure.
I braved the storm today and rode about 20 miles throughout the afternoon/evening in Philadelphia today. I put up a picture of the bike tonight while waiting for the subway home.

The GT tires did alright. I was riding on a bunch of different snow situations; soft thick snow, slushy roads, hard packed snow, ice. The bike just goes right through the majority of it. You cant really go through 6 inches of soft snow without slipping unless its only a few feet. When I had to go through that I would ride until the bike would slip to one side and just catch it and walk the rest. After a while I started getting some courage and riding right through it, usually had to put my foot down to stop from falling over every few feet though.

Over hard packed snow and really thick slush, you can move quickly but you have to keep perfect balance and go straight, if you turn the handlebars at all you start to slide and have to hope you catch yourself. When I was riding on a thin layer of slush up to an inch or so it was fine, you will only slip if you turn try to turn fast. When it was later in the evening and all that soft snow turned to that crunchy ice snow, the bike went over and through that perfectly fine almost as if it was asphalt, you could turn and go fast. Most of the main roads were just wet with patches of snow/slush so it wasn't too bad. The back roads were tough though, sometimes I would use the sidewalk since that was the only thing plowed. I enjoyed riding the bike in the snow even tough I had to put my foot down to stop from sliding at least a hundred times lol. Just thought I would share that experience!

P.S. When I am not logged into the site and try to read the forums, it tells me my IP address is banned. It allows me on the site but if I click forum it would say I am banned unless I login. Weird....

1/1
Matt A
2 weeks ago

Yeah Matt, I certainly would have preferred the belt. The only experience I've had with a Gates belt drive was on a Harley I once owned. Apples and oranges, I know (motorcycle vs. bicycle), but it was a great improvement over chain lines. That said, I don't have an issue with a chain with the Rohloff. I've been using White Lightning chain lube for 20 + yrs on all my bikes. It is a wax based lube. It will still tattoo you if you haven't cleaned the chain in awhile, but generally it is still much cleaner than petroleum based lubes. Only problem is that it does tend to cake up on components such as derailleurs and tensioners, so you occasionally need to take care of that + I tend to use a lot of it since it is designed to flake off with the contaminants as you ride. The thing with the Rohloff is that you are not continually bashing the chain against the cogs every time you shift. It simply runs from front to rear sprocket, no side to side movement jumping up and down on a rear cassette + front chainrings. Chain life, with a little attention, is probably triple that of a derailleur. The sprockets will eventually need replacement, but not for a long time. Also, the Roloff has a reversible sprocket. You simply spin it off and turn it around, so you get twice the life. Just did that on my trike Rohloff after getting maybe 10K miles on the one side. Only the second sprocket I've had on the trike in over 20K miles.

Oh man, that's an age-old problem with no good answer. My thoughts on that: the bicycle, by design, is a bit of a torture device. You are forced to bend over like a pretzel while getting a seemingly postage stamp size saddle ("so called support") up your butt. I don't know if anyone totally beats that issue. I think we just minimize the problem. When purchasing a new bike, my LBS has allowed me to take a saddle and try it out for a few rides, then return it an try another if that isn't working out. I've heard of shops that will accept a deposit, then do the same thing. The thing is, everyone is built differently and each bike has different geometry. Getting the right saddle for yourself is a black art - and certainly there are no pat answers. You will find that very slight tweaks in handlebar and seat height, or the forward/backward pitch of the saddle, can make a huge difference. Everyone is different. I find the Terry Men's Liberator:

http://www.terrybicycles.com/Saddles/Mens-Saddles/Liberator-Y-Elite

works great for me - all day riding with no pain - but I have friend who thinks it sucks. He is a Brooks guy. Retro-grouch. I did buy a Brooks about 15 years ago and lived with if for maybe 2000 miles. Beautiful workmanship, but it never broke in to my satisfaction. To each their own. I have never tried the Ergon saddle (same as yours) that comes with the GX, but I'll certainly give it a shot before switching it out. The Bisaddle looks very interesting. I'm guessing that you'll end up with one, so please let us know your impressions. The immediate - though not elegant - solution for you may be to get a gel cover for the Ergon, at least until you figure out the best solution. My wife has a saddle that the guys at my LBS call "the sofa". Super wide, looks like it is made for a stationary trainer (probably is). She has a gel cover on it and it got her through thousands of touring miles. Like I said, all of us are different and the combinations/solutions are endless . . . One reason I bought a trike was that those issues totally go away: you are pedaling in a relaxed, laid back recumbent position while sitting on what almost amounts to a lawn chair.

Matt: it is great to hear that you are so enjoying your bike. Makes me super eager to get a hold of my Delite and start riding. Kind of glad I have been forced to wait a few weeks for delivery though - at the moment in NY it is windy and cold for the foreseeable future. Snow today, super cold over the weekend, and more snow predicted for next week. If I had the bike now, like you, I'd be out there courting frostbite, for sure.
It sounds like you've got a great setup for yourself there with the Rohloff and chain, it would be nice to ride the Rohloff again and compare it since now I know how the NuVinci feels. The Rohloff sounds really cool now that you are explaining it to me. I am not really sure how the internals work so I am having a hard time picturing your explanation of it, so I will take the time to research it a bit. I researched the NuVinci a lot before getting it so I fully understand the planetary gear system now. That's great that you've gotten so many miles out of your Rohloff, thats really a lot. I have had my bike 2 weeks now and have about 300 miles on it. It has been cold though so that will likely increase. I will probably put 7500-10,000 miles on the bike per year, so I really want durable materials that last a long time. It's nice to have more commercial quality components than consumer quality when they are really going to see some use.

Thank you for your insight into the saddle issue. Your experience with it has helped me understand more about the products I have looked at. I like how you refer to the bicycle as a torture device haha. Bisaddle is apparently about to come out with a new version, which is really the same thing, they are just making it so that they have even more interchangeability between parts so that you can replace every piece as they wear, instead of getting an entire new saddle. I have actually grown to like the Ergon saddle now, it is only slightly uncomfortable at times, but we are talking about a bike saddle here so you will always feel it. I will eventually end up with a Bisaddle I am sure, it seems like the least risky purchase since it can be so customized to you, even if it is $300.........

You will not be disappointed when you get your bike, and I was very eager about getting mine as well. When I first test rode the bike I was a little nervous about it and only went a couple blocks, but later on I regretted it because I almost forgot what it all felt like since it was such a short ride. I really only paid attention to the amount of power the bike had to offer. Not being knowledgeable in bicycle components at all at that point, I just figured with that brand and the advice at Propel that I could trust the components.

We got some crazy snow to endure tomorrow! You definitely won't be missing your bike this week. I may go out on it tomorrow a little bit, we'll see how it looks in Philadelphia haha. Stay safe during the storm!

Shoestring
2 weeks ago

Welcome to the elite Haibike club, JayVee. Your "HOG" , Haibike Owners Group package will be arriving shortly. (hope the real HOG group doesn't see this, at least they can't ride down the bike trail and beat us up!) There are many benefits to be enjoyed, one being our wallets are much thinner and don't protrude from our pockets making riding much more comfortable. All your ebike friends will wish they were "just like you" riding tall and proud on that new Haibike. So be sure to enjoy your new found popularity and ride with pride!

Drumulac
2 weeks ago

I just have remember as a kid I had chain grease permanently tattooed in black on my legs, and in general wanted something that lasts the longest between replacements. I am not well informed about bicycle chains, but I think a belt stands up better to the use of a motor. From videos I have seen from Court, the shift sensing with Bosch works, but you still can mash the chain and wear that and your cassette down. This really is negligible to someone that is an experienced cyclist and used to maintaining a chain.

Yeah Matt, I certainly would have preferred the belt. The only experience I've had with a Gates belt drive was on a Harley I once owned. Apples and oranges, I know (motorcycle vs. bicycle), but it was a great improvement over chain lines. That said, I don't have an issue with a chain with the Rohloff. I've been using White Lightning chain lube for 20 + yrs on all my bikes. It is a wax based lube. It will still tattoo you if you haven't cleaned the chain in awhile, but generally it is still much cleaner than petroleum based lubes. Only problem is that it does tend to cake up on components such as derailleurs and tensioners, so you occasionally need to take care of that + I tend to use a lot of it since it is designed to flake off with the contaminants as you ride. The thing with the Rohloff is that you are not continually bashing the chain against the cogs every time you shift. It simply runs from front to rear sprocket, no side to side movement jumping up and down on a rear cassette + front chainrings. Chain life, with a little attention, is probably triple that of a derailleur. The sprockets will eventually need replacement, but not for a long time. Also, the Roloff has a reversible sprocket. You simply spin it off and turn it around, so you get twice the life. Just did that on my trike Rohloff after getting maybe 10K miles on the one side. Only the second sprocket I've had on the trike in over 20K miles.

I wanted to ask you something as an experienced cyclist. This is diverging from this thread's purpose, but I need some advice. I want a saddle that is comfortable, and that can be ridden on for a very long time. The one the Delite came with was killing me at first, but I got used to it I guess because it is not so bad now, however there is still some soreness.

Oh man, that's an age-old problem with no good answer. My thoughts on that: the bicycle, by design, is a bit of a torture device. You are forced to bend over like a pretzel while getting a seemingly postage stamp size saddle ("so called support") up your butt. I don't know if anyone totally beats that issue. I think we just minimize the problem. When purchasing a new bike, my LBS has allowed me to take a saddle and try it out for a few rides, then return it an try another if that isn't working out. I've heard of shops that will accept a deposit, then do the same thing. The thing is, everyone is built differently and each bike has different geometry. Getting the right saddle for yourself is a black art - and certainly there are no pat answers. You will find that very slight tweaks in handlebar and seat height, or the forward/backward pitch of the saddle, can make a huge difference. Everyone is different. I find the Terry Men's Liberator:

http://www.terrybicycles.com/Saddles/Mens-Saddles/Liberator-Y-Elite

works great for me - all day riding with no pain - but I have friend who thinks it sucks. He is a Brooks guy. Retro-grouch. I did buy a Brooks about 15 years ago and lived with if for maybe 2000 miles. Beautiful workmanship, but it never broke in to my satisfaction. To each their own. I have never tried the Ergon saddle (same as yours) that comes with the GX, but I'll certainly give it a shot before switching it out. The Bisaddle looks very interesting. I'm guessing that you'll end up with one, so please let us know your impressions. The immediate - though not elegant - solution for you may be to get a gel cover for the Ergon, at least until you figure out the best solution. My wife has a saddle that the guys at my LBS call "the sofa". Super wide, looks like it is made for a stationary trainer (probably is). She has a gel cover on it and it got her through thousands of touring miles. Like I said, all of us are different and the combinations/solutions are endless . . . One reason I bought a trike was that those issues totally go away: you are pedaling in a relaxed, laid back recumbent position while sitting on what almost amounts to a lawn chair.

Matt: it is great to hear that you are so enjoying your bike. Makes me super eager to get a hold of my Delite and start riding. Kind of glad I have been forced to wait a few weeks for delivery though - at the moment in NY it is windy and cold for the foreseeable future. Snow today, super cold over the weekend, and more snow predicted for next week. If I had the bike now, like you, I'd be out there courting frostbite, for sure.

InversionEnabled
3 years ago

It seems relatively quiet

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Yeah, the direct drive (gearless) hub motor is pretty quiet indeed :)

Aubrizzle
3 years ago

Any news about the st2?

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

I've heard a couple people talk about it but haven't seen or heard much myself. You could create a thread in the Community and maybe get some input from other Stromer fans http://electricbikereview.com/community/forums/stromer/ If I see you there I'll dig in a bit and post what I've heard :)

mo jooly
3 years ago

Laws R made 2 B steped on

Joe Pah
3 years ago

You're making me nervous riding like that on a city street!  Get a cheap mounter camera.. Please..

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Thanks for the concern Joe, this was one of the busier test locations I've been at. I try to keep my helmet handy and use common sense but a different camera setup might also help :)

mike willis
3 years ago

great review i think u really need to invest in a go pro cam so u can do a longer better safer drive test and it would mos def help your channel grow!!

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Thanks for the suggestion, I've been considering it and have actually updated my filming technique a bit recently. Still trying to get it right ;)

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

Cool, thanks again for calling this out and the tip :)

tobbe lerone
4 years ago

seems to be a throttle, this guy got it reviewed: NYCeWheels, search for his video over here

MRTHAKKAR123
4 years ago

How much does this cost?

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

Thanks for calling this out and providing the solution here! When it's in boost mode, how do you actually "throttle" the bike? Is there another button or a lever or twister?

tobbe lerone
4 years ago

also, it would be great to see some maybe daily vlogs on the interbike ;) cheers

tobbe lerone
4 years ago

i already figured it out, in the manual it says you have to long press the selection button to get in the boost mode. it will support riding without pedaling between 3 and 20 km/h. i think most people get this wrong, also in the shops because you have to read as it isnt obvious.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

Great catch, to be honest I'm not really sure? I didn't see a throttle or setting for that on the bike but maybe it's buried in the computer system? I tried these bikes at a shop and the manager had said the were only pedal assist... Maybe a newer model has come out? I'll ask the reps at Interbike this next week and try to get back to you with the info here :)

tobbe lerone
4 years ago

are you sure you got your facts right?? because on the stromer site it says the following:

The support mode can be selected from four different output modes. In addition, the Stromer has a boost mode (riding mode without pedaling support) and push assistance.

So, to my understanding the boost mode is a mode where u can use a twist throttle? right or wrong, did you test these modes?

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

Good call, everyone keeps asking me about Prodeco bikes but I just haven't had the chance to review them yet. I rode one at Interbike last year and was unimpressed due to the geometry. It rode like a downhill bomber and I didn't like the rear rack.

I really like what Easy Motion is doing, they have bikes that offer everything this Stromer does at a fraction of the price and they can go above 20mph too! I mention this in the full review of the Stromer Platinum on the site.

george04b
4 years ago

if this bike had a throttle it would be in my house now, even with the almost 4000 price tag. i love the 28mph but there is also the prodeco ss wish is almost half the price and has a throttle but im saving and will wait for interbike :) tho i saw your pics on fb and i saw that they are rasing the prices....