VoltBike Urban Review

Voltbike Urban Electric Bike Review
Voltbike Urban
Voltbike Urban 350 Watt 8fun Motor
Voltbike Urban Removable Battery Pack 36v 10ah
Voltbike Urban Lcd Computer Console
Voltbike Urban Ergonomic Grips Bell Display Panel
Voltbike Urban Six Speed Shimano Tourney Derailleur
Voltbike Urban Ebike Kickstand Folding Pedals
Voltbike Urban Twelve Magnet Cadence Sensor
Voltbike Urban Folding Electric Bike Side
Voltbike Urban Folding Ebike Above
Voltbike Urban Folded Top Tube Inside View
Voltbike Urban Quick Release Front Wheel Basic Suspension
Voltbike Urban Front Headlight
Voltbike Urban Rear Rack Spring Latch Manual Light
Voltbike Urban Portable Battery Charger
Voltbike Urban Electric Bike Review
Voltbike Urban
Voltbike Urban 350 Watt 8fun Motor
Voltbike Urban Removable Battery Pack 36v 10ah
Voltbike Urban Lcd Computer Console
Voltbike Urban Ergonomic Grips Bell Display Panel
Voltbike Urban Six Speed Shimano Tourney Derailleur
Voltbike Urban Ebike Kickstand Folding Pedals
Voltbike Urban Twelve Magnet Cadence Sensor
Voltbike Urban Folding Electric Bike Side
Voltbike Urban Folding Ebike Above
Voltbike Urban Folded Top Tube Inside View
Voltbike Urban Quick Release Front Wheel Basic Suspension
Voltbike Urban Front Headlight
Voltbike Urban Rear Rack Spring Latch Manual Light
Voltbike Urban Portable Battery Charger

Summary

  • An ultra-affordable folding electric bike sold online from Canada, offers a full range of accessories including lights, fenders and a rear carry rack
  • Available in black or white but only one size, you get six gears with a basic Shimano Tourney TX derailleur and over sized thumb shifter
  • Larger 1.95" tires and a very basic suspension fork soften the ride, standard saddle and cheap ergonomic grips further improve comfort
  • The rear light is not wired in like the headlight which makes it easier to forget and run out, the stem lock felt cheap and came loose easier than other products I've tested, no built in clasp to keep the bike folded

Search EBR

Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

VoltBike

Model:

Urban

Price:

$1,049

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Commuting, Travel

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States, Canada

Model Year:

2016

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

47.5 lbs (21.54 kg)

Battery Weight:

5 lbs (2.26 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Geometry Measurements:

12" Seat Tube, 22" Stand Over Height, 22.5" Reach

Frame Types:

Folding

Frame Colors:

Black, White

Frame Fork Details:

Basic Suspension with 25 mm Travel, 10 mm Skewer with Quick Release

Frame Rear Details:

10 mm Skewer

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

6 Speed 1x6 Shimano Tourney TX MF-TZ20, 11-28T

Shifter Details:

SIS Index on Right

Cranks:

45 Tooth Chainring

Pedals:

Folding Alloy and Plastic Platform

Stem:

Folding, Integrated with Handle Bar, Telescoping Height

Handlebar:

Flat, Aluminum Alloy, 24" Length

Brake Details:

Tektro Novela MD-M311 Mechanical Disc with 160 mm Rotors, Generic Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Grips:

Rubber, Ergonomic

Saddle:

Velo Standard

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

533 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

33.9 mm

Rims:

Power Circle

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 13G

Tire Brand:

Kenda 20" x 1.95"

Wheel Sizes:

20 in (50.8cm)

Tire Details:

Reflective Sidewall Stripes, 40-65 PSI

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Plastic Fenders, Rear Carry Rack with Spring Latch (25 kg Max Weight), Plastic Chain Guard, Integrated LED Headlight, Independent LED Back Light (Uses Two AA Batteries), Flick Bell on Left, Single-Side Kickstand on Left, Free DOT Approved Helmet

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, Shipping to US ~$70, 2 Amp Modiary Charger 1.4 lbs

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

8Fun

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

350 watts

Motor Peak Output:

500 watts

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

10 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

360 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4 hours

Estimated Min Range:

15 miles (24 km)

Estimated Max Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Display Type:

Fixed, Monochrome Backlit LCD Console on Left

Readouts:

Speed, Battery Level (6 Bars), Battery Voltage, Assist Level (0-5), Walk Assist (On/Off), Odometer, Trip Distance, Current, Timer, Headlight (On/Off)

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle (12 Magnet Sensor Disc)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

The VoltBike Urban is one of the most affordable folding electric bikes I’ve tested, even with the ~$70 shipping fee from Canada to the US it’s priced well below some of the similar models I’ve covered including the e-Joe Epik, Enzo Ebike and EZ Pedaler X350 which all rely on a very similar frame. You don’t get fancy Magnesium wheels or rust proof hardware here, the folding stem felt a bit less robust and the suspension fork is extremely basic but again… the price!

The electric systems on this bike are very standard with a 350 watt 8Fun planetary geared hub motor in the back wheel powered by a 36 volt 10 amp hour battery. It felt zippy to me during the ride tests, almost more zippy than I wanted at the lowest level, but it did regulate the top speed going from 10 mph at level 1 up to ~20 mph at level 5. This is one area that confused me a bit because the feedback I received from VoltBike was that the top speed is closer to 15 mph but I was able to hit 20 mph (32 km/h) in both pedal assist level 5 and with the trigger throttle. The throttle is one of my favorite features here because it lets you override assist with full power at any level including level zero. As a trigger throttle it stays out of the way, not compromising the right grip like a twist throttle but it’s still being easy to reach and intuitive for me (mounted near the right grip, push down to go). I also like the display panel which has all of the general readouts (speed, odometer, battery level) and a few extras like walk mode and headlight operation. The rear LED light is more basic, relying on two AA batteries and having to be turned on physically with a slider switch on the right side as demonstrated in the video review.

I don’t have many complaints with this folding model and Volt Bike has been around for several years now which instills confidence. You’ll have to receive and setup the bike yourself because it’s not available in shops but it’s mostly assembled and mine came tuned pretty well. I wish there was some kind of clasp to keep the bike folded (some higher end folders have magnetic discs or rubber bands). Given the cheap price point this is offered at I love that it has lights at all and that the tires feature reflective tape to boost the visual footprint of the frame… the white color would be the safest and most visibile. Many times a product like this will be stored on a boat, transported in a private plane or left in an RV and I like that the battery pack is removable to reduce weight for lifting on those occasions. You can charge the pack on or off the bike and it locks securely inside the downtube. Overall the bike is stealth with the small motor blending right in with the cassette on one side and the 160 mm disc brake rotor on the other. The brakes stop well and despite using generic levers, offer motor inhibitor feedback so you can cut power almost instantly. Despite using a 12 magnet cadence sensor (the highest number I’ve seen) there’s a bit of delay starting and stopping with the Urban but it’s not too bad.

Twenty inch wheels are sturdy and provide a mechanical advantage to hub motors compared to larger wheelsets and it looked like the spokes on the VoltBike Urban were 13 gauge (one step stronger than standard 14G). The kickstand worked well and the rear rack uses standard gauge tubing so it will be compatible with the widest range of panniers and trunk bags including this one with an integrated bottle holster. One thing the VoltBike Urban does not have is bottle cage bosses on the frame… like most ultra-portable electric bikes. Given the one year comprehensive warranty and mostly great setup here I was impressed with the Urban but might bring a flat head screwdriver to keep the stem tight, it just felt weaker and looser than some of the other models I’ve tested but I did like how it telescoped up to match the extra long seat post for a “full sized” ride experience. I also liked the half-aluminum folding pedals which felt stiffer when I stood up and really put some power into the bike pedaling. The front wheel can be quickly and easily removed for further weight reduction using the quick release skewer and the chain guard looked nice and would protect pants but did make it more difficult getting the chain back on when it dropped during my ride test. I think a chain guide would limit drops and I’ve seen it used on other similar folders including the e-Joe but then your pant leg gets exposed to more grease when pedaling. It’s a trade off :)

Quick tips: You can activate the headlight by pressing the Cur button and hold Cur to enter walk mode where the bike will push itself forward at a lower speed. Pressing power will cycle through some of the other menus and holding it down will power the bike off. I like that everything is controlled by the display and you don’t need to power the battery pack on/off before and after riding as with many other affordable electric bikes.

Pros:

  • Given the smaller 20″ wheels, the bike feels pretty comfortable thanks to its basic suspension fork, wider diameter 1.95″ tires and ergonomic grips
  • All of the bases are covered for commuting with basic fenders, a carry rack with spring latch and LED Lights (I love that the headlight runs off the main battery and the display is backlit)
  • Name brand 8Fun geared hub motor was zippy and performed as expected, the Tektro disc brakes offered great stopping power for a smaller bike and the six speed drivetrain worked well at a range of speeds
  • I love that the stem is telescoping to raise the handlebars for larger riders, the seat post is also extremely long at over 530 mm which enables leg extension
  • You get trigger throttle on demand which overrides pedal assist at any time (or operates in level zero for throttle-only operation) as well as five levels of assist with decent responsiveness thanks to a 12 magnet cadence sensor
  • The smaller wheels make the bike compact when folded, lower the center of gravity when the rack is loaded up with supplies and make it easier for the motor when climbing
  • I like how well concealed and protected the battery pack is, it’s completely hidden in the downtube and locks there for security (with a keyhole at the bottom), you can charge the pack on or off the bike for convenience when commuting
  • The price is very reasonable at just over $1k USD, it’s available in two colors (black or white) and ships to Canada or US for reasonable rates, you also get a decent one year comprehensive warranty
  • I like that the front wheel has quick release along with the seat post and stem… I noticed that the electronic cables from the display, trigger throttle and brake levers (motor inhibitors) were all color coded and run through an organized hub piece for easier re-connecting and troubleshooting

Cons:

  • The rear light is not wired in to the main battery and has to be activated with a slider switch (on the right side) independently, be sure to turn it off after each ride as it will not auto-shutoff
  • The folding stem seemed a bit less solid than some of the other models I’ve reviewed, you can ajust tightness but the set screw comes loose naturally over time and may require re-adjustment (thankfully there is an extra plastic lock to keep it in place while riding
  • Lower-end Shimano Tourney TX drivetrain, lots of generic parts including the grips, brake levers, suspension fork and kickstand… they get the job done and keep the bike affordable
  • There’s no magnetic clasp or rubber band to keep the bike folded, the display panel is not removable (for protection when transporting or parking outside) and there’s no bottle cage mounting options on the bike… but the rear rack kind of makes up for it
  • The seat tube collar wasn’t tight enough on the demo model I got and I had trouble twisting the bolt by hand on the opposite side (you might need pliers to tighten it down but this could scratch the paint)
  • The chain dropped during my ride test, perhaps the bike needed a tuneup? When you buy online and set things up yourself there’s a greater tendency for things to be slightly out of alignment and that’s exacerbated by the folding nature of this bike, perhaps a chain guide would be more useful than the chain cover

Resources:

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Eric
2 years ago

On the gearing, (typo: TZ20 is not 11-28.) it looks like this is 45 x 14-28 6 speed vs e-joe’s epik SE 52 x 14-28 7 speed. A megarange 14-34 (available in 6 or 7 speeds) should fit under a TX55 — seems a shame they didn’t.

I have a hard time finding 5lb difference if the frame is the same (actually, matches epik lite except dropouts and disk brake mount — is the frame heavier with or without chainstays?) Spread across tires+fork+battery, maybe.

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Thanks for the feedback Eric, I sent the bike back to VoltBike and cannot confirm but I trust you’ve dug into this a bit and appreciate that it might help another interested party. I do weigh the frames by hand using the same scale each time and just weighed one of the latest 2016 e-Joe EPIK SE models which was 48.1 lbs.

Reply
Robert Arthur
2 years ago

Hi! I’m anxiously awaiting delivery of my Voltbike Urban thanks to your excellent review! It should arrive in the next few hours. Do you have any advice regarding adjusting the de-railer (can’t remember the French spelling:). I’m an older guy and would have difficulty dealing with a “chain drop”. The “Hebrew Hammer:)” mentioned the adjustment method, but is there a generic starting point? I checked Youtube, but all the clips were about more sophisticated gear. Thanks, AGAIN FOR THE GREAT REVIEW!!!

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Hi Robert, I usually take my bikes to shops for cleaning and tuneups… I have tried to do my own adjustments with screw drivers but there are also usually little finger twisters where the cable enters the back side of the derailleur (there’s the French spelling for you btw ;) sorry I can’t be more helpful and clear, if you shift easy and aren’t pedaling hard when you do it and if you take the bike in for tune ups a couple times per year you should be fine. Glad the review helped and I welcome your future feedback as you get to test the bike out and learn your way around the different systems and the gears to keep it running right ;)

Reply
Gene Keyes
2 years ago

I always carry 2 or 3 twist ties from cookie bags (affixed to the seat), to yank a dropped chain back into place. But I hate derailleurs and chains, and might well go for the shaft drive you cited on the Energie Excursion 2.0.

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Hi Gene! Yeah… getting fingers messy or pinched messing with chains is no fun. Belt drives are cleaner, quieter and usually more reliable and they seem to be more widely available on ebikes than the shaft drive system. The Energie Excursion 2.0 is a neat ebike and I’d love to see more built like it, especially folding ebikes because the chain is easier to get in the way or get bumped with folding and transport :)

Reply
Caryl Dineen
2 years ago

I ordered the Volt Urban bike a week before your EBR review! I’ve had the bike now for a month and am enjoying it so much! I did not have to do any tune up on the bike at all (just to let your reader Robert Arthur know). I am a 63 year old female and have ridden bikes all my life. The Urban has made it easier to get around and I have received so many positive comments about the bike and interested neigbours trying it out. I do enjoy reading your reviews! (PS. I chose the black Urban and it is sleek!)

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Hey! Great comment Caryl, thanks for sharing your enthusiasm and contributing to the conversation here. I’m sure Robert will appreciate your feedback. Ride safe out there and have fun :D

Reply
Caryl Dineen
1 year ago

Hi Court/Adam: I am still enjoying the Urban volt bike. I do not do much travelling on rough terrain – usually on quiet roads/field paths/sidewalk. The furthest round trip I have done is about 8 miles. Now that Fall is in the air, I am riding less. I probably charge it every 2 to 3 weeks. One thing I will mention is: I once let the battery run out while I was biking (not on purpose). I charged it up and still bike would not turn on – I did email George at Voltbike.ca and he got right back to me. He told me to fold the bike (disengage the battery) then unfold it again (to reset bike/battery). And that did the trick! It would have been nice to have a manual on the bike/instructions but George was very helpful. Also, like you experienced when test riding, the chain has come off twice but not when I was riding – only when I leaned the bike against my other bike and the pedal hit it. I found unscrewing the chain guars was the easiest way of putting the chain back on.

Adam
1 year ago

Now that you have had the Urban for a few months, how does it play out? How fast do you go, any rough road conditions, how often do you charge the battery?

Reply
boomy
2 years ago

My bike arrived recently and I’ve been recharging it inside my house because I can’t seem to take the battery out of the bike. I’ve watched your video many times over, and I know I have to unlock the battery and then remove the key to slide the battery out, but it’s not budging not 1 bit. It’s like it’s held in by clamps. Am I missing a step? Are there screws or something else holding the battery pack in?

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Hey boomy! So glad you asked… I struggled with the battery removal as well if you look at the video around 11:45 you can see there are two holes along the bottom of the main tube (one for charging and one for the key). Insert the key into the locking core and twist so you see the security rod retract and then TAKE THE KEY OUT so that you can slide the pack out. If the key is left in the battery won’t come out. There should be a little plastic handle on the battery that you can pull on to slide it in/out. I hope this helps, perhaps you’ve already tried these steps in which case I suggest reaching out to VoltBike for help. Please chime in with your solution so others can learn too :)

Reply
boomy
2 years ago

Actually I found out why today, apparently there are 2 fat/short screws next to the Key hole (not the recharging hole). Those were screwed so in, it was pressing the battery pack’s shell inside the bike, so it couldn’t be pulled out. I didn’t notice those screws there until I flipped the bike upside down to inspect the area. It’s easy to miss those 2 screws because the wires were covering them.

Corey
2 years ago

Tried buying this bike on Sunday and they said it would ship Monday. They never contacted me so I reached out Tuesday and they said it was out of stock and they are upgrading the battery and will ship in August.

Question is: worth the wait? Seems like this is the best bike under the $1,500 range, but I really wanted to use it during the summer… Any suggestions for an alternative?

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Hmm… that’s a long time to wait. There are lots of other very similar folding ebikes that cost maybe $200 more. I’m not sure where you live and what the weather is like but that $200 could get you dozens of rides in the mean time saving money and providing some fun before Fall/Winter. As someone who rides my bike all the time, I wouldn’t want to wait but I agree that the price and value of the VoltBike Urban are great. If you don’t mind waiting that’s cool but there’s definitely a trade-ff :/

Reply
Corey
2 years ago

Update – the customer service is great. Saw the mariner was a little more expensive and asked about it. They had one in stock. Looking forward to it! Thanks for the reply

boomy
2 years ago

Hi, today was a nice day, so I decided to take this bike for the 2nd time, this time around the neighborhood instead of the school playground. Keep in mind I live in a quiet residential area, I was going downhill in an area, and just as I was nearing the bottom, I slowly pull on the brake, and the next thing I knew, I was thrown off the bike, flipped, the bike flipped and skid too. My elbows both banged on the pavement, and then the left one took the most damage, it ripped 2 inches open, and my rear pelvis area took a hard bang from the seat of the bike when it landed behind me. My right palm was scraped. The bike was totaled, handle bar, seat ripped, bell, phone clamp, other stuff turned to roadkill when it smashed off the bike, and the gear shirt & speedometer was smashed, when the bike smashing on the ground.

I was lucky an old man saw the whole thing and rushed right over to drag me off the road and the bike too, those drivers didn’t give a shit and just kept driving, crushing the bike accessories like roadkill.

The guy called officers, 4 of them came, they had to do an inspection and asked what happened. The old guy told them everything he saw, and when they asked me what happened. I told them I tried to slow down, I pulled on my right hand brakes like every bike has in North America. When he checked the brakes, he told me it gripped the front wheels, so at the 15MPH on a slant, that would automatically throw a rider forward and flip the bike forward too.

WHAT COMPANY Switched the BRAKE HANDLES with each side, and NOT WARN THE RIDER?!! Isn’t the safety kind of the number one thing companies need to point out?!! IN BIG BOLD WORDS, “HEY, WE DECIDED TO USE A EUROPEAN METHOD IN BRAKING FOR YOUR NORTH AMERICAN BIKES, SO WHEN YOU TRY TO BRAKE WITH YOUR REAR WHEELS LIKE MOST CYCLISTS DO, YOU’LL INSTEAD BRAKE YOUR FRONT WHEEL AND FLIP DOWN HILL. SURPRISE!!!”

If anyone wants to see my wrecked bike and ripped up arms, let me know, I can upload it anytime. The officers there told me they ride all the time, and never have this problem when braking, because when they pull on their right hand-side trigger, it stops their rear wheel, NOT THE LEFT FRONT WHEEL!!

Buyers BEWARE, I’m not some ranting troll, I’m someone that was sitting with officers covered in my own blood waiting for my dad to come pick me and my messed up bike up. All of this, just because some idiot decided “Hey lets swap out the left brake handle with the right handle, just for fun!!”

[EDIT] The following images were provided by Boomy (image 1, image 2, image 3) along with this statement: The bike’s bell and my “phone clamp” attachment are all over the pavement, the seat was ripped, the LCD display was hit so hard the clamp cracked off, the speedometer casing was scratched and damaged. Besides for the helping old man, the rest of the drivers were asses, they actually saw us, and honked their horns and shouted “move”, just so they wont miss the previews from the movie theater… unbelievable…

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Gosh, that sounds terrible! I’m glad you’re able to type but I hope it hasn’t added pain to the already bad accident :( in my time reviewing bicycles I have come across a few models that have switched brakes as you describe and it can create unexpected results… especially when your instincts kick in. I believe you can re-configure some brakes to be the opposite if you want so it will feel more natural. I’ll email you for the pictures, thanks for offering to share and sorry again that this happened.

Reply
boomy
2 years ago

I was pretty pissed at the time of our communication but they were understanding and didn’t argue back, they gave me time to cool down, then resumed what to do to fix the problem.

After communicating and telling/showing them what happened, they did send me replacement parts for the destroyed and damaged parts, so they do honor their warranty statements. Just an advice, if you’re use to using your right hand for the rear wheel brakes, before riding it, bring it to a local repair bike shop and have their people switch the brake wires for you and then ask them to ride it around a few times to make sure everything is good, it’s just a few dollars for their service and can save you from accidents.

Again, their company does take responsibility for their products, and they try to make you have a good experience with them which is much more than what you get from some other large name companies. If you have questions for them or want a quick response, don’t just email them, use their website’s chat option, it’s much quicker from my experience. The local repair shop I went to had similar ebikes for a few hundreds cheaper, but they did tell me the parts from the Urban model are of the highest quality, the expert told me the motor is actually China’s best ebike motor. After they swapped the brake handle wires and replaced the damaged equipment, it looked the same but felt safer thx to a simple brake switch.

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

I’m so glad things are working out… I hope you continue getting better and it’s great that you took time to share about your brake experience so others can avoid accidents. Glad VoltBike was there for you :)

Reply
Shirley
2 years ago

Hi, just wondering if you will recommned a bike newbie to buy this electric bike? I just learned to ride a bike but have trouble going uphill because of not enough strength in my legs, will this help? Or will it easily get me out of control because it is too fast? Thanks!

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Hi Shirley! I think this ebike would help you climb but the smaller wheels might feel a little unstable compared with a 26″ wheel (or whatever standard size you’re likely using). I love that it folds and can be made lighter by removing the battery… It’s affordable but you might feel a little overwhelmed with the huge box it comes in and the bit of assembly required. If you can deal with this or even take it to a shop for help I think the bike could work very well. I’m assuming you’re petite and value the low-step design of this frame and how small it looks? Alternative affordable ebikes that I’ve reviewed are listed here and one that stands out (from a reputable manufacturer that is still approachable for shorter riders) is the IZIP E3 Vibe+. Hope this helps!

Reply
Ethan Requardt
2 years ago

Hello all! I am considering the E-JOE folding e-Bike vs Volt folding e-Bike and am looking for some help. The above video was great, but one question I have that was not answered is which Bike is more likely to last a longer time, require fewer tune-ups, and is all around more durable? If anyone has any answers or relevant experience on this topic, please let me know! Thanks :)

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Hi Ethan! I think the E-Joe will be slightly higher quality and probably hold up better if you purchase it from a shop. VoltBike predominantly sells online and most end users don’t have the experience or tools to really dial things in. If you know you’re buying a bike online regardless, it would probably be worth spending $80 to have a local shop help you put it together and fit it. There are even mobile bike repair services like VeloFix that I’ve used before :)

Reply
Richard Wilson
2 years ago

can these bikes be customized like bosch mid drive,better LCD display etc?

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

I don’t think so (though I might be misunderstanding your question?!) from what I could tell they sort of come “as is” with more value components and electronic systems. Changing stuff on ebikes is usually difficult unless it’s a DIY kit.

Reply
VoltBike
1 year ago

Hi Richard, changing motor, controller or LCD on any electric bike is different task and not worth it that much, because the time and money spend could be higher than buying different bike. Changing the LCD screen also requires changing the controller inside the bike. Controllers also comes in different sizes and you need to make sure it will fit in the compartment. Changing the motor to mid drive for example would require different frame. Of course you are welcome to replace parts as suspension, tires, handlebars etc. Hope this helps.

Brian Becker
1 year ago

I bought the Voltbike Urban for my wife as a 20th anniversary gift, and she is having a great time on it. I did want to point out several changes/improvements that Voltbike has done on the Urban since your very informative review. I probably spent 25+ hours reading reviews of various e-bikes before choosing a Voltbike urban.

Chain guides have been installed on either side of the crank, and even on very rough terrain the chain stays put so I was quite pleased with that improvement. The crank also appears to be a 54 tooth? crank–hard to count, but the gears seem well matched and must be an improvement over the 45 tooth crank. The fenders are now actually a matte black painted aluminum vs. plastic. The pedals are slightly changed to a more traditional folding plastic Well-go brand. The handlebar stem clamp seems very sturdy and tight and looks to be a different design than what is shown in your video on the Urban you tested.

That sums up the improvements/changes, and I must say I am very pleased with my purchase and looking forward to convincing friends and family to purchase their own voltbike. Thanks for the detailed reviews; I could not have bought a bike over the internet without them. Brian

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

Hey! Thanks for your very informative updates about the VoltBike Urban Brian, glad your wife is enjoying it! Yeah, those chainring teeth can be a pain to count. I usually put some blue tape on a tooth then turn it slowly and count that way… trying not to get too greasy ;)

I realize how unsettling it can be to spend hundreds or thousands of dollars online to buy something without even getting to test ride it. That’s a big part of why I do these reviews and it’s nice to hear they help. Ride safe and thanks again :)

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Adam
1 year ago

I’m quite interested in the Urban but am a bit worried about the company not being responsive. I’ve had a few email exchanges with them where they would answer a question or two and then not respond to more questions, also for their instant messenger part of their site. I’ve also tried to arrange a test ride (of any of their models) in the Twin Cities and they have not been helpful. If I am buying from an online store I want to be assured of communication!

2 more things: Do you think the Urban can be ridden through a puddle or mud without shorting out? And, does anyone know where to get the Voltbike Discount Codes?

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Court Rye
1 year ago

Hi Adam! I don’t know anything about coupon codes but maybe someone else will chime in. The default prices on their website are already a pretty good value since they sell direct… which brings us to your other question. By paying less you may forego some of the hands on support and responsiveness that shops provide. It’s a trade many people feel okay with but I think VoltBike is a smaller company which means there might not be a dedicated support team member, maybe they swap positions and sort of rotate as support is needed? Either way, have had a good time reviewing their stuff and wish you well!

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Adam
1 year ago

Thanks Court! For my other question about riding through a puddle or mud, do you think this can be done without shorting out? I am also not sure about a control panel in rain. What say you?

Brian B.
1 year ago

Just wondering what the rider size limit is for the Urban. I’m 6’1 190 lbs – because of neck issues I’m more comfortable riding somewhat upright (which seems doable with the Urban) and I like the idea of a folding bike that I can easily place in our vehicle or store inside. Thanks.

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Court Rye
1 year ago

Hi Brian! Voltbike tends to be responsive when I email them with questions like this but just going off of what I’ve seen and heard about similar folding electric bikes, I think you’d be alright weight wise. My friend Sam is ~250 lbs and he rides the folding Epik models from E-Joe regularly at his shop (they assemble and test them for customers) and that bike has a lot in common with this including the frame design. You’re also a tall individual so there might be a squished feeling until you adjust the seat high and possibly the handlebars. Ultimately, you’re on the bigger side for a bike like this but I do think it’s possible. I guess I’d recommend that you search for a local shop with any sort of folding bike first and see how it feels and then make a decision about this one based on that. You might feel very comfortable and happy with the size and body position or start having second thoughts. There are some larger folding models out there with 24″ wheels and cruisers that are much more comfortable and still upright but perhaps more expensive. There are many factors and I assume you’ve explored the site here and seen the different options?

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Adam
1 year ago

Hey Court! I see that Voltbike has new upgrades for 2017. It looks like the chainguard is off, and the frame and wheels look quite different. Thoughts?

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Court Rye
1 year ago

Hey Adam! Yeah, it looks like Goerge has continued refining the bikes… there has always been a great balance of utility, fun and affordability with the VoltBike line. I really enjoyed reviewing the Mariner and Yukon recently in Mexico, did you see those? He worked with me to get the bikes down there and they arrived in good shape :) I do like the new solid wheels on the updated VoltBike Urban.

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Yuri
4 months ago

Hi Court, I see that Voltbike Urban has new upgrades for October 2017 release, did you get a chance to see the bike? If yes, are you going to update the review?

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Court Rye
4 months ago

Hi Yuri! I am sure we will review the new model at some point but I believe VoltBike and some others do rolling releases throughout the year and I cannot cover them all. Also, I do not like to update reviews as much as just making comments or talking about the new ones in the forum. This way, the bike I reviewed remains accurate for people who might own the older one or find it used. Thanks for alerting me to the new model, I welcome your feedback about it!

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Susan
3 weeks ago

I just got this bike picked it up from George at his shop. Really nice guys there, very helpful, they stayed late for me to try the bikes out. I believe mine is the newer model as it’s different from your review and it looks like some of the problems you mentioned have been fixed. It looks to be more like the pink bike in your review now. For example, there’s no chain guard on my bike, instead there’s a chain guide just like that other pink bike. I also noticed other little differences such as:

  • support strut for the bike to sit on when it’s folded
  • fender has mud flaps
  • brake levers are black not silver, not sure if it’s better though
  • seat post might be a bit different as mine didn’t come all the way down to the bottom like in your video
  • rear rack is a different shape, probably only cosmetic difference
  • single headlight instead of double

I’ve only had this for 2 days, so far so good, I’m happy with my choice. However I do wish it didn’t limit my speed when I’m using throttle only. I use this to commute to work so I don’t really want to pedal much at all, as I don’t want to get sweaty and have to shower/change clothes at work. Also I dislike pedal assist, when I pedal I want to pedal I don’t like to be assisted, if I want power I will use the throttle.

Another thing I think I would change in the future, maybe after the battery dies, is to extend the wiring out to use other 36V batteries and keep on the rack. I looked at the connection it looks to be a very simple thing to do. I live in a condo I need to take the battery out to charge it’s a bit of a pain to have to unfold the bike each time to take the battery out. I was looking to get the Mariner for that reason but I’m a smaller person and that bike is a bit big for me.

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Court Rye
3 weeks ago

Great feedback Susan! Thanks for taking the time to record and post the updates to your model and provide some feedback about how you like to ride. Perhaps VoltBike will see your comment and consider updating how their assist and throttle work. I agree that throttle-only mode can be nice. Some ebikes allow you to turn the throttle on or off with a physical button, you can see this on the RadMini twist throttle.

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ZeroPointM
25 mins ago

@oltbike I would be intrested in knowing if any major changes or more of a refresh for the new year?

ZeroPointM
34 mins ago

@ce20ri Looking in to ordering a Yukon in the next few weeks are you part of the VoltBike Ambassador program? Reading some of your posts on it helped me decide one the Yukon, aside from its great price and being shipped from my backyard.

PCDoctorUSA
1 day ago

My big concern is the ascent back up. I've reached out to a lot of people here who have had offered some great feedback both in these forums and private conversations in hopes of coming up with a consensus of the best direction to go in regards to type of drive: geared rear hub or mid-drive. I don't know anyone locally who owns any type of electric bike, and I only spot an electric bike in my daily commute once in a blue moon so these forums are my only source for info. I have yet to find a LBS that is both knowledgeable and passionate about selling ebikes that could help me. The big brand dealers (Specialized and Trek) only have a few models to make the Brand happy while they concentrate on selling non-ebikes. The owner of one ebike-only shop couldn't even tell me the correct model names of the bikes he had to sell or even figure out their displays to show me the Assist levels. I actually knew more than he did thanks to EBR forum members and Cort's reviews.

For those that have looked at the https://www.dropbox.com/s/ym61mubq23mjhg5/Commute%20Elevation.jpg?dl=0, most have said the geared rear hub on the Yukon 750 will make the once daily climb without issue. I've had one reader in another EBR forum that says a geared rear hub won't make it, but a Bafang BBS02 mid-drive will. My goal this weekend is to visit a shop that rents ebikes to the tourists and see if they have a geared hub model so I can see how it does on my hill. I'm really hoping the geared rear hub will do the job because there are no mid-drive options in the Yukon's price range even with adding in the cost of changing out the tires to something more street commuter friendly once the Yukon arrives. Voltbike's shipping charge of $120 to Hawaii is also the cheapest of ANY online dealer I've found yet. If a dealer ships to Hawaii at all, the price is between $300 and $500.

Thanks in advance to anyone else that would like to chime in.

surfstar
2 days ago

Heck, if I thought I'd do any trail / offroad riding, I'd seriously consider the 2018 Voltbike Yukon!

Ann M.
6 days ago

Actually, lot's of them, @rich c ;). BionX, Ohm, Voltbike, Emmo, Daymak just to mention a few.

@JohnCO, from what I can find; Court hasn't done a review of the current Velec ebikes; however, there is some info at https://electricbikereport.com/tag/velec-electric-bikes/ from Sept. 2017 that includes the Velec products. It appears that Velec became a distributor for the Hero Eco ebikes, the A2B and intro level Fast4Ward bikes for Canada in 2012. Since A2B ceased business in the US a year or two ago, I don't know if Velec is still selling them in Canada.

surfstar
6 days ago

Juiced CrossCurrent S and Voltbike Yukon Limited are also contenders for my price range, but I think I was going with the RadCity for the lower price over those. Now the Haibike is throwing off my decision!

Ashley64
2 weeks ago

I've pumped mine to 20 psi but not had a chance to ride yet. Anything below this seems far too low for road use.

vincent
2 weeks ago

what about a radmini or voltbike mariner and just put smaller tires on it or that sondors fold bike and put smaller tires on it a lot of the rover guys put smaller thinner tires on their bikes for commuting, but maybe the 26 inch tire is easier to find in thinner tires, not sure

Ian in Alberta
3 weeks ago

Interesting that you should raise the issue of tire pressure, Ashley64. I was chatting with one of the lads in a local bikeshop (Lethbridge AB) about finding a longer seat post with a built in shock absorber, as I had to swap the one that came with the bike for a longer (but non-absorbing) one. He asked what pressure I was running in the tires. "24 psi", I replied, and he raised his eyebrows. Typically, fat tires run at 5-6 psi, he told me...better for both comfort and traction. I was a bit surprised, so I did a little research, and it seems that fat tire bikes ride and race at around 5 psi, but are most efficient on pavement at 23-25 psi. I suggest a little online research to determine what might be best for your conditions. I've dropped my tire pressure to about 12 psi to see what happens. Perhaps @oltbike will weigh in on this. I'll look forward to hearing of your experiences.

PCDoctorUSA
3 weeks ago

I've enjoyed reading this thread as I hope to make my first ebike purchase in the coming months. My opinion is that ebike manufacturers should require a LBS wanting to be a dealer of their bikes to perform warranty service on their bikes regardless of where it was purchased. Now, I'm assuming that the manufacturer has an agreed reimbursement schedule with their dealers. If there is no schedule or written reimbursement terms then as a LBS I wouldn't sell the bike. I think the manufacturer also has a responsibility to refrain from selling their bikes direct to the public at less than MSRP, or at all, to protect their dealers. A manufacturer should also not make their bikes available to online dealers or big box stores for less than the LBS can buy them for. If I'm a LBS dealer for your brand, and you make the same bikes I'm selling available to Here-Today-Gone-Tomorrow-Bikes.com for less than what you're selling them to me for, I can guarantee you I'm going to drop your brand. Now, if the online dealer or another LBS dealer wants to discount the retail price to their customers that's their business. For the record, I'm very pro-LBS but there's a limit to my loyalty. The ebike dealers here on O'ahu that sell known ebike brands have starting prices of $2500 for something comparable to a Juiced CrossCurrent. The local Trek and Specialized dealers have their budget ebike offerings starting at $3k. There's one shop that sells some unbranded stuff under $2k, but I wouldn't touch it. To some, those prices may seem fine, but when the budget for your first ebike is max'd out at $2k, those prices are prohibitive. When you question why their price is HUNDREDS more than a LBS on the Mainland, they'll all say, "Well, we have to ship it here." Something tells me there were a lot of other goods on the container ship from CA than the half-dozen ebikes on your showroom floor. Yes, I can order an ebike online for A LOT cheaper than something comparable from any of the O'ahu LBSs until I get to that "Calculate Shipping" portion of the web form. It's either, "Shipping is not available to your area" or I get slapped with an outrageous shipping charge like Rad Power Bikes who wants $450 to ship a Rad Rover. Fortunately, there are a few vendors who don't view Hawaii as Antarctica and their shipping charges are much more reasonable. E-Glide Electric Bikes charges $175 and Voltbikes charges an additional $70 on top of their normal flat shipping rate. I think Juiced was $190, but don't quote me on that. Now, I've found a few offerings that inclusive of shipping stay below my $2k budget, but what if need service whether under warranty or not. Both E-Glide and Voltbike state in their warranty if they can't fix it by sending you a replacement part or talking you through it over the phone then they'll work with a LBS in your area to get it resolved. From E-Glidebike, "It rarely happens, but sometimes issues can arise during shipping. If any parts happen to be damaged during shipping, E-Glide will send a replacement part at our expense and will work with you or the bike shop of your choice to fix the issue. If the issue cannot be fixed, E-Glide will exchange the bicycle. For warranty issues, E-Glide will cover the cost of labor involved handling the warranty service within a 30-day period after delivery. We will work with, and pay directly, your local bike shop of choice. After the 30-day free repair labor period, the owner will be responsible for labor costs associated with warranty replacements." The question then becomes, can I find a LBS willing to work with E-Glide in such warranty matters, and is there a LBS that will work on ebikes they didn't sell for non-warranty issues? That's what I'm working on finding out right now. Regardless of what I discover, I think for me the choice is to go with a company who has a track record of making a valid effort at satisfying their customers post-sale. I may not find a LBS willing to work on an ebike they don't sell, but if the company that sold me the bike will send me the part and a link to a YouTube video that will walk me through the process of replacing it than I should be good to go. Personally and professionally, I think any LBS that turns away a customer because of the "you didn't buy it from me" attitude loses a potential future customer. Just my 2-cents.

bob armani
3 weeks ago

Wow Joe EE-This looks awesome. Nice setup from top to bottom. Thanks for sharing. What kind of camera is that- kinda looks like a Logitech webcam?? That is a well equipped Voltbike! Looks like your customizing can give some ebike dealers some good tips on how to do customer setup at POS. Have fun with that new rig this summer!

Calldon
4 weeks ago

I started looking at EBikes a couple weeks ago when I was reading about the sondors car and then about the sondors electric bike. I've never had an e-bike or ridden one, but I thought about it quite a lot. I watch several videos and reviews of the various bikes. Then I saw this one video comparing the Sondors with the Radrover, I think it is.

I finally ended up buying a RadMini because it seemed to be a much better quality bike and for not much more money. And I can Fold It Up for traveling without needing a bike rack. I only ride in town on pavement and paved bike trails. No beaches, no forests, no mud, just regular streets. So I'm hoping this bike will work OK In town since everybody seems to push the fat tires for trail riding, except me. Have another regular bike, I bought four years ago and I've only ridden about 5 times. Just not motivated to ride it . I think the rad mini will be a lot more fun and I'll get out with it more often .

Watch this comparison video before you make a purchase. Then see what fits you better. I'll ride my rad Mini a while and post on it later.

Alaskan
2 days ago

I had read that the micro-usb port on the Bosch Intuvia display can be used to charge a phone. That does not appear to be the case. When I plug in my phone the Intuvia display indicates a USB connections and looses all functionality and my phone (Samsung Galaxy S7 egde) does not charge.

Is there a setting one can access on the Intuvia that will accommodate phone charging or are we dealing with an urban myth?

geddyleesnose
3 days ago

I test road the Urban Plus last summer. Was $3200 back then which was out of my price range, but I wanted to see what it road like and I just thought it looked really cool. For me, anyway, I found the ride too stiff. Roads are bumpy in West Los Angeles. I ended up getting a Juiced Crosscurrent S with 17.4 battery for 2K. Ok front suspension (also bought a Suntour suspension seatpost - absolute must!), but it's better than none and the motor is more powerful than the Trans X without question. Has torque sensing. throttle (great in the city) and nearly everything you'd want at an excellent price. Granted, the components aren't as nice as the Urban Plus, so that's the big tradeoff along with the mid-drive motor which has advantages. The biggest downside of the Crosscurrent was the wait. Took a month and a half to arrive, but I still love the bike, four months and around 500 or so miles later, with no issues so far. At that price I'd be tempted by the Haibike too. The thing that would concern me is the trans x motor if ever needed replacing and they weren't around, and the cobi system. Just seems wonky. Best of luck on your search!

hurricane56
3 days ago

I guess if it helps, here are some baseline figures from one year of commuting in 2017.

2016 Haibike Trekking S - Bosch Performance Line Speed
- approximately 4k miles, 1/3 urban stop and go, 2/3 rural
- new chain and cassette after 2500 miles
- One set of front brake pads at the end of the year, rear brake pads had about 3-4 months pad life remaining. Brakes are Magura Mt5.
- Rear tire is a Schwable Energizer Plus, it's about half of the tread life is worn, front tire is still almost new.

I agree with with @rich c , for such a heavy duty commute schedule, I'd be sticking to the big motor manufacturers. Also with the OP previous comment about dual suspension. It's certainly a nice to have but not vitally required feature for high mileage.

bob armani
3 days ago

Please keep us all posted with any updates of your new purchase. Good Luck!

Nber
3 days ago

Help , I'm looking at rad mini , we have many trails which assist and fat tires would come in handy , but my main concern is I travel by bike every day year round in at times harsh weather , I don't want to use the assist other than for hilly terrain , how does the bike handle without assist , any advice would help

Norbert72
4 days ago

I was afraid to buy it. My phone is turning off in the cold. I bought a Haibike Trekking S 5.0 2017. But I'll waiting for your update.

bob armani
4 days ago

Surfstar-I concur with your decision to go with the RAD. I myself would not like to get stuck in the middle of all the COBI issues associated with this particular Haibike. I agree with others that it has great components, and perhaps other bikes that use COBI system may work flawlessly.
ie: The IZIP E3 Protour looks like a nice system using COBI. Looks like it may need more debugging before it becomes a more popular interface IMHO. Not sure if Haibike was able to resolve the issue and report the root cause of the system failures to current owners.
Good luck with your new purchase.

Gdufour1
4 days ago

I'll be getting my Urban Plus next week, hopng they've sorted out most of the system bugs, will have to look for firmware updates.

surfstar
5 days ago

After another night of reading, I think I'm leaning towards the RadCity for its potential long term durability and the fact that the few reviews/info on the Urban Plus mention issues with the COBI system and [older] issues with the transX motor (2016s mainly?). Either way, not too confidence inspiring.
I do prefer the integrated battery look of the Haibike, and the upgraded components, but for a commuter the RadCity will likely suit me better. Just gearhead / vanity that says the $3600 MSRP bike must be twice as good ;) it does look quite sporty, that's for sure. Nicer, bigger tires too.

Now does anyone have a RAD referral? Might pull the trigger soon...

Jeff Williams
5 days ago

I just received my Ohm Urban Class 3 speed peddlec bike 8 days ago but have to gradually work my body up to that 28 mph level over a fair distance. We have lots of ups and downs in NWArkansas even on our beautiful regional trail system. As I ride longer and longer distances I will be able to give you more accurate answers, although Ken S has by far the most riding and distance experience on the Ohm bikes and the BionX system. I do find it easy to quickly get up to 23-25 mph on the long straight level sections of our trails with this bike, but our trail system speed limit is 15 so I won't be riding this fast on lengthy rides until I move to more street riding. The only times I have experienced quick battery drain and perhaps some battery heating was when I used the throttle alone going up hills on some more level sections - the BionxD motor really likes you to pedal at all times going uphill. I drained about 8 percent using the throttle plus peddling versus 3 percent peddling at level 4 of assist but no throttle going up the longest steepest hill to my house.

Jeff Williams
5 days ago

Took delivery via Velofix of my new (repaired) Ohm Urban on Monday, Feb 5, 2018. Actual bike delivered in mid-Jan but damaged by UPS in transit from Vancouver to Northwest Arkansas. Velofix delivery is the way to go - as they handle all assembly and setup (plus future tuneups) as well as warranty and repair issues, so damaged bike issues were worked by Adam, my local NWA Velofix bike mechanic. Rack was bent severely, and new rack quickly on the way from Ohm. However power failed repeatedly during my initial short rides in January and more deep problem diagnosis was necessary. Ohm then sent new battery and other parts, turned out battery contains lots of the control circuitry and this had been damaged by the UPS impact on box during shipping. I have had NO issues with my Ohm Urban since last Monday, and I have gone on two longer rides of 12 and 17 miles last Thursday and Friday. Weather very variable here this time of year - did not get above freezing over the weekend and we had ice. Today is better weather (40) and I am going on an even longer ride later today. Must build up gradually as I am 71 with both knees replaced and live on Mt Sequoyah here in Fayetteville about one mile from our trail system. The steep hills and my knees took me away from bike riding the past 6 years - now this is my way back! I really enjoyed my rides last week and will give everyone my complete impressions of the Ohm Urban as I get more time and distance on it.

Ken M
6 days ago

Here's my take. I have an Haibike XDuro Bosch urban model and a SDuro Yamaha full suspension model. The Bosch is certainly a better drive system for sustained speeds above 15mph (why I went with that motor on the urban commute bike) but I consider the Yamaha (even the earlier PX motor as I have) a better climbing drive system (it has 90nM peak torque and on the larger chain rings that is even amplified a bit to the rear wheel). If you spend most of trail time riding below 15mph I believe the Yamaha is the better mid drive system but it's not like they are not both nice drive systems (albeit I think everyone in the US wants more power but a mid drive like the Bafang ultra really isn't necessary for most trail riders but for high speeds it may make sense). Unless you are a very serious mountain biker the Haibike Sduro models are excellent values when you buy them at discounts when not the current year model.

While I like hard tails, I think the general comfort of a full suspension is now always worth the extra expense (they have become very reliable so no reason to not go full suspension unless you are looking for hard tail ride traits for some personal reason - I know some riders just love to slide the rear end of hardtails when they ride).

If you want a hidden battery you'll have to go with one of the newest mountain bike models.

Cristian Serrano
2 weeks ago

Solid video! Thanks!

The SynDRONE Effect
2 months ago

Too much talking. Just show us folding capabilities and electric speed

John Kang
3 months ago

Does it have regen braking?

Sungwook Kim
4 months ago

foldable electric bike of my concern as it seems having a good price tag on it!

Trey Drier
4 months ago

Another stellar review Court! The new 2017 eJoe now has an LCD display (which I know because I watched your latest review on it). I'm sold on the eJoe. For a few hundred more dollars it seems to be worth it. Also, in your detail review of the eJoe, the algorithms it uses for the battery assist seem to be superior to the VoltBike....smoother. I own several Dahon folding bikes so when you said the eJoe has magnets to keep the bike together when folded, that hit home. I have one non-Dahon folding bike with no magnets and its a pain to keep folded. I use bungee cords. Yuck! What I like most about your reviews is you don't try to impress people with flashy videos. You are honest and point out all the important aspects and features. Very thorough. Very much appreciated.

urbansustainability
5 months ago

Would be nice if you actually stated the price in the description.

Terry07
7 months ago

Have to keep peddling?

Adam
8 months ago

So if i wanna buy an electric bike i should get one of the Sondors?
Or is there an better alternative?

ThunderGirl95.2
8 months ago

I hope somebody can help me. I'm looking for a electric folding bike. but I have some things what I want on it. thats that the battery in the frame and that it has a display (digital) so I can see what my speed is etc. and with suspension. But I wonder of is there one for cheap. I saw Enzo en Ejoe ebike but they are expensive. So I hope that somebody can help me out

PixelatedDominic
1 month ago

ThunderGirl95.2 the Xiaomi TDR01Z Mi has an internal battery and it only costs around 1000 dollars

Practical Guy
8 months ago

trigger shifters are considered higher end over grip shifters.

Will Tee
8 months ago

No chemistry between the host and the shop owner at all.

Theodore Marakas
4 months ago

Maybe things will improve when they start taking hot showers together......LOL
I thought they were good, they don't work together all day long therefore some roughness around the edges when it comes to conversation is to be expected. Overall, I thought the review ws very good. By the way, Volt Bike informed me they've got bikes in stock again. I'm ordering one in the next 5 minutes.

Paintbrush 1962
6 months ago

Totally

Andrew Escobar
9 months ago

Just ordered this! Super excited and plan to ride this in DC

Michelle Jordan
9 months ago

is there something similar that i can get in California?

NetBoySteve
9 months ago

Did you find the motor loud? or?

Hamsky HEF
10 months ago

how about rain if caught up in it if its down pour can it still be ridden will it ruing the electric parts and battery

Will Gonzalez
10 months ago

I'm shopping for an affordable electric folding bike and I'm having a hard time deciding between this bike and the Energie Cycles excursion 2.0. Which one would you recommend?

outta reach24
10 months ago

can you upgrade the battery

Sharon Phillips
11 months ago

Im 70 years old and have to carry an oxygen machine. So, Im looking to find a LITE folding bike so I can lift it into the trunk of my car. Which brand should I look at?

WSWEss
9 months ago

xiaomi

INTERNETSUPERSTAR
11 months ago

can I have a child on the back? and how far does it go on throttle?

VoltBike
11 months ago

It's legally allowed only one person on "power assisted bicycles". On throttle you can expect range around 20km. With pedal assist is around 35-40km or so. *Depends on rider weight and terrain.

Jon Auty
12 months ago

These reviews are really informative and well produced - I find myself binge watching and I don't even cycle! Could you recommend a bike or things to look out for on a folding e-bike able to handle uk canal towpaths and some hills? So concrete, gravel, thick mud and cobbles!?