VoltBike Urban Review

Voltbike Urban Electric Bike Review
Voltbike Urban
Voltbike Urban 350 Watt 8fun Motor
Voltbike Urban Removable Battery Pack 36v 10ah
Voltbike Urban Lcd Computer Console
Voltbike Urban Ergonomic Grips Bell Display Panel
Voltbike Urban Six Speed Shimano Tourney Derailleur
Voltbike Urban Ebike Kickstand Folding Pedals
Voltbike Urban Twelve Magnet Cadence Sensor
Voltbike Urban Folding Electric Bike Side
Voltbike Urban Folding Ebike Above
Voltbike Urban Folded Top Tube Inside View
Voltbike Urban Quick Release Front Wheel Basic Suspension
Voltbike Urban Front Headlight
Voltbike Urban Rear Rack Spring Latch Manual Light
Voltbike Urban Portable Battery Charger
Voltbike Urban Electric Bike Review
Voltbike Urban
Voltbike Urban 350 Watt 8fun Motor
Voltbike Urban Removable Battery Pack 36v 10ah
Voltbike Urban Lcd Computer Console
Voltbike Urban Ergonomic Grips Bell Display Panel
Voltbike Urban Six Speed Shimano Tourney Derailleur
Voltbike Urban Ebike Kickstand Folding Pedals
Voltbike Urban Twelve Magnet Cadence Sensor
Voltbike Urban Folding Electric Bike Side
Voltbike Urban Folding Ebike Above
Voltbike Urban Folded Top Tube Inside View
Voltbike Urban Quick Release Front Wheel Basic Suspension
Voltbike Urban Front Headlight
Voltbike Urban Rear Rack Spring Latch Manual Light
Voltbike Urban Portable Battery Charger

Summary

  • An ultra-affordable folding electric bike sold online from Canada, offers a full range of accessories including lights, fenders and a rear carry rack
  • Available in black or white but only one size, you get six gears with a basic Shimano Tourney TX derailleur and over sized thumb shifter
  • Larger 1.95" tires and a very basic suspension fork soften the ride, standard saddle and cheap ergonomic grips further improve comfort
  • The rear light is not wired in like the headlight which makes it easier to forget and run out, the stem lock felt cheap and came loose easier than other products I've tested, no built in clasp to keep the bike folded

Search EBR

Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

VoltBike

Model:

Urban

Price:

$1,049

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Commuting, Travel

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States, Canada

Model Year:

2016

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

47.5 lbs (21.54 kg)

Battery Weight:

5 lbs (2.26 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Geometry Measurements:

12" Seat Tube, 22" Stand Over Height, 22.5" Reach

Frame Types:

Folding

Frame Colors:

Black, White

Frame Fork Details:

Basic Suspension with 25 mm Travel, 10 mm Skewer with Quick Release

Frame Rear Details:

10 mm Skewer

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

6 Speed 1x6 Shimano Tourney TX MF-TZ20, 11-28T

Shifter Details:

SIS Index on Right

Cranks:

45 Tooth Chainring

Pedals:

Folding Alloy and Plastic Platform

Stem:

Folding, Integrated with Handle Bar, Telescoping Height

Handlebar:

Flat, Aluminum Alloy, 24" Length

Brake Details:

Tektro Novela MD-M311 Mechanical Disc with 160 mm Rotors, Generic Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Grips:

Rubber, Ergonomic

Saddle:

Velo Standard

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

533 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

33.9 mm

Rims:

Power Circle

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 13G

Tire Brand:

Kenda 20" x 1.95"

Wheel Sizes:

20 in (50.8cm)

Tire Details:

Reflective Sidewall Stripes, 40-65 PSI

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Plastic Fenders, Rear Carry Rack with Spring Latch (25 kg Max Weight), Plastic Chain Guard, Integrated LED Headlight, Independent LED Back Light (Uses Two AA Batteries), Flick Bell on Left, Single-Side Kickstand on Left, Free DOT Approved Helmet

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, Shipping to US ~$70, 2 Amp Modiary Charger 1.4 lbs

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

8Fun

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

350 watts

Motor Peak Output:

500 watts

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

10 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

360 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4 hours

Estimated Min Range:

15 miles (24 km)

Estimated Max Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Display Type:

Fixed, Monochrome Backlit LCD Console on Left

Readouts:

Speed, Battery Level (6 Bars), Battery Voltage, Assist Level (0-5), Walk Assist (On/Off), Odometer, Trip Distance, Current, Timer, Headlight (On/Off)

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle (12 Magnet Sensor Disc)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

The VoltBike Urban is one of the most affordable folding electric bikes I’ve tested, even with the ~$70 shipping fee from Canada to the US it’s priced well below some of the similar models I’ve covered including the e-Joe Epik, Enzo Ebike and EZ Pedaler X350 which all rely on a very similar frame. You don’t get fancy Magnesium wheels or rust proof hardware here, the folding stem felt a bit less robust and the suspension fork is extremely basic but again… the price!

The electric systems on this bike are very standard with a 350 watt 8Fun planetary geared hub motor in the back wheel powered by a 36 volt 10 amp hour battery. It felt zippy to me during the ride tests, almost more zippy than I wanted at the lowest level, but it did regulate the top speed going from 10 mph at level 1 up to ~20 mph at level 5. This is one area that confused me a bit because the feedback I received from VoltBike was that the top speed is closer to 15 mph but I was able to hit 20 mph (32 km/h) in both pedal assist level 5 and with the trigger throttle. The throttle is one of my favorite features here because it lets you override assist with full power at any level including level zero. As a trigger throttle it stays out of the way, not compromising the right grip like a twist throttle but it’s still being easy to reach and intuitive for me (mounted near the right grip, push down to go). I also like the display panel which has all of the general readouts (speed, odometer, battery level) and a few extras like walk mode and headlight operation. The rear LED light is more basic, relying on two AA batteries and having to be turned on physically with a slider switch on the right side as demonstrated in the video review.

I don’t have many complaints with this folding model and Volt Bike has been around for several years now which instills confidence. You’ll have to receive and setup the bike yourself because it’s not available in shops but it’s mostly assembled and mine came tuned pretty well. I wish there was some kind of clasp to keep the bike folded (some higher end folders have magnetic discs or rubber bands). Given the cheap price point this is offered at I love that it has lights at all and that the tires feature reflective tape to boost the visual footprint of the frame… the white color would be the safest and most visibile. Many times a product like this will be stored on a boat, transported in a private plane or left in an RV and I like that the battery pack is removable to reduce weight for lifting on those occasions. You can charge the pack on or off the bike and it locks securely inside the downtube. Overall the bike is stealth with the small motor blending right in with the cassette on one side and the 160 mm disc brake rotor on the other. The brakes stop well and despite using generic levers, offer motor inhibitor feedback so you can cut power almost instantly. Despite using a 12 magnet cadence sensor (the highest number I’ve seen) there’s a bit of delay starting and stopping with the Urban but it’s not too bad.

Twenty inch wheels are sturdy and provide a mechanical advantage to hub motors compared to larger wheelsets and it looked like the spokes on the VoltBike Urban were 13 gauge (one step stronger than standard 14G). The kickstand worked well and the rear rack uses standard gauge tubing so it will be compatible with the widest range of panniers and trunk bags including this one with an integrated bottle holster. One thing the VoltBike Urban does not have is bottle cage bosses on the frame… like most ultra-portable electric bikes. Given the one year comprehensive warranty and mostly great setup here I was impressed with the Urban but might bring a flat head screwdriver to keep the stem tight, it just felt weaker and looser than some of the other models I’ve tested but I did like how it telescoped up to match the extra long seat post for a “full sized” ride experience. I also liked the half-aluminum folding pedals which felt stiffer when I stood up and really put some power into the bike pedaling. The front wheel can be quickly and easily removed for further weight reduction using the quick release skewer and the chain guard looked nice and would protect pants but did make it more difficult getting the chain back on when it dropped during my ride test. I think a chain guide would limit drops and I’ve seen it used on other similar folders including the e-Joe but then your pant leg gets exposed to more grease when pedaling. It’s a trade off :)

Quick tips: You can activate the headlight by pressing the Cur button and hold Cur to enter walk mode where the bike will push itself forward at a lower speed. Pressing power will cycle through some of the other menus and holding it down will power the bike off. I like that everything is controlled by the display and you don’t need to power the battery pack on/off before and after riding as with many other affordable electric bikes.

Pros:

  • Given the smaller 20″ wheels, the bike feels pretty comfortable thanks to its basic suspension fork, wider diameter 1.95″ tires and ergonomic grips
  • All of the bases are covered for commuting with basic fenders, a carry rack with spring latch and LED Lights (I love that the headlight runs off the main battery and the display is backlit)
  • Name brand 8Fun geared hub motor was zippy and performed as expected, the Tektro disc brakes offered great stopping power for a smaller bike and the six speed drivetrain worked well at a range of speeds
  • I love that the stem is telescoping to raise the handlebars for larger riders, the seat post is also extremely long at over 530 mm which enables leg extension
  • You get trigger throttle on demand which overrides pedal assist at any time (or operates in level zero for throttle-only operation) as well as five levels of assist with decent responsiveness thanks to a 12 magnet cadence sensor
  • The smaller wheels make the bike compact when folded, lower the center of gravity when the rack is loaded up with supplies and make it easier for the motor when climbing
  • I like how well concealed and protected the battery pack is, it’s completely hidden in the downtube and locks there for security (with a keyhole at the bottom), you can charge the pack on or off the bike for convenience when commuting
  • The price is very reasonable at just over $1k USD, it’s available in two colors (black or white) and ships to Canada or US for reasonable rates, you also get a decent one year comprehensive warranty
  • I like that the front wheel has quick release along with the seat post and stem… I noticed that the electronic cables from the display, trigger throttle and brake levers (motor inhibitors) were all color coded and run through an organized hub piece for easier re-connecting and troubleshooting

Cons:

  • The rear light is not wired in to the main battery and has to be activated with a slider switch (on the right side) independently, be sure to turn it off after each ride as it will not auto-shutoff
  • The folding stem seemed a bit less solid than some of the other models I’ve reviewed, you can ajust tightness but the set screw comes loose naturally over time and may require re-adjustment (thankfully there is an extra plastic lock to keep it in place while riding
  • Lower-end Shimano Tourney TX drivetrain, lots of generic parts including the grips, brake levers, suspension fork and kickstand… they get the job done and keep the bike affordable
  • There’s no magnetic clasp or rubber band to keep the bike folded, the display panel is not removable (for protection when transporting or parking outside) and there’s no bottle cage mounting options on the bike… but the rear rack kind of makes up for it
  • The seat tube collar wasn’t tight enough on the demo model I got and I had trouble twisting the bolt by hand on the opposite side (you might need pliers to tighten it down but this could scratch the paint)
  • The chain dropped during my ride test, perhaps the bike needed a tuneup? When you buy online and set things up yourself there’s a greater tendency for things to be slightly out of alignment and that’s exacerbated by the folding nature of this bike, perhaps a chain guide would be more useful than the chain cover

Resources:

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Eric
2 years ago

On the gearing, (typo: TZ20 is not 11-28.) it looks like this is 45 x 14-28 6 speed vs e-joe’s epik SE 52 x 14-28 7 speed. A megarange 14-34 (available in 6 or 7 speeds) should fit under a TX55 — seems a shame they didn’t.

I have a hard time finding 5lb difference if the frame is the same (actually, matches epik lite except dropouts and disk brake mount — is the frame heavier with or without chainstays?) Spread across tires+fork+battery, maybe.

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Thanks for the feedback Eric, I sent the bike back to VoltBike and cannot confirm but I trust you’ve dug into this a bit and appreciate that it might help another interested party. I do weigh the frames by hand using the same scale each time and just weighed one of the latest 2016 e-Joe EPIK SE models which was 48.1 lbs.

Reply
Robert Arthur
2 years ago

Hi! I’m anxiously awaiting delivery of my Voltbike Urban thanks to your excellent review! It should arrive in the next few hours. Do you have any advice regarding adjusting the de-railer (can’t remember the French spelling:). I’m an older guy and would have difficulty dealing with a “chain drop”. The “Hebrew Hammer:)” mentioned the adjustment method, but is there a generic starting point? I checked Youtube, but all the clips were about more sophisticated gear. Thanks, AGAIN FOR THE GREAT REVIEW!!!

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Hi Robert, I usually take my bikes to shops for cleaning and tuneups… I have tried to do my own adjustments with screw drivers but there are also usually little finger twisters where the cable enters the back side of the derailleur (there’s the French spelling for you btw ;) sorry I can’t be more helpful and clear, if you shift easy and aren’t pedaling hard when you do it and if you take the bike in for tune ups a couple times per year you should be fine. Glad the review helped and I welcome your future feedback as you get to test the bike out and learn your way around the different systems and the gears to keep it running right ;)

Reply
Gene Keyes
2 years ago

I always carry 2 or 3 twist ties from cookie bags (affixed to the seat), to yank a dropped chain back into place. But I hate derailleurs and chains, and might well go for the shaft drive you cited on the Energie Excursion 2.0.

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Hi Gene! Yeah… getting fingers messy or pinched messing with chains is no fun. Belt drives are cleaner, quieter and usually more reliable and they seem to be more widely available on ebikes than the shaft drive system. The Energie Excursion 2.0 is a neat ebike and I’d love to see more built like it, especially folding ebikes because the chain is easier to get in the way or get bumped with folding and transport :)

Reply
Caryl Dineen
2 years ago

I ordered the Volt Urban bike a week before your EBR review! I’ve had the bike now for a month and am enjoying it so much! I did not have to do any tune up on the bike at all (just to let your reader Robert Arthur know). I am a 63 year old female and have ridden bikes all my life. The Urban has made it easier to get around and I have received so many positive comments about the bike and interested neigbours trying it out. I do enjoy reading your reviews! (PS. I chose the black Urban and it is sleek!)

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Hey! Great comment Caryl, thanks for sharing your enthusiasm and contributing to the conversation here. I’m sure Robert will appreciate your feedback. Ride safe out there and have fun :D

Reply
Caryl Dineen
1 year ago

Hi Court/Adam: I am still enjoying the Urban volt bike. I do not do much travelling on rough terrain – usually on quiet roads/field paths/sidewalk. The furthest round trip I have done is about 8 miles. Now that Fall is in the air, I am riding less. I probably charge it every 2 to 3 weeks. One thing I will mention is: I once let the battery run out while I was biking (not on purpose). I charged it up and still bike would not turn on – I did email George at Voltbike.ca and he got right back to me. He told me to fold the bike (disengage the battery) then unfold it again (to reset bike/battery). And that did the trick! It would have been nice to have a manual on the bike/instructions but George was very helpful. Also, like you experienced when test riding, the chain has come off twice but not when I was riding – only when I leaned the bike against my other bike and the pedal hit it. I found unscrewing the chain guars was the easiest way of putting the chain back on.

Adam
1 year ago

Now that you have had the Urban for a few months, how does it play out? How fast do you go, any rough road conditions, how often do you charge the battery?

Reply
boomy
2 years ago

My bike arrived recently and I’ve been recharging it inside my house because I can’t seem to take the battery out of the bike. I’ve watched your video many times over, and I know I have to unlock the battery and then remove the key to slide the battery out, but it’s not budging not 1 bit. It’s like it’s held in by clamps. Am I missing a step? Are there screws or something else holding the battery pack in?

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Hey boomy! So glad you asked… I struggled with the battery removal as well if you look at the video around 11:45 you can see there are two holes along the bottom of the main tube (one for charging and one for the key). Insert the key into the locking core and twist so you see the security rod retract and then TAKE THE KEY OUT so that you can slide the pack out. If the key is left in the battery won’t come out. There should be a little plastic handle on the battery that you can pull on to slide it in/out. I hope this helps, perhaps you’ve already tried these steps in which case I suggest reaching out to VoltBike for help. Please chime in with your solution so others can learn too :)

Reply
boomy
2 years ago

Actually I found out why today, apparently there are 2 fat/short screws next to the Key hole (not the recharging hole). Those were screwed so in, it was pressing the battery pack’s shell inside the bike, so it couldn’t be pulled out. I didn’t notice those screws there until I flipped the bike upside down to inspect the area. It’s easy to miss those 2 screws because the wires were covering them.

Corey
2 years ago

Tried buying this bike on Sunday and they said it would ship Monday. They never contacted me so I reached out Tuesday and they said it was out of stock and they are upgrading the battery and will ship in August.

Question is: worth the wait? Seems like this is the best bike under the $1,500 range, but I really wanted to use it during the summer… Any suggestions for an alternative?

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Hmm… that’s a long time to wait. There are lots of other very similar folding ebikes that cost maybe $200 more. I’m not sure where you live and what the weather is like but that $200 could get you dozens of rides in the mean time saving money and providing some fun before Fall/Winter. As someone who rides my bike all the time, I wouldn’t want to wait but I agree that the price and value of the VoltBike Urban are great. If you don’t mind waiting that’s cool but there’s definitely a trade-ff :/

Reply
Corey
2 years ago

Update – the customer service is great. Saw the mariner was a little more expensive and asked about it. They had one in stock. Looking forward to it! Thanks for the reply

boomy
2 years ago

Hi, today was a nice day, so I decided to take this bike for the 2nd time, this time around the neighborhood instead of the school playground. Keep in mind I live in a quiet residential area, I was going downhill in an area, and just as I was nearing the bottom, I slowly pull on the brake, and the next thing I knew, I was thrown off the bike, flipped, the bike flipped and skid too. My elbows both banged on the pavement, and then the left one took the most damage, it ripped 2 inches open, and my rear pelvis area took a hard bang from the seat of the bike when it landed behind me. My right palm was scraped. The bike was totaled, handle bar, seat ripped, bell, phone clamp, other stuff turned to roadkill when it smashed off the bike, and the gear shirt & speedometer was smashed, when the bike smashing on the ground.

I was lucky an old man saw the whole thing and rushed right over to drag me off the road and the bike too, those drivers didn’t give a shit and just kept driving, crushing the bike accessories like roadkill.

The guy called officers, 4 of them came, they had to do an inspection and asked what happened. The old guy told them everything he saw, and when they asked me what happened. I told them I tried to slow down, I pulled on my right hand brakes like every bike has in North America. When he checked the brakes, he told me it gripped the front wheels, so at the 15MPH on a slant, that would automatically throw a rider forward and flip the bike forward too.

WHAT COMPANY Switched the BRAKE HANDLES with each side, and NOT WARN THE RIDER?!! Isn’t the safety kind of the number one thing companies need to point out?!! IN BIG BOLD WORDS, “HEY, WE DECIDED TO USE A EUROPEAN METHOD IN BRAKING FOR YOUR NORTH AMERICAN BIKES, SO WHEN YOU TRY TO BRAKE WITH YOUR REAR WHEELS LIKE MOST CYCLISTS DO, YOU’LL INSTEAD BRAKE YOUR FRONT WHEEL AND FLIP DOWN HILL. SURPRISE!!!”

If anyone wants to see my wrecked bike and ripped up arms, let me know, I can upload it anytime. The officers there told me they ride all the time, and never have this problem when braking, because when they pull on their right hand-side trigger, it stops their rear wheel, NOT THE LEFT FRONT WHEEL!!

Buyers BEWARE, I’m not some ranting troll, I’m someone that was sitting with officers covered in my own blood waiting for my dad to come pick me and my messed up bike up. All of this, just because some idiot decided “Hey lets swap out the left brake handle with the right handle, just for fun!!”

[EDIT] The following images were provided by Boomy (image 1, image 2, image 3) along with this statement: The bike’s bell and my “phone clamp” attachment are all over the pavement, the seat was ripped, the LCD display was hit so hard the clamp cracked off, the speedometer casing was scratched and damaged. Besides for the helping old man, the rest of the drivers were asses, they actually saw us, and honked their horns and shouted “move”, just so they wont miss the previews from the movie theater… unbelievable…

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Gosh, that sounds terrible! I’m glad you’re able to type but I hope it hasn’t added pain to the already bad accident :( in my time reviewing bicycles I have come across a few models that have switched brakes as you describe and it can create unexpected results… especially when your instincts kick in. I believe you can re-configure some brakes to be the opposite if you want so it will feel more natural. I’ll email you for the pictures, thanks for offering to share and sorry again that this happened.

Reply
boomy
1 year ago

I was pretty pissed at the time of our communication but they were understanding and didn’t argue back, they gave me time to cool down, then resumed what to do to fix the problem.

After communicating and telling/showing them what happened, they did send me replacement parts for the destroyed and damaged parts, so they do honor their warranty statements. Just an advice, if you’re use to using your right hand for the rear wheel brakes, before riding it, bring it to a local repair bike shop and have their people switch the brake wires for you and then ask them to ride it around a few times to make sure everything is good, it’s just a few dollars for their service and can save you from accidents.

Again, their company does take responsibility for their products, and they try to make you have a good experience with them which is much more than what you get from some other large name companies. If you have questions for them or want a quick response, don’t just email them, use their website’s chat option, it’s much quicker from my experience. The local repair shop I went to had similar ebikes for a few hundreds cheaper, but they did tell me the parts from the Urban model are of the highest quality, the expert told me the motor is actually China’s best ebike motor. After they swapped the brake handle wires and replaced the damaged equipment, it looked the same but felt safer thx to a simple brake switch.

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

I’m so glad things are working out… I hope you continue getting better and it’s great that you took time to share about your brake experience so others can avoid accidents. Glad VoltBike was there for you :)

Reply
Shirley
1 year ago

Hi, just wondering if you will recommned a bike newbie to buy this electric bike? I just learned to ride a bike but have trouble going uphill because of not enough strength in my legs, will this help? Or will it easily get me out of control because it is too fast? Thanks!

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

Hi Shirley! I think this ebike would help you climb but the smaller wheels might feel a little unstable compared with a 26″ wheel (or whatever standard size you’re likely using). I love that it folds and can be made lighter by removing the battery… It’s affordable but you might feel a little overwhelmed with the huge box it comes in and the bit of assembly required. If you can deal with this or even take it to a shop for help I think the bike could work very well. I’m assuming you’re petite and value the low-step design of this frame and how small it looks? Alternative affordable ebikes that I’ve reviewed are listed here and one that stands out (from a reputable manufacturer that is still approachable for shorter riders) is the IZIP E3 Vibe+. Hope this helps!

Reply
Ethan Requardt
1 year ago

Hello all! I am considering the E-JOE folding e-Bike vs Volt folding e-Bike and am looking for some help. The above video was great, but one question I have that was not answered is which Bike is more likely to last a longer time, require fewer tune-ups, and is all around more durable? If anyone has any answers or relevant experience on this topic, please let me know! Thanks :)

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

Hi Ethan! I think the E-Joe will be slightly higher quality and probably hold up better if you purchase it from a shop. VoltBike predominantly sells online and most end users don’t have the experience or tools to really dial things in. If you know you’re buying a bike online regardless, it would probably be worth spending $80 to have a local shop help you put it together and fit it. There are even mobile bike repair services like VeloFix that I’ve used before :)

Reply
Richard Wilson
1 year ago

can these bikes be customized like bosch mid drive,better LCD display etc?

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

I don’t think so (though I might be misunderstanding your question?!) from what I could tell they sort of come “as is” with more value components and electronic systems. Changing stuff on ebikes is usually difficult unless it’s a DIY kit.

Reply
VoltBike
1 year ago

Hi Richard, changing motor, controller or LCD on any electric bike is different task and not worth it that much, because the time and money spend could be higher than buying different bike. Changing the LCD screen also requires changing the controller inside the bike. Controllers also comes in different sizes and you need to make sure it will fit in the compartment. Changing the motor to mid drive for example would require different frame. Of course you are welcome to replace parts as suspension, tires, handlebars etc. Hope this helps.

Brian Becker
1 year ago

I bought the Voltbike Urban for my wife as a 20th anniversary gift, and she is having a great time on it. I did want to point out several changes/improvements that Voltbike has done on the Urban since your very informative review. I probably spent 25+ hours reading reviews of various e-bikes before choosing a Voltbike urban.

Chain guides have been installed on either side of the crank, and even on very rough terrain the chain stays put so I was quite pleased with that improvement. The crank also appears to be a 54 tooth? crank–hard to count, but the gears seem well matched and must be an improvement over the 45 tooth crank. The fenders are now actually a matte black painted aluminum vs. plastic. The pedals are slightly changed to a more traditional folding plastic Well-go brand. The handlebar stem clamp seems very sturdy and tight and looks to be a different design than what is shown in your video on the Urban you tested.

That sums up the improvements/changes, and I must say I am very pleased with my purchase and looking forward to convincing friends and family to purchase their own voltbike. Thanks for the detailed reviews; I could not have bought a bike over the internet without them. Brian

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

Hey! Thanks for your very informative updates about the VoltBike Urban Brian, glad your wife is enjoying it! Yeah, those chainring teeth can be a pain to count. I usually put some blue tape on a tooth then turn it slowly and count that way… trying not to get too greasy ;)

I realize how unsettling it can be to spend hundreds or thousands of dollars online to buy something without even getting to test ride it. That’s a big part of why I do these reviews and it’s nice to hear they help. Ride safe and thanks again :)

Reply
Adam
1 year ago

I’m quite interested in the Urban but am a bit worried about the company not being responsive. I’ve had a few email exchanges with them where they would answer a question or two and then not respond to more questions, also for their instant messenger part of their site. I’ve also tried to arrange a test ride (of any of their models) in the Twin Cities and they have not been helpful. If I am buying from an online store I want to be assured of communication!

2 more things: Do you think the Urban can be ridden through a puddle or mud without shorting out? And, does anyone know where to get the Voltbike Discount Codes?

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

Hi Adam! I don’t know anything about coupon codes but maybe someone else will chime in. The default prices on their website are already a pretty good value since they sell direct… which brings us to your other question. By paying less you may forego some of the hands on support and responsiveness that shops provide. It’s a trade many people feel okay with but I think VoltBike is a smaller company which means there might not be a dedicated support team member, maybe they swap positions and sort of rotate as support is needed? Either way, have had a good time reviewing their stuff and wish you well!

Reply
Adam
1 year ago

Thanks Court! For my other question about riding through a puddle or mud, do you think this can be done without shorting out? I am also not sure about a control panel in rain. What say you?

Brian B.
1 year ago

Just wondering what the rider size limit is for the Urban. I’m 6’1 190 lbs – because of neck issues I’m more comfortable riding somewhat upright (which seems doable with the Urban) and I like the idea of a folding bike that I can easily place in our vehicle or store inside. Thanks.

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

Hi Brian! Voltbike tends to be responsive when I email them with questions like this but just going off of what I’ve seen and heard about similar folding electric bikes, I think you’d be alright weight wise. My friend Sam is ~250 lbs and he rides the folding Epik models from E-Joe regularly at his shop (they assemble and test them for customers) and that bike has a lot in common with this including the frame design. You’re also a tall individual so there might be a squished feeling until you adjust the seat high and possibly the handlebars. Ultimately, you’re on the bigger side for a bike like this but I do think it’s possible. I guess I’d recommend that you search for a local shop with any sort of folding bike first and see how it feels and then make a decision about this one based on that. You might feel very comfortable and happy with the size and body position or start having second thoughts. There are some larger folding models out there with 24″ wheels and cruisers that are much more comfortable and still upright but perhaps more expensive. There are many factors and I assume you’ve explored the site here and seen the different options?

Reply
Adam
11 months ago

Hey Court! I see that Voltbike has new upgrades for 2017. It looks like the chainguard is off, and the frame and wheels look quite different. Thoughts?

Reply
Court Rye
11 months ago

Hey Adam! Yeah, it looks like Goerge has continued refining the bikes… there has always been a great balance of utility, fun and affordability with the VoltBike line. I really enjoyed reviewing the Mariner and Yukon recently in Mexico, did you see those? He worked with me to get the bikes down there and they arrived in good shape :) I do like the new solid wheels on the updated VoltBike Urban.

Reply
Yuri
2 months ago

Hi Court, I see that Voltbike Urban has new upgrades for October 2017 release, did you get a chance to see the bike? If yes, are you going to update the review?

Reply
Court Rye
2 months ago

Hi Yuri! I am sure we will review the new model at some point but I believe VoltBike and some others do rolling releases throughout the year and I cannot cover them all. Also, I do not like to update reviews as much as just making comments or talking about the new ones in the forum. This way, the bike I reviewed remains accurate for people who might own the older one or find it used. Thanks for alerting me to the new model, I welcome your feedback about it!

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Echos
3 weeks ago

Weiterstadt, Germany - Riese & Müller - www.r-m.de - a maker of luxury eBikes sold worldwide has introduced the stylishly minimal and clean Roadster that will change how you look at eBikes. The Roadster’s sleek frame and traditional aesthetics combined with the best new e-technology are sure to catch the eye as you navigate urban areas or head out of the city and into the countryside.

Stylish, clean and minimal define the approach and lines of the redesigned Roadster while offering all of the technology and performance expected from Riese & Müller. The Roadster factors in concepts of classic bicycle frames: diamond frame construction, narrow rounded tube cross-sections, almost horizontal top-tube and delicate seat stays. The result is a clean, lightweight and sporty appearance that Riese & Muller have dubbed E-sthetics for those who love the classic construction and feel the technical elements of an eBike detract from the overall look of a bicycle. The Roadster incorporates a new, lighter Bosch Active Plus motor, the Gates belt drive, and Suntour NCX fork, bringing the total weight to just below 44 pounds. The Roaster is a perfect city rocket built for those who want all the benefits of an eBike in a classic look.

Features:

Bosch Performance CX Motor

36V / 500 watt battery

Shimano Deore 10-speed drivetrain

Magura MT4 hydraulic brakes

Suntour NCX Suspension Front Fork

Three Available Sizes

Mixte Model Available

Available colors: Electric Green Metallic, Black Matte, White

MSRP: $3879 (starting price)

Landing Page

ABOUT RIESE & MÜLLER
It all began with two engineers, a good idea and a garage. But not in California, rather in the south of Hesse. In Darmstadt, to be more precise. In the parent's courtyard. Immediately after the company was founded, it won the Innovation Prize in 1993 and has grown to become an internationally renowned premium manufacturer of E-Bikes and folding bikes. As previously, Riese & Müller manufactures the most innovative bikes of tomorrow with the passion of yesteryear - and still in Weiterstadt, not far from the old garage.

tinotino
1 month ago

Nice pics! I almost forgot this thread. Did you road test it already?

Did a first ride test drive yesterday. Rode about 22 miles. I did 1/3 thottle only, 2/3 on various power settings. The battery started from 5/6 and down to 1/6, pretty close to empty. My commute route is 12.5m each way so I guess it's possible to do a round trip with 1 charge.

A couple observations:
* power setting 1-5 might as well simplified to 1-3, I don't feel enough difference between them.

* This is my first time riding an ebike, all my previous bikes were 26-28" no suspension commuter hybrid bikes.

* The front suspensing doesn't feel that useful to me, it only helps in certain down curb situation. I now understand why a lot of bikes don't have it. Maybe I need to upgrade the seat but so far standing up on the pedals is still a better "suspension".

* 20" with suspension is still worst than bigger wheels, epecially on concrete and bricked sidewalk, but I need a smaller folding bike.

* My original observation of commuting in New York was correct, there is almost no point in getting faster ebikes because there is so little chance to go over 15m, 18m in any long stretch. If I start over again, I would still choose the Urban for cheap, or an old model year Easy Motion Volt for the dealer support and 5 year warranty. EM doesn't sell the spear battery separately is one reason I chose Voltbike. Voltbike acts more like a Chinese company, you can buy parts from them.

* The power setting is probably just a voltage setting not a top speed setting, I haven't read the manual yet. When I was on power 1 (weakest), I could still coast to 20mph, however when the battery was on 1/6, it only went up to 12mph, and then 10mph, 8mph top speed. On my last mile the trottle was going slower than my human powered pedaling.

* The throttle is a really good idea. Even if you pedal 90% of the time, it really helps you in many situations, such as going pass an intersection in the safest speed. Countries and cities that outlaw throttles are retarded. It's like a mouse vs controller argument. If you can use the mouse for more precise control, why shouldn't you use it? Commuting is not a game.

* Oh yeah it really can use a pair of bottle holder screws holes. Now I have to jerryrig a solution.

mrgold35
3 months ago

Sounds like a 4" folding fat tire bike from Radmini, Indegogo MOAR, Volt Mariner, Ride Scoozy VeeGo Fat tire, or Sondors to name a few. I like the option of:
- store back of RV on bike rack or inside the RV because of weather or protect from thieves (even place inside a towed vehicle if have a car on the hitch)
- all terrain with snow, sand, paved roads, and soft to hard trails
- usually have enough utility and power for shopping and grocery runs with added rack+bags
- prices can range from $700 to $1500 compared to $1500 to $4000 for eMTB
- hub motor fold bikes can have PAS and throttles (throttles very handy in urban settings getting across a 6 lane intersection in a hurry)
- don't need a bike rack to transport in your hometown if you don't have hitch or trunk mounted bike rack for your other vehicles
- minimal prep time to place on bike rack or fold for storage inside (can remove seat and lower handle bars for an even smaller footprint)
- easy to store at home after the vacation.

DR Win
3 months ago

So, while I'm REALLLY all about getting a tandem... if I get into that and actually use it, the next thing I'm going to look into is an electric urban commuter bike.

I love in a burb of DC/B'More. Too far from work to commute it all (20 miles) and it's not a bike friendly commute. I work at the tip top of DC - right on the edge of Silver Spring. Most of my commute time is getting through/out of that area - then I fly. I wonder about parking my car and riding in. Anyone do a commute like that?

I wouldn't want a bike on the car, but fit "in" the car.
Good lightweight (under 40lbs) folding e-bikes with 20" wheels include Easy Motion EasyGo Volt and Daymak New Yorker. (There are others over 40lbs but to my mind that is too heavy to be convenient. I won't go under 20" wheels due to the chance of potholes, uneven pavement, etc.: smaller wheels can cause crashes.) They fold up nice and small for car trunk.

Denis Shelston
3 months ago

Thank you for this @Mike Burns , very much appreciated.

My wife has decided to go with the Voltbike Urban in white, she likes the design, the size and I appreciate the folding, easier to store.

tinotino
4 months ago

The folding and the weight is manageable, but don't expect it to be quick and easy. Because the bike is 53 lbs, it does take a bit of effort to fold. I would not want to fold and carry it up stairs daily. Below, I took it with me on a vacation. The folding works great for this purpose:

Hi Supergoop, what Pannier do you have? And how many flat do you have so far?

I placed an order for a black one, their current ship date is mid Sep. I heard its changing from mag wheel back to spoke wheel too.

Is there a more active Voltbike Urban group on the internet besides this thread?

jharlow77
4 months ago

Ok thanks for the response. I ordered direct from them today and supposedly it would ship out by the end of the week so I'll update as it goes along. Out of curiosity again, what other ebikes were you looking at? I was about to get a Motiv stash but I was hesitant about the price, also the Voltbike Urban. Yes I was looking at folding bikes for a 2 mile commute but the CC with the upgrades sold me. That and Juiced email respsonses were pretty quick.
Man there were so many I looked at I can hardly remember them all but the main companies I considered were Rad Power Bikes, Easy Motion, and Giant. Nothing seemed to come close to the price per features of the Juiced bikes. I test rode an original CrossCurrent and decided to add the torque sensor to my AIR order. It feels so much more fluid than the cadence sensor only.

sucka free
4 months ago

Ok thanks for the response. I ordered direct from them today and supposedly it would ship out by the end of the week so I'll update as it goes along. Out of curiosity again, what other ebikes were you looking at? I was about to get a Motiv stash but I was hesitant about the price, also the Voltbike Urban. Yes I was looking at folding bikes for a 4 mile commute but the CC with the upgrades sold me. That and Juiced email respsonses were pretty quick.

rich c
4 months ago

I think you would need a full suspension bike if you are recovering from spinal cord injury. The folding bikes have smaller diameter tires which I think will result in a harsher ride on many surfaces. I have a road tire on my Haibike XDURO Full Seven S RX and love it for urban riding. I just rode around the north side of Chicago this past weekend, and felt like the full suspension was a necessity. Between pot holes and construction, it was like riding a single trail in the woods! If you buy the Sondors, join the Facebook page. Sondors has about 1 or 2 people handling customer service and service is not a real thing for them, selling is their main directive. You can get a lot of help on the Facebook page, but you have to buy the parts and install them yourself if you have problems. I have two of their fat bikes, but I am handy with bike repairs.

1/1
Zach Kadletz
4 months ago

Taipei, Taiwan, August 2nd 2017 – Urban transportation specialist Tern Bicycles unveiled the GSD — an ebike that defines a new category: ‘compact utility’. The GSD is designed to carry two kids, a week’s worth of groceries, or 180 kg of cargo, but it’s only 180 cm long—shorter than a Dutch city bike. With Tern’s best-in-class folding technology, it packs down small enough to fit in a VW Touran or an urban apartment. It adjusts to fit riders from 150 – 195 cm—so mom, dad and the kids can all use it. A Bosch Performance motor, with up to two batteries, powers the GSD for up to 250km. It comes fully equipped with integrated lighting, rack, mudguards, double kickstand, two XL panniers, and even retractable passenger foot pegs – everything needed to shift to a bike-centric lifestyle.

“Most of the ebikes on the market today basically look like standard bicycles with motors and batteries grafted on,” said Josh Hon, Tern Team Captain. "That means that all of the valid compromises that were made in designing a muscle-powered vehicle are carried over to the ebike, where they don’t make as much sense. The Tern GSD is the result a fundamental insight: when you design a bicycle around an electric drivetrain, you don’t need to compromise key functionalities like comfort and cargo capacity to optimize for speed. With a Bosch drivetrain, 20” wheel bikes ride just as fast as 700c bikes but thanks to smaller wheels, deliver punchier acceleration. The smaller wheels also allow us to maximize cargo capacity. And with top speed removed from the optimization equation, we were free to design the GSD with a comfortable Dutch-bike riding position. Best of all, we were able to fit all this goodness into a package that’s only the size of a standard city bike.”

“One of our guiding insights was that cargo bikes are most useful in city centers, but they’re correspondingly difficult to manage and store,” according to Galen Crout, Communications Manager at Tern. “Dense urban centers bring cargo bikes to life—where groceries, schools and work are all within a bikeable distance—but they’re also where houses are small, and where bike theft is a persistent problem. We’re creating the compact utility ebike category to let people in cities enjoy the benefits of cargo bikes without the limitations.”

Fits the Family
The GSD is an ebike that everybody in the family can ride. Tern’s patented adjustable stem, special cockpit geometry, and super low step frame make the bike easy to handle and ride, even for very small riders. Taller riders will appreciate the expanding cockpit and handlebars that can be adjusted for height and reach. Heavier riders will appreciate the massively buttressed frame and fork, and components that are designed to handle loads of up to 180kg.

Super Stable
Just as a scooter is easier to ride than a motorcycle, the GSD rides and handles better than many ebikes on the market today. The GSD’s smaller wheels, low frame, and centrally mounted motor and batteries give the bike an extremely low center of gravity. Coupled with an extended wheelbase, the GSD is remarkably stable and easy to handle. This extra stability is critically important and appreciated when the GSD is fully loaded with cargo, especially with the wriggling child variety. And since ebikes are typically ridden at higher average speeds, this extra stability adds to safety.

Capacious Capacity
The GSD is built to carry stuff, lots of it. The frame, fork, and components have been tested to exceed 180kg of total weight for the rider and cargo. The GSD comes standard with an 80cm integrated rear rack and side panniers with a total capacity of 62L. The GSD fits two children in Thule Maxi child seats or one adult passenger. Additional carrying capacity can be added with lower deck supports, a rear tray, and a front tray. Tern will open source the frame attachment point dimensions so riders with an interest can also design and build their own custom cargo accessories.

Portabilty, Storability
Despite its extra large cargo capacity, the GSD packs small to fit into tight urban environments. Since the GSD is no longer than a standard bike, it will work with standard bike racks on cars and buses. But even better, patented Tern folding technology lets the GSD pack even smaller – three seconds is all it takes to reduce its height by 1/3rd and its width by 40% so the GSD can fit INSIDE mid-sized cars like a VW Touran. With two GSD’s packed in the back of the car, family bike adventures will never be the same again. The GSD is even designed to fit into small elevators with a specially designed rack that allows it to stand vertically.

Component Quality
Whereas many cargo-oriented bicycles use mostly standard bicycle parts, the GSD goes a step further with some of the most robust parts available. Examples include Magura 4 piston disc brakes, custom 2.4" Schwalbe Super Moto-X tires, Boost thru-axle hubs, and custom 36mm width double-joined rims.

The GSD, designed as the ultimate car replacement or small business utility vehicle, launches together with a collection of accessories, including Eurocrate-standardized front and rear racks, a passenger kit with KLICKfix adapters, and optional foot supports. The rear rack, sized for up to four Ortliebs, is designed for optimal compatibility with up to two Thule Yepp Maxi Seats. The base price of 3,999 EUR (3,999 USD) includes a pair of 62 L Cargo Hold panniers, a Bosch Performance mid-drive, and a 400 watt hour Bosch battery.

“It’s a bike that fits a family, but it’s also a bike that the whole family can share” said Hon. “When you’re investing $4,000 in a new electric bike, fundamental versatility makes a world of difference. Fit any riders, passengers, or cargo, and fit anywhere.”

Tern will debut the GSD at the Fall trade shows, starting with Eurobike 2017. Dealers and consumers can stop by the Tern booth at B4-405, or the Tern demo booth at DA-417 to test ride the GSD.

SuperGoop
5 months ago

I now have around 100 km the Voltbike Urban. Some observations:

- On my first full charge, I went 65 km (at random speeds, not too aggressive).
- Motor doesn't cut in-and-out when nearing low battery. It simply gets weaker and weaker, until there is no more power.
- Took a lot longer to fully charge an empty battery than I expected. 6.5 hours with the included 2A charger.
- Lots of low-end torque and power. High-end speed & power is not as great as my Yukon 750.
- On freshly charged battery, I can easily hit 32+km/h with throttle only on flats. But when the battery is below 80%, then the top speed is around 30km/h on throttle only.
- With pedaling, it is easy to maintain around 30-32km/h regardless of battery strength.
- Much more jarring than my Yukon 750 (fat tires). Perhaps due to its smaller & stiffer 20" tires.
- Fairly light (53 lbs), and easy to carry with the built-in handle on the top-tube.
- Key must be inserted and in the ON position to operate the motor.
- Battery range is not really an issue, because the bike rides like a regular folding bike even without motor assistance.
- The Urban is more suited to lower speeds (around 25km/h). It can go faster, but it feels inefficient and bumpy above 25km/h.
- The front shocks are very nice and effective. It is on the softer side, which I like.
- I can very accurately gauge the battery level by monitoring the real-time voltage (42V=full, 32V=dead).
- Every time the display is switched off, the "Trip" meter is reset back to zero. However, you can leave the display on, and it will got to "Sleep" without resetting the Trip meter.
- The rear light is aimed a bit too high and partially blocked by the rear rack. I had to bend it down a little with a wrench. Now, it is perfect.
- The front light runs off the main battery and is bright enough to be seen, even during daytime.
- Due to the small bike, panniers need to be small and mounted further back to avoid interfering with pedaling.
- The rack does not have the spring clasp like last year's model, which I miss.

Any questions, let me know.

Dewey
5 months ago

The Voltbike Urban is a $1095 folding bike with a decent 350w motor that gets up to 20mph and has a front suspension fork. Avoid the Xiaomi, initial feedback suggests it comes from the Amazon seller without the correct US voltage charger, it's much slower, only has 3 gears, tiny wheels so the handling will be squirrelly, and you'll appreciate the extra power of the Voltbike going up hills.

Eduardo Domingues de Jesus
5 months ago

I’ve been enjoying following the comments on this review and really appreciate hearing the feedback from real ebike owners. I think there are some points raised that we can improve on. What I personally find interesting here is that the Gocycle G3 is being compared with the Stromer and mainly on criteria that are the Stromer's key strengths - high mileage commuting/range/big battery/big motor. As the designer of Gocycle, I’m really encouraged by this given Gocycle is half the weight and also portable! I feel like all of the many years of development and progress made from G1, to G2, G3 and soon our GS is paying off. We are probably closer than ever to delivering a game changing ebike for urban and recreational commuters in value, practical usage, fun, and performance – and in a package that also brings with it many other benefits for the owner simply not found on any traditional ebike currently available.

My sense though in reading is that the Stromer is probably the right choice for most of the reviewers. It’s a very solid and capable ebike.

I wanted to add a few notes though on some of the comments such as “don’t ride it in the rain” which is not true. The G1 was very revolutionary when it launched in 2009 and we wanted to be cautious while we gathered service data from real customers over years and 10,000s of miles. So we had a note of caution in the manual on riding in the rain. I think we also had a note like “if it rains be smart/take your car or the train”, yikes we got stick for that :) !!! I’ve ridden bicycles all of my life and commuted daily rain/snow/sun – very few times I enjoy riding in the rain – but anyway…we quickly confirmed that the Gocycle design was fine in all weather conditions, and we’ve opened up Cleandrives with 8,000 miles of year round British weather riding and the chain and drive components are immaculate. We sell a lot of product to boat owners and we know that while you can never prevent corrosion, we excel against competitors in that area under salty sea air conditions. Last week it rained most all days and I road my G3 to work throughout. In 2012, we had months of torrential British rain and our test fleet of G2s ran everyday collecting 1000’s of miles of heavy wet weather riding. But results also will vary on how the owner takes care of the product. Following the guidelines of the manufacturer and reading the owner's manual will give you the best and highest possible service life.

This is an interesting recent Gocycle owner story on how Gocycle is used in all weather conditions:

https://gocycle.com/review/the-4-seasons-gocycle-rider/

On the comment on security, the cable lock referred to in the review comes free with the product and is mainly for “coffee shop” security as with any cable lock.

If you want a more secure option, the Gocycle lock holster is super convenient, fast and has a sold silver secure rating.

I use it daily and it works well. We’ve put a lot of thought into how and where it is mounted which goes for all Gocycle’s accessories and design. Gocycle does also have anti-theft capability via the app too and we’ve helped a number of customers recover their stolen Gocycles.

Gocycle accessories are more expensive than traditional bikes because they are bespoke designs for Gocycle. That’s a personal choice for potential customers whether to back a company / product that is taking a clean sheeted design approach with total integration or a pick and mix approach from off the shelf standard bike parts.

On the Gocycle Performance tires, they have very low rolling resistance and are a performance item. If you want more durable tires, there are a wide range of alternatives. I run the Gocycle tires in the summer and Schwalbe Big Ben tires in the winter.

On the battery fuel level - we are currently testing a new version of our fuel gauge. After you live with and get to know your ebike what ever the brand, you become less sensitive to range anxiety and in my opinion, the fuel guage should not be a major driver in deciding what kind of ebike to buy. But we’re trying to consider a totally different approach to range information for the user which could be really interesting in the future. Stay tuned!

On the comment about the folding being a novelty and not of practical value, probably that is not a fair statement. Gocycle is not like a Brompton or a Dahon - meaning it is not designed to quickly fold up to take on a train. There's been no compromise to the riding fit and geometry and so that sort of usage is not really a part of the Gocycle's DNA. But the stow-ability of Gocycle is definitely practical and useful! and is one of the key benefits that comes with owning a Gocycle and something that a Stromer in this comparison review cannot do! There are many many times that I have broken it down to put in the car to integrate with family errands, work, social occasions, weather - it is an added convenience that really highlights the flexibility of the product. Having two Gocycles with one folded up over the winter for example saves space. It's practical not just for commuters, but boaters, caravan owners and light aircraft owners.... But also, the Pitstopwheels are much easier to fix flat tires on than traditional bicycles and you don't even get your hands greasy. What other ebike weighs around 35lbs, can drive a 200 lb guy 20 miles/20 mph - and is small enough to fit four into the back of a Ford Focus or a few with room for the dog?

https://www.facebook.com/206815859442009/photos/a.256374007819527.1073741828.206815859442009/512326365557622/?type=3&theater

I’m encourage that Gocycle is being compared head to head with Stromer on commuting usages. That says something about the progress we have made as a company and we appreciate the feedback given here by real owners. It is worth mentioning though that my approach to how an ebike should be designed is different. Two main points 1) Lightweight is VERY important for bicycles and Ebikes, and when there has been a design choice to add more batteries and weight to increase range for example, I’ve not compromised at the expense of increasing weight. 2) Gocycle’s philosophy is a hybrid approach, two-wheel / balanced drive – you power the rear the motor powers the front. I've not compromised on my view that human power input and health/well-being benefits that come with exercise/cycling should always be at the core of pedal two-wheelers.
Hello Mr. Thorpe, glad to read you here.
Kindly explain why you had hacked us all with your app, we, those who supported your brand by putting in plain trust 4000€ for you (I bought TWO of your bikes, say thanks at least please) all of us bought it knowing that the bikes had a 40 km/h top speed and then you invaded it and unauthorisedly killed it to half (25 km/h in our case in Europe).
You have no rights to do so, its a shame what you made.
Now your product doesn't even charge either, no matter how diligently we follow your website's and documented infos.
Your customer assistance is not assisting at anything really, no one replies.

Do not dare to say a word that we don't have the right to be pissed at you.
I'm struggling to have anyone rational at Gocycle sorting this issue honorably since the unhappy idea you had to behead our properties to its half capacity with your "upgrade" v5.0.
You should have a manager and a lawyer lecturing you that these post-sold-goods invasion and breach of marketing good practices against your customers is not polite, at least.

Its an insult what you are doing, I am very sorry if someone anyhow forced you to do so, it is really not our problem, you must to restore it, kindly either FIX IT or REFUND US ALL.
Have a better day

mrgold35
6 months ago

I have two his/her 4" fat tire Radrover I use for work commuting, weekend fun rides, vacations, and trail riding for about 45-75 miles per week (around +1300 miles each since Sept/2016). Very inexpensive Class II bike at $1500 with plenty of power at 750w rear hub motor, 7 speeds, PAS 0-5, throttle, front suspension, and 20 mph top speed. Volt or Teo also make fat tire ebikes in the same price range with about the same capabilities if your used ebike price range is around the same price. The same ebike companies also have folding mini or city only ebikes around the same price range.

What I learned after getting back into biking after a +20 year break was:
- Keep the bike in the Class I or Class II range (PAS w/ or w/o throttle, 750w max motor, 20 mph max). Class III bikes have a top speed of around 28 mph and most often don't have a throttle. There seems to be more restrictions with Class III bikes depending on local laws because of their top speeds (young age restriction, helmet, sometimes registration as motor vehicle, no Class III ebikes on bike/hike trails, etc...). So far, Class I & II bike are allowed everywhere a regular bike is allowed EXCEPT where posted to target ebikes.

- I love having a throttle! I use it pick up speed quickly to get across intersection, to help get started on inclines, a little extra power to maintain my speed for short inclines, used it to push my +65lbs Radrover up 2 flights of stairs, or when my pedals might hit obstacles or hit the ground on tight turns if I pedal. I even used the throttle when my left pedal crank fell off and I used the throttle to get home instead of pushing the bike 3 miles up hill.

- Rack mounting points. Some full suspension bikes don't have rack mounting points or you have to attach a floating rack arm to the seatpost.

- Front suspension. You can really increase your avg speed on an ebike and you will feel every bump more and that will wear on you after a while without a front suspension

- Add suspension seat post like Suntour, Thudbuster, or bodyfloat are top choices.

- Brakes. Disc brakes seem to be standard. I like 180mm size since ebikes are sometimes 2X the weight of regular bikes. Upgrades of disc, pads, or even to hydraulic can be done.

- Tires in the 2"-4" range are really comfy off road and at +20 mph on paved streets. Go smaller if you need to take your ebike on public transportation or +90% urban. Go fatter if you plan to do more off-road with sand, snow, and mud and you need to adjusts the PSI. More tire choices from 100% urban to 100% trail with smaller size tires.

- upright/comfort riding position. Some eMTB might have you lean more forward or have extra wide handlebars. That can put extra stress on back, shoulders, arms, and hands to limit long distance riding.

- bottle cage attachments. Some eMTB don't have any bottle cage attachments. My Radrover comes with three. Bottle cage attachment can be used for other things like bike lock holders, tool kits, or for GPS trackers like Boomerang.

- Locks. U-bolts and chains seems to slow bike thieves down the most; but, very heavy and bulky to carry. Goes back to having an ability to add a rack and rack bag can help carry a good lock.

- Platform Bike rack. Just in case you need to travel with the +60 lbs ebike(s). Platform rack can really secure the ebike with little to no movement when traveling and easier to mount/dismount. I had too much movement with the Softride Dura 4 bike rack and I didn't trust the rubber straps with my +65lbs ebikes. Went with the Saris Freedom Superclamp 4 and very happy with this rack.

mams99
6 months ago

So, while I'm REALLLY all about getting a tandem... if I get into that and actually use it, the next thing I'm going to look into is an electric urban commuter bike.

I love in a burb of DC/B'More. Too far from work to commute it all (20 miles) and it's not a bike friendly commute. I work at the tip top of DC - right on the edge of Silver Spring. Most of my commute time is getting through/out of that area - then I fly. I wonder about parking my car and riding in. Anyone do a commute like that?

I wouldn't want a bike on the car, but fit "in" the car.

keyboardmashing
6 months ago

I think I've narrowed it down to these three. I live in Buffalo, NY - very flat, and very snowy. Most rides would be 10+ miles.

Must have: PAS and Throttle (thumb, not twist), 350W+, folding, $1,600USD or less.

Voltbike Urban: The price is great ($1100), Motor and Battery weaker than the other two. Easier to transport. No-name cells.
Voltbike Mariner: 6lb heavier than the Urban, Motor and Battery are stronger too but the fat tires probably compensate for this. Name-brand battery cells. Claims longer range than the urban. Better derailer than the other two. No suspension but the fat tires probably help. I'd really enjoy off-road capabilities but 90% of my riding will be on-road.
E-Joe EDPIK: More expensive, softer suspension, lighter than the other two, fun colors, longer battery range.

I'm open to other suggestions, corrections, or thoughts on the above three. Thanks!

Jan Janssens
7 months ago

I’ve been enjoying following the comments on this review and really appreciate hearing the feedback from real ebike owners. I think there are some points raised that we can improve on. What I personally find interesting here is that the Gocycle G3 is being compared with the Stromer and mainly on criteria that are the Stromer's key strengths - high mileage commuting/range/big battery/big motor. As the designer of Gocycle, I’m really encouraged by this given Gocycle is half the weight and also portable! I feel like all of the many years of development and progress made from G1, to G2, G3 and soon our GS is paying off. We are probably closer than ever to delivering a game changing ebike for urban and recreational commuters in value, practical usage, fun, and performance – and in a package that also brings with it many other benefits for the owner simply not found on any traditional ebike currently available.

My sense though in reading is that the Stromer is probably the right choice for most of the reviewers. It’s a very solid and capable ebike.

I wanted to add a few notes though on some of the comments such as “don’t ride it in the rain” which is not true. The G1 was very revolutionary when it launched in 2009 and we wanted to be cautious while we gathered service data from real customers over years and 10,000s of miles. So we had a note of caution in the manual on riding in the rain. I think we also had a note like “if it rains be smart/take your car or the train”, yikes we got stick for that :) !!! I’ve ridden bicycles all of my life and commuted daily rain/snow/sun – very few times I enjoy riding in the rain – but anyway…we quickly confirmed that the Gocycle design was fine in all weather conditions, and we’ve opened up Cleandrives with 8,000 miles of year round British weather riding and the chain and drive components are immaculate. We sell a lot of product to boat owners and we know that while you can never prevent corrosion, we excel against competitors in that area under salty sea air conditions. Last week it rained most all days and I road my G3 to work throughout. In 2012, we had months of torrential British rain and our test fleet of G2s ran everyday collecting 1000’s of miles of heavy wet weather riding. But results also will vary on how the owner takes care of the product. Following the guidelines of the manufacturer and reading the owner's manual will give you the best and highest possible service life.

This is an interesting recent Gocycle owner story on how Gocycle is used in all weather conditions:

https://gocycle.com/review/the-4-seasons-gocycle-rider/

On the comment on security, the cable lock referred to in the review comes free with the product and is mainly for “coffee shop” security as with any cable lock.

If you want a more secure option, the Gocycle lock holster is super convenient, fast and has a sold silver secure rating.

I use it daily and it works well. We’ve put a lot of thought into how and where it is mounted which goes for all Gocycle’s accessories and design. Gocycle does also have anti-theft capability via the app too and we’ve helped a number of customers recover their stolen Gocycles.

Gocycle accessories are more expensive than traditional bikes because they are bespoke designs for Gocycle. That’s a personal choice for potential customers whether to back a company / product that is taking a clean sheeted design approach with total integration or a pick and mix approach from off the shelf standard bike parts.

On the Gocycle Performance tires, they have very low rolling resistance and are a performance item. If you want more durable tires, there are a wide range of alternatives. I run the Gocycle tires in the summer and Schwalbe Big Ben tires in the winter.

On the battery fuel level - we are currently testing a new version of our fuel gauge. After you live with and get to know your ebike what ever the brand, you become less sensitive to range anxiety and in my opinion, the fuel guage should not be a major driver in deciding what kind of ebike to buy. But we’re trying to consider a totally different approach to range information for the user which could be really interesting in the future. Stay tuned!

On the comment about the folding being a novelty and not of practical value, probably that is not a fair statement. Gocycle is not like a Brompton or a Dahon - meaning it is not designed to quickly fold up to take on a train. There's been no compromise to the riding fit and geometry and so that sort of usage is not really a part of the Gocycle's DNA. But the stow-ability of Gocycle is definitely practical and useful! and is one of the key benefits that comes with owning a Gocycle and something that a Stromer in this comparison review cannot do! There are many many times that I have broken it down to put in the car to integrate with family errands, work, social occasions, weather - it is an added convenience that really highlights the flexibility of the product. Having two Gocycles with one folded up over the winter for example saves space. It's practical not just for commuters, but boaters, caravan owners and light aircraft owners.... But also, the Pitstopwheels are much easier to fix flat tires on than traditional bicycles and you don't even get your hands greasy. What other ebike weighs around 35lbs, can drive a 200 lb guy 20 miles/20 mph - and is small enough to fit four into the back of a Ford Focus or a few with room for the dog?

https://www.facebook.com/206815859442009/photos/a.256374007819527.1073741828.206815859442009/512326365557622/?type=3&theater

I’m encourage that Gocycle is being compared head to head with Stromer on commuting usages. That says something about the progress we have made as a company and we appreciate the feedback given here by real owners. It is worth mentioning though that my approach to how an ebike should be designed is different. Two main points 1) Lightweight is VERY important for bicycles and Ebikes, and when there has been a design choice to add more batteries and weight to increase range for example, I’ve not compromised at the expense of increasing weight. 2) Gocycle’s philosophy is a hybrid approach, two-wheel / balanced drive – you power the rear the motor powers the front. I've not compromised on my view that human power input and health/well-being benefits that come with exercise/cycling should always be at the core of pedal two-wheelers.

I've been interested in this Gocycle bike since mid 2016. Because the bike is so expensive I was hoping there would be a price reduction for overseas countries as the British Pound has devalued 15% since the UK decided to leave the EU. However, here in Holland where I live the price has remained the same. I have literaly no clue how this is possible. If I order it online at UK based shops I get a 15% discount, however, I want to buy it a local shop in Holland. It would be great if you explained why Gocycle has choosen for this strategy.

RichardThorpeGocycleDesigner
7 months ago

I’ve been enjoying following the comments on this review and really appreciate hearing the feedback from real ebike owners. I think there are some points raised that we can improve on. What I personally find interesting here is that the Gocycle G3 is being compared with the Stromer and mainly on criteria that are the Stromer's key strengths - high mileage commuting/range/big battery/big motor. As the designer of Gocycle, I’m really encouraged by this given Gocycle is half the weight and also portable! I feel like all of the many years of development and progress made from G1, to G2, G3 and soon our GS is paying off. We are probably closer than ever to delivering a game changing ebike for urban and recreational commuters in value, practical usage, fun, and performance – and in a package that also brings with it many other benefits for the owner simply not found on any traditional ebike currently available.

My sense though in reading is that the Stromer is probably the right choice for most of the reviewers. It’s a very solid and capable ebike.

I wanted to add a few notes though on some of the comments such as “don’t ride it in the rain” which is not true. The G1 was very revolutionary when it launched in 2009 and we wanted to be cautious while we gathered service data from real customers over years and 10,000s of miles. So we had a note of caution in the manual on riding in the rain. I think we also had a note like “if it rains be smart/take your car or the train”, yikes we got stick for that :) !!! I’ve ridden bicycles all of my life and commuted daily rain/snow/sun – very few times I enjoy riding in the rain – but anyway…we quickly confirmed that the Gocycle design was fine in all weather conditions, and we’ve opened up Cleandrives with 8,000 miles of year round British weather riding and the chain and drive components are immaculate. We sell a lot of product to boat owners and we know that while you can never prevent corrosion, we excel against competitors in that area under salty sea air conditions. Last week it rained most all days and I road my G3 to work throughout. In 2012, we had months of torrential British rain and our test fleet of G2s ran everyday collecting 1000’s of miles of heavy wet weather riding. But results also will vary on how the owner takes care of the product. Following the guidelines of the manufacturer and reading the owner's manual will give you the best and highest possible service life.

This is an interesting recent Gocycle owner story on how Gocycle is used in all weather conditions:

https://gocycle.com/review/the-4-seasons-gocycle-rider/

On the comment on security, the cable lock referred to in the review comes free with the product and is mainly for “coffee shop” security as with any cable lock.

If you want a more secure option, the Gocycle lock holster is super convenient, fast and has a sold silver secure rating.

I use it daily and it works well. We’ve put a lot of thought into how and where it is mounted which goes for all Gocycle’s accessories and design. Gocycle does also have anti-theft capability via the app too and we’ve helped a number of customers recover their stolen Gocycles.

Gocycle accessories are more expensive than traditional bikes because they are bespoke designs for Gocycle. That’s a personal choice for potential customers whether to back a company / product that is taking a clean sheeted design approach with total integration or a pick and mix approach from off the shelf standard bike parts.

On the Gocycle Performance tires, they have very low rolling resistance and are a performance item. If you want more durable tires, there are a wide range of alternatives. I run the Gocycle tires in the summer and Schwalbe Big Ben tires in the winter.

On the battery fuel level - we are currently testing a new version of our fuel gauge. After you live with and get to know your ebike what ever the brand, you become less sensitive to range anxiety and in my opinion, the fuel guage should not be a major driver in deciding what kind of ebike to buy. But we’re trying to consider a totally different approach to range information for the user which could be really interesting in the future. Stay tuned!

On the comment about the folding being a novelty and not of practical value, probably that is not a fair statement. Gocycle is not like a Brompton or a Dahon - meaning it is not designed to quickly fold up to take on a train. There's been no compromise to the riding fit and geometry and so that sort of usage is not really a part of the Gocycle's DNA. But the stow-ability of Gocycle is definitely practical and useful! and is one of the key benefits that comes with owning a Gocycle and something that a Stromer in this comparison review cannot do! There are many many times that I have broken it down to put in the car to integrate with family errands, work, social occasions, weather - it is an added convenience that really highlights the flexibility of the product. Having two Gocycles with one folded up over the winter for example saves space. It's practical not just for commuters, but boaters, caravan owners and light aircraft owners.... But also, the Pitstopwheels are much easier to fix flat tires on than traditional bicycles and you don't even get your hands greasy. What other ebike weighs around 35lbs, can drive a 200 lb guy 20 miles/20 mph - and is small enough to fit four into the back of a Ford Focus or a few with room for the dog?

https://www.facebook.com/206815859442009/photos/a.256374007819527.1073741828.206815859442009/512326365557622/?type=3&theater

I’m encourage that Gocycle is being compared head to head with Stromer on commuting usages. That says something about the progress we have made as a company and we appreciate the feedback given here by real owners. It is worth mentioning though that my approach to how an ebike should be designed is different. Two main points 1) Lightweight is VERY important for bicycles and Ebikes, and when there has been a design choice to add more batteries and weight to increase range for example, I’ve not compromised at the expense of increasing weight. 2) Gocycle’s philosophy is a hybrid approach, two-wheel / balanced drive – you power the rear the motor powers the front. I've not compromised on my view that human power input and health/well-being benefits that come with exercise/cycling should always be at the core of pedal two-wheelers.

america94
7 months ago

Radrover owners have put anywhere from 2.5" to 4.8" tires on the existing Radrover rims. Not sure about going tubeless and what is needed to convert. I just use Kenda 26X3.5-4.0" fat tire tubes with Schrader valves, Amazon, $20. I just see the inner tube as an added layer of protection and easier to fix a server flat with a tube. I did on one occasion run over some glass at 5:30am on my work commute that put a 1/8" slit in the rear tire, Mr. Tuffy liner, and tube. The slit on the tire was too big for Stans to seal; but, a patch kit on the tube and few pumps of air got me on my way.

It really depends on your mix of urban, hard-packed trail, single track, mud/sand/rocks/inclines, and weather for the right tires for the job. For me, I would lean more towards the Maxxis if I was +95% paved roads/trails in an urban environment and 5% or less dry weather hard-packed trails. Once you air up any fat tire to +20 PSI, only about 2-2.5" of the center tread is making contact with the road anyways. The Maxxis is perfect for a fast and comfortable ride with (waaaaay) less noise and better traction than the Kenda.

I'm about 60%-70% urban with hard-packed to single track trails with occasional sandy/rocky/muddy with steep inclines around 5% of the time at 200-225 miles a month. The 120 tpi Vee8 are much better for my riding because they give me:
- less road noise
- longer tread wear
- lighter tire
- more knobs to lessen flats (all of my Kenda punctures were between the spaced out knobs, the Vee8 have a lot more knobs for added protection)
- no tools needed to seat/unseat the tires because they are 120 tpi (can be a pain sometimes because the tire is so floppy with a folding bead)

I usually set the PSI to 20-22 for commuting and I can drop it down to 12-17 PSI for 100% trail riding days. Even at 20 PSI, the Vee8 can still traverse the occasional spots of mud/sand/rocks and make you own trail situations with ease on a trail that would stop a thinner tire (less dig in and more float compared to a thinner tire). The Vee8 is like a year round all season "jack of all trades, master of none" car tire.

The other day on a slight detour riding home after work. I was riding the single track trails near the Rio Grande river and a tree fell overnight across the path. I just made my own path with the Vee8 tires around the soft sandy terrain around the fallen tree without missing a beat.
^^^^ very well put, nothing to add there :-)

mrgold35
7 months ago

Radrover owners have put anywhere from 2.5" to 4.8" tires on the existing Radrover rims. Not sure about going tubeless and what is needed to convert. I just use Kenda 26X3.5-4.0" fat tire tubes with Schrader valves, Amazon, $20. I just see the inner tube as an added layer of protection and easier to fix a server flat with a tube. I did on one occasion run over some glass at 5:30am on my work commute that put a 1/8" slit in the rear tire, Mr. Tuffy liner, and tube. The slit on the tire was too big for Stans to seal; but, a patch kit on the tube and few pumps of air got me on my way.

It really depends on your mix of urban, hard-packed trail, single track, mud/sand/rocks/inclines, and weather for the right tires for the job. For me, I would lean more towards the Maxxis if I was +95% paved roads/trails in an urban environment and 5% or less dry weather hard-packed trails. Once you air up any fat tire to +20 PSI, only about 2-2.5" of the center tread is making contact with the road anyways. The Maxxis is perfect for a fast and comfortable ride with (waaaaay) less noise and better traction than the Kenda.

I'm about 60%-70% urban with hard-packed to single track trails with occasional sandy/rocky/muddy with steep inclines around 5% of the time at 200-225 miles a month. The 120 tpi Vee8 are much better for my riding because they give me:
- less road noise
- longer tread wear
- lighter tire
- more knobs to lessen flats (all of my Kenda punctures were between the spaced out knobs, the Vee8 have a lot more knobs for added protection)
- no tools needed to seat/unseat the tires because they are 120 tpi (can be a pain sometimes because the tire is so floppy with a folding bead)

I usually set the PSI to 20-22 for commuting and I can drop it down to 12-17 PSI for 100% trail riding days. Even at 20 PSI, the Vee8 can still traverse the occasional spots of mud/sand/rocks and make you own trail situations with ease on a trail that would stop a thinner tire (less dig in and more float compared to a thinner tire). The Vee8 is like a year round all season "jack of all trades, master of none" car tire.

The other day on a slight detour riding home after work. I was riding the single track trails near the Rio Grande river and a tree fell overnight across the path. I just made my own path with the Vee8 tires around the soft sandy terrain around the fallen tree without missing a beat.

1/1
Dewey
7 months ago

There are some lighter European e-bikes in the works. Brompton https://www.brompton.com/News/Posts/2016/Electric-bike are coming out with a folding e-bike later this year. Focus and Bianchi have been tinkering with the new Fauza evasion motor and the Focus project Y and Bianchi e-Doardo concepts show the direction of their thinking but it will be a while before they are available.

Saucy
8 months ago

Thank you for your reply galvinro! I will keep those brands in mind. However, I am actually more wondering on the best type of lock to get (chains vs u-lock) and how to best use that lock to lock a folding ebike such as the Voltbike Urban.

Saucy
8 months ago

Hi all,

I'm sorry if this question has been asked before. I'm thinking about getting a folding ebike such as the Voltbike Urban or the Epik SE. I am just wondering your guys' opinion on what type of lock to get (links to buy would be appreciated!) and the best way to lock these folding bikes since their frames are unique. If it helps, I would be parking in a low-crime area, but I would still like the peace and comfort of a more secure lock. Thank you guys so much!!

joyride
9 months ago

I also like the looks/ possibilities of this one, a 3.5" urban assault speed (which mean efficient to me) tire http://www.niagaracycle.com/categories/vee-rubber-speedster-folding-black-26-x-3-50

I ordered these along with the light Q-tubes, so I'll let you know how they go when they arrive.

The SynDRONE Effect
7 days ago

Too much talking. Just show us folding capabilities and electric speed

John Kang
1 month ago

Does it have regen braking?

Sungwook Kim
1 month ago

foldable electric bike of my concern as it seems having a good price tag on it!

Trey Drier
2 months ago

Another stellar review Court! The new 2017 eJoe now has an LCD display (which I know because I watched your latest review on it). I'm sold on the eJoe. For a few hundred more dollars it seems to be worth it. Also, in your detail review of the eJoe, the algorithms it uses for the battery assist seem to be superior to the VoltBike....smoother. I own several Dahon folding bikes so when you said the eJoe has magnets to keep the bike together when folded, that hit home. I have one non-Dahon folding bike with no magnets and its a pain to keep folded. I use bungee cords. Yuck! What I like most about your reviews is you don't try to impress people with flashy videos. You are honest and point out all the important aspects and features. Very thorough. Very much appreciated.

Sajjad Mengal
3 months ago

Xiaomi Yunma mini Intelligent Folding Power Assisted Electric Bicycle a superb bike with affordable price

you can get yours here at a special discount:https://goo.gl/nfwbiX

urbansustainability
3 months ago

Would be nice if you actually stated the price in the description.

Terry07
5 months ago

Have to keep peddling?

Adam
5 months ago

So if i wanna buy an electric bike i should get one of the Sondors?
Or is there an better alternative?

ThunderGirl95.2
5 months ago

I hope somebody can help me. I'm looking for a electric folding bike. but I have some things what I want on it. thats that the battery in the frame and that it has a display (digital) so I can see what my speed is etc. and with suspension. But I wonder of is there one for cheap. I saw Enzo en Ejoe ebike but they are expensive. So I hope that somebody can help me out

Practical Guy
6 months ago

trigger shifters are considered higher end over grip shifters.

Will Tee
6 months ago

No chemistry between the host and the shop owner at all.

Theodore Marakas
2 months ago

Maybe things will improve when they start taking hot showers together......LOL
I thought they were good, they don't work together all day long therefore some roughness around the edges when it comes to conversation is to be expected. Overall, I thought the review ws very good. By the way, Volt Bike informed me they've got bikes in stock again. I'm ordering one in the next 5 minutes.

Paintbrush 1962
3 months ago

Totally

Andrew Escobar
6 months ago

Just ordered this! Super excited and plan to ride this in DC

Michelle Jordan
7 months ago

is there something similar that i can get in California?

NetBoySteve
7 months ago

Did you find the motor loud? or?

Hamsky HEF
7 months ago

how about rain if caught up in it if its down pour can it still be ridden will it ruing the electric parts and battery

Will Gonzalez
8 months ago

I'm shopping for an affordable electric folding bike and I'm having a hard time deciding between this bike and the Energie Cycles excursion 2.0. Which one would you recommend?

outta reach24
8 months ago

can you upgrade the battery

Sharon Phillips
8 months ago

Im 70 years old and have to carry an oxygen machine. So, Im looking to find a LITE folding bike so I can lift it into the trunk of my car. Which brand should I look at?

WSWEss
6 months ago

xiaomi

INTERNETSUPERSTAR
9 months ago

can I have a child on the back? and how far does it go on throttle?

VoltBike
9 months ago

It's legally allowed only one person on "power assisted bicycles". On throttle you can expect range around 20km. With pedal assist is around 35-40km or so. *Depends on rider weight and terrain.

Jon Auty
10 months ago

These reviews are really informative and well produced - I find myself binge watching and I don't even cycle! Could you recommend a bike or things to look out for on a folding e-bike able to handle uk canal towpaths and some hills? So concrete, gravel, thick mud and cobbles!?