VoltBike Yukon 750 Review

Voltbike Yukon 750 Electric Bike Review
Voltbike Yukon 750
Voltbike Yukon 750 Bafang 8fun Fat Bike Geared Hub Motor
Voltbike Yukon 750 Removable Inset 48 Volt Battery
Voltbike Yukon 750 Lcd Display Trigger Throttle
Voltbike Yukon 750 Cranks 12 Magnet Cadence Sensor
Voltbike Yukon 750 Electric Fat Bike Suspension
Voltbike Yukon 750 Adjustable Kickstand 160 Mm Disc Brakes
Voltbike Yukon 750 Shimano Tourney 7 Speed Derailleur
Voltbike Yukon 750 Electric Bike Review
Voltbike Yukon 750
Voltbike Yukon 750 Bafang 8fun Fat Bike Geared Hub Motor
Voltbike Yukon 750 Removable Inset 48 Volt Battery
Voltbike Yukon 750 Lcd Display Trigger Throttle
Voltbike Yukon 750 Cranks 12 Magnet Cadence Sensor
Voltbike Yukon 750 Electric Fat Bike Suspension
Voltbike Yukon 750 Adjustable Kickstand 160 Mm Disc Brakes
Voltbike Yukon 750 Shimano Tourney 7 Speed Derailleur

Summary

  • An affordable but surprisingly powerful and quiet electric fat bike, sells online only and ships from Canada with a flat rate $70 fee, comes with a comprehensive 1 year warranty
  • Upgraded Kenda Juggernaut tires that feel good on pavement, dirt, sand and snow, removable battery is convenient to charge and has a USB port on the side mostly out of the way for portable electronics
  • More active saddle and bar setup, the reach was a bit longer which might suit taller riders, integrated headlight is convenient on cloudy days for winter riding or at night, trigger throttle design doesn't compromise grip
  • Only available in one color scheme and one frame size, basic Shimano Tourney 7 speed drivetrain, average mechanical disc brakes, the battery rattled a bit on my unit, suspension is fork is entry level

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

VoltBike

Model:

Yukon 750

Price:

$1,499 ($70 Flat Rate Shipping)

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Sand and Snow, Trail

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States, Canada

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

62 lbs (28.12 kg)

Battery Weight:

7.2 lbs (3.26 kg)

Motor Weight:

14 lbs (6.35 kg)

Frame Material:

Aluminum

Frame Sizes:

19 in (48.26 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

72" Length, 29.5" Stand Over Height, 24" Reach

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Black

Frame Fork Details:

Basic Top Gun Suspension with 90 mm Travel, 135 mm Dropout Width, 11 mm Axle

Frame Rear Details:

11 mm Axle

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Tourney, MF-TZ21, 11-28T

Shifter Details:

Shiman SIS Index Shifter on Right

Cranks:

42T Chainring with Aluminum Bash Guard

Pedals:

Wellgo M248DU Alloy Cage Style Platform

Headset:

VP-A41ACK

Stem:

Promax DA-3210 ~8° Rise

Handlebar:

Promax Low-Rise, 25" Length

Brake Details:

Tektro Novela Mechanical Disc with 160 mm Rotors, Artek Vigorous Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Grips:

Flat Rubber, Black

Saddle:

Selle Royal Freccia

Seat Post:

Promax, Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

320 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Samson Double Walled Alloy, Punched Out

Spokes:

13 Gauge, Stainless Steel, Black

Tire Brand:

Kenda Juggernaut, 26" x 4"

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)

Tire Details:

31TPI, Wire Bead, 5-30 PSI

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Integrated LED Headlight, Rust Resistant Z Chain, Floating Ball Compass, Flick Bell, Optional Fenders and Rack $100

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, USB Charging Port on Right Side of Battery

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bafang

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

750 watts

Motor Torque:

80 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Sanyo

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

10.4 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

499.2 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4 hours

Estimated Min Range:

15 miles (24 km)

Estimated Max Range:

35 miles (56 km)

Display Type:

APT Development, Fixed Backlit LCD

Readouts:

Battery Gauge (5 Bars), Assist Level (1-9), Speed, Avg. Speed, Top Speed, Odometer, Trip Odometer

Display Accessories:

Independent 3 Button Pad

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle (12 Magnet Pedelec Disc)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

VoltBike is a leader in low cost electric bikes, I visited their headquarters near Vancouver Canada in 2015 and learned more about their online sales business… shipping to Canada and the US for a flat $70. If you don’t live near a bike shop but want an efficient city ebike or something a little more wild like the Yukon here, they can be a great option. My experience testing their products has been mostly good with only the occasional minor damage in shipping (the kickstand arrived broken on one of their folding mini fat bikes recently). All things considered, with their one year warranty and wide selection of styles I’ve been pretty impressed. Of course, there are always trade-offs when you try to hit lower price points and I encountered a few with the updated Yukon 750. Their prior Yukon model was built around a slightly weaker and louder 500 watt geared hub motor and had an exposed controller box and top mounted battery. It’s easy to appreciate how much nicer the 750 looks as well as how the frame balance has been improved. The top tube here is sloped down to make standing over the frame more comfortable and a suspension fork has been added to improve comfort… all for just $350 more!

But as I said, there are some trade off’s with the value approach and some that I noticed were the more basic seven speed Shimano Tourney drivetrain. It does the job but might go out of tune easier, adds some weight and just has a limited selection. There’s no slap guard on the right chainstay but that’s not a huge deal considering the frame is Aluminum and won’t rust there if it gets knicked. The suspension fork is comfortable but very basic with no adjustments or lockout and it’s probably heavier than something like a RockShox Bluto air fork. By the way, don’t rush out and buy that fork for this ebike because I believe it’s designed for a tapered head tube and I think the Yukon 750 is straight. The battery rattled a bit during my ride and I tried to demonstrate this in the video review but it never cut out and the model I tested was an early build so perhaps that will be resolved? That’s about it… these are all minor gripes and yes, I wish it had a bottle cage mounting point on the seat tube but there are accessories to work around that.

Getting back to what works on this bike… the motor is powerful, it offers enough zip to start and maintain in deep soft sand and this really surprised me! You get a nice large LCD display panel that’s backlit and an integrated headlight that doesn’t require separate batteries! A rechargeable backlight could be added inexpensively later if you do a lot of early morning or evening riding. The battery can be charged on or off the frame and helps to reduce the weight of the bike when lifting for transport or service but I wish the front wheel offered quick release to further reduce weight. It’s not a huge deal to unscrew though and I love the adjustable length kickstand that’s far back and out of the way for pedaling so if you back up and the cranks turn they don’t collide :)

The tires on this bike were a big upgrade from before and since they take a lot of abuse if you ride off-road and could potentially make a lot of noise if you stay on road I feel like the tread pattern they chose was thoughtfully chosen. It offers good durability and is a good all-around design. The only other big consideration with this particular bike is that the stem is kind of long, the bars are low-rise and the saddle is active. That means you tend to lean forward more when riding and can feel the bumps in your arms, shoulders and bottom. The saddle itself is a nice one, just not super soft. Consider adding a 27.2 mm Thudbuster to improve comfort along with lowering tire PSI (especially for riding on soft surfaces like sand… we used ~7 PSI). I guess one final area is worth scrutinizing here and that’s the brakes which are average sized with 160 mm rotors. They’re mechanical which require more wrist strength to actuate and again, smaller rotors means less mechanical advantage and the bike is on the heavier side at ~62 lbs. When you’re slashing prices you have to make trade offs and I feel like VoltBike made them pretty well. This is the kind of bike that could get rusty and beat up if used in salty sand or salty snow environments. When you spend a ton of money on a really nice bike sometimes it’s not as fun to actually take it out, knowing that it is going to be damaged. With a cheaper bike like this you still get good power and can have a lot of fun and again, I feel like it looks really nice and has really been improved since the original 500 watt model.

This review was shot with the help and financial support of Cabo Adventures in Cabo San Lucas Mexico! If you’d like to go for an electric fat bike ride on the beach like we did for these photos and video you can visit their website at www.cabo-adventures.com to learn more. I found their commitment to environmental sustainability to be inspiring, they offer lots of activities outside of ebikes, the food was good and their employees were wonderful. Cabo itself is one of the safest parts of Mexico, the airport is nice, roads are good and lots of celebrities visit because it’s only a 2.5 hour flight from Los Angeles. I shot a fun vlog about the visit where you can see some of the behind the scenes action here. My thanks again to the organization for being open to a creative review like this where we could truly test the bikes in a rigorous and majestic environment :D Big thanks to VoltBike for partnering with me for this review.

Pros:

  • The motor is fairly quiet but feels zippy and had no problem with the soft sand or hills we tested it on, when the air pressure was lowered in the tires to ~7 PSI the bike worked great, the 8Fun motor seemed to be fat-bike specific and extra wide to support the spoke pattern of the wheels, it looked nice
  • The battery can be charged on or off the bike, has an integrated USB charging port (though it’s a bit exposed on the right side) and you only need to push one button to get the bike powered on, not two! Also, keys don’t have to be left in when riding
  • Pedal assist relies on a 12 magnet sensor, that’s the highest number I see on other bikes and it leads to faster on/off activation, I also love that the brake levers override all power modes and cut the motor when pulled
  • It’s neat that you can override assist at any time with the trigger throttle with full power output! Note however that assist is always active, there is not throttle-only mode on the bike
  • I love that this bike offers nine levels of pedal assist because the increments are finder and differences are more subtle… you can find the perfect level for your terrain, range and ride style
  • I love that VoltBike sells a matching fender and rack set for just $100, it can be difficult to find the correct size of accessories when dealing with unique frames like those of fat tire bicycles
  • Thumb throttles work great for off-road riding because they don’t compromise your grip on the handle bar, I hear some people say that they are also easier to actuate and can be adjusted up or down to sit wherever your thumb feels most comfortable
  • The punched out rims are cool looking, reduce weight and might offer a little bit more comfort and cushion than solid ones, the red liners show through and match the paint accents on the frame
  • I like that the battery is seated into the downtube and doesn’t stick up very far, it leaves a bit more room for hanging the bike on some racks, lifting it and possibly adding a tight fitting bottle cage adapter to the seat tube like this
  • I appreciate having a kickstand and love that this one is adjustable and mounted far enough back on the left chainstay that it doesn’t collide with the crank and pedal if you are backing up (the crank automatically turns)
  • The Kenda Juggernaut pro tires are high quality… light but durable and with a good off-road tread pattern that’s still fairly dense for use on hard surfaces
  • Quality battery cells from Sanyo, a generous one year comprehensive warranty and flat rate shipping to the US and Canada for just $70 (cheaper than almost all other bikes I see being sold online)
  • I like that the top tube slopes down, lowering stand over height to accommodate people with shorter inseams, I feel like it could slant more but VoltBike also has the Mariner folding fat bike for people who really need a lower stand over or just don’t like the big frames

Cons:

  • The display panel is compact, swivels to reduce glare and offers a lot of information but isn’t removable… this means it could take more damage if left outside, I do like that it’s backlit and that the headlight is powered off the main battery pack however
  • The button pad is easy to reach and fairly intuitive so you can arrow up or down when riding for more or less pedal assist power but the plastic cover is more delicate than inset buttons, ours got bent during tests when the bike crashed
  • This isn’t necessarily a bad thing but the saddle felt firm and the stem and bars were positioned further forward and lower down to accommodate active riding or larger longer-armed riders, you could always swap the stem out, replace the seat and get different bars like cruiser style if you prefer, I like that the bike has suspension but it’s not adjustable or lockable… just basic
  • Maybe it was just the unit I was testing but the battery rattled a little bit, I was surprised because it seems very securely mounted, maybe the fit is just a little loose?
  • The pedals are decent but I prefer wider, grippier ones like these Wellgo’s especially if you’re riding in snow… I do like the oversized thumb shifter however which works great with gloves on
  • The brakes are kind of average being mechanical vs. hydraulic and since the rotors are smaller at 160 mm vs. 180 mm they heat up a bit more and require more hand strength to stop
  • I wish the chainring had a plate on both sides, not just the outside, because sometimes when riding at higher speeds using the throttle bounding around off-road the chain can come off, I’d also appreciate a slap guard on the right chain stay
  • The floating compass is unique but a little gimmicky, I definitely appreciate the bell, would be nice if the grips were locking but considering their basic flat design it’s not a huge deal if they spin
  • Considering how large and heavy the bike is I love that you can take the battery pack off to reduce weight but I wish the front wheel had quick release, just to make it easier to fit into cars and other tight spaces vs. loosening and twisting the handlebars

Resources:

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William
11 months ago

Great review once again Court! Good to see you had fun riding the Yukon at the beach over variable soft/hard sand and rock. Look forward to your review on the other VoltBike Mariner and how it compares with the similar Trail Viper 350W, and if it feels stable in terms of loose parts/components when going over bumps, since you mentioned the battery on the Yukon rattled, so I suspect things to be worse on folding bikes. Also, please comment whether you feel the power and speed difference between the Yukon 750 vs Mariner 500 vs Trail Viper 350, when doing 0 to 20mph. I believe shipping to US is $69 and Canada is $49, last I checked when looking to shop for an eBike on VoltBike website, so you may want to double check that.

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Cristina
1 day ago

Hi,

I am looking at the RadRover and Voltbike Yukon. RadRover comes with a a 18.25" frame, and 31.25" stand over. The Voltbike Yukon comes with a 19" frame, yet has a stand over height of 29.5". What is more important to look at when considering height between these two bikes, or should I be looking at a different measurement than stand over and frame size?

Would appreciate some input! Thanks.

Denis Shelston
4 days ago

Got a nice portable pump to inflate tires on my bike.

The idea is simple, it works with voltage from 42v to 72v. Need to inflate the tire, simply remove battery, connect the pump to battery and Bob's your uncle.

Trying to figure out how to connect it to my battery... Does anyone know the name or have any technical info on that 2 pin connector, the one to which the battery connects to on the bike? I'd like to simply make an adapter...

Thank you.

PS. I have a Téo Fat Bike, but it's exactly the same mount for the battery found on the Yukon 750.

https://lunacycle.com/luna-e-pump/

vadim1836
5 days ago

I'm researching fat bikes, comparing different brands/models. I really like Teo S fat bike, read and watched tons of postings and videos comparing it to Volt Yukon and RadRover bikes. However, there is another similar bike Daymak Wild Goose that I couldn't find any recent reviews (Jan 2016 is the latest) and there isn't much info on Daymak sub-forum either.
Spec-wise Daymak is similar to the above bikes and the price is very competitive, so I'm wondering if anyone can share their personal experience about Wild Goose.

Motor: 500W Hybrid Pie Brushless Hub Motor
Battery: 48V 10AH Lithium
Battery type: Lithium Ion Polymer
Battery life: 800 charges
Brakes: Hydraulic front and back disc brakes
Charger type: 48V
Max speed: up to 32km/h
Range: up to 40 km on throttle/ up to 80 km on pedal assist
Max load: 120 kg
Gross weight: 42 kg
Climbing incline: 15 degrees
Tire size: 26" x 4"
Gauges: Battery level, speedometer, odometer, 6 speed pedal-assist mode, 7 speed Shimano torney Gearing system
Lights: Front LED
Removable battery: YES
Key ignition: YES
Front Shocks: YES

westwood
6 days ago

Yukon 750 with 1000kms on it, had a big spill and broke the left hand brake. Looking to replace but can't find what / who sells this hand brake with the electical cut-off?

Also, does someone know the "how" to replace the brake?

I contacted Volt twice and have received no response?....

All help appreciated.

This should do the trick.

http://www.ebikes.ca/shop/electric-bicycle-parts/ebrakes/ebrakewuxl.html

gcoop
1 week ago

Yukon 750 with 1000kms on it, had a big spill and broke the left hand brake. Looking to replace but can't find what / who sells this hand brake with the electical cut-off?

Also, does someone know the "how" to replace the brake?

I contacted Volt twice and have received no response?....

All help appreciated.

dogdad
1 week ago

Maybe someone can help with this. I have a 2006 Toyota Tacoma pickup and I am in the market for a standup rack for the bed. I will need something that will accommodate a Voltbike Yukon with 4 inch tires and a Surface Colt. Not interested in removing the front wheel or hanging the bike over the tailgate. Any suggestions appreciated.[/QUOT Try Crags list ,I found a lot of racks cheap .

tarhead
2 weeks ago

I picked up my shiny red Téo Limited, Size L earlier this week and thought I'd share my initial impressions.

First, some background on me and why I decided to go with an electric fat bike. I'm fairly large at 6'4" 285 lbs, in my early 50s, with the attendant knee problems you might expect of someone with that description. I purchased a new Colnago road bike last year and loved it, but I eventually realized it's just not the right bike for me at this point. It was exhilarating to ride, but also painful to my back, knees and wrists. I'll miss it!

I did my research and decided that something sturdier with pedal assist was the way to go. I was one of those considering the Voltbike Yukon 750, but just couldn't say no to the upgrades available on the Téo for only a few hundred extra $. The key factors were the larger battery capacity and hydraulic disc brakes.

The Purchase Experience

Benoit was great right from the start; quick to respond to queries and very accommodating. I live close enough to Montréal pick it up, so I'm not able to comment on the shipping process. The website is fairly straightforward to navigate, once you figure out how to change the language (for non-francophones, at least). I was only a bit saddened to see that I couldn't get a black or white Limited in Size L, but in retrospect the red colour looks fantastic. I think I prefer it to the black and the white would've been difficult to keep clean, so my third choice just might have been the best one.

Setup

I'm a technical writer who writes manuals for a living, so I'm going to be overly critical regarding most documentation for any goods I buy. I'll give Téo's a solid C+. ;) plenty of illustrations, but nothing about setting up the fenders, rack and lights for the Limited model. Also nothing about how to use the LCD display, though I was able to find that manual by searching this forum after being unsuccessful trying to find it on the Téo website.

The bike comes out of the box about 80% preassembled, with the most difficult bits happily ready to ride. I'm hardly a mechanically proficient person, but I was able to get most of the remainder put together in what appeared to be a solid fashion. The exception being the front fender--it remains off as the bolt doesn't appear to be long enough to thread through both the fender and the front light. This is a bit frustrating as I spent about an hour trying to make it fit without bending it. I noticed a post on this forum that mentions the same issue, so I'll try that fix over the weekend.

The Bike and its Components

My impression in seeing the fully assembled bike was, "wow, this is huge!" For someone my size, this is a very welcome feeling. The quick-release seatpost is a great touch, because you just know that you're going to have to let all of your buddies try this thing, so the seat will be bobbing up and down as everyone takes a turn. The leather (pleather?) handlebar grips are very attractive and offer a nice balance of comfort versus 'grippiness'.

Overall, I'm extremely impressed with the quality of components Téo has selected. I had expected to replace the grips, pedals and saddle immediately, but in the end decided to keep all of these, as the performance and comfort provided by the original components is more than adequate. The tires, cable-managent, paint/finish and suspension forks are all superior to what I would've expected for this price point. Great job, Téo!

The Ride

It doesn't take long to get used to riding this bike and, once you do, any other bike seems inadequate by comparison. The assist provided even at PAS 1 lends the impression of riding a regular road bike. Bump that up to 5 or more and you'll be feeling as if you're ready for the peloton in Paris. The only way to describe it is exhilarating and the minimal noise and drag created by the knobby 4" tires is more than overwhelmed by the smooth assist of the 500w Bafang hub motor. It's just an absolute blast to ride. Eventually, you might find yourself frustrated by the 32 km speed limit imposed by the government (understandable for bike paths but annoying on the road when a bit more speed would result in increased rather than decreased safety) and the requirement that you pedal a half-term or so before you can engage the throttle. Again, this is a safety feature, but one I'd willingly forgo if possible. (Is it possible?)

I took the bike into the woods on a medium-difficulty mountain bike trail and have yet to be able to wipe the stupid grin off of my face. I feel like I should be handing over $5 to some bored carney ticket-taker every time I ride these trails. Whenever I felt I was getting stuck in foot-deep water and muck, or starting to slide backwards on a particularly steep rock section, a quick blast of throttle was my get-out--of-jail-free card. It's an experience more akin to riding a motocross bike than a mountain bike.

Negatives

These are few and far between, but have to mentioned in the interests of a balanced review:

Gear shifting with pedal-assist activated. According to the manual, you're not supposed to do it. I didn't realize this and broke my chain on my first ride. Still a bit unclear as to how I should be handling this, as I discussed in another thread on this forum.
Front light wires are very susceptible to damage. After my chain broke (see above), the pedals moved on their own as I was walking it, activating the pedal assist and driving the bike out of my hands and into the brush. (Forgot to disable pedal assist.) The handlebars twisted all the way around in the very gentle collision and snapped the wires at the point where they attach to the light. (See photo.) Would like to have it fixed but my LBS didn't know how to and I'm the polar opposite of handy, so I guess I'll just go with a standalone light for now. I'm pretty sure this would just happen again were I to repair it.
The manual doesn't cover everything and I struggled with installing some of the Limited parts. Front fender in particular.
Handlebars are way too low with the seat raised to maximum. This is a problem for only a few of us I know and is to be expected for a bike with only two frame size choices. I must confess I look longingly at those whose bikes have the handlebars resting above the seat; sometimes far above. It looks sooooo comfortable! Perhaps a stem riser might work?

Conclusion

I love this bike and spend much of my time at work counting down the hours until I can go for a ride. It handles my gravitationally challenged body perfectly, making me feel like a kid again. (I was a very skinny kid, BTW.) Téo has done a great job examining the competition and learning from what works and what doesn't, offering upgrades wherever it makes the most sense, while still maintaining affordability. I would highly recommend this bike to anyone looking to increase the fun factor of cycling while decreasing the pain factor.
Something like this should help to raise your handlebars. MEC also has longer adjustable stems that could be tilted up for a little more height. https://www.mec.ca/en/product/5042-662/Alloy-Stem-Raiser

Max Mangold
2 weeks ago

My bike has a brand newcontroller and throttle and batteries are load testing as good as new however the bike does go but the hubs motor is kinda loud and it seems to reach half what should be top speed and then that's all the faster it goes barely enough to keep the bike upright... it's a Walmart Yukon trail navigator lead acid battery bike...someone please give me some direction. I Have no idea where the proper place to post this is so I am trying a third time

WheelsOntario
2 weeks ago

I picked up my shiny red Téo Limited, Size L earlier this week and thought I'd share my initial impressions.

First, some background on me and why I decided to go with an electric fat bike. I'm fairly large at 6'4" 285 lbs, in my early 50s, with the attendant knee problems you might expect of someone with that description. I purchased a new Colnago road bike last year and loved it, but I eventually realized it's just not the right bike for me at this point. It was exhilarating to ride, but also painful to my back, knees and wrists. I'll miss it!

I did my research and decided that something sturdier with pedal assist was the way to go. I was one of those considering the Voltbike Yukon 750, but just couldn't say no to the upgrades available on the Téo for only a few hundred extra $. The key factors were the larger battery capacity and hydraulic disc brakes.

The Purchase Experience

Benoit was great right from the start; quick to respond to queries and very accommodating. I live close enough to Montréal pick it up, so I'm not able to comment on the shipping process. The website is fairly straightforward to navigate, once you figure out how to change the language (for non-francophones, at least). I was only a bit saddened to see that I couldn't get a black or white Limited in Size L, but in retrospect the red colour looks fantastic. I think I prefer it to the black and the white would've been difficult to keep clean, so my third choice just might have been the best one.

Setup

I'm a technical writer who writes manuals for a living, so I'm going to be overly critical regarding most documentation for any goods I buy. I'll give Téo's a solid C+. ;) plenty of illustrations, but nothing about setting up the fenders, rack and lights for the Limited model. Also nothing about how to use the LCD display, though I was able to find that manual by searching this forum after being unsuccessful trying to find it on the Téo website.

The bike comes out of the box about 80% preassembled, with the most difficult bits happily ready to ride. I'm hardly a mechanically proficient person, but I was able to get most of the remainder put together in what appeared to be a solid fashion. The exception being the front fender--it remains off as the bolt doesn't appear to be long enough to thread through both the fender and the front light. This is a bit frustrating as I spent about an hour trying to make it fit without bending it. I noticed a post on this forum that mentions the same issue, so I'll try that fix over the weekend.

The Bike and its Components

My impression in seeing the fully assembled bike was, "wow, this is huge!" For someone my size, this is a very welcome feeling. The quick-release seatpost is a great touch, because you just know that you're going to have to let all of your buddies try this thing, so the seat will be bobbing up and down as everyone takes a turn. The leather (pleather?) handlebar grips are very attractive and offer a nice balance of comfort versus 'grippiness'.

Overall, I'm extremely impressed with the quality of components Téo has selected. I had expected to replace the grips, pedals and saddle immediately, but in the end decided to keep all of these, as the performance and comfort provided by the original components is more than adequate. The tires, cable-managent, paint/finish and suspension forks are all superior to what I would've expected for this price point. Great job, Téo!

The Ride

It doesn't take long to get used to riding this bike and, once you do, any other bike seems inadequate by comparison. The assist provided even at PAS 1 lends the impression of riding a regular road bike. Bump that up to 5 or more and you'll be feeling as if you're ready for the peloton in Paris. The only way to describe it is exhilarating and the minimal noise and drag created by the knobby 4" tires is more than overwhelmed by the smooth assist of the 500w Bafang hub motor. It's just an absolute blast to ride. Eventually, you might find yourself frustrated by the 32 km speed limit imposed by the government (understandable for bike paths but annoying on the road when a bit more speed would result in increased rather than decreased safety) and the requirement that you pedal a half-term or so before you can engage the throttle. Again, this is a safety feature, but one I'd willingly forgo if possible. (Is it possible?)

I took the bike into the woods on a medium-difficulty mountain bike trail and have yet to be able to wipe the stupid grin off of my face. I feel like I should be handing over $5 to some bored carney ticket-taker every time I ride these trails. Whenever I felt I was getting stuck in foot-deep water and muck, or starting to slide backwards on a particularly steep rock section, a quick blast of throttle was my get-out--of-jail-free card. It's an experience more akin to riding a motocross bike than a mountain bike.

Negatives

These are few and far between, but have to mentioned in the interests of a balanced review:

Gear shifting with pedal-assist activated. According to the manual, you're not supposed to do it. I didn't realize this and broke my chain on my first ride. Still a bit unclear as to how I should be handling this, as I discussed in another thread on this forum.
Front light wires are very susceptible to damage. After my chain broke (see above), the pedals moved on their own as I was walking it, activating the pedal assist and driving the bike out of my hands and into the brush. (Forgot to disable pedal assist.) The handlebars twisted all the way around in the very gentle collision and snapped the wires at the point where they attach to the light. (See photo.) Would like to have it fixed but my LBS didn't know how to and I'm the polar opposite of handy, so I guess I'll just go with a standalone light for now. I'm pretty sure this would just happen again were I to repair it.
The manual doesn't cover everything and I struggled with installing some of the Limited parts. Front fender in particular.
Handlebars are way too low with the seat raised to maximum. This is a problem for only a few of us I know and is to be expected for a bike with only two frame size choices. I must confess I look longingly at those whose bikes have the handlebars resting above the seat; sometimes far above. It looks sooooo comfortable! Perhaps a stem riser might work?

Conclusion

I love this bike and spend much of my time at work counting down the hours until I can go for a ride. It handles my gravitationally challenged body perfectly, making me feel like a kid again. (I was a very skinny kid, BTW.) Téo has done a great job examining the competition and learning from what works and what doesn't, offering upgrades wherever it makes the most sense, while still maintaining affordability. I would highly recommend this bike to anyone looking to increase the fun factor of cycling while decreasing the pain factor.

1/2
Max Mangold
2 weeks ago

My bike has a brand newcontroller and throttle and batteries are load testing as good as new however the bike does go but the hubs motor is kinda loud and it seems to reach half what should be top speed and then that's all the faster it goes barely enough to keep the bike upright... it's a Walmart Yukon trail navigator lead acid battery bike...someone please give me some direction.

Max Mangold
2 weeks ago

My bike has a brand new controller and throttle and batteries are load testing as good as new however the bike does go but the hubs motor is kinda loud and it seems to reach half what should be top speed and then that's all the faster it goes barely enough to keep the bike upright... it's a Walmart Yukon trail navigator lead acid battery bike...someone please give me some direction.

Denis Shelston
2 weeks ago

I've never heard of Teo eBikes.

@86 and still kicking. It is very similar in design to the Rad Rover and the Voltbike Yukon 750.

Equipped with a 9-speed Shimano Alivio derailleur and shifter.

So now, you've heard of them. ;)

ace20ri
3 weeks ago

Hi Guys,
I'm trying to replace the tubes on my Yukon 750. I got the front wheel off no problem but the rear wheel is completely stuck to the frame. I've loosened both of the bolts, have the chain in the highest gear, applied some degreaser and lightly tapped the bolts with a small hammer to get them loose but the wheel refuses to budge.

Has this happened to anyone? If anyone has ideas or recommendations I'd love to hear them.
Thanks.

Hey Rusty, not sure if this is a good thing but I am pretty seasoned now on removing the rear tire from the frame (lots of practice from flats). I have had this same issue and found that rocking the wheel from side to side a few times did the trick. The rear mount on the disc side seems to be a little too tight and does not have the nice torque arm like the freewheel side to help prevent the threads from digging in. You may even have to push on the frame on the disc side in the direction of the freewheel to reduce the load on the threads while rocking the wheel.
I have had zero luck pulling straight up on that wheel. Didn't try a hammer as I was concerned about the axial. Rocking (tilting) wheel side to side seemed to provide enough mechanical advantage to leverage the axel free. Take some sand paper and remove a few layers once you get the axel free and lube it and you should be golden for the next attempt.

Hope that helps!

Rusty Shackleford
3 weeks ago

Hi Guys,
I'm trying to replace the tubes on my Yukon 750. I got the front wheel off no problem but the rear wheel is completely stuck to the frame. I've loosened both of the bolts, have the chain in the highest gear, applied some degreaser and lightly tapped the bolts with a small hammer to get them loose but the wheel refuses to budge.

Has this happened to anyone? If anyone has ideas or recommendations I'd love to hear them.
Thanks.

Rob Cobb
3 weeks ago

Hello all. Looking into this bike. Presently riding a Voltbike Yukon 750. My question is; at my 230 pound 6 foot size, in your opinion is the 500 Watt motor going to be enough. It is fairly hilly where I live and the Yukon is fine. Really peppy uphill actually. The Colt looks like a great bike. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Hi,

Just got my new black Colt less than 2 weeks ago. So far put about 240 kms on it. I happen to weigh in at 239 lbs. and am 6'2" tall. I have no problems with the bike going up hills (although I live in the greater Toronto area and there are no hills like out west) with the bike. I find it to be quite peppy. The only complaint I have is that I can only get about 40 to 50 kms on a charge. The review I saw on Youtube indicated that 60 kms would be about right. I'm sure this decreased kms per charge is due to the fact that I am quite heavy but I wish I could get a few more kms per charge.

america94
4 weeks ago

Thank you @Jazzcat and @AguassissiM for the compliments and vote of confidence :-)

@Baron, I rode the Rad and the Teo back to back at the Teo shop. The Rad is a nice bike and has a solid feel too. If a Teo was not available, I would consider a RadRover in the same price range.

But the Teo is better designed for durability and for water resistance as well (ex. the Rad has a bunch of cables running underneath that can easily get crushed riding over a rock or wood stump and definitely get soaked when running in water. The smallest slit in a cable and corrosion will start).

And then for what I believe is the same price, you basically get a bunch of great free upgrades with the Teo over the Rad (extended battery and hydraulic brakes like @AguassissiM just by themselves are great and are worth a lot of extra $$$ :D).

Checkout the super long original Teo thread to get started and the comparison between Teo, Voltbike and Rad.

I do get a small commission for my efforts through an affiliate link. But I think everyone here knows by now I really don't do it for the money and never try to influence people to lean towards the Teo (well I do, but because I truly believe what I say :D:D)

Here is my affiliate link if you decide to go with a Teo and want to help me out: Teo Fat Bike website

In the upper left corner, don't forget to change the currency to US. You'll see how much more it is for us Canadians if you leave the option to CAD dollars :eek:

Denis Shelston
1 month ago

It is pretty awesome :) A couple of weeks ago I actually compared the Teo forum to the Yukon and noticed we had caught up reaaaally fast! I said it before, we're a great bunch and are learning, sharing a lot while having fun. Can't spend much time myself outside of this great circle :D

It is a great sharing group we have.

Lots of Canadians, but we're growing South of the border.

Good job @america94, you started it all.

america94
1 month ago

I was kinda lookin' around this site.

I noticed we (Apostles of the Church of Téology)* are one of the most active of all.

For a relatively newer fat bike and with no official review.

Kinda fun don't you think?

* not meant to offend anyone, for fun only.

It is pretty awesome :-) A couple of weeks ago I actually compared the Teo forum to the Yukon and noticed we had caught up reaaaally fast! I said it before, we're a great bunch and are learning, sharing a lot while having fun. Can't spend much time myself outside of this great circle :D

Denis Shelston
1 month ago

Just curious @Joe EE, with less than 100 mi on the Yukon, seemingly quite happy with it, why did you get the Surface 604?

SuperGoop
1 month ago

@Joe EE Thanks for your impressions. Nice write up. I am also considering adding the Colt or the Rook. I have over 2,000 km on my Yukon 750, and I can relate to your experiences.

Joe EE
1 month ago

Hey everyone. Just want to start off by saying: I am not an expert on any of this. Just started riding this season after a 30 year hiatus so I am just happy to be back up on 2 wheels again. I have been riding the Yukon since Memorial Day and I still haven't put 100 mikes on that yet. Close, but not yet. I work a lot. Just got my Colt this week and did a 16 mile round trip today and it was lots of fun but these bikes are a sharp contrast in a lot of ways.
The Yuke arrived almost completely assembled, I needed to attach the handlebars and the pedals and it was easy. It came with the necessary tools and the tires were properly inflated. It has been riding as it was designed and I love it. There are some cons in my opinion but they have nothing to do with the design or manufacturing. I suspected that riding a fatbike would feel kind of "trucky" and it does. Very solid, lots of momentum once you get going but agile is not a word I would use to describe it. I'm fine with it but I remember my childhood riding and the bikes I had were always nimble. The Yuke is also a heavy beast, upwards of 70 lbs. I could never pedal it without the motor assist. With the motor she is lots of fun and very solid feeling. I get a lot of range out of the battery and I am satisfied with purchase and the price.
Again I am not knocking either of these bikes, just going to point out the differences. The Colt came with more assembly necessary and I wouldn't call it easy exactly. Surface has some assembly videos on Youtube but I had a harder time than I would have liked. The front wheel is a quick release so that was straightforward. Every review and advertisement of the bike I have seen shows a lever assembly adjustment for the handlebar height. That is not what arrived, I am assuming what I got is an upgrade? No tools came with this bike either. Fortunately, I still have the Voltbike tools so they came in handy and I don't keep a workshop. Just attaching the handlebars was tough, as that bolt that goes straight down was tough to tighten enough to the point where if felt secure and I was nervous I was going to snap it. The allen key adjustment for the height adjustment was easy enough but started to loosen after the first 2 miles around the neighborhood. Not exactly confidence inspiring. I tightened the bejesus out of that bolt also and have gotten rid of that wobble, hopefully for good. The tires needed to be correctly inflated and the bike also does not come with a bell.
I have a lot of positive things to say about the Colt after my first ride. She's fast! It's a lighter bike and with the relatively skinny tires (compared to the beast) she just goes and goes. I think I coasted half the way today! The Yukon does not coast unless you are going downhill. I think the torque sensor is a better approach than the cadence sensor. I like the mild assist when pedaling lightly but more when you push, it's almost like it's reading your thoughts which is a little weird but lot's of fun. The display has a photocel so it backlights automatically when you go into a tunnel and such and I loved that feature also. This bike is noticeably more agile as well and I spent the day happily swerving all over and I can easily control it with one hand. The throttle will only give you the percentage of power that is associated with the level of pedal assist you are in 1-5, which I think is a battery saver also. After 16 miles today I barely dented the charge on the battery. Pedal assist 1 most of the way and up to 3 on a quarter mile hill on the way back. I barely expended 2 of the 10 bars on the charge indicator. I was concerned about "only" 500 Watts from the motor as I weigh 235 but this bike was zooming today. Uphill no problems at all. I also love the ergonomic grips which I will be putting on the Yukon at the end of the season. They make for a much more pleasant riding experience. I believe I am also going to go to a height adjustable set of bars on the Voltbike, as that leanover gets fatiguing after a while
Anyway, that's my 5 cents worth. I am glad I went something so drastically different and both of these bikes at less than 2000 apiece, I think has been a great deal. Safe riding everyone.

1/4
AguassissiM
1 month ago

Hi there @Shaun MacDonald welcome to the forums.
First forgive all the grammar and spelling mistakes i`m about to make it has been a while since i graduated.
This will sound like a sales pitch, trust me it is not i have nothing to gain from your choice of bike brand that you purchase, my only reason is to give back to the community that has given so much to myself .
Back few months i was looking around to purchase my first electric bicycle, browsed a lot of forums and looked a ton of YouTube videos of experts talking about why their choice of the bike they ride should become my choice. Than one day i seen @Court reviewing one of the Volts bikes, intrigued i had a look at the website. The excitement started building once i saw the Yukon 750 for that would be my new bike to purchase. Being over cautious i read everything i could possibly find and exchanged few e-mails with George at Volt regarding the bike, was ready to pull the trigger until i seen this post by @america94 and then this one. Actually it took me a long time to decide (being over cautious) to pull the trigger on my Teo fat bike, come to think of it even @Denis Shelston pulled the trigger before i did. Just like Denis mentioned have a look around this site and i`m sure eventually you will make the best choice that will make you happy. You can read about my first experience with Teo here.
Wish you all the best Shaun in your choice and hopefully you`ll shock all your students come September by riding in on your brand new bike.

SuperGoop
1 month ago

I now have around 100 km the Voltbike Urban. Some observations:

- On my first full charge, I went 65 km (at random speeds, not too aggressive).
- Motor doesn't cut in-and-out when nearing low battery. It simply gets weaker and weaker, until there is no more power.
- Took a lot longer to fully charge an empty battery than I expected. 6.5 hours with the included 2A charger.
- Lots of low-end torque and power. High-end speed & power is not as great as my Yukon 750.
- On freshly charged battery, I can easily hit 32+km/h with throttle only on flats. But when the battery is below 80%, then the top speed is around 30km/h on throttle only.
- With pedaling, it is easy to maintain around 30-32km/h regardless of battery strength.
- Much more jarring than my Yukon 750 (fat tires). Perhaps due to its smaller & stiffer 20" tires.
- Fairly light (53 lbs), and easy to carry with the built-in handle on the top-tube.
- Key must be inserted and in the ON position to operate the motor.
- Battery range is not really an issue, because the bike rides like a regular folding bike even without motor assistance.
- The Urban is more suited to lower speeds (around 25km/h). It can go faster, but it feels inefficient and bumpy above 25km/h.
- The front shocks are very nice and effective. It is on the softer side, which I like.
- I can very accurately gauge the battery level by monitoring the real-time voltage (42V=full, 32V=dead).
- Every time the display is switched off, the "Trip" meter is reset back to zero. However, you can leave the display on, and it will got to "Sleep" without resetting the Trip meter.
- The rear light is aimed a bit too high and partially blocked by the rear rack. I had to bend it down a little with a wrench. Now, it is perfect.
- The front light runs off the main battery and is bright enough to be seen, even during daytime.
- Due to the small bike, panniers need to be small and mounted further back to avoid interfering with pedaling.
- The rack does not have the spring clasp like last year's model, which I miss.

Any questions, let me know.

SuperGoop
1 month ago

@Joe EE Did you receive your Surface 604 Colt yet? I'd also like to know if the Yukon 750 batteries are interchangible with the Surface 604 Colt. Thanks!

HighsNBurgers
6 days ago

Get out there and hump in the ocean? 14:50

actnowone
2 weeks ago

Great review, love how your reviews on YouTube integrate into your website this all must take you a very long time

DeluxeMan12345
2 months ago

nice review as always. you may want to look into deflatators or a portable pump with a gage to lower the psi perfectly

valveman12
2 months ago

ElectricBikeReview.com Ok so based on your review, I just bought the Yukon Limited with the fenders and rear rack. So if I hate it, it will be you fault. Nah just kidding. I'm sure I will like it.

Drónos Vili
5 months ago

This or the radrover? I really want to decide wich one i should get? No power only mode on the voltbike?

Clark Kormier
3 months ago

Rad Rover is a decent product with almost as nice features. If you don't mind the fact that the battery and controller pack look like bricks that were added onto the generic frame with zip ties as an afterthought..

Derrick Lee
5 months ago

Try Rad Power. I got zero response from Voltbike after I bought 2 from them with some quality issues.

jason mcclure
6 months ago

i read on the website its 70 bucks to ship to your business 30 extra bucks to ship to your house

iddddaduncan
6 months ago

What are theses bikes like out west for mountain trails? I live in Idaho and would love to take this into the backcountry.

Clark Kormier
7 months ago

This is the one...In the fat tire ebike category I couldn't find a better value anywhere for the features offered and price point. Now I ride it 6 days out of 7 lol. Shipping was cheap and easy.

Clark Kormier
3 months ago

It's fine on pavement, but if it is wet and rainy the stock knobby tires have a little less grip than a smoother road tire. This beast is designed for off road riding, but it's super fun just running errands around town.

1rcproductions
5 months ago

Clark Kormier How is it on pavement? Trying to decide between fat or mountain style of ebike. Thanks.

40footgiantowl
8 months ago

i recently bought a electric fat bike and was wondering what the usb port on the battery was for?

VoltBike
7 months ago

Voltbike Yukon 750 comes with built-in USB port. You can use this port to charge external devices like cell phone, camera or similar.

John Grijalva
8 months ago

this bike or the radrover?

VoltBike
5 months ago

Hi Derrick, apologize but I still can't find your inquiry in our email list but I will be more than happy to speak with your either by phone or email. When you call just mention this conversation and I will come on the phone. You can also email me at our support or let me know what is your real name so I can find your order. Waiting very much to hear any feedback or comments you may have. By the way Voltbike Urban is using rear motor. It's not on the front.

Clark Kormier
5 months ago

That is too bad, I had no problems with customer service, and the gang I know on our Voltbike Facebook page have had good experiences with them. I absolutely love my Yukon 750. I am still riding it straight out of the box 4 months later, and she runs great. I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it.

Derrick Lee
5 months ago

This is one of the names I use online. Just review the emails you ignored within the past 2 weeks, you'll know who I am.

VoltBike
5 months ago

Hi Derrick Lee, I see your comments on few other Voltbike Youtube videos. I will reply here as well. We don't have customer under the name of Derrick Lee. We searched also our email list from the past 2 years and I can't find any request under either your first or last name. We always respond to customer enquiry either before or after the sale. (Most of the time even after regular work hours.) In fact, customer after sale support has been always our number one priority. We realised this early in our business.

Nigel Sookram
5 months ago

Derrick Lee too bad man I'm really thinking of buying one

jose ignacio alvarez
8 months ago

que precio valen esa bici ?? pueden enviar en ESPAÑA

Seani Vostro
8 months ago

I just bought Yukon 750 limited three days ago. Picked it up in their warehouse. Bike is powerful considering i am 6.1 and 230 Lb having lots of fun!

VoltBike
7 months ago

Hi Seani, it was nice meeting you in our warehouse. Glad you are enjoying your Yukon 750.

Clark Kormier
8 months ago

Me too, I got mine 2 weeks ago and it is so much fun I have to ride it every day.

Jesus Jimenez
8 months ago

Court do you know, How I can change the max speed on my Yukon 750? I just got my bike today but it didn't come with a owners manual.

Clark Kormier
8 months ago

I just got my new Yukon 750. I love it, this thing is a beast. It is a large bike but fits my 5'11" frame great. Comes completely assembled except for mounting the handlebars and the pedals, quick and easy. The battery housing is solid on mine and doesn't rattle at all. The mechanical disc brakes work well for basic rides and moderate trails, but for a lot of downhill riding an upgrade is in order. Right out of the box it was tuned and ready to go. For an extra $100 I opted for the upgraded version, and I really like the aluminum flat black fenders, rear rack, and integrated tail light. For the coin this is an amazing, eye-catching package. Peddle assist on the lowest setting had me flying around the local park.

Darryl BEAN
10 months ago

?? isn't the RadRover and the Volt Yukon both rated at 750 w motors?? Same output? Thanks

snowbird29803
10 months ago

I've been following your videos for a while and seriously contemplating a purchase of an electric bike for nearby errands and light shopping. I like this Voltbike for the perceived (by me a novice) value. I am a senior man at 200Lbs. and not a bike guy. So, what makes this bike worth almost a Grand more than the Sondors, shipping notwithstanding? And do YOU as an expert think this is a good bike for the price...or can you recommend any other fat tire electric for me in this price class that is actually available now and would be better for an old guy.

Derrick Lee
5 months ago

Expect zero response to your inquiries from Voltbike if you have quality issues. This is my actual experience with Voltbike after buying 2 bikes from them.

VoltBike
10 months ago

Hi snowbird29803, Yukon 750 is completely different battery setup. The battery and frame on Voltbike Yukon 750 are newer design. The battery is partially integrated into the frame which provides better weight distribution. The motor is also more powerful. Yukon is using brand name Tektro disc brakes and the battery is Sanyo (by Panasonic). Hope this helps.

koolstup
11 months ago

That long stem with the bars forward look very uncomfortable. You could rotate the bars towards you, this would give a shorter reach. I had to do this with my own bike (non electric)

ElectricBikeReview.com
11 months ago

Yeah, it's good if you're someone with long arms but I'd probably get a shorter stem or riser bars to make it fit me better :)

Boulderdaceous
11 months ago

BUMMER ... I ordered and pretty much got ZERO response from the VoltBike people, so I had to cancel (bummer). VOLTBIKE PEOPLE HAVE REFUSED ANSWERING MY EMAILS, MY PHONE CALLS AND MY TEXTS ! ... Sad that such a good bike is sold by such a poor company

Derrick Lee
5 months ago

You were lucky it happened before you spent your money. I just bought 2 bikes from Voltbike last month. They always replied to my inquiries before the sale, but gave zero response after the sale.

Jessy Cliche
9 months ago

I've just contacted them (email) today for technical info and got an answer about 3-4 hours later. Seems to me as quite a nice company actually! Pretty weird that they won't answer you..?

Boulderdaceous
11 months ago

I'm sure the Volts folks are super and that I'm the only one who ever had a bad experience with them. Having been in the industry for over four decades, I would request that they post All shipping charges (both commercial and residential), it keeps everyone in the know. Also, having been there, companies should Always be alert and respond to emails, phone calls and texts from customers. You're running a business after all.

FYI - currently riding a Phantom XR V5 and loving it ! Great Bike :-)

MrSuperGoop
11 months ago

I had great experiences with Voltbike.  I emailed them twice and asked a web question, and all 3 inquiries got answered (in a few days).  I called them by phone on 2 separate occasions, and someone answered each time, and I spoke with someone immediately. This was around Sept/Oct 2016.  They do get very business when a new shipment arrive, so maybe you just caught them at a busy time.  The second time I called, I think I could hear busy warehouse noises in the background.The 1st phone call was over 10 minutes because I had so much questions to ask about the new Yukon 750 and whether I should buy now or wait because they are also releasing a mid-drive model soon.  He was very patient and open with information, and I appreciated that.

Franky Alvarez
11 months ago

That's weird. When my brother got his, they were great

Teffy Teflon
11 months ago

l have the older Yukon and really happy with it for the price point. I have to agree with you on the long stem. I changed mine out for a shorter one with more angle rise. I do a long commute and changing it has made my back a lot less sore. l also changed to a wider bar which makes steering way smoother. l think the wider bar would help with not loosing steering control in the sand you mentioned in the video. The wider bar also allowed me to put on full size grips which are so much better than the original ones. the original ones wore out in a couple weeks.

l kinda wish l waited for the 750 but that being said make sure you know you local E-bike laws. Where l am from a 500 watt motor is the legal max.

Karl Fonner
11 months ago

Would it be good for climbing and descending?