Add-E 250W Kit Review

Add E 250w Electric Bike Kit Review
Add E 250w Kit Installed
Add E 250w Kit Removable Bottle Battery 22 Volt 6 Amp
Add E 250w Kit Gearless Motor Unit
Add E 250w Kit Clean Handle Bars
Add E 250w Kit Belt Drive Compatible
Add E 250w Kit Kickstand Mount
Add E 250w Kit Grip Tape Friction Surface
Add E 250w Kit Side View
Add E 250w Kit Top Down View
Add E 250w Kit Width View
Add E 250w Kit Retail Box
Add E 250w Kit Unboxing
Add E 250w Electric Bike Kit Review
Add E 250w Kit Installed
Add E 250w Kit Removable Bottle Battery 22 Volt 6 Amp
Add E 250w Kit Gearless Motor Unit
Add E 250w Kit Clean Handle Bars
Add E 250w Kit Belt Drive Compatible
Add E 250w Kit Kickstand Mount
Add E 250w Kit Grip Tape Friction Surface
Add E 250w Kit Side View
Add E 250w Kit Top Down View
Add E 250w Kit Width View
Add E 250w Kit Retail Box
Add E 250w Kit Unboxing

Summary

  • Exceedingly compact, light weight and easy to remove (for temporary unpowered use) though it does produce more noise than most of the ebike kits I've tested
  • The bottle style battery pack is beautiful, the cap twists to add power at 50 watt increments up to 250 making it legal internationally, limited top speed of 15.5 mph
  • Lots of optional accessories including a twist or trigger throttle, the included five magnet pedelec disc isn't super responsive but works well and qualifies as Class 1
  • Compatible with a wide range of bicycle types but may require extra work to install (completely removing the bottom bracket), solid six month battery warranty

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Add-E

Model:

250W

Price:

$1,012

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Pedal Assist (Class 1), Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

6 Month Battery, 2 Year Mechanical Parts

Availability:

United States, Worldwide

Model Year:

20152016

Bicycle Details

Battery Weight:

2.5 lbs (1.13 kg)

Motor Weight:

1.9 lbs (0.86 kg)

Geometry Measurements:

Motor Dimensions: 80 mm x 70 mm x 70 mm

Accessories:

EasyDo Bottle Cage for Battery, Additional Charger $80, Additional Battery $296, Universal Bottle Cage Mount $23, Crank Puller Tool $23, Brompton Specific Mounting Kit $182

Other:

Compact 2 Amp Charger, Removable Battery Pack

Electronic Details

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Gearless Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Battery Voltage:

22.2 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

6 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

133.2 wh

Charge Time:

2 hours

Estimated Min Range:

8 miles (13 km)

Estimated Max Range:

16 miles (26 km)

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Twist Throttle, Trigger Throttle (5 Magnet Pedelec Disc)

Top Speed:

15.5 mph (25 kph)

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Written Review

The Add-E 250W is a perfect electric bike kit for someone like me because it’s light weight, minimal and supports more active ride styles. It’s also probably the only choice for a lot of people who live in Europe due to legal restrictions of 25 kilometers per hour (15.5 mph) and power rating of 250 watts or less. Top speed is definitely one of my complaints compared to other kits available in the US that can reach 20 or even 28 miles per hour but this is still a satisfying kit. It’s noisier than a lot of other ebikes because the motor in’t contained within a hub and is spinning at a relatively higher RPM. You’ll notice the high pitched electronic whir in the video review above. Still, it’s something I got used to with a bit of time and the other elements of the design (namely size) make it very stealthy, nearly hidden on the frame! Weighing in at ~5.5 lbs including the motor, battery and mounting hardware this kit is light… and it’s mostly removable. The battery bottle can be taken off (and replaced with a real water bottle if you’d like) and the motor slides forward and off with a quick bolt adjustment (using a hex wrench). All of the weight that is present is kept very low and centered on the frame for improved balance and if you plan on riding further and have space for a second battery bottle on the downtube (assuming you used the seat tube for the first one) that will cost you ~$300 extra. Batteries get a basic six month warranty but all hardware gets two years which is awesome!

To me the Add-E makes a lot of sense when used on city style bikes, and maybe road bikes as well, but it’s not idea for full suspension setups because it may not reach the rear wheel at all times. A hardtail trail bike could be a good fit but might produce even more noise due to the knobs and require more frequent adjustment as the tread wears down over time. I love that it’s a seemingly affordable kit but want to point out that you get ~30% of the battery I would consider “average” in the US and may experience much shorter rides as a result (especially if you opt for the twist or trigger throttles). If you do get a throttle, you’ll be transitioning the bike from Class 1 to Class 2 and it may not be allowed at all in some countries. Add-E makes a 600 watt kit that I’m excited to check out and it’s not that much more expensive. I think my favorite part about the way it’s designed is that the motor friction surface does not come into contact with the tire when coasting (if installed correctly). It just hangs out sort of bouncing up and down as you traverse cracks, curbs and other obstacles and this means coasting is not impacted. It’s a super-efficient design, it’s beautiful but it’s also a bit loud and the 250 watt version especially may be underpowered and limited on range for some riders.

Pros:

  • The bottle style battery is extremely convincing and I love the way it operates (twist the cap to the right for 50 volt increments of additional power from 0 to 50 to 100 up to 250 total)
  • It’s great that this kit can work as pedal assist only or you can opt for twist and trigger throttle options, basically going from Class 1 to Class 2 depending on your needs (throttle mode will likely drain the battery faster if you choose not to pedal as actively)
  • The kit is extremely light weight (~5.5 lbs for all pieces combined) and minimal in appearance, the basic pedal-assist only setup has only one wire and keeps the handlebar area of your bike clean, if you add a throttle you’ll have one wire going from the battery area to your bars
  • Once the mounting plate has been installed, it’s pretty easy to remove the Add-E motor by loosening one bolt and unplugging the power… then simply take the bottle battery off and you’re back to a normal bike
  • The bottle cage battery adapter can be used with traditional water bottles (if you take the battery and Add-E off) but it doesn’t sit perfectly flat at the bottom due to the plug interface
  • You can get additional batteries for ~$300 to increase range and since they fit into normal bottle cages you could potentially have two mounted to the bike if you have bosses on the downtube and seat tube, each pack only weighs ~2.5 pounds which is nice
  • Because the motor and battery are mounted at the middle of the frame you get excellent balance and reduce unsprung weight compared with a hub motor… that said, I don’t think it would work well with a full suspension bike due to wheel movement and limited travel of the Add-E

Cons:

  • There are no display readouts so you can’t tell how full the battery pack is, how fast you’re going, how far you’ve traveled or anything else… you have to estimate or get a separate cycle computer but that still won’t display your battery
  • The battery capacity offered by this kit is extremely small compared to most kits and bikes I review (about 30% of average) so the range is lower, but it’s also much lighter than traditional offerings
  • You absolutely need space to mount the bottle cage but Add-E does sell an adapter kit for those without threaded bosses on their seat tube or downtube
  • Limited power and top speed on the 250 watt kit, it’s setup for European standards so you get ~15.5 mph top speed vs. 20 mph which is more common in the US, their 600 watt kit can top 20 mph and doesn’t cost much more
  • Depending on the frame design of your bicycle this kit may be easy to install (using a kickstand plate just behind the bottom bracket) or difficult (mounting Carbon fiber plates directly to the bottom bracket)
  • The five magnet pedelec disc isn’t as responsive as a 12 magnet disc and you don’t get brake levers with integrated motor inhibitors so there are moments where you may be braking against the motor
  • If you mount this kit using the kickstand plate you may no longer be able to use the actual kickstand and your bike may tip… consider an aftermarket chain-stay mounting kickstand
  • This kit is actually kind of expensive in my opinion given the very small capacity of the battery pack (about 30% as large as a “normal” sized battery of ~350 watt hours) if you bought two additional batteries you’d be priced at kits with 350+ watts of power vs. 250 but still much lighter weight

Resources:

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More Add-E Reviews

Add-E 600W Kit Review

  • MSRP: $1,251
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015, 2016

Exceedingly compact, light weight and easy to remove (for temporary unpowered use) though it does produce more noise than most of the ebike kits I've tested. The bottle style battery pack is beautiful, the cap twists to add power at 50…...

Nirmala
2 years ago

I’m curious about the surface material of the friction drive. Is it replaceable? Do you think it might cause a lot of extra tire wear?

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

I’m wondering the same things Nirmala… but even without the grippy surface metal on rubber would still work alright (maybe unless it’s wet out?) difficult to say on the tire wear… I’d imagine that YES it would wear your tread down more quickly than a hub motor. It might depend on your tread pattern like knobby off-road vs. slick or hybrid tires. The system might also become louder on a knobby tire vs. the smoother ones used in this review :/

Reply
NerdBrick
1 year ago

I was one of the original funders of the Add-e campaign, and I have over 600 miles with my commuting on partial paved road and some hard packed gravel. It hasn’t really worn my tire any faster, but I should point out that I’m running a tire that is labeled “E-Bike” it has has a tread that good for my ridding conditions. The friction material on the motor is still holding up. I was worried it would be rubbed off sooner than the tire would wear. So far so good with both.

Greg Ritter
2 years ago

Thanks for the well done review. Was waiting for this review as I’ve been watching the news of the bike motor since its launch and like the look and idea behind the motor. But with what I’ve been learning about e bikes from reviews and info from this site, maybe this isn’t the way to go for an affordable, almost hidden ebike kit. I was looking for something with a little more power and some controls to adjust speed and keep track of battery life and distance. Plus the price is higher than I was thinking for what you get. Will continue to watch this site for further reviews, perhaps the go-e bike kit, with 800 W capacity and lower price point will have more success and be more of what I’m looking for. Will patiently stay tuned to electric bike review to keep informed.

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Hi Greg! Yeah, I love the direction that the Add-E is exploring but it has limits with this iteration. I’ve been in touch with Go-E and hope to review their product at some point soon so keep an eye out and I’ll continue charging forward :D

Reply
Nirmala
2 years ago

A lot of the concerns raised in the review seem to be better addressed by the ShareRoller, another add-on friction drive. It is not as stealth as the Go-E, but it does have much more sophistication and features, and also three sizes of battery to accommodate different needs. You can learn more here: http://igg.me/at/shareroller/x/12713097

Court also did a review of an earlier version here: https://electricbikereview.com/shareroller/version-1/ (Note that the latest version includes a lot of improvements.)

Reply
David Barroso
2 years ago

I have the 600W (sport) version and it is great to take me to work and back. I do 15km (9.3mi) every day with some climbing (200m accumulated climb) with the power output set to maximum. The add-e takes me up to around 40km/h (24.8mph) with little effort. I do the same time by car, some times more, depending on traffic. I have a hardtail scott aspect with schwalbe big ben tyres.

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Wow, that sounds awesome David! Pretty stellar performance for such a small battery pack. I’m assuming you use pedal assist only vs. throttle? Any other tips about getting the most out of the Add-E, noticed you’re using smooth tires vs. knobby.

Reply
David Barroso
2 years ago

Only pedal assist. I have another set of wheels with schwalbe thunder burt (knobby tyres) for off-road use. Tyres with smooth surface work better with the add-e. They have a bigger and better surface and therefore better grip between the metal surface of the motor and the tyre. And also less noise. The add-e when working sounds like an RC toy car :)

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Cool, thanks David… I reached out to the company and was told that these Schwalbe Hurricane tires work well for off-road because the center is smooth but they are still wider and have some knobs on the edges for traction.

Michael Craigie
2 years ago

David, I installed the 600w set on my bike yesterday and went for a 15km ride on Map 1. Fairly flat ride with only one 2 short but steep hills. In the course of the ride it wore my brand new Continental Gatorskin tyre right down till the threads are exposed at one point. Do you have any tyre wear issues? Have I perhaps installed it incorrectly do you think?

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Wow! That’s intense Michael… I didn’t ride very far during my demos for this review + video but the tires held up alright and they were just basic. Continental makes good stuff so I’m really surprised you’ve had such deep wear. I want to provide some sort of feedback like maybe the motor is too close to the tire but honestly, the design is built to “dig in” to get traction so even if it’s further vs. close you should still have similar force going from the motor to the tire… I really don’t know but am hoping David can chime in and help.

Geir
2 years ago

Love your reviews Court. I have the 600W one too, but its way to noisy so im not going to use it. If you drop your address I’ll be happy to donate it to you so you can do a review (I guess you already have a battery and the stand installed?)

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

That’s an awesome offer Geir! I’ll reach out :D

Reply

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Dewey
1 day ago

For folks seeking a step-through donor pedal bicycle frame to convert to an ebike with a DIY motor kit, the Reddit City Bikes spreadsheet has a column indicating where a step-through frame is available together with price, type of drivetrain, and web link:
https://www.reddit.com/r/citybike/comments/45zbr3/the_rcitybike_spreadsheet_updated_for_spring_2016/

Common features of ebikes used in urban bikeshare systems such as the Smoovengo E-Bike (Paris), Social Bicycles JUMP (Washington, DC), Bewegen Pedelec (Baltimore), and BCycle Dash+ (designed by Trek, coming in 2018), are a step-through frame, 26" wheels, 3 or 7 speed IGH, Class 1 pedelec, 250w front hub or 350w mid-drive motor, and rollerbrakes. Dock based systems recharge off the bikeshare dock vs dockless systems like JUMP incorporate a GPS locator chip and require you lock up the ebike with a provided U-lock and a maintenance guy either swaps out the battery or recharges it at a hub collection point every 2-3 days.

harryS
4 days ago

Sorry, I am very new to this ebike thing. Is it possible to run an ebike (say a bbso2 mid drive) off a 36v battery with only 2.6ah?

I have the 80WH and 180WH Ryobi lawn batteries. They are called 40V batteries, but they're a typical 36V lithium battery with 10 cell groups.

I've never tried my BBS02 on a 36V because I thought it's programmed to shut down at 42-43 volts,. A fully charged Ryobi tool battery is 42 volts.

I did rig up a harness/connector and have played around with it on my other ebikes.

It runs my 250W motor. I have gotten about 11 miles at 13 mph with the 80 WH unit. Pedal assist. My wattmeter said 2.3 AH, which matches the advertised capacity of the battery. I typically get around 5 miles per AH, no matter what battery I use at 13 mph.

On a bigger motor, like 500W, the batteries will shut off if I use the throttle. Too much current draw (25A controller). They will run the bike in pedal assist though. I would guess 8 miles is possible in pedal assist on the bigger motor at the same speed. The 80WH battery, while it has less capacity, doesn't rest under throttle as badly as the 180WH model.

I would say it's not a good alternative, unless you already had some Ryobi tools you were already using. It's not really a good alternative to an ebike battery. and I don't believe it's in the spirit of the airline rules, It's a weedwahcker, chainsaw battery, Can't bring a chain saw on an airplanae,

1/1
bob armani
5 days ago

Hi all. About to become an ebike owner for the first time and need some honest, informed advice. I'm getting the bike mainly for commuting and perhaps for a calm weekend trail ride with the kids. My wife will also use the bike from time to time. I'm a pretty experienced road and CX rider and currently commute on a cheap and terrible "trail" bike.

My LBS has a very nice looking bike: A BH Diamond Wave Pro with a Brose 250W motor, NuVinci carbon drive system. I've tried a few ebikes and what they say about Brose vs Bosch/Yamaha seems to be true: it doesn't feel like you're being pushed but seems more natural -- as a cyclist I like this in theory. That said, the result of this is that it can also feel like you're not getting as much power / working harder. I sort of felt this when comparing vs. Yamaha, but put it down to the more natural, "responsive" feel of Brose. The Yamaha really felt like i was being powerfully pushed up the hill. My wife (a far less experienced cyclist) felt this to a greater extent, much preferring the more powerful feel of the Yamaha.

So my questions are: How have your experiences with Brose-powered ebikes been? Could my wife be right that there is less power pushing you up the hill and not just a feeling that there is because of this whole natural-feel thing? I don't know how this could be with such a powerful motor, but I will admit, with the 10 mins I had on the bike I didn't know with absolute certainty (though figured i'd just need more time to get used to it). I love everything else about the bike.

Thanks in advance for any thoughts or advice!

My two cents-I had the same feeling when comparing the two motors. Yamaha was pushing more and felt more 'zippy' where as Brose was a more natural feel with a non-pushing effect. On the other hand, I then discovered a rear hub motor on a BH Easy Motion Jet and that is a fast and quick pushing forward motion that gets me up to over 20mph in seconds in a higher gear. That was the selling point for me, for a fast commute with no sluggishness. The Dapu motor seems to be a great choice that BH used for these bikes. My understanding is that Bafang and 8Fun motors also have the same effect. The manufactures setup the default power levels and tune the motors within each PAS setting. When you test ride many ebikes back to back on the same terrain, you can tell the difference in performance IMHO. Good Luck!

David Sorrentino
6 days ago

Hi all. About to become an ebike owner for the first time and need some honest, informed advice. I'm getting the bike mainly for commuting and perhaps for a calm weekend trail ride with the kids. My wife will also use the bike from time to time. I'm a pretty experienced road and CX rider and currently commute on a cheap and terrible "trail" bike.

My LBS has a very nice looking bike: A BH Diamond Wave Pro with a Brose 250W motor, NuVinci carbon drive system. I've tried a few ebikes and what they say about Brose vs Bosch/Yamaha seems to be true: it doesn't feel like you're being pushed but seems more natural -- as a cyclist I like this in theory. That said, the result of this is that it can also feel like you're not getting as much power / working harder. I sort of felt this when comparing vs. Yamaha, but put it down to the more natural, "responsive" feel of Brose. The Yamaha really felt like i was being powerfully pushed up the hill. My wife (a far less experienced cyclist) felt this to a greater extent, much preferring the more powerful feel of the Yamaha.

So my questions are: How have your experiences with Brose-powered ebikes been? Could my wife be right that there is less power pushing you up the hill and not just a feeling that there is because of this whole natural-feel thing? I don't know how this could be with such a powerful motor, but I will admit, with the 10 mins I had on the bike I didn't know with absolute certainty (though figured i'd just need more time to get used to it). I love everything else about the bike.

Thanks in advance for any thoughts or advice!

trebor
7 days ago

This is really a big disappointment to hear about these bikes. I was under the impression that the Brose 250w was at the leader of the pack with overall performance,
Oh no. Brose is the least power, but claimed to be the most natural feeling (least like a motorized bike).

Dewey
2 weeks ago

I've have been wanting smaller batteries so my ebikes look less like ebikes.

Some Chinese "frog" ABS battery packs look like a chunky saddle bag - the EasyGo Race uses a small saddlebag type pack, fabric battery bags such as found on the Hill Topper kits are unobtrusive though less secure, when I had one I slipped it into a pannier bag and the hub motor was small and silver so looked much like a bicycle. Semi-recessed frame batteries are getting slimmer, and some motors too like the 250w Fazua evation that has the gearbox on the bottom bracket, and the motor and battery in-line in the down tube.

Al P
2 weeks ago

Gary, I too ride in the Adks. in the summer. My 250w Evelo Aurora is a great bike but not enough power for those hills. I added a front hub 500w kit to my standard lightweight bike and can now fly up those hills. If you like your Treks, why not just add a kit to one of them and save a bunch of money? They are easy to install.

JayVee
3 weeks ago

Anyways, it comes with 800W motor and I can't think of anywhere in the world you can ride 800W motor legally. No, I'm not talking about somewhere in Africa or Asia where no strict regulations exist.

China and Japan has strict 250W rule (I think?), Canada and Europe usually have 500W rule, and in the US, up to 750W.

From an EU perspective the ST5 falls under the same law as the ST2. Both bikes are L1e-b category vehicles since they exceed 25km/h. As such, they're allowed a maximum power output of 4000W but require type approval. They're both street legal in several EU countries...

Cephalotus
3 weeks ago

I agree about the 650Wh battery.

BionX now usally uses 13s4p battery packs.

The BionX d-Series has recuperation currents up to 12A, which is 3A per cell.

Those 3500mAh cells you are asking for will die very quickly if charged that way. For example the Samsung INR18650 35E which is used by other bike manufacturers is only ratet at 1A charge current for (acceptable) cycle life.

Even if treated within specs those cells degrade evry quickly t around 3000mAh, after that degradation slows down.

High quality cells like the LG INR18650HG2 would be much better cells, but they are more expensive and "only" rated at 3000mAh each. They last for 600 cycles at very high cahrge and discharge rate a 3500mAh cell would not survive for 10 cycles, they work well in low temperatures, they can easily handle the recuperation current and they would provide more power/voltage up to an almost empty battery pack compared to a Samsung 35E cell.
But you could not write "650Wh" on your battery pack, this is why we will never see those cells. (as long as you don't exchange them for yourself)

This chart compares a Panasonic PF cell with 2900mAh (used in most BionX batteries today), a Samsung 35E with 3500mAh and a LG HG2 with 3000mAh at 5A discharge rate:

http://www.dampfakkus.de/akkuvergleich.php?akku1=498&akku2=577&akku3=592&akku4=&akku5=&akku6=&a=5

I would rather see a BionX battery with more cells like 13s5p or 13s6p, but this seems unlikely.

Generally speaking, I've been very disappointed by BionX recently. The D500 has great potential, but it's not being exploited. There are almost no brands in the EU using the D500, save for the Elby.

The 500D is the exaclty same motor as the 250D, just a different sticker on it. Both will take up to 33A from the 48V battery. So for legal reasons a 250W motor is more suitable to the EU market.

I added a 250D BionX motor to my street legal speed pedelec with BionX SL motor. I had to go to TÜV/Dekra to get the papers, which is far from easy and heavily depends on the will of the person you are dealing with, but now I have a street legal 45km/h bike with BionX d-series motor and I agree that this motor would be a good choice for speed pedelecs. The 13s4p batteries on theother hand are only suitable for shorter distances riding at 40-545km/h and the old 48V batteries with Samsung 22P cells will degrade very quickly at the high currents in speed pedelecs, too.

There have been some fairly good clearance deals in Switzerland for Wheeler bikes using the D500 but I decided to pass. Wheeler mountain bikes were repackaged (with lights and fenders) ,upgraded to 45km/h, and are being sold online for about 2700 dollars. Really good deal, but the support seems to be the weak point though, as you need to bring the bike to a repair center that's pretty far from where I live. So I decided to pass. BionX needs to have a much better commercial strategy over on this side of the Atlantic. I'll keep my trustworthy Haibike Sduro Trekking Speed Pedelec in the meantime. Not the fanciest bike, but it gets the job done.

My solution is simple: I do not care about the support. BionX Pedelecs are just standard bike technology plus the BionX components. you can change and or repair components rather easily...

1/1
JRA
3 weeks ago

There are a few states that have 1000w limits in the law books. Oregon where I live is one of them.

It is kind of a game at this point. Some EU spec 250w bikes can peak at over 600w depending on how they are programmed and a US 750w bike with a 48v battery and a 20amp controller that is a popular option will peak @ 960w. The big thing to me is the speed restriction which is 15.5mph EU and 20mph US and bikes programmed to those restrictions will be only that fast under power, and hard to pedal above that unless on a downhill grade or with a tailwind.

Class III as described by the CA. law and being adopted in other states does allow for 28mph but doesn't address the wattage it takes to get there, but 750w, né 960w even, is not going to maintain that speed unless you are on flat ground with no wind for very long.

Ravi Kempaiah
3 weeks ago

As you know, the Stromer introduced the ST5 (whatever happen to ST3 and ST4 is another debate).

Anyways, it comes with 800W motor and I can't think of anywhere in the world you can ride 800W motor legally. No, I'm not talking about somewhere in Africa or Asia where no strict regulations exist.

China and Japan has strict 250W rule (I think?), Canada and Europe usually have 500W rule, and in the US, up to 750W.

Obviously, just by looking at all the features Stromer ST5 offers, it was very clearly meant to be a commuter bike.

How are they expecting to sell the ST5? Do they just put "off road use only" sticker so that customers can take the full risk of getting caught for riding on the road as a commuter?

**Edit**
I didn't notice we had a Stromer Forum and I was trying to delete this thread but it was impossible. Sorry.

In the US, they are limited to 750W.

Timpo
3 weeks ago

As you know, the Stromer introduced the ST5 (whatever happen to ST3 and ST4 is another debate).

Anyways, it comes with 800W motor and I can't think of anywhere in the world you can ride 800W motor legally. No, I'm not talking about somewhere in Africa or Asia where no strict regulations exist.

China and Japan has strict 250W rule (I think?), Canada and Europe usually have 500W rule, and in the US, up to 750W.

Obviously, just by looking at all the features Stromer ST5 offers, it was very clearly meant to be a commuter bike.

How are they expecting to sell the ST5? Do they just put "off road use only" sticker so that customers can take the full risk of getting caught for riding on the road as a commuter?

**Edit**
I didn't notice we had a Stromer Forum and I was trying to delete this thread but it was impossible. Sorry.

Andy_Austria
3 weeks ago

Hi there,
not many user reviews about that bike are out there. I have the 250W version, bought second hand, and can answer your real world questions if there are any.

Owning the Ariel Rider for a month I can say it keeps the promises of the flashy ads and videos so far. I am not super happy with the range which seems to be closer to 30 km (assist level 1 in a rather flat city) than the 50 km promised, but on the other hand it is quite cold now in Austria, the battery gets charged overnight in my yard at typically 5-10 °C and used during the day at about 5-15° C which is not ideal.

Only thing I really miss is any kind of instructions, e.g. on the assist levels and that "6 km walk" thingy I read about. Can anybody enlighten me here? Do new bikes come with any instructions?
Ariel Rider does not seem to have such downloads on their home page.

Thanks,
Andy

John1960
3 weeks ago

That is really useful information, many thanks for the detailed reply. Your explanation make perfect sense.

I am really enjoying the ride on the Rad, it's so easy to cruise along at 10 - 15mph (our speed limit here) in Pas 2 - 3. My wife rides a different make of ebike, that has a 250W motor ( the old limit we were allowed here) and it's interesting how little power I need to match her pace. I am looking forward to getting out more and trying some off road riding.

I'm sure I am going to have many many hours of enjoyment.

FredE
1 month ago

... Emco5..on your 350w Hill Topper battery about how long have you owned it and how many miles have you put on it and about what range is left on your battery?.....

The CR 350w hub was used most of one season before it was edged out of the game by a 250w mid-drive. Its accumulated mileage was a bit over 600. Most of the rides were short daily errands, and grocery trips a few times a week, so I never experienced diminished range.

….and got up to 20 miles out of it on a single charge but over the years.. range diminished with use and now I get about 12 miles of range.......

Battery degradation over time is normal, but from 20 to 12 miles seems like a lot. I’m speculating, but the frequency of charging [topping off] might have something to do with the degree of lost battery capacity. Unlike the new Horizon pack, the bagged Ranger battery had no meter which encourages unnecessary charging.

Ike582
1 month ago

I believe the battery (604Wh) and motor (250W) are the same on the 5.0 and 6.0, at least here in the U.S.

eagamer80
1 month ago

I think in Europe they sell the 6.0 at 45km/h but with the 250W motor, though the 5.0 is the one with the more powerful 350W motor. Is it like that in the US (I mean the power of the motor, not the speed, lucky you guys have not this stupid limitation).

DRR
1 month ago

Thanks for your excellent blog of experiences to date. I currently own my first ebike, a Cyclamatic CX3 and it is outstanding! Chinese made, alloy frame; sold on line only by Shop247.com for $750 (available on Amazon); outstanding value. (I’d love to see review by Court/EBR!). It has 250w rear hub motor and 36v 10.4 amp battery. I have about 250 miles so far with no problems. I love the front suspension, and have lowered rear tire pressure to about 30+ psi to improve the ride - I’m also considering a suspension seat post. I also installed a wider more comfortable seat, and a 110mm adjustable stem to move the handlebars up and towards me; also cheap plastic fenders from Amazon. It has a great display and 9-speed controller; pedal assist only. Normally I ride at about 15-18 mph (I upped the max speed) and the range is about 20-25 miles. They say it weighs 42 lb; I travel a lot so I remove the battery and quick-release front wheel, and lay it atop all the stuff in my SUV when we travel - very manageable. For lighter weight, you may want to take a look at the Cyclamatic CX3 - I recommend it highly.
I’m already thinking about my next ebike and have enjoyed reading Court’s reviews on EBR. I’m considering the Radrover (which I love!) and the Voltbike Enduro; but they both weigh 60+ lb. so not sure about those for my travels. BTW, I’m 78, 5’10”, weigh about 178 lb. and live in Michigan. I ride 12-15 miles a day and I’ve been a bike rider on and off since my youth. Hope my ramblings are of some interest. Keep biking!

PCDoctorUSA
2 months ago

Very sleek looking bike, but with only a 250w motor I think its appeal will be limited to the European market. What's the price? I didn't see it on the product website.

Akatsuki69
2 months ago

Dillenger Opia Was less than $900 shipped (to Oakland, CA). I like it better for my commute than the Juiced Cross Current Air. The Opia has a 250w motor but honestly, it feels peppy when compared to the Air’s 500w.

Both were internet purchases (ie no test rides). I probably would have just bought the Opia and be happy with it as a commuter.

Do you have link for the opia? And can you share an actual picture of it?

harryS
2 months ago

If it's a completed bike, best to test ride. I might believe the ratings if published by a Bosch or Yamaha. If done by some importer out of China, the first liar hasn't got a chance.

Watts is really quite arbitrary too, when it's stamped on a motor. Euro laws are so restrictive on power ratings, I suspect everyone gets their engineer to say "yup",that's 250W" , when it is really a lot more. I wouldn't have said this two years ago, but if a Volkswagon is willing to cheat, you cannot trust anyone.

Without anything else to go by, with my engineer hat on my head, I'd always want more data. Which mid drives you lookingat?

emco5
2 months ago

... Emco5..on your 350w Hill Topper battery about how long have you owned it and how many miles have you put on it and about what range is left on your battery?.....

The CR 350w hub was used most of one season before it was edged out of the game by a 250w mid-drive. Its accumulated mileage was a bit over 600. Most of the rides were short daily errands, and grocery trips a few times a week, so I never experienced diminished range.

….and got up to 20 miles out of it on a single charge but over the years.. range diminished with use and now I get about 12 miles of range.......

Battery degradation over time is normal, but from 20 to 12 miles seems like a lot. I’m speculating, but the frequency of charging [topping off] might have something to do with the degree of lost battery capacity. Unlike the new Horizon pack, the bagged Ranger battery had no meter which encourages unnecessary charging.

RockstarBruski
2 months ago

Hi, Bruce (AKA RockstarBruski) here,
I thought I would post about Hill Topper electric conversion kits and electric bikes.

Here's my two e-bikes so far.

1. Conversion of a Giant "Escape" commuter with a 350W 36V Hill Topper front e-wheel first with 20 mile Ranger bag battery and then changed with Horizon 17 to 40 mile lockable slide in and out battery.

2. Foldable Hill Topper 350W 36V Hill Topper front e-wheel with Horizon 17 to 40 mile lockable slide in and out battery.

Video of Giant Escape with Hill Topper Ranger kit conversion

Video of foldable Hill Topper ebike with Horizon battery review

Also, one day in the future I might try to convert an older Schwinn tandem cruiser to a 350W 36v Hill Topper kit.

I’ve been riding Hill Topper products daily for years so if you have any questions let me know and I’d be happy to answer them.

Also, if you end up deciding to purchase a kit or bike from Hill Topper you can use this link http://www.electric-bike-kit.com/index.aspx?dc=brucemoody and save a bit of money and I get a small referral fee to help pay for my video equipment and time to make video reviews.

I LOVE e-bike riding! :)
Happy and Safe riding everyone!
RockstarBruski Youtube Channel

RockstarBruski
2 months ago

Hi, Bruce (AKA RockstarBruski) here,
I thought I would post about Hill Topper electric conversion kits and electric bikes.

Here's my two e-bikes so far.

1. Conversion of a Giant "Escape" commuter with a 350W 36V Hill Topper front e-wheel first with 20 mile Ranger bag battery and then changed with Horizon 17 to 40 mile lockable slide in and out battery.

2. Foldable Hill Topper 350W 36V Hill Topper front e-wheel with Horizon 17 to 40 mile lockable slide in and out battery.

Video of Giant Escape with Hill Topper Ranger kit conversion

Video of foldable Hill Topper ebike with Horizon battery review

Also, one day in the future I might try to convert an older Schwinn tandem cruiser to a 350W 36v Hill Topper kit.

I’ve been riding Hill Topper products daily for years so if you have any questions let me know and I’d be happy to answer them.

Also, if you end up deciding to purchase a kit or bike from Hill Topper you can use this link http://www.electric-bike-kit.com/index.aspx?dc=brucemoody and save a bit of money and I get a small referral fee to help pay for my video equipment and time to make video reviews.

I LOVE e-bike riding! :)
Happy and Safe riding everyone!
RockstarBruski Youtube channel

Joe Pan
3 weeks ago

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bSSP9ble3sU

RoCk Y
3 months ago

Where to buy it

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 months ago

I think they might have gone out of business, you used to be able to go to http://www.add-e.us/ but it doesn't seem to be loading now?

Hernan1205 Paz Zapata
4 months ago

cuanto cuesta el accesorio y en donde lo puedo conseguir

1975supermike
6 months ago

how expensive ! Jesus.

Jai's Media
6 months ago

Gearless direct drive !> Erm the wheel is the gear with friction drive not 'Direct drive' get it right or why bother do a review!
Have you mentioned the power waste through compressing the tyre when engaged ?

Rıfat Erdem Sahin
7 months ago

Great video will it work on foldable bikes and on hills?

Matt Walls
7 months ago

pretty pricey considering the quality is meh!

Freeflight Paragliding
7 months ago

Thank you, well explained and presented video.

Peter Kenyon
11 months ago

Because it spins in contact with the tyre, how much wear is there on the tyre? I remember similar products twenty plus years ago and the rate it wore the tyre was incredible. Wasn't worth the expense.

Don
11 months ago

+Peter Kenyon . You are absolutely right. Regarding this particular product, our experience shows need of one road Tyre (Michelin 700x28) every 51 km, meaning 0.46 € per Km. If the motor follows... Because it is terribly fragile.

james hester
12 months ago

Anyone know of the most inexpensive solution for a e bike add on? Don't care about looks or weight just need power and range.

mike x
12 months ago

250volts may work well for 250w-500w motors so you could use 1amps continuous discharge current on low 2.5 or 5ah capacity battery packs which would keep discharge current on cells low

Rick Kern
1 year ago

This could be excellent as just booster power for getting up hills. Most people cruise just fine.

Don
11 months ago

+Rick Kern . Come on Rick, as an add-e's pawn, you perfectly know that it can't climb a hill. It heats up and gets damaged. It's even written in page 30 of it's manual § 8. So on the way up the hill one should stop and check the temperature of the motor by hand... Stop fooling people you guys, there is an end to every deception.

Eric Piepers
1 year ago

Your hand reminds me of Spiderman.., but nothing comes out of yours.. :-D

Jimmy Walker
1 year ago

What is it like on wet roads

Bharath Naik L
1 year ago

Hi, What is the speed that I get if I add 250w motor to my fat tyre cycle ? Which one is good for fatbike ? 250w or 500w or 1000w ?

subhash nayak
1 year ago

can i use it in my Hercules A500

SilverPower
1 year ago

trop de bruit

Adventures with Jerry
1 year ago

what about weather resistance. i live in Michigan we get lots of rain and snow how is this going to hold up to that.

cold productions
1 year ago

Can I use it on a beach cruiser ?

Rocky
1 year ago

+Pavle Pavlovic Well observed. I 100% agree with your coherent comment. It is true that this product is a real CRAP in every aspect. Considering changing the tier every 30-35 miles, and the battery (300 $) every 6 month and what you have to pay meanwhile to the vendor for repairing because it is a poor quality material and not secured, makes that buying a real and serious electric bike will certainly save you a lot in wallet, nerves and Asprin expenses.
PD: Probably Add-e will soon report your comment as spam, like other similar ones we don't see anymore. :-)