Add-E 250W Kit Review

Add E 250w Electric Bike Kit Review
Add E 250w Kit Installed
Add E 250w Kit Removable Bottle Battery 22 Volt 6 Amp
Add E 250w Kit Gearless Motor Unit
Add E 250w Kit Clean Handle Bars
Add E 250w Kit Belt Drive Compatible
Add E 250w Kit Kickstand Mount
Add E 250w Kit Grip Tape Friction Surface
Add E 250w Kit Side View
Add E 250w Kit Top Down View
Add E 250w Kit Width View
Add E 250w Kit Retail Box
Add E 250w Kit Unboxing
Add E 250w Electric Bike Kit Review
Add E 250w Kit Installed
Add E 250w Kit Removable Bottle Battery 22 Volt 6 Amp
Add E 250w Kit Gearless Motor Unit
Add E 250w Kit Clean Handle Bars
Add E 250w Kit Belt Drive Compatible
Add E 250w Kit Kickstand Mount
Add E 250w Kit Grip Tape Friction Surface
Add E 250w Kit Side View
Add E 250w Kit Top Down View
Add E 250w Kit Width View
Add E 250w Kit Retail Box
Add E 250w Kit Unboxing

Summary

  • Exceedingly compact, light weight and easy to remove (for temporary unpowered use) though it does produce more noise than most of the ebike kits I've tested
  • The bottle style battery pack is beautiful, the cap twists to add power at 50 watt increments up to 250 making it legal internationally, limited top speed of 15.5 mph
  • Lots of optional accessories including a twist or trigger throttle, the included five magnet pedelec disc isn't super responsive but works well and qualifies as Class 1
  • Compatible with a wide range of bicycle types but may require extra work to install (completely removing the bottom bracket), solid six month battery warranty

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National eBike Shops

Electric Cyclery
900 N Coast Hwy
Laguna Beach,  CA  92651
Propel Bikes
134 Flushing Ave
Brooklyn,  NY  11205

Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Add-E

Model:

250W

Price:

$1,012

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Pedal Assist (Class 1), Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

6 Month Battery, 2 Year Mechanical Parts

Availability:

United States, Worldwide

Model Year:

20152016

Bicycle Details

Battery Weight:

2.5 lbs ( 1.13 kg )

Motor Weight:

1.9 lbs ( 0.86 kg )

Geometry Measurements:

Motor Dimensions: 80 mm x 70 mm x 70 mm

Accessories:

EasyDo Bottle Cage for Battery, Additional Charger $80, Additional Battery $296, Universal Bottle Cage Mount $23, Crank Puller Tool $23, Brompton Specific Mounting Kit $182

Other:

Compact 2 Amp Charger, Removable Battery Pack

Electronic Details

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Gearless Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Battery Voltage:

22.2 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

6 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

133.2 wh

Charge Time:

2 hours

Estimated Min Range:

8 miles ( 13 km )

Estimated Max Range:

16 miles ( 26 km )

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Twist Throttle, Trigger Throttle (5 Magnet Pedelec Disc)

Top Speed:

15.5 mph ( 25 kph )

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Written Review

The Add-E 250W is a perfect electric bike kit for someone like me because it’s light weight, minimal and supports more active ride styles. It’s also probably the only choice for a lot of people who live in Europe due to legal restrictions of 25 kilometers per hour (15.5 mph) and power rating of 250 watts or less. Top speed is definitely one of my complaints compared to other kits available in the US that can reach 20 or even 28 miles per hour but this is still a satisfying kit. It’s noisier than a lot of other ebikes because the motor in’t contained within a hub and is spinning at a relatively higher RPM. You’ll notice the high pitched electronic whir in the video review above. Still, it’s something I got used to with a bit of time and the other elements of the design (namely size) make it very stealthy, nearly hidden on the frame! Weighing in at ~5.5 lbs including the motor, battery and mounting hardware this kit is light… and it’s mostly removable. The battery bottle can be taken off (and replaced with a real water bottle if you’d like) and the motor slides forward and off with a quick bolt adjustment (using a hex wrench). All of the weight that is present is kept very low and centered on the frame for improved balance and if you plan on riding further and have space for a second battery bottle on the downtube (assuming you used the seat tube for the first one) that will cost you ~$300 extra. Batteries get a basic six month warranty but all hardware gets two years which is awesome!

To me the Add-E makes a lot of sense when used on city style bikes, and maybe road bikes as well, but it’s not idea for full suspension setups because it may not reach the rear wheel at all times. A hardtail trail bike could be a good fit but might produce even more noise due to the knobs and require more frequent adjustment as the tread wears down over time. I love that it’s a seemingly affordable kit but want to point out that you get ~30% of the battery I would consider “average” in the US and may experience much shorter rides as a result (especially if you opt for the twist or trigger throttles). If you do get a throttle, you’ll be transitioning the bike from Class 1 to Class 2 and it may not be allowed at all in some countries. Add-E makes a 600 watt kit that I’m excited to check out and it’s not that much more expensive. I think my favorite part about the way it’s designed is that the motor friction surface does not come into contact with the tire when coasting (if installed correctly). It just hangs out sort of bouncing up and down as you traverse cracks, curbs and other obstacles and this means coasting is not impacted. It’s a super-efficient design, it’s beautiful but it’s also a bit loud and the 250 watt version especially may be underpowered and limited on range for some riders.

Pros:

  • The bottle style battery is extremely convincing and I love the way it operates (twist the cap to the right for 50 volt increments of additional power from 0 to 50 to 100 up to 250 total)
  • It’s great that this kit can work as pedal assist only or you can opt for twist and trigger throttle options, basically going from Class 1 to Class 2 depending on your needs (throttle mode will likely drain the battery faster if you choose not to pedal as actively)
  • The kit is extremely light weight (~5.5 lbs for all pieces combined) and minimal in appearance, the basic pedal-assist only setup has only one wire and keeps the handlebar area of your bike clean, if you add a throttle you’ll have one wire going from the battery area to your bars
  • Once the mounting plate has been installed, it’s pretty easy to remove the Add-E motor by loosening one bolt and unplugging the power… then simply take the bottle battery off and you’re back to a normal bike
  • The bottle cage battery adapter can be used with traditional water bottles (if you take the battery and Add-E off) but it doesn’t sit perfectly flat at the bottom due to the plug interface
  • You can get additional batteries for ~$300 to increase range and since they fit into normal bottle cages you could potentially have two mounted to the bike if you have bosses on the downtube and seat tube, each pack only weighs ~2.5 pounds which is nice
  • Because the motor and battery are mounted at the middle of the frame you get excellent balance and reduce unsprung weight compared with a hub motor… that said, I don’t think it would work well with a full suspension bike due to wheel movement and limited travel of the Add-E

Cons:

  • There are no display readouts so you can’t tell how full the battery pack is, how fast you’re going, how far you’ve traveled or anything else… you have to estimate or get a separate cycle computer but that still won’t display your battery
  • The battery capacity offered by this kit is extremely small compared to most kits and bikes I review (about 30% of average) so the range is lower, but it’s also much lighter than traditional offerings
  • You absolutely need space to mount the bottle cage but Add-E does sell an adapter kit for those without threaded bosses on their seat tube or downtube
  • Limited power and top speed on the 250 watt kit, it’s setup for European standards so you get ~15.5 mph top speed vs. 20 mph which is more common in the US, their 600 watt kit can top 20 mph and doesn’t cost much more
  • Depending on the frame design of your bicycle this kit may be easy to install (using a kickstand plate just behind the bottom bracket) or difficult (mounting Carbon fiber plates directly to the bottom bracket)
  • The five magnet pedelec disc isn’t as responsive as a 12 magnet disc and you don’t get brake levers with integrated motor inhibitors so there are moments where you may be braking against the motor
  • If you mount this kit using the kickstand plate you may no longer be able to use the actual kickstand and your bike may tip… consider an aftermarket chain-stay mounting kickstand
  • This kit is actually kind of expensive in my opinion given the very small capacity of the battery pack (about 30% as large as a “normal” sized battery of ~350 watt hours) if you bought two additional batteries you’d be priced at kits with 350+ watts of power vs. 250 but still much lighter weight

Resources:

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More Add-E Reviews

Add-E 600W Kit Review

  • MSRP: $1,251
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015, 2016

Exceedingly compact, light weight and easy to remove (for temporary unpowered use) though it does produce more noise than most of the ebike kits I've tested. The bottle style battery pack is beautiful, the cap twists to add power at 50…...

Nirmala
1 year ago

I'm curious about the surface material of the friction drive. Is it replaceable? Do you think it might cause a lot of extra tire wear?

Court Rye
1 year ago

I'm wondering the same things Nirmala... but even without the grippy surface metal on rubber would still work alright (maybe unless it's wet out?) difficult to say on the tire wear... I'd imagine that YES it would wear your tread down more quickly than a hub motor. It might depend on your tread pattern like knobby off-road vs. slick or hybrid tires. The system might also become louder on a knobby tire vs. the smoother ones used in this review :/

NerdBrick
7 months ago

I was one of the original funders of the Add-e campaign, and I have over 600 miles with my commuting on partial paved road and some hard packed gravel. It hasn't really worn my tire any faster, but I should point out that I'm running a tire that is labeled "E-Bike" it has has a tread that good for my ridding conditions. The friction material on the motor is still holding up. I was worried it would be rubbed off sooner than the tire would wear. So far so good with both.

Court Rye
7 months ago

Nice, good to know! Appreciate the tip about e-bike specific tires. I believe the Schwalbe Energizer Plus is one of these tires correct? Which one do you use?

NerdBrick
7 months ago

They are Schwalbe Marathon E-Bike Ready tires. My only two thing about the add-E. It's noisy with a loud whine. People hear you coming for sure. The other thing is the connectors into the motor are kind of cheap. They haven't broken yet, but they will once a rock or curb hit the bottom of my bike. Looking at the Go-E , I think they did a better design for the connections with connector-less connections. Plus I like the connection with your phone idea, https://go-e.bike/en/. I haven't seen the Go-e up close, so I can't see how good it is by comparison.

David Conway
5 months ago

Thank you for the review. Could you clarify if the add e will operate without the pas sensors and you could use the throttle cable only.? Regards

Court Rye
5 months ago

Hmm... I don't have the unit in front of me anymore David but if you all ELV Motors (a shop in Santa Clara, CA that carries it) they might be able to respond. I feel like technically it could work but there might be a limiter switch designed to not engage the motor if you're not pedaling, it just hangs there not contacting the tire if it hasn't been activated and I believe that happens when it senses pedaling vs. the throttle but I can't say for sure. I'd love to hear what you find out! Just given them a call at (888) 612-9883 and ask for Doug.

Greg Ritter
1 year ago

Thanks for the well done review. Was waiting for this review as I've been watching the news of the bike motor since its launch and like the look and idea behind the motor. But with what I've been learning about e bikes from reviews and info from this site, maybe this isn't the way to go for an affordable, almost hidden ebike kit. I was looking for something with a little more power and some controls to adjust speed and keep track of battery life and distance. Plus the price is higher than I was thinking for what you get. Will continue to watch this site for further reviews, perhaps the go-e bike kit, with 800 W capacity and lower price point will have more success and be more of what I'm looking for. Will patiently stay tuned to electric bike review to keep informed.

Court Rye
1 year ago

Hi Greg! Yeah, I love the direction that the Add-E is exploring but it has limits with this iteration. I've been in touch with Go-E and hope to review their product at some point soon so keep an eye out and I'll continue charging forward :D

Nirmala
1 year ago

A lot of the concerns raised in the review seem to be better addressed by the ShareRoller, another add-on friction drive. It is not as stealth as the Go-E, but it does have much more sophistication and features, and also three sizes of battery to accommodate different needs. You can learn more here: http://igg.me/at/shareroller/x/12713097

Court also did a review of an earlier version here: https://electricbikereview.com/shareroller/version-1/ (Note that the latest version includes a lot of improvements.)

David Barroso
1 year ago

I have the 600W (sport) version and it is great to take me to work and back. I do 15km (9.3mi) every day with some climbing (200m accumulated climb) with the power output set to maximum. The add-e takes me up to around 40km/h (24.8mph) with little effort. I do the same time by car, some times more, depending on traffic. I have a hardtail scott aspect with schwalbe big ben tyres.

Court Rye
1 year ago

Wow, that sounds awesome David! Pretty stellar performance for such a small battery pack. I'm assuming you use pedal assist only vs. throttle? Any other tips about getting the most out of the Add-E, noticed you're using smooth tires vs. knobby.

David Barroso
1 year ago

Only pedal assist. I have another set of wheels with schwalbe thunder burt (knobby tyres) for off-road use. Tyres with smooth surface work better with the add-e. They have a bigger and better surface and therefore better grip between the metal surface of the motor and the tyre. And also less noise. The add-e when working sounds like an RC toy car :)

Court Rye
1 year ago

Cool, thanks David... I reached out to the company and was told that these Schwalbe Hurricane tires work well for off-road because the center is smooth but they are still wider and have some knobs on the edges for traction.

Michael Craigie
9 months ago

David, I installed the 600w set on my bike yesterday and went for a 15km ride on Map 1. Fairly flat ride with only one 2 short but steep hills. In the course of the ride it wore my brand new Continental Gatorskin tyre right down till the threads are exposed at one point. Do you have any tyre wear issues? Have I perhaps installed it incorrectly do you think?

Court Rye
9 months ago

Wow! That's intense Michael... I didn't ride very far during my demos for this review + video but the tires held up alright and they were just basic. Continental makes good stuff so I'm really surprised you've had such deep wear. I want to provide some sort of feedback like maybe the motor is too close to the tire but honestly, the design is built to "dig in" to get traction so even if it's further vs. close you should still have similar force going from the motor to the tire... I really don't know but am hoping David can chime in and help.

Geir
1 year ago

Love your reviews Court. I have the 600W one too, but its way to noisy so im not going to use it. If you drop your address I'll be happy to donate it to you so you can do a review (I guess you already have a battery and the stand installed?)

Court Rye
1 year ago

That's an awesome offer Geir! I'll reach out :D

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Eddy Rush
2 days ago
Dewey - thanks so much for taking the time to post such a well detailed reply I really appreciate it and you've given me lots to think about.

A Leicester lad ay...not too far down t'road from me then.

Please tell me if I'm wrong but from what I've read elsewhere and your comments regarding the performance on hills, it seems I'm doomed by the UK 250W/15.5 MPH limit law and anything more powerful than that is categorised as a motor vehicle and even requires a tax disc and insurance and is basically classed as a moped.

That's kind of disappointing since the most assistance I would need is for hilly areas.

Thanks for clarifying all my other points and I'll definitely take a look at those links you provided.

I'm a little discouraged by the UK law to be honest but I'll keep doing more research into it.
Dewey
2 days ago
Hi Eddy from South Yorkshire, I'm from Leicester, studied in Sheffield for a year before emigrating to the US and enjoyed traveling around the peak district and south Yorkshire. Fun fact, in Pittsburgh at the University 'Cathedral of Learning' they have a series of nationality rooms and in the England room one of the windows displays the Sheffield city crest celebrating links to Pittsburgh's past industrial history as a steel-making town. Anyway on to your questions:

1) How good are E-Bikes at managing steep hills/long stretches of inclined road and do you still have to pedal?
A: I well remember climbing Sheffield's hills. It takes power to pull the weight of you, bike, motor, & battery, up hill. As you pointed out the UK has a 250W/15.5mph continuous power/speed limit. For purposes of making comparisons the formula for working out the peak power of an E-Bike is battery voltage times controller amperage e.g. 24v X 10a = 240W, this would be weak for peak power and definitely not enough to tackle hills as I can attest, my first attempt to convert my bike was with a 250W front hub kit which was alright for getting up to 15mph on the flat but failed miserably to provide meaningful assistance getting up hill so I returned it (buy from a UK shop to facilitate returns). This page on the UK Pedelecs website has more about UK E-Bike regulations and you can search the forum/ask questions about what types of bikes/kits with higher peak power are legal/fall under the "250W continuous rated power" definition.

If you decide to purchase a factory built E-Bike, try this website for suggestions between 1-2,000GBP. Try to find out the weight of the bike and where the battery is mounted makes a big difference to the balance. I first tried a battery on my rear rack but that meant I locked up the back wheel when braking hard, I then tried one mounted to the down-tube in place of the water bottle and the bike is better balanced.

If you decide to go the DIY kit route the front chain ring adapter so you can mount a lower tooth count ring than the kit supplied chain ring - you should be aiming for no more than 10 tooth difference (and preferably fewer) between the front and rear gears for hill climbing comfortably. I own this kit and reckon this would be the minimum you need to tackle hills with pedalling, and for steep stretches you will be standing on the pedals. You can buy a USB adapater and download Bafang software to change the controller settings, this would invalidate your warranty, I uprated my controller to 18a and set a 17mph controller speed limit because it's street legal where I live and the extra power makes a big difference climbing hills - no more standing on pedals. The Bafang kit is rather delicate for the ham-fisted like me, I have destroyed a couple of non-essential cables/wires coming out of the motor through clumsiness, you should either zip-tie everything down before you go for a test-ride, or buy a factory E-Bike that routes cables though the frame.

2) I notice some E-Bikes have what's known as 'Pedal assist' and some also have a throttle in addition - can you explain the difference?
A: There are two types of pedal assist - cadence sensors act as an on-off switch for the motor when they detect you are pedalling - torque sensors detect how much effort you are putting into pedalling and increase power to compensate. Most cheaper E-Bikes & kits use a cadence sensor which is perfectly adequate because you modulate power by changing the PAS level. An E-Bike throttle might be a twist grip similar to what you find on a moped/scooter, or it may be a thumb-push or trigger switch. Some find throttles helpful when starting from stand still because you don't have to pedal to get going.

3) I guess mudguards would come in handy for wet weather trips, would I be able to add them later?
A: Yes, or your tires will throw muddy water onto your trousers and up your back. Hopefully your bike should come with brazed-on eyelets/lugs for screws - look on the inside of the frame near the top and bottom of the stays - otherwise you would need p-clamps to wrap around the stays.

Hope this helps
Curtis Paddock
1 month ago
Ravi Kempaiah
BULLS is introducing Lacuba EVO E45 this year in the US market. This is one of top end commuter offerings from them along with a host of other Bosch Pedelec/S-pedelecs.

I have been anticipating this bike for sometime and quite excited about it. Brose system is one of the smoothest and this bike comes with the new speed engine. Their pedelec version runs on 250W motor but this one is 350W, speed engine. Perfect for anyone who likes to pedal.

https://www.bulls.de/produkt/bulls-lacubae45-569-69450

View attachment 10295

Attention to details and top of the line components make it a top contender for anyone looking for a well-balanced S-pedelec commuter.

I will highlight what I like in this bike.
  1. Quality components. Shimano XT shifters, derailleurs, both front and rear hubs are Shimano XT. Tektro Dorado hydraulic brakes with 203 mm !! rotors. Well, that's an overkill for commuting but why not?!

  2. B & M brake light + a decent headlight but they run off of the main battery. Ergon GP1 grips, adjustable stem and upright riding position. Reminds me of OHM bikes' geometry.

  3. 36V, 17.5Ah BMZ pack with 4A charger. Much better than 400Whr offered by Bosch. But because it runs at 36V, expect some voltage sag. This drive is perfect for stop and go traffic. Range ~ 45-50 miles.

  4. Of course, the water bottle cage! Kickstand, mirror. E-bike specific tires for extra puncture protection. Overall a fully featured commuter.
Now, what looks good on paper may not always translate to real world performance. But, this bike has the same engine that you would find on Specialized Turbo Vado. Why would Specialized engineers pick that engine if they were not convinced of its performance?

Finally, price point! I think the MSRP is ~ $4500. You may spend $700 on a bike and call it a complete waste of money or spend $5000 and think it's a great value. Totally depends on the use and for commuters, this bike would be a great choice.
Thanks Ravi, I have been zeroing in on the evo 45 for my first ebike/car replacement. I love that it has every feature I would want in a ready-to-ride package. Probably will add a Body Float and still stay under 5K. Moving to San Diego in 30 days and can't wait to test drive one. Alooooha!
Prof_Stack
1 month ago
The Kickstarter Cortland S is now complete now that the accessories have finally arrived. The front rack is attractive and very usable, but does add more weight to the mix. The emphasis on style and the use of wood slabs contribute, BUT it puts more weight on the front tire, where the motor resides, so that part of it is positive.

The Cortland feels more like a bicycle with a motor than an e-bike. The 250w motor is enough for hills if you gear down enough. For longer rides, don't pick a path with a lot of elevation. The auxiliary battery is currently (heh) due in late summer along with Faraday's GPS system. Kickstarter campaigns require patience.

The mirrors I bought from Amazon, and work decently enough. The Garmin GPS unit is very cool.

View attachment 14160View attachment 14163
Ravi Kempaiah
3 months ago
Dane Huxley
I need a little advice, I'm about to buy a 2015 superrace 28 from a dealer in America and have it shipped to Australia. I'm concerned about the sizing the dealer has said I need a size 56cm. I'm 6.1 and using a comparison index it says I need 60cm frame. I've never ridden a road bike before. I currently have a hybrid and that's a large size frame.

I am 6ft and ride a 56cm Super Race.
If you're 6ft 1" and your inseam is more than 33" then you need 59cm frame.
Do your homework on the shipping. The AUS law limits the motor rating at 250W and anything more, you need a lot of paperwork for import and customs.
harryS
3 months ago
At $450, the returns would kill the already slim profit margin on a low cost e-bike. You want to see something a bit more robust, and simpler. Something a customer can't break.

That article said the majority of sales are above $1000 euros, which is around $1060 US dollars. Figure Europe with a 20% VAT, so these are $800 bikes, all from China. That's not too far from a Walmart break point.

Home Depot sold me a 5AH weed whacker battery for $140. I powered my 250W bike motor with it, and went 12 mph for an hour with pedal assist. I was impressed. They just need a 10AH battery with the same quality for $200. That makes a $600 bike something you can make money on.
Thomas Jaszewski
3 months ago
Shelley-MAC
Hi Thomas,

Nice to meet you. Very glad to hear that you want to compare our motor with BBS motor. But actually, I learn little about BBS motor. Is it from Bafang?

The comparison should be meaningful at the same condition. Anyway, hope you can try our motor. You will know how MAC motors are. Now, we have used 0.27mm laminations for our ebike hub motor , which has fantastically obvious speed changes at 6 wingdings. Could you tell me your technical requirement , just like voltage , power and speed that you want to try ?

Thanks,

Shelley
I have 36, 48, and 52V batteries. Two BBS01 36V, 1 BBS02 750W 48V, 2 BBSHD 750W, 1 MXUS 250W Gear Drive, 1 MXUS 1000w DD, and soon a 36-48V Ebikekit Gear drive to repair and do something with. My daily runner is a BBSHD using 48V and 52V 20Ah packs with PF cells. That is on a flat foot bike with a 26" wheel and a 7 speed freewheel. I typically ride 25-30 MPH when traveling longer distances.

BTW I speak to Paul often and have my first Bafang motor from him. Due to the complexity of the Bafang mid drives I'm looking at MAC and wondering if it won't do everything most riders want and need.

My newest build is a one speed Fat Bike for the snow days when studded tires and normal tires just don't perform.
Amanda
3 months ago
I finally rode an bike today!

I started at Gears on Lake shore in my hometown on an Easy Motion Evo Street. I really liked the torque sensor, and hated the throttle being on level 0 only. It took some getting used to as I needed to lower the PAS before moving from standstill at a stop sign, as it was too zippy (what a problem lol) and made the steering control iffy. My test had a 76% battery and only lasted about 15minutes. Being on a side street was terrifying, I will definitely appreciate bike lanes in my own neighborhood. It got up to speed quickly and I liked the foot feel of the power whenever I tried to get the torque sensor to work harder by applying more force in pedalling.

I hem decided to check out my local surface dealer, Bike Zone They had a PAS Raleigh detour Ie. I liked the reach on he size I tested, but could've used a seat post adjustment which this shop didn't do.

Gears did a quick check and adjustment of the bike I tested, and even checked my seat. They showed me how the quick adjustments worked too.

Anyways, no big deal, the PAS without throttle wasn't as zippy but I wasn't able to go far on my test ride either. it didn't feel as powerful, but I also didn't notice much rear heaviness like I expected either. I imagine that would change when she was loaded up.

They can order in the rook for me, at he same prize I can which I suppose is fair. my understanding is they don't have much experience with surface despite being a dealer which is a bit worrisome.

Conclusions: While I liked the 500w ride at gears, plus their thoughtfulness, I am not sure that will translate to the 250w Street from easy go. They have one on it's way to the shop, so maybe I'll return to test. $1999 cdn is painful, matching scooteretti.com sale price. That's the reality apparently due to import difference which sounds a bit fishy.

The rook is a better deal, but both are beginning to breech my Max budget. yikes.

It was good to try them, no regrets there. I'm wondering if I should order online and see if that works out cheaper.
Ravi Kempaiah
3 months ago
Rincon
Ravi That's exactly the e-MTB I'm looking for. The 2017 27.5 Plus is about 3lbs heavier than the old 27.5, and more expensive. I was just thinking of buying the 2016 model, but the E-45 is tempting.

When will it be available? Is it a 27.5, but not plus?
Hi @Rincon ,
This bike will be available sometime in Jan/Feb 2017.
I don't think the rear chain-stay will accept plus sized tires. You can go upto 2.4" max
Here some more photos if you're interested.
If you're going to do more off-roading, then FS 27.5 Plus would be a better choice because of the plus sized tires and 250W motor.
This one has the new Brose speed engine which runs at 350W instead of 250W and will consume more power compared to the ones limited to 20mph.
harryS
4 months ago
I agree with you on the Mini's form factor. Bulky, even though it's small. I would have liked a lower height, but maybe it's stronger this way.

It got its first run last night, on my BBS02 equipped beater bike. Seemed like I picked up a few extra mph at my usual pedal effort with the 52 volts vs 48 volts. Brrr. Extra wind chill that I didn't need. Its main use will be on a 250W bike though which doesn't need much battery.

Hey. best wishes to you for good health, Tom. I'm back into biking for mine.
harryS
4 months ago
Rear motor kits and mid drive kits are within your budget if you have some building skills, and don't need insane power levels.

With a mid drive kit, you keep the wheel and rear derailleur but you lose the front derailleur, not that important with a motor.. It weighs about 8 pounds. A light battery will add 6 pounds. It's very powerful, but will run smoothly all day at 200 watt level. Except for the extra weight, pedals like it wasn't there if you turn off power. Doesn't alter the character of the bike very much, In the USA, this kit is currently available as low as $450 and a battery is $500. A year ago, it was $1300 to consider this route.

Hub motor kits can be less expensive. I've been happy with two that cost around $200. These are geared 250W-500W motors. Again they pedal nice, and are light. Rear motors eliminate the possibility of a motor breaking an allow front fork. Geared motors get by with less watts, are light, and also easy to pedal. No experience with direct drive motors, which are more powerful, but harder to pedal. For your fiance's safety, get torque arms for either type of motor.

I have spoked a small motor into a 700CC wheel. Not that hard, but I could have bought a motor kit with 700cc wheel for $180.

I suppose the more expensive kits are more plug-n-play. My kits, I have to understand basic electricity, be willing to splice and solder wires (and have the tools to do so) , use zip ties, and maybe fashion a simple brackets to mount parts.
MLB
5 months ago
Cameron Newland
I assume higher speeds because there is no reason to go to 48V except to attain higher speeds. If your bike is limited to 25kph (15.5mph) or 32kph (20mph), then all you'll need is a 36V/250W (nominal) motor. 36V/350W (nominal) Bosch systems are quite capable of 28MPH (45kph) cruising.
As noted above, running higher voltage and lower amps keeps a motor cooler. My 500w Falco motor (36v) shuts down via thermal switch at less than 10 miles of mild assist. They suggest going to 48v and less amp through the controller. There are reasons other than going faster.
Cameron Newland
5 months ago
MLB
Why would you look at assumed higher speeds when the bikes in question are clearly all speed regulated?
I assume higher speeds because there is no reason to go to 48V except to attain higher speeds. If your bike is limited to 25kph (15.5mph) or 32kph (20mph), then all you'll need is a 36V/250W (nominal) motor. 36V/350W (nominal) Bosch systems are quite capable of 28MPH (45kph) cruising.
George S.
5 months ago
“Whoever thinks that the ebike community is going to be satisfied with 250W, 500W or even 1000W ebike laws is dreaming. As long as the sun keeps rising, there’s going to be guys out there who will push the limits until they inadvertently find out what those limits are. By the same token we would like to help raise the standard of DIY ebikes across the world and see those limits pushed further. I want to see how nutso these guys can get.”

This is from the CEO of Stealth (Bomber). I assume this is why 36v batteries are disappearing from the catalogs of DIY vendors, like Luna. It means that Luna can't sell into the 36v replacement market very well, which could be a missed opportunity.

The ebike industry will have to settle whether there is a bright line somewhere, a power limit that absolutely defines an ebike. Which is not to say that you can't build something with a higher wattage, it just won't be an ebike.

I would rather buy 36 volt batteries, but good luck with that, DIY.
Roger R
5 months ago
The Stromer ST1 is fully reprogrammable. One can programme the 500W motor to give a 250W nominal effect (code 1007).
Code 3773 makes it possible to set the max speed. Maybe it is possible to set a higher max speed using this code on the Mountain 25.
russ moir
5 months ago
Mountain 25 is a 250w motor. Big nope for me.
Joergen8
5 months ago
Users have reported a boost in performance/torque with the 48V battery, so this would mean more watts produced by the motor, not just a higher RPM. 36 times 15A is 540W, and 48V times 15A would be 720W, which would be a 25% increase in power. The higher voltage also drives the motor with more RPM, hence the increased top speed. If the 500W /48V and 250/350W/36V Dapu motors weigh the same or are essentially the same motor, the 250W/360W motors should do fine at 48V.

I suppose an acute limiting factor would be the voltage rating of the capacitors in the controller. You could fry the controller before the motor.

I hope somebody with access to a Revo reports back with info as to the compatibility with Evo frames.
Cornishman
5 months ago
harryS
Your first observation seems certainly true for the USA. We are an automatic transmission culture here. Even some people who have been riding bikes for years don't understand gears very well.

Me, I've always enjoyed clicking up and down thru the gears on my bikes, and I really like it when the adjustments are set right. I use gears and pedal assist because I am a recreational rider. Don't need to get somewhere on time. 25 km/hour is faster than my usual speeds. When I have checked my "mileage", it's under 8 watt-hours per mile which is about half of "average" use. I get range anxiety, but I'm capable of riding home on no battery.

Your second applies to mid drives that are used hard, very hard. I have a Bafang mid drive kit. I picked up an extra chain and a better derailleur, and I have extra free wheels (new), but haven't seen any wear on my old stuff after 500 miles because my usage is pretty mild.

On the other hand, I like having power in reserve. Verified that my Bafang kit will do 45 km/hr. I also have a bike with a little 250W motor and 250W/36W controller. The throttle was kind of useless. I upgraded to a 500W controller, and now it has some bite. I put 48 volts on it yesterday and it will do 40 km/hour. Will probably melt the motor if we used it like that.
I know about the automatic gearbox culture as I also have a Model A Ford and am a member of a forum based in the US. Every now and again there are threads about people having to learn or relearn how to use a manual gearbox.
harryS
5 months ago
Your first observation seems certainly true for the USA. We are an automatic transmission culture here. Even some people who have been riding bikes for years don't understand gears very well.

Me, I've always enjoyed clicking up and down thru the gears on my bikes, and I really like it when the adjustments are set right. I use gears and pedal assist because I am a recreational rider. Don't need to get somewhere on time. 25 km/hour is faster than my usual speeds. When I have checked my "mileage", it's under 8 watt-hours per mile which is about half of "average" use. I get range anxiety, but I'm capable of riding home on no battery.

Your second applies to mid drives that are used hard, very hard. I have a Bafang mid drive kit. I picked up an extra chain and a better derailleur, and I have extra free wheels (new), but haven't seen any wear on my old stuff after 500 miles because my usage is pretty mild.

On the other hand, I like having power in reserve. Verified that my Bafang kit will do 45 km/hr. I also have a bike with a little 250W motor and 250W/36W controller. The throttle was kind of useless. I upgraded to a 500W controller, and now it has some bite. I put 48 volts on it yesterday and it will do 40 km/hour. Will probably melt the motor if we used it like that.
Berry78
5 months ago
I have to give a pat on the back to the PA GAP trail people. They heard the arguments for and against ebikes, and decided low powered ebikes were fine...for the disabled. But most people that would ride the acceptable 250w bikes probably ARE disabled. Teens that are wanting ebikes to zoom around on would scoff at 250w. I don't remember right off if throttles are allowed (they SHOULD be, considering the disabled are more likely to need it).

To me, this is a great start to the ebike on trail discussion. 250w is humanly attainable, so is really just a playing field leveler.
BowtieDuck
5 months ago
ebiker89
There are 26" electric folding bikes. I see there's one kind on www.amazon.com now on sale for US $756.99. It's bigger and heavier, I guess. It seems nice and have 5 stars rating by 3 people. It's just not brand name and only 250W, so it may not be very cool as some others. You get what you pay for. But who knows. If you don't care much about brand name and don't need high speed and tough bike, then that one may be good enough.

To answer a few questions you asked above: I never rode in mud or sand. Did ride on gravel a little bit. When I use my Urban, I always put it on assist level 1. Just don't feel the need for 2, 3, 4, 5. I want to paddle too. The higher level the less you have to paddle. If you paddle, it will go quite fast. I charge my bike every two or three days; just leave it in my trunk and pull the cord in to the car and charge it. When it rains, you better to cover the controller and the throttle as I said in my last post. You sure can ride the electric bike without turning on the motor (controller) easily. But the Urban is 20", therefore it does not go as fast as the 26". When you don't turn it on, you just need to use more energy to paddle like riding the regular one. I still ride my regular bike because I want to exercise more sometimes.
Thank you for the great response!
ebiker89
5 months ago
There are 26" electric folding bikes. I see there's one kind on www.amazon.com now on sale for US $756.99. It's bigger and heavier, I guess. It seems nice and has 5 stars rating by 3 people. It's just not brand name and only 250W, so it may not be very cool as some others. You get what you pay for. But who knows. If you don't care much about brand name and don't need high speed and tough bike, then that one may be good enough.

To answer a few questions you asked above: I never rode in mud or sand. Did ride on gravel a little bit. When I use my Urban, I always put it on assist level 1. Just don't feel the need for 2, 3, 4, 5. It would use up battery faster. I want to paddle too. The higher level the less you have to paddle. If you paddle, it will go quite fast. I charge my bike every two or three days; just leave it in my trunk and pull the cord in to the car and charge it. When it rains, you better to cover the controller and the throttle as I said in my last post. You sure can ride the electric bike without turning on the motor (controller) easily. But the Urban is 20", therefore it does not go as fast as the 26". When you don't turn it on, you just need to use more energy to paddle like riding the regular one. I still ride my regular bike because I want to exercise more sometimes.