Add-E 600W Kit Review

Add E 600w Electric Bike Kit Review
Add E 600w Installed On Raleigh
Add E 600w Electric Bike Motor
Add E 600w Downtube Battery Pack Bottle
Add E 600w Optional Trigger Throttle
Add E 600w 5 Magnet Cadence Sensor
Add E 600w Bottle Cage Battery Holder
Add E 600w Motor Installed Carbon Fiber Mounts
Add E 600w Removable Battery Bottle
Add E 600w Speed Sensor Rear Wheel
Add E 600w Twist Cap Battery Lithium Ion
Add E 600w Lightest Ebike Motor
Add E 600w Ebike Motor
Add E 600w Small Ebike Kit
Add E 600w In Packaging
Add E 600w Electric Bike Kit Review
Add E 600w Installed On Raleigh
Add E 600w Electric Bike Motor
Add E 600w Downtube Battery Pack Bottle
Add E 600w Optional Trigger Throttle
Add E 600w 5 Magnet Cadence Sensor
Add E 600w Bottle Cage Battery Holder
Add E 600w Motor Installed Carbon Fiber Mounts
Add E 600w Removable Battery Bottle
Add E 600w Speed Sensor Rear Wheel
Add E 600w Twist Cap Battery Lithium Ion
Add E 600w Lightest Ebike Motor
Add E 600w Ebike Motor
Add E 600w Small Ebike Kit
Add E 600w In Packaging

Summary

  • Exceedingly compact, light weight and easy to remove (for temporary unpowered use) though it does produce more noise than most of the ebike kits I've tested
  • The bottle style battery pack is beautiful, the cap twists to add power at 50 watt increments up to 250 making it legal internationally, limited top speed of 15.5 mph
  • Lots of optional accessories including a twist or trigger throttle, the included five magnet pedelec disc isn't super responsive but works well and qualifies as Class 1
  • Compatible with a wide range of bicycle types but may require extra work to install (completely removing the bottom bracket), solid six month battery warranty

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National eBike Shops

Electric Cyclery
900 N Coast Hwy
Laguna Beach,  CA  92651
Propel Bikes
134 Flushing Ave
Brooklyn,  NY  11205

Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Add-E

Model:

600W

Price:

$1,251

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedalec (Class 3), Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

6 Month Battery, 2 Year Mechanical Parts

Availability:

United States, Worldwide

Model Year:

20152016

Bicycle Details

Battery Weight:

2.5 lbs ( 1.13 kg )

Motor Weight:

1.9 lbs ( 0.86 kg )

Geometry Measurements:

Motor Dimensions: 80 mm x 70 mm x 70 mm

Accessories:

EasyDo Bottle Cage for Battery, Additional Charger $80, Additional Battery $296, Universal Bottle Cage Mount $23, Crank Puller Tool $23, Brompton Specific Mounting Kit $182

Other:

Compact 2 Amp Charger 0.6 lbs (0.27 kg), Removable Battery Pack

Electronic Details

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Gearless Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

600 watts

Battery Voltage:

22.2 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

6 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

133.2 wh

Charge Time:

2 hours

Estimated Min Range:

6 miles ( 10 km )

Estimated Max Range:

16 miles ( 26 km )

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Twist Throttle, Trigger Throttle (5 Magnet Pedelec Disc)

Top Speed:

28 mph ( 45 kph )

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Written Review

The Add-E kit has always impressed me with its compact size and weight. The motor unit can be quickly and easily removed and even the battery pack (which resembles a traditional water bottle) can be taken off and replaced with an actual bottle for drinking purposes or you could get a second holster and double your range for ~$300 and ~2.5 lbs extra. Basically, you can switch between an ebike and your traditional pedal powered bike in under three minutes… but even if you decided to leave the motor and battery connected at all times, the total weight is just five pounds and the friction drive canister doesn’t produce any drag because it “floats” in front of your rear wheel, never making contact unless you hit a small bump. Once the system is switched on and the control unit senses wheel movement and pedal assist or throttle input, the motor spins into action sending it backwards with centripetal force, engaging the tire and propelling you forward. It’s a beautiful system and priced at just over one thousand dollars (for the 250 watt version) or $1,251 for the 650 watt being covered here, it’s one of the more affordable kits I’ve seen that’s all inclusive.

So is the 600 watt Add-E kit faster more powerful than the international 250 watt kit? The short answer is not really. From what I can tell (using both kits, weighing all of the components and using a cycle computer) it appears that the motor hardware is the same, along with the battery pack, and all you’re getting is an unlimited top speed. While it is possible to go faster, it just doesn’t feel much different and still struggles with hills and even grass. The Add-E kit takes a while to ramp up speed and my hopes of using this off-road were dashed after a lackluster urban experience. So maybe it’s worth the extra $250 if you truly just need to go a little faster when riding but the limitations of the battery size remain, your range may decrease to just six miles per charge when riding at “high speed” but I’d still wager a maximum range in the lowest pedal assist mode at 16 miles. There are five power levels to choose from using the twist cap on the bottle battery (gently twist to the left to turn it off and to the right for more power) but without a display it’s difficult to tell how much battery power remains and I noticed that even when it’s “off” the red LED on the base of the motor unit continues to flash which may draw power and run it completely dry. I recommend taking the battery off the bike when not in use.

One of the greatest challenges to overcome when reviewing this kit was installation… but only when using the carbon fiber bottom bracket option. If your bike has a kickstand plate behind the bottom bracket then it’s a breeze. The length of the video review for this kit is a testate to what Sam and I went through to prep our bike platform and ultimately install it and while you may not have quite as many steps as us… it’s still time consuming and special tools may be required such as a bottom bracket puller. Frankly, I’d just ask my local shop to install it for me. The second big challenge relating to installation was setting the unit for high speed operation. When I received it the top speed was only ~15.5 mph (25 km/h) which was confusing and disapointing. Nothing in the manual I received explained how to change it so I called ELV Motors in Santa Clara, CA (the official distributor) and Nate helped me out over the phone. In short… turn the battery up to full power (five clicks to the right) then take it off the bike. Now unplug the white connector from the Add-E motor unit while leaving the black power cable plugged in. Next, insert the small speed chip into the slot that had the white cable in it before then plug the bottle battery back onto the mount. Look at the flashing red LED light on the base of the Add-E and confirm that it’s flashing in intervals of six (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 wait 1, 2, 3… and so on). This is your confirmation that the kit is now “unlocked” for higher speed. Frankly I wish this had been done before I received the kit because the chip is so small and easy to lose and the lack of instructions… hours wasted :(

Note that instead of a seamless look, our final Add-E electric bike demo bike was a bit tackier appearance due to the wire running from the control unit at the motor up to the handle bars for the throttle. I received both a trigger and twist throttle for testing but went with a trigger to leave room for the gear shifters near the right and left grips. For me it was worth it because I like to use throttles sometimes and wanted to test the motor on its own vs. pedaling to see how fast it would go. Due to the safety setup (where the motor won’t start even in throttle mode unless the bike is going 2+ mph) the throttle wasn’t immediately useful but did make filming easier.

While I’m still very impressed with the price, size and ease of use after installation… the Add-E kit remains noisy and I feel the 600 watt rating does not accurately reflect the difference in power or speed coming from the 250 watt version. This is basically a 20 mph kit and possibly 250 watts nominal up to 600 watts peak but with pretty low torque. Still, I’d rather have an unlimited kit than one that cuts out at 15.5 mph even if that means my battery drains a little quicker. If we look at my ideal commuting setup then it would cost ~$1,600 for the system with one extra battery plus the price of a bike so it’s not much less expensive than a purpose built ebike that’s much powerful and capable of longer rides. However, this is one of the few kits that can be mounted on a super efficient road bike platform and that’s exciting. There are very few kits that offer what the Add-E does and if they could make it silent I would be twice as interested and excited. It’s a beautiful system and one that sort of grows on you after the initial shock of the sound and lackluster power. It’s going to work better on some bikes than others and is probably best suited to light weight riders.

Pros:

  • The bottle style battery is extremely convincing and I love the way it operates (twist the cap to the right for additional power (there’s a difference between level 1 and level 5 but the middle all feels similar)
  • It’s great that this kit can work as pedal assist only or you can opt for twist and trigger throttle options depending on your needs (throttle mode will likely drain the battery faster if you choose not to pedal as actively and requires the bike to be going ~2 mph to activate)
  • The kit is extremely light weight (~5.5 lbs for all pieces combined) and minimal in appearance, the basic pedal-assist only setup has only one wire and keeps the handlebar area of your bike clean, if you add a throttle you’ll have one wire going from the battery area to your bars
  • Once the mounting plate has been installed, it’s pretty easy to remove the Add-E motor by loosening one bolt and unplugging the power… then simply take the bottle battery off and you’re back to a normal bike
  • The bottle cage battery adapter can be used with traditional water bottles (if you take the battery and Add-E off) but the bottle won’t sit perfectly flat at the bottom due to the plug interface
  • You can get additional batteries for ~$300 to increase range and since they fit into normal bottle cages you could potentially have two mounted to the bike if you have bosses on the downtube and seat tube, each pack only weighs ~2.5 pounds which is nice
  • Because the motor and battery are mounted at the middle of the frame you get excellent balance and reduce unsprung weight compared with a hub motor… that said, I don’t think it would work well with a full suspension bike due to wheel movement and limited travel of the Add-E

Cons:

  • To unlock the higher speed of this Add-E kit I had to use a little computer chip that was included but there were no instructions… In short, remove the battery and unplug the white cable then insert the chip there, now turn the battery all the way up to level five (twist to the right) then plug it into the bottle cage interface, now look for six red flashes (repeating) at the base of the motor then unplug the battery from the bike and you should be good
  • The battery design is cool but didn’t appear to have an auto time-off so if you forget to manually twist it to off you may drain the battery slowly, without a display unit or lights to show that it’s on it’s just easier to overlook
  • Despite being rated at 600 watts and labeled as a speed pedelec, this version resembles the base 250 watt kit in terms of performance, I feel that it may be the same motor but have the top speed limit removed
  • There are no display readouts so you can’t tell how full the battery pack is, how fast you’re going, how far you’ve traveled or anything else… you have to estimate or get a separate cycle computer but that still won’t display your battery
  • The battery capacity offered by this kit is extremely small compared to most kits and bikes I review (about 30% of average) so the range is lower, but it’s also much lighter than traditional offerings
  • You absolutely need space to mount the bottle cage but Add-E does sell an adapter kit for those without threaded bosses on their seat tube or downtube
  • Depending on the frame design of your bicycle this kit may be easy to install (using a kickstand plate just behind the bottom bracket) or difficult (mounting Carbon fiber plates directly to the bottom bracket) it took us several hours and special tools to get it working
  • The five magnet pedelec disc isn’t as responsive as a 12 magnet disc and you don’t get brake levers with integrated motor inhibitors so there are brief moments where you may be braking against the motor
  • If you mount this kit using the kickstand plate you may no longer be able to use the actual kickstand and your bike may tip… consider an aftermarket chain-stay mounting kickstand

Resources:

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More Add-E Reviews

Add-E 250W Kit Review

  • MSRP: $1,012
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015, 2016

Exceedingly compact, light weight and easy to remove (for temporary unpowered use) though it does produce more noise than most of the ebike kits I've tested. The bottle style battery pack is beautiful, the cap twists to add power at 50…...

Greg Ritter
9 months ago

Thanks for your review of the 600W Add-e kit. Always learn alot and helps in making decisions about an ebike. Like the idea of how it works, but for price and what it actually does? ? ?
Maybe the go-e on bike kit will be the ticket. Sounds like its about half the price and comes with an app to keep track of speed, and adjust the electronic features. It claims to be 800W. Hopefully those guys will send you one to try and inform the American market about its capacity. Will keep watching and reading your reviews.

Court Rye
9 months ago

Sounds good Greg, I'm excited to check it out and compare the sound, power and speed... Hopefully I'll get one soon ;)

Greg Harm
8 months ago

Court points out this example of the major pitfalls of this industry, i.e., when you spend over a $1000 for a kit, you don't want to have to do a great deal of fabrication.

These startup manufturing companies in this industry have the best of intentions, but this particular kit seemed to have a dozen or more pitfalls that required calls to California to resolve. When you add in limited business hours, and phone hold times, one would need an infinite well of patience to complete the instsllation of this motor.

It's important to note that this professional bike mechanic had far more bicycle tools thsn the common cyclist, but still needed to physically take the bike to a formal shop (and very few of us live or work next door to one.)

That said, I'm old school--in that if I buy something and have to wait a week or more for it to arrive, I want the ability to bolt it on and go. AT LEAST the first weekend after it arrives. But in this case, he had to jump through a host of hoops to learn all of the steps that they had failed to include instructions for. It's probablt a safe bet that there are still steps in the installation that this company didn't bother to tell him about.

Finally, the lack of any meter, to show the operator how much power remains, or indicators to inform the user what power level he ir she is using, and the noise: any one of these would be a deal breaker for me.

Since the ebike industry is still in its infancy, it is plagued by undercapitalized rookies that will most likely be gone a year after you buy the product. Thanks, EBR for helping consumers make informed ebike product purchases, and especially for giving consumers the straight market analysis as to whether a product has value--or is just not worth it to have to practically rebuild it prior to its first use.

Court Rye
8 months ago

I appreciate the innovation and admire the small size of this thing but yes... it seems to require more effort in some situations and the 600 vs. 250 watt versions seemed very similar, to me that was the biggest surprise.

MikeB
5 months ago

It is very interesting imo but does need some more refining. I would love to have a very light weight, easy mount on regular bike e assist. Make it good for MOST riders 10-15 mile rides with no fear because the bike is still easily ridden without assist. Big huge motors that can climb the steepest hills with huge heavy batteries are NOT the only thing needed or wanted.

Court Rye
5 months ago

I'm totally with you... I'd love a light weight QUIET ebike kit. Even something with 180 watts and a five mile range, I'd use it sparingly but feel good getting up hills or pressing through wind. Hope we see something like this in the future. I think Add-E could do it if they just made it quieter.

Jean cleverson da silva
3 months ago

Vivo em Brasil estado de Rondônia adoraria compra um kit add-e para colocá em minha bike enfelismente vivemos longe de tudo tipo de recurso e tudo e muito difícil consequir coisa de qualidade achei maravilhoso este produto e sei que vai ser um sucesso de vendas E tomara que logo logo Venha para perto de nós porque eu sou um apaixonado por bike elétrica.

Court Rye
3 months ago

Eu não vender esses kits mas talvez você pode comprar um do distribuidor aqui nos EUA e tê-lo enviado? Tente entrar em contato ELV Motors em Santa Clara, CA. Seu site é www.elvmotors.com

Bereket Tesfay
3 months ago

Add-E 250W Kit Review I want to get one but I don't no how?

Court Rye
3 months ago

Hi Bereket, not sure where you live but I believe in the US there's a dealer called ELV Motors in Santa Clara California that sells this kit. They might even be willing to ship it. Hope this helps!

Rick
1 month ago

Horrible test. Put it on a descent road bike or at least put a smooth tire on the cheapo mountain bike you put it on. That tire is horrible for the motor to grip. It makes a ton of extra noise also. Use your head...

Court Rye
1 month ago

Hi Rick, I appreciate your feedback. Sometimes my equipment and time are limited due to the travel required to find and review bikes. Did you see the review I shot of the Add-E 250W? I used a more appropriate bike there but was hoping that this bing the 600 watt version, it could go off-road and be like the lightest, cheapest way to create an electric trail bike. Unfortunately, things just didn't work out that way... Anyway, I'll keep your suggestions in mind for next time :)

Post a Comment

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ROJA
2 months ago
Just as a thought experiment, I tried http://www.bikecalculator.com/

for a 70 kg (154 lb) rider on a 27 kg (60 lb) bike, this will give you a sense of how hard this would be:

Power (motor plus legs) --> Speed kph / Speed mph

200W --> 31 kph / 19.3 mph
300W --> 36.2 / 22.5 (100W adds 3.2 mph)
400W --> 40.3 / 25.0 (+2.5 mph)
500W --> 43.8 / 27.2 (+2.2 mph)
600W --> 46.8 / 29.1 (+1.9 mph)
700W --> 49.5 / 30.7 (+1.6 mph)
800W --> 52.0 / 32.3 (+1.6 mph)
900W --> 54.2 / 33.7 (+1.4 mph)
1,000W --> 56.3 / 35.0 (+1.3 mph)
*****
5,000W --> 98.2 / 61.0 mph
*****
10,000W --> 124.2 / 77.1 mph
*****

150cc vespa = 8650 W (11.6 hp) (less at the rear wheel)
Honda CBR300 = 20,730W (27.8 hp) (measured at the rear wheel)
MLB
4 months ago
Yes, you're on the right track with all your thinking I'd say.
Since you ride a regular bike and presumably understand how to shift to the gear you need BEFORE hitting the hill then you'll have no problem. You shift when the load on the chain is light, THEN accelerate.
A geared hub motor may well do just fine on that climb, it's ------------------- where I live, so hard to tell. LOL My dual hub motored Big Bud outclimbed (barely) my Haibike (mid drive Bosch) up a hill (in Michigan) where I had to pedal smoothly to not have the front end up on each stroke. And that's 600w COMBINED motors, so a big hub motor can presumably climb a bunch. And might be the lightest setup.
Bafang will pull it with ease. You can build an awesome bike with a Bafang. Fair amount of posters have had warranty issues too.
Internally geared hubs very heavy. Just like E motors. And batteries.
Use a good, solid, preferably steel bike to begin with. More weight, but you want an aluminum bike DESIGNED to be an Ebike. JMO!!
No rim brakes.
Decent wheels are a must at the speeds and weight or you'll regret not.
sanglee007
5 months ago
Hi Vincent,

The RadMini, is very different than my RadRover 2016
  • PAS 1
    • From 0-8mph: will ramp @ about 2-3mph to 300w+- (it can go a bit over, but generally tries to stay in this range for all of the PAS levels except 5, which will give you all 750w)
  • PAS 2
    • From 0-11mph: will ramp @ about 2-3mph to 400w+-
  • PAS 3
    • From 0-15mph: will ramp @ about 2-3mph to 500w+-
  • PAS 4
    • From 0-17mph: will ramp @ about 2-3mph to 600w+-
  • PAS 5
    • From 0-20mph: will ramp @ about 2-3mph to 750w
So the RadMini computer will get to about 2-3mph (rolling) then get to near the top of the watt for the PAS level and maintain it until you reach the max speed for the PAS. With the smaller wheels, this is probably a good idea... When I use the throttle, it will give me 750w almost as soon as I get rolling and the bike feels like it wants to scoot away from me.


Sang
Ann M.
7 months ago
info@shareroller.com. It doesn't look like they've responded to similar questions earlier this month on their Facebook page.

Don't now what type of bike you have, there are other friction drive systems with reviews on EBR that you may want to consider which are available now. The Share Roller is unique with the quick mounting.
Bike_On
1 year ago
Jack Tyler
Maybe it's just due to the l-o-n-g list of ebike brands here plus the absence of a current Optibike review from Court, but I'd missed researching Optibike until I ran into two excellent tutorial interviews with Jim Turner. I do have a question for you Optibike owners, but first wanted to point out to other visitors here like me that Bofeili branded 'sport ebikes' are now available on eBay. BUT it surely is a case of apples vs. oranges: steel frame, smaller battery with no reference to the Lithium battery chemistry, non-integrated controller, funky non-LCD display, only one (26") wheel size, and a 'disguised' seller (I can't tell who it is other than someone in Oregon, perhaps just a freight forwarder) who may offer zip in the form of customer service and does not allow returns. Given the earlier discussion about cheaper Bofeili-branded ebikes similar to Optibike, I thought I'd point that out. Cheaper, yes. Same or similar? Not from that seller, not even a little bit.

For folks like Allen & Greg, who bought Optibike products, do you know what is the source(s) of the chronically late deliveries? And @Optibike_Austen, I'd welcome an explanation from you, as well. I can imagine a variety of business-related reasons, some actually beneficial to the customer (e.g. a biz decision to avoid significant flooring/inventory financing to keep the price competitive) and others more worrisome (such as an unreliable manufacturer). The answer is certainly not just dock strikes. Given my move to SW Montana and to a town in a valley surrounded by mountains, the mid-drive system with lots of battery and lots of gears might be the best fit for my needs. And the owner praises here are surely encouraging. But whether fair or not, I'm always worried when a business can't reliably supply its product.

Thanks for all the helpful posts, everyone.

Jack
Jax, FL to Bozeman, MT
Jack,

Optibike is notoriously late.... no excuses, they are very small... They moved operations from being in Boulder to Jim's residence outside of town.

I have owned and ridden an Opti 5 years. Don't have one now. I'm interested to get back on one, after a time with ddhubs.

They are expensive. I'd buy one from the optibike owners group on Google. Offers come up. They are not perfect. They need a PAS system on their 700W+ bikes. The SIMBB has much promise - low weight, 600W, decent battery size, normal looking, rack+accessories doable. Not much feedback on them to date. And YES, Court needs some updated reviews with Opti on their higher speed offerings.

Best-
Dan
JoePah
1 year ago
I have a BMC geared motor that can easily be pedaled without power.. Fairly light and low resistance.. Downside it is noisier and from what i'm told, will need the internal gears replaced at some point.. That motor can't reliably handle high power over 1500W or higher voltage above 60v.

I have a 600w Stromer Direct drive.. Very quiet.. Should last many thousands of miles.. My last one got 7000 miles. Very heavy motor and no fun to just pedal.

So if you want a more natural ebike experience, go with a geared hub motor.. Just keep the power down and expect more noise and more problems.
Bike_On
1 year ago
Bike_On
Here is my short list of bikes that can handle it, by weight.
  1. Nicolai E-Boxx2, 42 lb, 36V/11 Ahr, 350/550W, Gen2 Bosch mid drive, $5.5k
  2. Lapierre Overvolt FS 900, 42.9 lb, 36V/11Ahr, 350W, Gen2 Bosch mid drive, 27.5" wheels, $5.5k
  3. Felt Duale, 44.0 lb, 36V/11Ahr, 350W, Gen2 Bosch mid drive, 27.5" wheels, $5.8k
  4. Haibike Xduro AMT Pro, 46.5 lb, 36V/11Ahr, 350W, Gen2 Bosch mid drive, 27.5" wheels, $7.7k
  5. Easy Motion Bosch Jumper, 47lb, 36V/11Ahr, 350/550W, Bosch Gen2, 27.5" wheels, $5.2k
  6. Haibike XDURO Fullseven RX , 48lb, 36V/11Ahr, 350W, Bosch Gen2, 60nm, 27.5" wheels, $5.5k
  7. BMEBikes Apollos, 48lb, 36V/8.8Ahr, 350/600W, 8fun mid,26" wheels, $3.9k
  8. Haibike Xduro FS RX, 48 lb, 36V/11Ahr, 350W, Gen2 Bosch mid drive, 27.5" wheels, $4.9k
  9. *Neo Jumper, 48 lb, 36V/9Ahr, 350W, BH geared rear hub, 26" wheels,$4k
  10. Focus Thron Impulse Speed, 48 lb, 36V/17Ahr, 350W, Impulse II mid drive, 27.5" wheels, $7k
  11. Specialized S-Works Turbo Levo FSR 6Fattie, 48.5 lb, 36V/14Ahr, 250/530W, Brose MD, 90nm, 27.5x3" wheels, $9k
  12. Haibike Xduro Nduro Pro, 49 lb, 36V/11Ahr, 350W, Gen2 Bosch mid drive, 26" wheels, $9.1k
  13. Haibike Xduro AMT RX, 49.2lb, 36V/11Ahr, 350W, Gen2 Bosch, 60nm, 27.5" wheels, $6.35k
  14. IZIP E3 Peak DS, 50lb, 48V/8.7Ahr, 350W, Tranzx geared mid, 27.5" wheels, $4.5k
  15. Haibike Xduro Nduro RX, 51b, 36V/11Ahr, 350W, Gen2 Bosch mid drive, 27.5" wheels, $7.0k
  16. *Easy Motion 27.5 Evo Jumper, 52lb, 36V/11.6Ahr, 350/548W, Dapu, 37nm, 27.5" wheels, $4.3k
  17. *Neo Jumper B, 52 lb, 36V/12Ahr, 350W, BH geared rear hub, 27.5" wheels,$4.2k
  18. Optibike R8, 59 lb, 37V/26Ahr, 750W, Optibike MBB mid drive, 26" wheels, $12k
  19. Optibike R11, 63 lb, 48V/18Ahr, 1100W, Optibike MBB mid drive, 26" wheels, $14k
  20. M55 Terminus, 65 lb, 43.2V/37.2Ahr, 3000W, mid drive, 26" ? wheels, $38k
  21. Stealth Fighter, 75 lb, 48V/20Ahr, 3000W, dd rear hub, 24" wheels, $7.9k
  22. Stealth Bomber, 116 lb, 72V/20Ahr, 4500W, dd rear hub, 24" wheels, $9.9k
* Not for heavy off road use.

Updated 8/6/14
Updated 4/17/15
Updated 9/16/15
updated today.
flymeaway
1 year ago
Denman
But mostly because I'm looking for a system that will assist me up a couple thousand feet of climbing. That way I can finish the remaining 2000 feet on my own after the battery gives out.
Curious, grade and distance? With my converted Elite Trail I can keep an 18 MPH pace with moderate pedaling at 6% grade 44T/16T. Whether or not it's accurate the watt meter on the C965 display indicates 500-600w draw on a 750W 48V BBS02.

Court J.
erikV
2 years ago
JayVee
I'm curious to hear what comments you might have about the handling characteristics of the Brose drive on your ex-bike. Also, were the issues you had recurring or was it just a single issue?
The Brose drive is very responsive and the bike just takes off as soon as you start pedaling. It is also very silent, I doubt most fellow commuters would notice the Rotwild as an electric bike due to its silent drive and well integrated motor and battery.

The problem were related to the controller / shifting between assist-levels. After about one month the bike would not respond when I tried to change between the support modes, it was stuck in the lowest eco-mode. It could stay like this for a couple of hours or even days before it suddenly worked without problems again. After some time the problem were back.

Adrian
A pity, I would have loved to hear impressions of the M1 Spitzing R. Though I must admit that the Rohloff and carbon drive would be tempting.
The new German company HNF Heisenberg released some very interesting bike a week ago. Take a look at their ultra-premium offering XF1:

Full suspension speed-pedelec with rohloff and gates carbon drive. Frame made by Nicolai and premium components as Magura MT7 brakes and Rock Shox Pike fork.
http://www.hnf-heisenberg.com/index.php/heisenberg-design-xf1.html/

EDIT: When I crunch the numbers this one actually comes out $330,- cheaper than the Optibike, taking shipping costs into consideration the savings are even more. Way better equipped bike with full suspension and proven electronics compared to the Opti, hmm..

Adrian
Doesn't the Optibike SIMBB 20r have a 600W motor? That's not exactly road legal in Norway either...
I belive the advertised 600W motor is maximum output? The Rotwild bikes with Brose motor are advertised as 250W bikes but will produce up to 580W quite consistant, same as the new Specialized Levo.

Ravi Kempaiah
SIMBB 29er only has throttle support, no pedal assist. I'm not sure if he will need L1e license on that !
While that was the case with the pre-production demo SIMBB bikes, Optibike told me that the production bikes now come with digital display / dashboard showing speed, battery life and distance travelled as well as a four levels of support pedelec system.
Ravi Kempaiah
2 years ago
Adrian
A pity, I would have loved to hear impressions of the M1 Spitzing R. Though I must admit that the Rohloff and carbon drive would be tempting.

Doesn't the Optibike SIMBB 20r have a 600W motor? That's not exactly road legal in Norway either...
SIMBB 29er only has throttle support, no pedal assist. I'm not sure if he will need L1e license on that !
Adrian
2 years ago
A pity, I would have loved to hear impressions of the M1 Spitzing R. Though I must admit that the Rohloff and carbon drive would be tempting.

Doesn't the Optibike SIMBB 20r have a 600W motor? That's not exactly road legal in Norway either...
Hurley
2 years ago
Lithium Battery Chargers


$79.00–$199.00


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– 48v 2a (120W) $79 In Stock

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– 48v 5A (300W) $129 In Stock

– 48v 7.5a (400W) $199 Special Order 3-4 Weeks

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– 72v 6a (600W) $199 Special Order 3-4 Weeks

J.R.
2 years ago
jcasad
It's beginning to look like the general consensus is that a new bike with a 500watt motor is the answer. Thanks everyone. Pedeco seems to be a good choice too.
ProdecoTech has really upped their game this year with many models now with a 600w geared motor and large Samsung batteries.
pxpaulx
2 years ago
I'll comment here for you

Seems like a good fit for a road bike - but man, for the beefier version 600w of power into such a tiny contact patch seems to me like that could create issues that aren't immediately quantifiable to my morning brain

What I do really like: 2nd mounting kit for $160 bucks.
pxpaulx
2 years ago
J.R.
The original poster is from Maryland, not Canada. All bikes noted here are available in North America. These bikes are not near par, the only items not listed on the Rebel are derailluer and shifter, not sure why it has not been updated, those will be Sram x7 or x9. Prodeco has a Sram deal that's why all componentry is made by Sram: Truvativ, RockShox, etc. You also have Sram 4 piston hydraulic brakes on the Rebel, but the major concern is the much smaller motor (350w) and the 13ah Sanyo battery on the Surface verses the Rebel's 600w motor and 14.25ah Samsung battery. I hope all get the best value in a bike they like, but there is a lot more value in the Rebel of the three bikes noted.
I stand corrected! I thought the guy that posted the Winnipeg scooter link was the first post I do agree battery and motor are better on the rebel.
J.R.
2 years ago
The original poster is from Maryland, not Canada. All bikes noted here are available in North America. These bikes are not near par, the only items not listed on the Rebel are derailluer and shifter, not sure why it has not been updated, those will be Sram x7 or x9. Prodeco has a Sram deal that's why all componentry is made by Sram: Truvativ, RockShox, etc. You also have Sram 4 piston hydraulic brakes on the Rebel, but the major concern is the much smaller motor (350w) and the 13ah Sanyo battery on the Surface verses the Rebel's 600w motor and 14.25ah Samsung battery. I hope all get the best value in a bike they like, but there is a lot more value in the Rebel of the three bikes noted.
Bike_On
2 years ago
Updated 4/17/14
Updated 8/6/14

Here is my short list of bikes that can handle it, by weight.
  1. Nicolai E-Boxx2, 42 lb, 36V/11 Ahr, 350/550W, Gen2 Bosch mid drive, $5.5k
  2. Lapierre Overvolt FS 900, 42.9 lb, 36V/11Ahr, 350W, Gen2 Bosch mid drive, 27.5" wheels, $5.5k
  3. Felt Duale, 44.0 lb, 36V/11Ahr, 350W, Gen2 Bosch mid drive, 27.5" wheels, $5.8k
  4. Haibike Xduro AMT Pro, 46.5 lb, 36V/11Ahr, 350W, Gen2 Bosch mid drive, 27.5" wheels, $7.7k
  5. BMEBikes, 48lb, 36V/8.8Ahr, 350/600W, 8fun mid,26" wheels, 43.9k
  6. Haibike Xduro FS RX, 48 lb, 36V/11Ahr, 350W, Gen2 Bosch mid drive, 27.5" wheels, $4.9k
  7. *Neo Jumper, 48 lb, 36V/9Ahr, 350W, BH geared rear hub, 26" wheels,$4k
  8. Focus Thron Impulse Speed, 48 lb, 36V/17Ahr, 350W, Impulse II mid drive, 27.5" wheels, $7k
  9. Haibike Xduro Nduro Pro, 49 lb, 36V/11Ahr, 350W, Gen2 Bosch mid drive, 26" wheels, $9.1k
  10. Haibike Xduro AMT RX, 49.2lb, 36V/11Ahr, 350W, Gen2 Bosch mid drive, 27.5" wheels, $5.5k
  11. *Neo Jumper B, 52 lb, 36V/12Ahr, 350W, BH geared rear hub, 27.5" wheels,$4.2k
  12. Optibike R8, 59 lb, 37V/26Ahr, 750W, Optibike MBB mid drive, 26" wheels, $12k
  13. Optibike R11, 63 lb, 48V/18Ahr, 1100W, Optibike MBB mid drive, 26" wheels, $14k
  14. M55 Terminus, 65 lb, 43.2V/37.2Ahr, 3000W, mid drive, 26" ? wheels, $38k
  15. Stealth Fighter, 75 lb, 48V/20Ahr, 3000W, dd rear hub, 24" wheels, $7.9k
  16. Stealth Bomber, 116 lb, 72V/20Ahr, 4500W, dd rear hub, 24" wheels, $9.9k
* Not for heavy off road use.
AirSpeed
2 years ago
DEAL UPDATE: This e-Bile is currently bidding on eBay for only $1,009 -- ending in 1 Day!
Prodeco e-Bike with 16aH + 600W Motor
Mike leroy
2 years ago
Next year, Haibike will only sell Yamaha. Haibike is dropping Bosch. Yamaha is a much better electrical system and at least $1000 cheaper.

We both want the same amount of torque. I need it for hills. I believe you want it for speed. The Yamaha is 600W peak. It is rated at 250W to get around Europe compliance.

The Yamaha has a sensor on the motor itself, called a "motor rotation" sensor. The Yamaha controller(Sine Wave) is a completely different animal than BBS02(square wave). The battery will last twice as long on a single ride.

You can buy the battery last, but you need to consider it in advance. If you want acceleration, 48V is your battery.

If you go with Rohloff, you will spend at least $1400. You will probably need a special brake adapter, too. After I went through all the details, I decided it was better for me to wait.

I did not realize how detailed it all is, until I listed the parts in a spreadsheet. For example, if your frame is incompatible with Rohloff, Rohloff is obviously not an option. Too much of a headache for me.

In the final analysis, I asked myself, "What am I getting out of a bike?".

In other words, do the costs justify the benefits?

I simply listed each component, the cost and benefit( on a scale 1-5). I just could not justify the costs. Your case may be different. I just could not draw a satisfactory conclusion until I listed the details. Too complicated for my brain power.

A Google Sheet to associate 50+ major eBike features (i.e., costs) with benefits.
George S.
2 years ago
Steve2014
When I purchase my Ecoreco M5 I'll absolutely post a review on EBR. Since I live in rainy Beaverton, Oregon, as far as purchasing the M5 I'm not going to "Just Do it" () until this Spring when I can actually ride the thing on a regular basis. If I buy it now, the M5 will mostly just sit in my garage waiting for better scooter-riding weather. Besides, I'm sorta secretly hoping that between now and April Ecoreco will start to offer a pneumatic tire option for the M5. I've read the rear suspension of the M5 does indeed help smooth out bumps compared to the M3. But still, pneumatic tires might bring even more improvement and allow for an overall better riding experience. Then again, I'm sure Jay Sung (co-founder of Ecoreco) is looking at this option or has already looked at it, and will ultimately do what's best for the scooter (which may or may not include a new tire option).

Oh, and as for choosing a scooter or a bike, yeah...I've dealt with that issue several times. I've owned a couple scooters (a Currie Phat Flyer SE and the Super Lithium 1500) and three ebikes (a piece of generic junk I bought off eBay in 2002 before I knew any better, a 2007-era Currie with their 600W "hi-torque" side-mounted motor, and finally the Giant Lite around 2009). As you can tell, I'm a slow learner. Ha!

Both of those scooters were great, and the Giant was pretty impressive for its time. As Court has mentioned, both electric bikes and scooters have their place. I've always viewed my scooters as semi-practical toys that are loads of fun. My last two bikes have also been great fun, and more often used for bonafide transportation purposes. Currently however I'm both sans scooter and bike, and will remedy that situation in the next six months. That's one of the reasons I was searching Google, and reading this website. I've been out of the electric bike scene for a few years, and am just now catching up with all the new models. Man, what a difference a few years makes! Seems like just five years ago you had a realistic choice of seven, maybe eight models. And you largely didn't have to decide between mid-drive or hub, pedal-assist or throttle, etc., etc. But nowadays...holy cow, the options! I'm glad this site exists to help separate the wheat from the chaff. Over the next several months I intend to read and learn all I can in order to make an informed investment in a good bike. (And BTW, thanks Court! You provide a tremendous amount of value here.) Hopefully over time I'll be able to contribute more to the vast collective knowledge of EBR.

Cheers,
Steve

P.S. That Motiv looks nice! Right in my financial sweet spot too, around $2,000-$2,500.

The scooter really wins the award for design simplicity. You can buy a new set of tires and new springs, but there aren't a lot of parts to break or wear out, as long as the battery and motor work. Plus the Ecoreco seems to be pretty well built, for a very reasonable price.

They are building a lot of light rail in cities these days. But the lines are going to be several miles away from many neighborhoods. It's not quite light enough to lug around too far.

At least Ecoreco is completely honest about the legal issues of electric vehicles. That is so refreshing. From their website:


Q: Is the electric scooter street legal?

Answer: Yes. State laws vary on this issue. Some state laws approve the use of electric scooters in bike lanes of general road traffic and some do not. To the best of our knowledge (we are still building it up so don’t hold it against us), e-scooters are street legal in California, Connecticut, Kentucky, Missouri, Nevada, Texas, Virginia and Washington, with many other states expected to follow suit. Some cities/counties have their own rules on light electric vehicles so it’s best to consult with your local transportation authority.


Mahindra makes an interesting scooter, the GenZe, but it's more like a Vespa. Due out in the spring. Mahindra is a giant Indian company.

As for ebikes, you can keep them fairly simple. If you read Court's reviews and do a few test rides, it should be easy to find what you want. There are probably too many players in the market, so it never hurts to buy a brand that can hang around.

Interesting Ecoreco video, shows the capabiity:

No One
2 days ago

I was researching e bike kits but... its just not worth it. I built a gas
motorized one.

Chinaski
4 days ago

Expensive, but looks great.

Don
2 days ago

Extortionately expensive, also listen to the noise it makes at minute 26:49
of this same review. In real it is even louder.

robert hitchcox
6 days ago

who's the girl doing the demo?I respect female bike mechanics!

shuvo khan
1 week ago

have EBR office/ shops in dubai??????

Don
19 hours ago

+shuvo khan .This product would not support Dubai's climate. It actually
doesn't support humidity, now if you add some sand and heat to the
humidity... There is also a reference to weather in its manual page 32
saying: "- Don‘t expose the battery to extreme weather conditions (for
example high or low
temperatures and extreme sunshine)."

krusher74
1 week ago

your test are useless unless you start adding some sort of hill testing

Suicide Ways
2 weeks ago

can I buy one

Don
1 week ago

read this review to the end. and if you buy one let us know your
experience. :-)))

Suicide Ways
1 week ago

Price?

Don
1 week ago

Yes, add-e is an expensive sick experience.

Suicide Ways
1 week ago

Sick

Don
2 weeks ago

Yes you can!
But think it again, or read a bit more in this review. Over 800 000
comments and almost all are negative.
Add-e is a poor quality expensive stuff and not approved.

Cristian Mares
2 weeks ago

it would have been enough to take the BB bolt off and ride it a while and
it would come off on it own...

wdowa94
2 weeks ago

600W... Yeah... Tell me more xD

Don
2 weeks ago

600 w not for sure, but bad quality, expensive, 0.46 €/Km cost due to tire
wear, up to 95 dB noise, not conform, they don't respect the guarantee, not
waterproof.
I Hope this is enough to save you money and aspirins.

Alejandro Schepens
3 weeks ago

To remove the pedals, hit the sides against a solid mass of iron. As if he
applauded the shaft with two hammers.

Desert9999
3 weeks ago

Really useless time wasting video here, who cares who you fix you crank, it
suppose to be a review..very boring as well

Ted dibiasi
3 weeks ago

who's bike is this?
chris elliot's from the show " get a life" ?

Csaba Molnar
3 weeks ago

OMG ... vandal monkey...

Dorito Chipps
3 weeks ago

Grinding without a guard. Ouch. I did a lot of that. I said DID.

ChiefJustice Middleton
3 weeks ago

The batteries are always far too overpriced. I would consider the
conversion however the prices are far too high especially when your dealing
with a max speed thats just enough to get you in trouble when you try and
compete with traffic speed to overcome or be overcome.

Massimiliano Paladini
1 month ago

Despite the fact that power-dimension ratio is very good in brushless
motors, in which magnetic field is yield from strong magnets and there is
no need of big magnetic core, the motor shaft needs a cross section
adequate to the torque applied. (torque is equal to Power/angular speed ,
T=P/w). For that reason, observing the shaft diameter, there is no way to
give 600W for that motor. Nevertheless, the system is very nice, and
100-150W are enough to assist your legs (a cyclist at medium rate gives
250-300W, a pro more or less 400W). If the system had a low cost I would
buy it for sure.
Regards

Don
2 days ago

+Massimiliano Paladini Not everybody know what torque is, and that with no
torque a motor will not displace a lot of weight, or will not take you up
the hill. Here I found something interesting which confirms your words:
http://study.com/academy/lesson/what-is-torque-definition-equation-calculation.html
. Regarding this particular product the lack of torque is not it's only
defect, it also is very noisy (93 dB with peaks of 105 dB), and tire wear
is tremendous (0.46 € per km) + The poor material to make it is just a
shame.

Squid Of Overkill
1 month ago

that motor looks like a brushless dc motor simaler to what you might find
in a large rc plane

Manfred Oxygen
12 hours ago

Kinder, Kinder! Habt ihr schon mal daran gedacht dass ihr keine
Untersetzung (gearbox) braucht weil ja schon der Durchmesser des Motors
50mm auf den Reifen 700mm wie eine 1:14 Untersetzung wirkt ?
Its a 5065 motor whith KV 270.
http://alienpowersystem.com/product-category/brushless-motors/50mm/

Don
2 weeks ago

+virgi109 I found some serious plans (free) for building a friction drive
with a CNC milling machine. If you want I can send you the references. But
please think it again: Friction is not a rational solution in ebiking.
Better go for a Aspirin-free mid or hub drive. Our add-e cost 0.46 € per km
of Tyre wear.
Everyone knows by now that this particular brand is rubbish, but even if
you come to spend 0.05 € per km, it is more than other types of motors. +
it really doesn't like any kind of humidity.

virgi109
3 weeks ago

+Don i beilive the name of the motor is 80-100 it's not available in
hobbyking due to obvious reasons, but you can still get it from turnigy,
take a look at hobbyking dude, at the electric motors option, im planning
on building one my self (: as soon as i can afford it lol

virgi109
3 weeks ago

+Don mmm yeah with a decent gearbox you can do anything, i have a little
truck powered by a brushless inrunner and its power is amazing running on
2s it handles big loads lol, but for a bike you can use 2 brushless
inrunner motors with 2 6s 8000-12000 mah battery pack, it will get your
bike moving for at least 40-50 min, maybe you can reach over 50 miles and
the gear is light af, i would say that creating new e-engines is a waste of
time, we already have amazing cheap motors. and lipo packs are very cheap
as well, if you can get a bigger lipo, there you go, actually hobbyking
used to sell a great outrunner motor, let me look for the name, anyways
that thing was perfect for biker, great power (:

Don
3 weeks ago

Well, you confirm that add-e is the wrong choice of motor because it
doesn't even pull a bike.
If you know about these things, you should advise add-e guys, because their
product is not reliable at all. It is made of poor quality material, and
burns out frequently.
Thanks in advance.
PS: You can pull rocks only with "power+gearbox(multiplication)=Torque".
Not just with Power. You know that, don't you?

Seb K
1 month ago

Yah I think I;ll stick with my traditional Ebike. Wearing out my tyres and
worrying about debris damaging the motor is a concern . Also 600W with
friction like that is like a 500hp car pulling over 4tons of weight .

Don
2 weeks ago

+ Seb K Just to tell you how much your decision was reasonable.. Someone
wrote me: "I should have bought a real eBike and continue loving mine,
instead of adding this thing to it and then hate it".

Seb K
3 weeks ago

+Don Ah I see .

Don
3 weeks ago

+Seb K Sorry Seb K, I mean "I approve your saying". I apologize for the
mistake (my French-English translation weakness). I actually agree 100%
with your reasoning.

Seb K
3 weeks ago

+Don There is a difference between knowing something from experience and
seeing the obvious . If you see something that looks like it will break but
you haven't used it then fair enough your opinion is only just that .
Seeing brick being thrown towards a piece of glass you will now the glass
will break .

This is rubbing against a tyre tread with considerable torque and will wear
the tyre quicker . Simple logic .

Don
3 weeks ago

+Seb K Based on our numerous experiences with add-e, I prove your saying:
You are right.

krusher74
1 month ago

safety glasses and leave the guard on the grinder you fluffin hacks!!!

Marcus Christensen
1 month ago

electric bikes are expensive and this add-e is a bit of an overpriced
choice for what you get.

Marcus Christensen
1 month ago

+Don yeah realistically this should cost maybe 400-600 dollars for the
600watt verson.
the motor is just a hobby grade motor you can get for 40 bucks.

Don
1 month ago

+Marcus Christensen .Artificially inflating prices is used by businesses to
give the illusion that a great deal on a product or service is available.
It is called False and Misleading Advertising Tactic. In this particular
case the product is of a poor quality and the service is perfect before the
purchase but null after.