Diamondback Trace EXC Review

Diamondback Trace Exc Electric Bike Review
Diamondback Trace Exc
Diamondback Trace Exc 500 Watt Hub Motor
Diamondback Trace Exc Removable 48 Volt Battery Pack
Diamondback Trace Exc Display Panel Throttle
Diamondback Trace Exc 9 Speed Cassette
Diamondback Trace Exc 180 Mm Disc Brake
Diamondback Trace Exc Computer Button Pad
Diamondback Trace Exc Locking Battery Pack
Diamondback Trace Exc Electric Bike Review
Diamondback Trace Exc
Diamondback Trace Exc 500 Watt Hub Motor
Diamondback Trace Exc Removable 48 Volt Battery Pack
Diamondback Trace Exc Display Panel Throttle
Diamondback Trace Exc 9 Speed Cassette
Diamondback Trace Exc 180 Mm Disc Brake
Diamondback Trace Exc Computer Button Pad
Diamondback Trace Exc Locking Battery Pack

Summary

  • A versatile urban or light-trail ready electric bike with removable battery, quick release wheels (front and rear) and a higher top speed of 28 mph in pedal assist level 4
  • Powerful 500 watt motor and 48 volt battery combine to offer decent climbing ability, gearless design is very quiet and smooth
  • The battery pack has to be turned on before the bike can be activated (which can be confusing and isn't as convenient), limited rear rack mounts, throttle mode cuts out ~6 mph if you aren't pedaling vs. 20 mph on most other ebikes

Video Review

Introduction

Make:

Diamondback

Model:

Trace EXC

Price:

$2,800 USD

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Urban, Commuting, Trail

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedelec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

Lifetime Frame, One Year Components

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

20142015

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

48.5 lbs (21.99 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy,

Frame Sizes:

17 in (43.18 cm)19 in (48.26 cm)

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Black

Frame Fork Details:

SR Suntour NRX-D LO Suspension with 75 mm Travel and Lockout, , 30mm Stanchions, Magnesium Lower, Alloy Crown

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

9 Speed 1x9 Shimano Deore M592 Shadow 11-34T

Shifter Details:

Microshift Triggers

Cranks:

Aluminum Alloy, 45T Sprocket

Pedals:

Wellgo Aluminum Alloy Platform, Forged CNC

Headset:

Ahead 1 1/8"

Stem:

DB 3D Forged 7° 31.8 mm

Handlebar:

DB Laser Series 31.8 mm Low Rise

Brake Details:

Mechanical Disc with 180 mm Front Rotor and 160 mm Rear Rotor, Levers with Motor Cutoff

Grips:

Diamondback Dual Density Comfort Grip

Saddle:

DB Dual Sport Series, Black

Seat Post:

DB Lazer Series Micro Adjust

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Diamondback SL-7 Doublewall, 36 Hole

Spokes:

14 Gauge Stainless Steel

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Land Cruiser, 700 x 40c

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

Kevlar Guard, Reflective Sidewall Stripe

Tube Details:

Presta Valve

Accessories:

Chainstay Protector, Side Mounted Kickstand, Aluminum Alloy Bash Guard and Chain Guide

Other:

KMC Z99 Chain, Locking Removable Battery Pack, Quick Release Front and Rear Wheels

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Currie Electro-Drive

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Gearless Direct Drive Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

8.8 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

422.4 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Estimated Max Range:

45 miles (72 km)

Display Type:

Backlit Monochrome LCD, Fixed

Readouts:

Speed, Odometer, Battery Capacity, Assist Level (1-4 and Throttle Mode)

Display Accessories:

Large Independent Button Pad on Left Bar

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist, Twist Throttle (Cadence and Torque Sensing, Pedal Assist Mode)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)


Written Review

The Diamondback Trace EXC is designed for more active, aggressive riding. While it’s probably best suited to urban environments given the speedy hub motor design and light suspension fork with lockout, it’s definitely capable of packed trail riding and comes stock with hybrid knobby tires. Compared to its cousin, the IZIP E3 Dash (which uses the same drive system) the Trace is a bit more rugged, slightly less expensive but also one gear short at 9 speeds vs. 10. In my experience riding the Trace it felt comfortable, smooth and fast thanks to the advanced pedal assist (which measures pedal cadence and torque). The real highlight on this electric bike is the higher top speed of ~28 mph when riding in assist level 4. My biggest complaints are the lack of better rack mounting hardware (in case you want to use this as a commuter) and the throttle cutout of ~6 mph. The throttle is capable of pushing the bike up to 20 mph but you’ll need to pedal along for this to work.

The motor driving this ebike is a high quality 500 watt gearless direct drive hub located in the rear. It’s heavier than some geared equivalents but runs smoother, quieter and will last longer. This is actually one of my favorite electric bike motors because it rides so smooth. One downside to gearless designs however is cogging (drag from the larger electromagnets inside repelling when the motor is off) but it wasn’t much of an issue during my ride tests. One of the really neat features of how this motor mounts to the frame is that the electrical cable providing power and activation signals has a built-in quick connect and the rear wheel features a quick release for easier maintenance. This makes transporting and servicing the bike much easier and until recently, was kind of rare in the hub-motor ebike world. The motor itself is from the Currie Electro-Drive line which is also used on some Raleigh and IZIP electric bicycles like the Dash mentioned earlier. In my opinion, hub motors aren’t quite as good for off-road riding (compared with mid-drives) because they add unsprung weight, make the frame rear heavy and make wheel service more difficult. With the Diamondback Trace EXC however, most of these issues are addressed because they’ve included quick release, it’s a hardtail so unsprung weight doesn’t matter and the battery pack is positioned forward on the downtube which improves balance. It’s still not as good as something like the Raleigh Tekoa-iE but it’s less expensive, quieter and zippier around town.

Powering the bike is an impressive 48 volt 8.8 amp hour battery pack with high quality Lithium Manganese cells. The 48 volt configuration is above average in terms of strength and really lets you take advantage of the 500 watt motor for climbing. What might otherwise feel mushy (when using the throttle) feels zippy even though the motor isn’t geared. The pack is removable for convenient charging or reducing the overall weight of the bike when transporting it. Since it’s mounted mid-frame your legs and the tubing surrounding the pack hep to protect it from damage in the event of a crash. Overall, it looks great and the keyed lock on the side of the pack is easy to use but the keys don’t have to be left in when riding (which might otherwise make them vulnerable to getting kicked). In addition to powering the bike, the primary battery can also be used to power after-market lights if your dealer is willing to install them. When the pack is off of the bike it has a built in LED power level indicator that helps you determine whether it needs to be charged. This is handy but one complaint I have is that the same power button that activates the charge status also has to be pressed in order to activate the bike. So turning the Diamondback Trace on is a two step process that just isn’t as convenient as some other bikes.

Operating the bike is very easy and intuitive. Once the battery has been charged up and is secured and locked to the frame, just press the power button on the control pad (located on the left bar) and the screen comes to life. The display is backlit with an auto-light sensor for easy use at night and it shows your speed, battery level and assist level (as well as a few other readouts). For the best range or climbing power I suggest using pedal assist but it’s also nice to have instant power from the throttle or sit back and relax with cruise control (this is one of the only trail capable ebikes I know of with cruise control). The system has a neat range estimator built in as demonstrated in the video review above so you can determine which level of power to use at any given time to avoid running out of juice on the way home. You can see the estimated range change dynamically as you switch from level through four in pedal assist mode. In terms of pedal power and cadence, you get a nine speed Shimano cassette in the rear and a trigger shifter interface on the right bar. It’s all pretty standard and my opinion ninet speeds is enough to get around town and make it up hills without adding the complexity and weight of a second front derailleur. I really like the front chain guide they’ve used here which doubles as a bash guard in case you hit a curb, it keeps the chain on track when you’re going over bumpy terrain and also protects your pants a little bit from getting greasy without adding the weight and vulnerability of a chain guard.

All things considered, the Diamondback Trace EXC is a solid electric bike that builds on the frame building expertise and distribution of Diamondback with the proven drive system and battery technology of Currie and TranzX. I’m not sure whether the production version will have hydraulic or mechanical brakes (the website says hydraulic but my demo unit had mechanical?) either way, disc brakes will stay cleaner and on dusty or muddy trails. The quick release wheels are great (for you or a shop) when tuning spokes, rims, tubes or tires and I like that all of the hardware matches the black frame. If you’re looking for a solid urban electric bike with larger wheels and suspension lockout that will be efficient and light weight but also want the ability to dip off road occasionally (again, hard packed or jogging trails) then the Trace would be an excellent choice. With a few minor improvements it would be nearly perfect but those are easy to overcome (get a beam rack vs. frame mounting and buy a Camelbak since there are no bottle cage mounts). I love that this thing will be available through any Diamondback outlet because that means more people will have access to a quality ebike and get decent service and support ongoing vs. trying to find something of lower quality online.

Pros:

  • Available in two frame sizes for improved fit, both are high-step which may be difficult for some riders to mount but adds strength for trail riding
  • Relatively light weight at ~48.5 lbs considering the large powerful 500 watt motor and 48 volt 8.8 ah battery pack
  • Decent suspension fork (with lockout for riding on flats), trail-ready tires and nine speed cassette make navigating light off-road sections comfortable and medium sized hills manageable
  • Sturdy metal pedals and bash guard (that is also a chain guide) can handle more rugged terrain
  • Very quiet motor considering the high power 500 watt design, also known for being durable and long lasting (built by Currie Electro Drive)
  • Battery can be charged on or off the bike (store in neutral temperatures and top off after each ride for maximum life) connects easily to frame and locks securely, the built-in LED charge level indicator is useful when the pack is off the bike
  • Quick release wheels including the rear with a special easy disconnect cable for the hub motor, makes tuneups easier for the shop and also easier for you if the tire goes flat on a trail and you need to perform a quick fix
  • Solid warranty, available at lots of locations throughout the USA for easier test riding, fitting and future service
  • Mechanical disc brakes stay clean in wet or dirty conditions (compared with V-brakes), offer good stopping power and the brake levers have a cutoff switch to the motor for safety
  • Good price considering the higher end drive system and 28 mph top speed, cables are all tucked away in the frame for a clean aesthetic

Cons:

  • Rear-heavy design makes the bike less stable and less agile than something with a mid-mount pack (especially for trail riding) but the mid-mounted battery is great
  • Display panel is not removable and only attaches to the handle bars with one support arm (some newer displays use two) could be a little more vulnerable when trail riding if you slide out on the bike
  • The rear seat stay bars lack side bosses for mounting a rear rack in the most secure way, you could still make it work with the middle hole but this might take the place of a rear fender, also there are no bottle cage mounting points on the frame
  • In order to operate this ebike the battery pack has to be turned on before the main display is activated, this takes extra time and can make you wonder if the battery is charged or if the bike has an issue (if you forget to activate the pack first)

Resources:

More Diamondback Reviews

January 7, 2015

Diamondback Overdrive EXC Review

  • MSRP: $3,300
  • MODEL YEAR: 2014, 2015

A rugged 29er style trail bike with efficient mid-drive motor system, centrally located battery pack and quick release wheels (front and rear) for easy maintenance. Nice 10 speed cassette with SRAM X7 derailleur, solid RockShox air fork with lockout, burly…...

December 23, 2014

Diamondback Lindau EXC Review

  • MSRP: $2,500
  • MODEL YEAR: 2014, 2015

Comfortable hybrid city style electric bike with relaxed upright handle bars, large ergonomic pedals, seat post suspension, full length fenders, a clean minimalist chain guard and a rear rear rack with triple bungee cord attachment. Available in two frame sizes and either high-step or step-thru design for improved stiffness and…...

Comments (35) YouTube Comments

EbikeNoob
5 years ago

Thanks for the review. Given its 2 step turn on process, can we operate the bike in battery-free mode say when battery is discharged or if don’t want to use the assist functions?

  Reply
Court Rye
5 years ago

Sure thing! If I’m understanding you correctly then you’re asking if this (or any ebike) can be ridden without the battery pack and the answer is yes. You can pedal it just like a normal bicycle and use the gears etc. and it will be easier than with the battery because the frame will be lighter by ~6 pounds or so. Keep in mind that without the main battery, the LCD display panel may not work so you won’t have the speed or distance readouts. On this bike, given the rear hub motor design, you could actually replace the rear wheel with a generic one (with cassette) and ride it as a nearly pure bicycle and save a bunch of weight. Hope I understood you and that this helps :)

  Reply
Ed
5 years ago

I have one of these bikes and it does assist in any assist mode up to 6 mph without pedaling and continues to assist up to 20 mph if you are pedaling. This helps when you stop and forget to down shift or need a sudden boost while using pedal assist. The throttle mode does operate up to 20 mph without pedaling.

  Reply
Court Rye
5 years ago

Thanks for the feedback Ed! I’m a bit confused about what you wrote… the first sentence says “continues to assist up to 20 mph if you are pedaling” but then in the third sentence you say “throttle mode does operate up to 20 mph without pedaling”. My experience has been that throttle works to 6 mph without pedaling or 20 mph with pedaling. Could you please clarify?

  Reply
jaime
5 years ago

when in pedal assist when does the motor cut off; I assume it doesn’t power all the way up to 28. Also do you know how this bike would do on hills?

  Reply
Court Rye
5 years ago

Hi Jaime, in the highest level of assist the motor will help you reach speeds up to ~28 mph if you are pedaling rigorously. I think it would perform fairly well on hills, the motor is relatively large at 500 watts though it may not be as torquey given the gearless design. The larger 48 volt battery also helps :)

  Reply
Iker
5 years ago

How does this bike compare with the E-joe Koda 2015? I really want the Koda, but it is not available in any of my local stores, and the EXC is on sales for 2300 nearby. I am a little bit afraid purchasing such a big investment online. Thanks!

  Reply
Court Rye
5 years ago

Hi Iker! Great question… I trust Diamondback as a frame manufacturer because they have been around for over a decade (my Dad bought a standard bicycle from them years ago and it worked very well). The drive system on this is from Currie Technologies which has also been around for over a decade and the motor and battery system here were both launched in 2014 and refined so I feel like all of the bugs and kinks have been ironed out. If you have a local shop that carries this model I’d recommend going that way. You might have to add fenders and lights on your own compared to the Koda but you get a solid warranty and support from that shop (even fitting probably and some free tuneups?) I don’t love putting bikes together so I always try to get one from a store and I’d trust the EXC.

  Reply
Randy
5 years ago

@Court I own one of these bikes and will step in for Ed re the 6mph limitation in pedal assist modes (1-4) vs the sub-20mph limitation in throttle (T) mode. This is an advanced concept in speed controls that represents solid use-case research by Currie Technologies/parent company Accel Group (ANA). As you know, federal law in the US requires manufacturers to limit ebike performance to under 20mph exclusive of pedaling. Compliance in the case of the electric Trace is accomplished seamlessly via firmware in the controller that the user is able to activate via the throttle mode. The 6mph limitation at the throttle in pedal assist mode is simply the company’s implementation of so-called walk-assist and startup use cases (not in any way inspired by US regulations). This system is also deployed on the sister Izip Dash and Peak E3 bikes. One can further extrapolate from the US example how this firmware solution is easily adaptable to regulatory schemes in other jurisdictions, all of which is common practice in device manufacture generally.

  Reply
Court Rye
5 years ago

I think I get it Randy… are you saying that in Europe they don’t allow throttle mode but they do allow walk assist so Currie has kept that feature in the US (for convenience) even though riders would prefer a 20 mph mode here?

  Reply
Randy
5 years ago

Well, no. I am saying there is a 20mph mode – T for throttle – and that it is designed to conform to language in US regulations for low speed electric bicycles, while offering the option to go ~28mph with pedal assist. I am saying the 6mph limitation only applies when you apply the throttle while in pedal assist mode (1-4 on the screen). Although not a model of clarity by itself (haha), review the System Operation Manual for the Trace, etc. In the section under Riding and use, you will find several paragraphs on assist levels and the throttle.

  Reply
Court Rye
5 years ago

Thanks Randy!

  Reply
James
5 years ago

This bike has a design flaw. I have ridden it enough to need 2 brake adjustments. The 1st adjustment, they cheated with the rear brake, and did not adjust the cable, but only the adjustment screws. The 2nd time I went in, the mechanic pointed out that the rear brakes are virtually impossible to adjust. The inside set screw is only accessible with the wheel off, yet you need the wheel on to properly adjust the brake. I called the store from which I purchased the bike, and they confirmed this brake should be a different model, either an Avid BB7, or hydraulic (although there may be some clearance issues with this). I am working with the bike shop to upgrade to a brake that can be adjusted. I am not a bike mechanic, have only confirmed with 2 different mechanics about this, so I apologize if my terminology is wrong. Otherwise, I like the bike.

  Reply
Court Rye
5 years ago

Excellent feedback, thanks for taking the time to point this out James! I’m sorry you’ve had to do some extra screwing around and feel shorted by Diamondback… This is their first model year in the electric bike space and it sounds like they compromised the design a bit. Hopefully we won’t see this on future iterations :/

  Reply
hugh
5 years ago

Hi, As Ed mentioned up there, this bike as well most of other currie-powered ebike gets you to 20 mph without pedaling (just using the throttle). In order to use the “throttle ONLY mode”, you have to go past the highest level of assist modes, then you are in “throttle only mode.” Once you are in the throttle mode, you don’t need to pedal to get to 20mph. I noticed in every review of these bikes you mention the throttle cuts off after 6mph. This is only true for if you have it set in one of the assist levels. I actually prefer the throttle mode being next to the highest level of assist mode rather than in “no assist” mode like BH’s bike does. Because sometimes, when you are riding without “no assist” and come to a stop to chat with someone you can accidentally twist the throttle causing the bike to run forward.

  Reply
Court Rye
5 years ago

Very interesting, thank you Hugh! I speak with the reps and test out the bikes as best as I can with limited time and I may have missed this next level of “throttle only” which is sad because I ding them for it… maybe they adjusted the settings after I reviewed the demo bikes? Many times I’m seeing pre-production stuff and some companies make updates all throughout the year (Pedego does this). In any case, the next time I see these I’ll experiment more and make a note of it. Thanks again!

  Reply
Charles
5 years ago

I saw the post by James on Aug 5 about brake issues, which I am having. I purchased my Diamondback Trace early September and it has been my primary mode of transportation since. I ride daily, between 5 and 16 miles, and have had to adjust the rear brake three times, which I expected, being a new bike. However, I am now having issues getting the rear brake rotor aligned correctly to avoid “rubbing”. I have tried centering the disc rotor using the “squeeze the brake” method and the “wiggle it to realign” method. The rear wheel still feels as if the brake is on and/or the rotor is coming in contact with something. Any ideas/help would be appreciated.

  Reply
Court Rye
5 years ago

Hi Charles, thanks for sharing your experience with this. I just recently learned the trick where you loosen the pads and squeeze the brake before tightening to get them lined up… if you’ve tried that and are still having issues I’m honestly not sure what to say. Maybe someone else will chime in to help :)

  Reply
Charles
5 years ago

Thanks for the brake advice Court. I did indeed try the squeeze the brake method with some success. However there is still a rub. More research recommended adjusting the “pad adjustment bolt” to better center the rear brake. And looking at “James” from Aug 5 it would seem that this is a design flaw in the brakes used on this bike. The rear motor placement on the wheel inhibits/prevents access to the “pad adjustment bolt”, which is pretty frustrating. It is a 30 second fix/adjustment made near impossible. I am due for the bike’s first tune up soon and will check with the fine bike mechanics at REI.

  Reply
Court Rye
5 years ago

Hmm, that is frustrating… Thanks for describing the way that the motor blocks access to the brake caliper and adjustment. I’ll keep an eye out for this type of design limitation in the future.

Izk
4 years ago

So the brake problem is not really a model problem, but is an issue with most of the mechanical disc brakes that have pad compensation done from the other side of the wheel through the spokes. You will experience this with most ebikes with discs either front or rear. Since the hub motor is so big, it makes this adjustment not possible without removing the wheel. To make matters worse, the Shimano resin pad brakes wear out really fast. I was going through a set every 4-6 months. I was also really hard on the cables and snapped two of them within 8 months. All in all, mechanical discs are not really up for the task of stopping such a fast and heavy bike if you put in a lot of miles.

You really need to upgrade the brakes to hydraulic with metal pads and rotors that support them. I did this recently with Shimano SLX and they seem to work great (except handle bar clamp limits microshift location) I just taped magnets to the brake sensors and removed them from the old cable levers. You really don’t need them with hydraulics since they are so much better (they easily stop the motor if you turn the throttle and want to stop with the brake).

Good luck with an upgrade and you will love the bike that much better. I have 2900 miles on mine so far and smile every day that I am on it.

Wayne
4 years ago

Jamie asked how this bike does on hills. I tried it on a steep hill that I can barely reach 8MPH with my light mountain bike. In throttle only mode (T) it slowed down from 20MPH at the bottom of the hill to 8MPH at the steepest point. In pedal assist mode 4, I was able to easily maintain 16MPH going up the hill at it’s steepest point.
Needless to say, I am thoroughly impressed by the power of this bike. I weigh over 200 pounds and have all the speed I need. We’ll see how the brakes work out. For now, it looks like they are easily adjustable without taking the wheel off.

  Reply
Court Rye
4 years ago

Nice, thanks for sharing your personal speed and weight stats to help others Wayne, glad you’re enjoying the Diamondback Trace :)

  Reply
Renato Kalugdan
4 years ago

I’m contemplating purchasing this but have concerns w/ the aforementioned brake issues. The other option I have is the 2016 Izip E3 Dash for $400 more dollars. After reading the braking issues, I’d like to know if you’ve seen the same issue on the Izip?

  Reply
Court Rye
4 years ago

Hi Renato! I wish I could give you an answer here but I think the best approach is to look closely at the photos and video of the two bikes and see if you can tell whether the IZIP is designed better. You could also call an IZIP dealer and ask directly… or ask on the forums for people who own the bike? It’s a slow process, hope you find an answer and if so please chime in here to help others!

  Reply
Prashant Mahadevan
3 years ago

Is this bike legal to ride in NYC ?

  Reply
Court Rye
3 years ago

Hi Preshant! I believe the Diamondback Trace is a Class 3 Ebike which is a grey area in NYC. I’m not an expert but the throttle is where they seem to draw a line between ebikes being legal vs. more classified like a Moped. Hope this helps! Here’s a video I made with a friend about it recently.

  Reply
Jay Dee
3 years ago

I actually cannot find the electric bikes on their website anymore period I was looking at the trace EXC about two years ago, but did not pull the trigger. No I have a friend who has a very good discount and I would like to get one but I can’t find them on their website anymore. I would have to buy from Diamondback from their website.

Jay Dee
3 years ago

Did diamondback discontinue their e-bikes? I can’t seem to find them on their site any longer. No mention of the trace exc. Help??

  Reply
Court Rye
3 years ago

Great question Jay, I’m not 100% sure but it does appear that they either didn’t change them for this new year or have backed off a bit. Do you own one or did you find a good deal on one that you’re considering?

  Reply
Jeff W
3 years ago

This bike is currently available under the “Sale” section on iZip’s website for $999.00. I had been looking for an entry level bike for a couple years and noticed this on iZip’s site last week. Mine arrived yesterday and I am completely satisfied with my purchase. At that price it is unbeatable for a beginner. I believe Diamondback offloaded their remaining stock to iZip as iZip has bikes with similar power systems. If so I don’t imagine the supply will last long. Court, throughout my search your reviews and detailed information was an outstanding resource. Thank you! It has also been great watching your style develop over the years, great job! Keep doing what you are doing! Jeff

  Reply
Court Rye
3 years ago

Thank you Jeff! Your words mean a lot, I write this reply from an AirBNB in Canada… on the road filming new ebikes, doing my best… It sounds like you got a sweet deal on the Trace and indeed, the Accell Group has a good range of bikes but seems to be narrowing down to just Haibike, Raleigh and IZIP. The IZIP models share a lot of similarities with Diamondback and the company seems to support parts going way back so I hope you enjoy it for many years! Have a blast out there :D

  Reply
richard myers
3 years ago

Just picked one up on sale – to be noted Diamondback have added screwed eyelets on the frame to mount a rack.

So in terms of cons, its down to having to press the power on the battery pack first – which I don’t consider to a be a terribly big deal.

  Reply
Court Rye
3 years ago

Nice! Thanks for the update about rack bosses Richard

  Reply

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