Electric Bike Outfitters EBO Commuter Kit Review

Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Kit Review
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter 350 Watt Geared Hub
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter 36 V 11 Ah Lithium Battery
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Led Console Trigger Throttle
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Controller Box
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Front
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Kit Review
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter 350 Watt Geared Hub
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter 36 V 11 Ah Lithium Battery
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Led Console Trigger Throttle
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Controller Box
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Front

Summary

  • An affordable, all-inclusive electric bike kit available in many wheel sizes (front or rear) with a nice one year warranty
  • You get a standard 350 watt internally geared motor, 36 volt Lithium-ion battery pack and a trigger throttle
  • No display console or pedal assist modes come stock with this kit, just a simple LED power meter and throttle mode, EBO has several upgraded kits and can sell custom packages
  • Predominantly available online but finding their way to more and more dealers in the United States

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Electric Bike Outfitters

Model:

EBO Commuter Kit

Price:

$704

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Commuting

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

30 Day Return, 1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

20152016

Bicycle Details

Battery Weight:

5.5 lbs (2.49 kg)

Motor Weight:

6 lbs (2.72 kg)

Gearing Details:

9 Single Speed or Shimano 6 or 7 Speed Cassettes or SunRace 8 and 9 Speed Cassettes

Brake Details:

Mechanical Wuxing Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy, Double Walled

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 36

Wheel Sizes:

16 in (40.64cm)20 in (50.8cm)24 in (60.96cm)26 in (66.04cm)27.5 in (69.85cm)28 in (71.12cm)

Accessories:

Optional Twist Throttle, Optional Cadence Sensor with 3 Mode LED Console and Controller for $31 at Time of Purchase or $105 Later (Because of the Additional Console and Controller)

Other:

Rear Motors Cost $25 to $50 Extra, Dropout Widths Front: 100 mm, Rear 120 mm or 135 mm, Brake Clamp Diameter 22.2 mm, 14 Amp Controller

Electronic Details

Motor Type:

Front-Mounted Geared Hub, Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

350 watts

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

396 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

15 miles (24 km)

Estimated Max Range:

35 miles (56 km)

Display Type:

LED Console

Readouts:

Battery Charge Level (Red, Yellow, Green)

Drive Mode:

Trigger Throttle

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

The EBO Commuter is the most affordable kit (at the time of this review) from Electric Bike Outfitters. This is a relatively new electric bicycle company based in Denver Colorado. The first things I noticed were the excellent price and all-inclusive setup. Unlike some kits, this one doesn’t tease you with a “battery not included” price tag. For well under $1k you get a modest motor and mid-mounted Lithium-ion battery that will take you 15 to 20 miles per charge and work on most traditional bikes. You can choose the wheel size from a wide selection of 16″, 20″, 24″, 26″, 27.5″ and 28″ which means folding bikes, kids bikes, cruisers, mountain bikes and city bikes will all work! The one hangup here is the slightly wider hub design that might not fit all fork widths, consider the EBO Phantom if you’ve got a single speed city bike because that hub was specially designed to be narrower and avoid scraping. Also, as you consider this kit, ask yourself whether you want pedal assist because it can be added for just $30 but costs over $100 after the fact (because it uses a different controller). This is the only kit from EBO that doesn’t come stock with assist and for many people that will be fine but your thumb might get a little tired after longer trips.

Powering the bike is a generic 350 watt planetary geared hub. It seems like the front-mounted design is a bit quieter but they both produce a bit of whirring noise and endure more wear than a gearless direct drive hub. The big benefits are small size, good torque at lower speeds and light weight ~6 lbs. The Pure City demo bike I was riding in the video review above weighed just 45 lbs with the kit installed! That’s pretty good… and the pricetag for the bike plus kit was under $1,200 making this a very affordable ebike option. Even though the motor you get here isn’t the most powerful and might not be the highest quality, it does offer a lot of value and you get an awesome all-inclusive warranty with the bike so that gives me peace of mind. Considering that it is a kit, you could also probably pick up a replacement on individual parts in the future should one fail.

The battery pack on the EBO Commuter electric bike kit is a mix of good and bad. The upside is that it’s downtube-mounting which improves weight distribution, frees up the rear portion of the bike for adding a rack and fenders and is pretty well protected by the frame. I like the canister design, it has a built-in LED charge level indicator and seats well once you’ve screwed the mounting bracket into the bottle cage bosses on your bike (your bike must have bottle cage bosses on the downtube for this kit to work). The downside is that while this battery pack is removable (for lighter transport and convenient charging) taking it off and putting it back on is a pain. Most downtube batteries (including those on the higher-end Electric Bike Outfitters kits) just click in and make contact with metal prongs, on this kit you have to manually screw the power cable into the battery and the space for getting your fingers in there and twisting the metal ring is very limited… It’s a pain but if you just leave the pack on and charge while mounted you’ll never have to do it.

Operating the EBO Commuter system is extremely simple in its stock form. You charge the battery, mount it and attach the power cable then click the on/off toggle switch at the base of the battery pack. Next you press the red button on the LED console near the trigger throttle and it lights right up. At this point, you can use the variable speed trigger throttle to your heart’s content. It can reach up to ~20 mph but also does well at lower speeds. I found myself juicing it from standstill then easing off once I hit a speed that felt comfortable for pedaling. Honestly, I think my thumb would get tired after too much riding with a throttle like this, especially given the grip style gear shifter on the right bar… this made the reach to the throttle a bit further and required more energy for me. You can screw around with the throttle position and find the perfect fit and as mentioned earlier, you can also upgrade to pedal assist but that requires more installation time and effort as well as an LCD display.

This e-bike kit is all about simplicity and in my opinion it’s a winner. While the ~$500 Pure City Bourbon that the demo kit was installed on felt great and had a lot of extras including an 8 speed derailleur, fenders, rack, nice grips and a comfortable swept-back bar… you could easily find a bike at Walmart with similar features for under $200 and get yourself a sub $1,000 electric bike that would work just fine. Keep in mind that this hub motor design is wider than the EBO Phantom and that you don’t get pedal assist stock but otherwise you do have the nice color coded wires that are easy to setup as well as upgraded brake levers with motor inhibitors. All kits tend to add a mess of wires to the bike so I usually go for black or dark colored frames that help them blend in. You’ll probably extend more time and effort with a rear-mounted kit but that’s usually my preference for traction and improved steering… especially if you have a weak suspension fork.

Pros:

  • Color coded wires are easy to setup, the motor cable has a quick disconnect point that makes servicing the wheel (front or rear) much easier
  • You get brake levers with integrated motor inhibitors here which could come in handy if you upgrade to pedal assist (much more affordable to do when you buy the bike ~$30 vs. later since it uses a different controller)
  • I like trigger throttles because they are easier to fit with existing grips and twist shifters, they also perform better for off-road use because they don’t compromise your grip, this one worked well but you can upgrade to a twist throttle if you prefer
  • Available in a huge assortment of wheel sizes including 16″, 20″, 24″, 26″, 27.5″ (650B) and ~28″ (700c) so you can convert folding bikes, kids bikes, road bikes, mountain bikes etc. and they all cost the same
  • Relatively light weight with the battery at ~5.5 lbs and the motor ~6 lbs so you aren’t going to end up with a heavy ride
  • The mechanical brake levers are compatible with traditional designs as well as disc brakes and the motor has a mounting pattern for use with a disc brake rotor

Cons:

  • Generic motor and battery cells might not last as long and produce a bit more noise under power but are still covered by the one year warranty
  • Basic LED display panel won’t show your precise battery level, speed, range or other details that the higher end kits will
  • The battery pack clicks into the holster easily but has a screw-in power connector that can be tricky and time consuming to connect, it also takes up most of the space where a bottle cage would mount… consider a saddle rail adapter, rear rack with a bottle bag or a hydration pack
  • The controller unit is built into a separate box vs. being integrated into the battery mount or motor, this just means more things have to be screwed onto the frame and possibly more wires
  • If you decide to upgrade and get pedal assist, it will require more effort to install and the units I saw only had a five sensor disc which isn’t as responsive
  • You have to power the battery pack on as well as the display unit to get the bike going… this adds a bit of time to each ride but also makes it easier to forget to turn the battery pack off when you park

Resources:

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cyclist2009
2 years ago

What are the dimensions of the battery?

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

I’m not exactly sure, this would be a great question to email Electric Bike Outfitters about because sometimes cases change and I reviewed their models last year.

Reply

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comradecasey
5 hours ago

Glad to hear it went well, I knew you were going to love it! Please let me know what kind of commuter tires you buy, I may switch in the Spring....

I just bought some 27.5" Schwalbe Marathons from my LBS. Haven't mounted them yet as I do love zooming through my "shortcuts" on my commute, but I've heard good things. Might get some Schwalbe Hurricanes so I can keep my shortcuts though! :)

Dwight
5 hours ago

Oh man. So I got mine on Friday. Picked it up locally at their shop and then proceeded to bike around the neighborhood. The NuVinci CVT is the best thing ever. Going to buy some commuter tires for it and keep the Nobby Nics for camping.

Love it!
Glad to hear it went well, I knew you were going to love it! Please let me know what kind of commuter tires you buy, I may switch in the Spring....

comradecasey
6 hours ago

Oh man. So I got mine on Friday. Picked it up locally at their shop and then proceeded to bike around the neighborhood. The NuVinci CVT is the best thing ever. Going to buy some commuter tires for it and keep the Nobby Nics for camping.

Love it!

rich c
2 days ago

For a commuter, I would prefer a class III bike, capable of 28mph. I hardly ever ride that fast, but really often hit 22-23mph. Also much prefer hydraulic brakes, not familiar with the brakes spec'd on the Voltbike. I'd consider that Voltbike a little short on gears, but since it has a throttle, you may be okay. Don't know the size of your children, but loaded down you may like a lower gear that you get with the 7. My Haibike XDURO Trekking S RX has 10. The price is very attractive on that Voltbike, but if I depended on my bike to get to work, I'd want a better class of components. Just a lot of my preferences here, but I started on a cheap Chinese eBike, but really only ride Haibike XDURO (Bosch mid drive) bikes now. Two of my eBikes are over 1600 miles, the Trekking is over 1100 miles. Just a bit of reference for my riding experience. Edit; If you want both kids to ride, look at a GSD cargo bike. You should also look at Thudbuster or Bodyfloat suspension seat posts with the style bike you are looking at.

smitty
2 days ago

Thanks for all the good info. I really don't think I want to ride in deep snow with anything other than a fat bike. I could see a narrower aggressive tread working on packed snow but not the deep stuff. Regarding drive systems, I've only ridden mid drives and only two of those but the Trek Super Commuter was really nice around town. I'd like to try a hub drive.

it seems like a fat bike might be the way to go in the Winter. I wouldn't particularly enjoy exposing my ST-2 to the salty sluice we get to make winter driving safer?? With that in mind I recently acquired a Specialized HT Comp Fattie for Winter riding. It is a decent mid-drive bike with a pretty good front shock. Fun to ride but no match for my Stromer. The price was right as Specialized appears to be getting out of the HT business?

PCDoctorUSA
3 days ago

I would prefer not to ride with a backpack because I don't like the weight and it leaves my back soaking wet. I did find a backpack from Osprey that has a web design to lift the pack off my back and allow air to flow behind it. I also found a commuter pannier with good reviews, but it doesn't come cheap. I've lightened my daily cargo load by purchasing an extra pair of dress shoes in both black and brown and leave them under my desk at work. Now all I carry is my change of clothes, lunch, and a few bike tools.

John from Connecticut
4 days ago

Hello all - I need some help. I am getting the below 4x4 Sprinter Van that has a bed that raises. I want to put two bikes under the bed that fit when it is lowered - which will require taking the front wheel off.

What my requirements are:

A fun - want to ride every day - ride.
Suspension (through forks / tires) that will allow us to ride on easy to medium trails. I assume the full suspension bikes can't take a bike rack.....
Must have a bike rack as we will be taking camping stuff at least 10 miles down the trail... or getting groceries.
Long lasting battery.
Tough as we will be banging this thing around.
Unique - I love having cool things that spark conversations. Not to show off - but to start a conversation... I like to talk....
Weight - In my experience the lighter the bike the better the carve. But... I understand the electric bike is a lot heavier which is fine - expected - but 70+ pounds I wonder if that is too heavy for some of these??

We will be peddling a lot - I have a Carbon Fiber DaVinci (which is over my head in capabilities) so I want a bike that I can peddle a lot of the time.... maybe 50% on assist 1 or 2.. At least that is my vision - might change as I've never had an electric bike! I'm 48 and still want to go to places that others people aren't.

The bikes (I need two - one for me / one for my girl -- 5' 10" / 5' 6") that I'm kind of excited about are:

Haibike SDURO Trekking 9.5 - a little expensive and unsure about the off road capability. Looks like it is well put together - well thought out bike. Looks mad cool. A take down from this bike might be the M2S XC Sport?? Half the price.

M2S R750 Looks like a nice bike for the price. Looks like it is mad fun and has decent options. Unsure if that is an actual 750 Watt motor or the peak? Wish the battery was 52v. 62 pounds.

RadRover Man I love this company - flew from Key Largo up to Seattle to tested the bike. My only problem with the RadRover is that it seems that it hasn't been updated that much. I wish it had an option for a better battery and forks.

Volt Yukon Limited Looks like a real nice bike - possibly a step above the Rad but that is more like a Ford / Chevy argument.... they are too close to call so go with the one that looks the best. And the Volt guy is a little aggressive replying to comments anywhere the Volt is talked about. If I had to pick between the two - I think I would go Volt but would choose the R750 over both.

Teo S Another well priced bike and it seems to be a pretty nice one with a 750W motor . I am unsure how it compares the other Rad / Volt. Looks like the people who bought this bike really like it. But that is all relative -

Bulls / Specialized / Trek / and many other high end brands that make amazing bikes... but they seem to be a lot more expensive. I'm sure super nice rides - but is the price justified?

HaiBike
https://www.haibike.com/en-US/US/bikes/672/2018-sduro-trekking-9-5?variant=3840272848
M2S XC Sport
https://shop.m2sbikes.com/collections/frontpage/products/xc-mid-drive-electric-commuter?variant=38435959432
M2S R750
https://shop.m2sbikes.com/collections/frontpage/products/all-terrain-electric-fat-bike
RadRover
https://www.radpowerbikes.com/products/radrover-electric-fat-bike?variant=1121017965
Volt Yukon Limited
http://www.voltbike.ca/voltbike-yukon/voltbike-yukon-750-limited.html
Teo S
https://teofatbike.com/boutique/en/teo-s/teo-s-medium-noir-750w-p111c83/

Hello SV Moving On,
Looking for opinions on e-Bikes. I purchased a Trek XM700+ this past July and I absolutely love it ! My average daily ride is 20-ish miles and I hate to stop.

The Bosch Performance Motor is silky smooth, but very powerful, the Intuvia Controller is simple to use. My XM700+ glides along bringing me great joy....Hills, 'there are none' : ) I never thought cycling could be so much fun !... I made one change and added the Cirrus Bodyfloat seat post which I consider and absolute must. For me the frame stiffness was more then my back would tolerate, but the Bodyfloat is a marvelous piece of engineering, now my Trek is so comfortable...

The disk brakes are strong, extremely smooth and boy do they work. The swept back handlebars and the ergonomic grips make for a very comfortable ride.... The bike feels rock solid and is very well built. I've put on a little over 1000 miles in 3 months.

I'm sure there are many fine e-bikes out there, and I'm sure a few that are 'not so fine', but to me the Trek XM700+ plus is worth every penny and I'd do it all over again...

In fact I'm sort of doing that. I just ordered a Trek Powerfly 7 Mountain Bike based on my 700+ experience. I want to ride gravel/stone dust trails and I don't feel stable enough on the 7oo. The bike is fine, the issue is me, my 71 year old agility isn't what it used to be.

One last thing...A bike rack. I bought a Sirrus Freedom SuperClamp 2. It is great, once the hitch is installed, the rack is simple to install and remove from your vehicle. The rack is well built. Sirrus is a US company ( Madison Wisconsin ) . They've been in Wisconsin for 40 years, long before the catch phrase "Make America great again" . : ) I hope this was helpful.
All the best, John

PCDoctorUSA
4 days ago

@Mike Burns Your points are spot on about the impression of the step-thru Elegant vs the Yukon. I definitely think Voltbike could sweep the entry-level commuter market by designing a commuter bike with a more aggressive look with the same quality build as their other bikes and keep the selling price under $1500. Take the look of Prodecotech's Phantom XR and outfit it with a removable rear rack, fenders, and the rest of the Voltbike component package and I'll buy one today.

Regarding tires, I thought I had to stay with a 4" tire on such a wide rim. I guess that shows how much I know. If I go with the Yukon (hope to make a decision within the next few weeks), my plans were to have my LBS swap out the Kenda's for something quieter like the Origin8 Supercell tires. As for the Elegant, I wish Voltbike had made the rear rack removable instead of a weld-on. And while I don't have a problem with the step-thru frame, it does prevent me from putting it on my car's hanging bike rack if I need to transport it due to a roadside emergency or scheduled maintenance at my LBS. I thought maybe I could get around it by using one of those adapter bars that are made specifically for women's and kids' bikes, but most of them have a weight limit of under 40#.

john peck
4 days ago

Here are a few other things I've done toward making my CCS not just a commuter, but a travel bike as well: 1) after the golf club
mirror failed, I simply bored out the end of the ergo grip & installed a quality *Mirrycle bar end that can rotate inward out of the way.
The internal clamp still holds the grip in position. 2) i swapped out the black, clip-on bar bag for this one,(better fit, more functional).
Top part holds glasses, a hex set, lock,& needlenose. The bottom half, gloves, a ski mask, small first aid kit, tube, levers, & a space blanket.
3) My in-frame, made from a carry-on,($6,Goodwill), fit on the top tube like a saddle. My heavier tools go in the bottom. 4) I opted for a double-legged kickstand as wellas the rear mount. it allows me to rock either wheel off the ground for service or tuning.

*I like these mirrors; the stay adjusted well. .

1/4
TForan
4 days ago

I see problems regarding the tires of the ST5. Will there be winter tires / spikes available in its size? For the ST2, there are (and are well proven in Switzerland). In general, a very large battery, a real (automotive like) headlight and disc brakes are helpful. From my personal experience, the sole critical point was icing on the derailleur. This might happen under rare circumstances.

Conclusion: Take the ST2s instead the ST5.

BTW: For commuting, hub drives are superior to the mid-drive due to technical reasons.

Thanks for all the good info. I really don't think I want to ride in deep snow with anything other than a fat bike. I could see a narrower aggressive tread working on packed snow but not the deep stuff. Regarding drive systems, I've only ridden mid drives and only two of those but the Trek Super Commuter was really nice around town. I'd like to try a hub drive.

Robie
4 days ago

10/14/17

10 - 2 Trek will be at Bicycle Sport Shop on Bee Cave Road. I get to ride a Super Commuter yay! Will share results , Sweetest looking bike I've seen in awhile.

Mike Burns
5 days ago

@Mike Burns I'm looking for my first ebike and Voltbike's offerings are definitely in my price range. I stumbled across Voltbike after seeing EBR's review of their Elegant model, but then got really interested in the Yukon. However, after reading some feedback on my recent post ("Any Yukon Commuters") I'm revisiting the Elegant. My biggest concern is how well the bike will hold up on the terrible roads over here. An elevated rail system is being built along my route so the roadway underneath is taking a beating from the heavy equipment. Riding on the sidewalk is illegal through business districts, which only encompasses a small portion of my route but that short time on the road can take a toll on a bike. Do you think the Elegant would hold up as a daily commuter?

Regarding the fenders, can they be removed? Is it possible to outfit it with better fitting fenders or modify the existing one enough so it's not an issue? In the EBR review of the Elegant, Court highlighted the flimsy fenders and their clearance.

If you have any experience with the Yukon 750, I'd love to hear your feedback on that post.

The Elegant should hold up fine. The frame is quite robust and the rack in welded on. The tires are wide enough to deal with rough roads without being so wide as to limit range. The battery and controller are identical to the Yukon. I can't comment on the long-term durability of the front fork but I haven't heard of any broken ones. As with any bicycle, check every single bolt when you buy it and every so often after that. Inspect your spokes regularly and keep them tensioned properly. If you have loose spokes, you will end up with bent wheels and broken spokes. Also, when you are about to hit a pothole or bump, get your butt off the saddle. Your legs are probably the best suspension out there! I see people and their bikes take jarring hits all the time that could have been avoided by rising off the saddle.

Fenders can easily be removed in less than 5 minutes. The front one is the problem. It is way too close to the tire. The back one visibly shakes (as do all bicycle fenders), but does not rattle or rub. Enlarging the slot on the front fender did not provide enough additional clearance. Reversing the metal bracket and positioning the fender above the fork brace instead of below works. You don't have road salt in Hawaii, so I would just remove it. I have ridden a bunch of fat bikes and owned one for a bit. If I was riding on the snow or sand, they are amazing. Might even consider a full-suspension one as my next normal off-road bike. Don't think they make great commuters because of the tires weird handling on pavement handling and their effect on range. I think 2-2.5" tires are the sweet spot for commuters with variable road conditions.

PCDoctorUSA
5 days ago

@SuperGoop Did you ever get an Elegant? I haven't crossed the Yukon 750 off my list as a commuter, but your comments and others did get me to revisit my short list and the Elegant was on it. Any thoughts on the Elegant as my commuter? I don't mind spending a $100 - $200 to change out a few components to get it right. I do wish the top tube was more of a conventional slope so I could haul it on my hanging rack when necessary.

PCDoctorUSA
5 days ago

@Mike Burns I'm looking for my first ebike and Voltbike's offerings are definitely in my price range. I stumbled across Voltbike after seeing EBR's review of their Elegant model, but then got really interested in the Yukon. However, after reading some feedback on my recent post ("Any Yukon Commuters") I'm revisiting the Elegant. My biggest concern is how well the bike will hold up on the terrible roads over here. An elevated rail system is being built along my route so the roadway underneath is taking a beating from the heavy equipment. Riding on the sidewalk is illegal through business districts, which only encompasses a small portion of my route but that short time on the road can take a toll on a bike. Do you think the Elegant would hold up as a daily commuter?

Regarding the fenders, can they be removed? Is it possible to outfit it with better fitting fenders or modify the existing one enough so it's not an issue? In the EBR review of the Elegant, Court highlighted the flimsy fenders and their clearance.

If you have any experience with the Yukon 750, I'd love to hear your feedback on that post.

PCDoctorUSA
5 days ago

@mrgold35 Thanks for the tire recommendations. I've been following a commuter on YT who rolls on Maxxis tires and his route is 95% asphalt or cement bikeway. No goathead thorns in my area, but I encounter a lot of glass shards from broken bottles and dodge quite a few screws and bolts on the side of the road.

PCDoctorUSA
5 days ago

@mrgold35 Thanks for sharing how you use your Rad Rover. The Rad Rover and Voltbike Yukon have been my two top fat-tire bikes all along, but the Yukon eventually bumped the Rover out of the running when Rad Bikes wanted $400 for shipping versus $120 from Volt. That $280 difference buys a lot of aftermarket accessories like a suspension seat post and quieter road tires. ;) On that note, can anyone recommend a quieter fat-tire bike for primarily asphalt road travel? I've seen another commuter with a fat-tire bike along my route a few times, but we seem to always be at opposite corners of a large busy intersection so I can't stop him to get his opinion. I also can't tell if he's riding an ebike or not.

@rich c Any recommendations on a "plus tire bike?"

SuperGoop
6 days ago

I don’t think the Yukon 750 will make a good commuter bike, IMO. It is too heavy, and the fat tires make locking it up on bike racks difficult. I have the “Limited” version with fenders and rack, and it is 70+ lbs with cargo, pannier, etc.

It may also standout too much on bike racks. You may need 2 locks, or one big lock because of the fat tires.

I also have the Voltbike Urban, which may work for you as a commuter bike and it is only US$1,059. It is much lighter, smaller, and stealthy. I think the new version is around 47 lbs.

PCDoctorUSA
6 days ago

Currently living on O'ahu and have been commuting 8 miles each way into Honolulu on my Trek FX 7.2 fitness bike for the past 2 years due to economic necessity (one-car family) and to preserve my sanity (Honolulu ranks 8th for most traffic-congested city). The terrible roads here have taken a toll on my bike: 3 flats and 3 broken spokes so far. However, I can still beat the city bus home and I never sit in traffic.

Having well exceeded membership age for AARP, my daily bike commute isn't getting any easier and ebike could help keep me in the game longer and hopefully make it more enjoyable. I was looking at the usual fare of commuter ebikes and knew I needed a strong geared hub motor for some of the hills on my route. The last mile home is an average 5% grade ascent, which makes for a great descent going to work (40.8 mph coasting record to date). I was looking at the Prodecotech Phantom XR and more recently Juiced Bikes CrossCurrent S, but then I started reading about commuters using fat-tire ebikes.

To make a long story short, the Yukon 750 Limited has made it to the top of my shopping list due to pricing, rider reviews and the quick response I've received from George Krastev to my questions. Now, I'd like to hear back from any Yukon 750 commuters out there to get their feedback and hear of their personal experiences and whether or not they would buy the bike again.

Over50
1 week ago

Excellent. Another Metro Detroit e-bike commuter. I'm hoping the community grows. Where are you commuting? I'm commuting Royal Oak to downtown Detroit on a Haibike and a Riese and Muller - about 2 to 3 times per week. If I see a Stromer with suspension I'll assume its you and say hi.

Just curious since I don't think we have any Stromer dealers locally: who did you choose to order your bike from?

Alex_C
1 week ago

Interested. I commuter here in MPLS all year round.

Ravi Kempaiah
1 week ago

I'm riding an ebike with 27.5 x 2.4 Schwalbe Moto X tires that has an active suspension (obviously many urban / road bikes do not have active front suspensions). When I lock-out the forks I really don't perceive that the ride quality is really any worse so I'm considering changing out the Magura active suspension forks for a carbon fiber fork.

I'm just wondering if there is a general consensus if a front suspension really adds much to ride quality of a street bike.

You could run your front tires at 30psi with a carbon fork, you really don't need any suspension fork. That's exactly what Trek did with their Super commuter ebike.
I have a Haibike Trekking S Rx with a heavy, cheap Suntour fork. Hate it. It's too heavy and doesn't respond to small road imperfections. A balloon tire would be far more responsive than a cheap suspension fork, at low PSI.

bob armani
1 week ago

Check out the Trek Super Commuter.

Test rode this bike at the ebike Expo and it was one of my favorite bikes out of approx 25 different makes and models tested over a 2 day period. Yes, it has the Bosch Performance mid-drive, but seems to be tuned perfectly for this bike, I would put this up against the Stromer ST1 and 2 as far as performance any day. Being a speed Pedelec, the motor puts you into 28mph quickly with very little hesitation. The Brose' mid-drive motor did not perform as well. A bit more sluggish IMHO.

Luv2ride
1 week ago

Mike's E-Bikes! Thanks for the truly educational post. Forums like this inspire great posts like yours which in turn inspire many, many people to be part of this unique world.

My budget can go as high as $5k per bike (I need two - one for me - one for the misses) but want to make an informed decision. I would rather purchase a $2,500 bike that is 95% of the $5,000 bike.... but if the $5,000 bike is 50% better than the $2,500... then it is worth the upgrade. I'm going to be using the heck out of these bikes and really want one that I totally smile each time I get on it.

Thanks all! _steve
Check out the Trek Super Commuter.

J.R.
1 week ago

We just had the results of a survey published for cycling in Arlington, VA. I was surprised 90% of female respondents were dissatisfied with the number of bike lanes, Arlington has pretty good bike infrastructure for the US, an active county govt-cyclists advisory group, a community youth bike program, a trail-separated learning loop for children learning to ride, and commuter trail snow removal, but only two short stretches of protected bike lanes so maybe that's what drove that answer. They also asked folks to select what type of bike lane they would like to see more of, the bike lane painted green is relatively new here but I've found it valuable for legitimizing riding through busy intersections and I'm looking forward to it being used to help fix a particularly difficult intersection that once was used by streetcars, then had a roundabout that was removed, and is presently a large open paved game of frogger for pedestrians and cyclists.
I've always thought of Arlington as above average and I'm going by memories from 3 years ago.

Snow here in PA is a real problem. Multi use paths and bike lanes are low priority for snow removal. Rail trails never get plowed. County execs really don't think bikes are a transportation alternative from December through March. The rail trail I most often use can be ice packed for weeks and months. Commuting in PA requires studded tires, but these can be really annoying on dry pavement. They don't help range either.

I do think infrastructure is better than it was 5 years ago.

DrZarkloff
2 years ago

I can't find anything that will allow me to convert my 32 inch Kent.

Flo Mo
2 years ago

Your videos are great. Thank you. :) More and more people ride e-bikes.... maybe they view your videos. :) COOL.

Jay Gurung
2 years ago

Hey Mr.Court,can you do the review of the EasyGo Race by BH EasyMotion please.

Flo Mo
2 years ago

Very good video. I like your channel. And this bike looks like old school. I like it. Cheap and nice. Very good. Thank you. :)

mn3m0n1c
2 years ago

Would be nice if manufacturers consider integrating control unit with battery pack. One detachable box would be a lot more convenient to carry when it comes to leaving an e-bike unattended in not too safe area.

ForbinColossus
2 years ago

I looked at BionX, eRad, Copenhagen wheel, Belon Electron - all of which have quirks and limitations. Confusing array of choices - none offers it all - where do you want to compromise? I lean slightly towards the copenhagen wheel for ease of setup, assuming the company gets it sorted out.
For anyone thinking of a kit, be sure to look at EBR's website and use the *compare* feature.
http://electricbikereview.com/tag/kits/

Eskil Eriksson
2 years ago

+ElectricBikeReview.com What made it for me was the mid drive, the opportunity to use the gears on the bike for both torque and high speed.Being able to do both hills and good speed on the flats is perfect for me.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+ForbinColossus Yeah, even the kits that seem to nail most of the features end up being more expensive which is a big trade off for people. I personally really like BionX for a full kit setup because you get assist, throttle, several size and power options, battery size options, regeneration, integrated lights if you want etc. but they cost so much... The all-in-one solutions are cool and I really like the Zehus and FlyKly for simplicity but then you don't get gears... so the Copenhagen Wheel seems like the winner but then again it still isn't out, it only comes in red, limited wheel size options, no throttle mode and the battery isn't removable and has yet to really be proven in the motor like that. Lots of choices, but at least that means lots of potential for finding something perfect for your needs ;)

Jonathan Seagull
2 years ago

Golden Motor Canada 1,000 watt motor, built in controller, variable speed throttle etc with Lithium battery is under $1,000...buy torque arms tho.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Jonathan Seagull Ha! Yeah... those larger motors can be pretty strong. Electric Bike Outfitters has two direct drive hubs at 500 and 750 watts (the Mountaineer goes 30+ mph and is more of an off-road thing). These cheaper kits are cool to keep things light and discreet ;)

R Valdez
2 years ago

Please do a review on "add-e" or "go-e" kit.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+R Valdez I'll keep an eye out for sure! Got a bunch more Daymak and Electric Bike Outfitters kits at the moment and a website redesign :D keep an eye out... thanks for the suggestions.

Eskil Eriksson
2 years ago

I have the same battery, and the connection is a big downside. Unless you can keep the battery on the bike most of the time, due to no extreme temperatures.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Eskil Eriksson Hmm, glad to hear you've had the same experience with the plug, thanks for your feedback. Seemed like a big hassle to me but their other kits click right in without the screw bit so they're way more convenient if you're willing to pay a bit extra.