Electric Bike Outfitters EBO Commuter Kit Review

Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Kit Review
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter 350 Watt Geared Hub
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter 36 V 11 Ah Lithium Battery
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Led Console Trigger Throttle
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Controller Box
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Front
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Kit Review
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter 350 Watt Geared Hub
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter 36 V 11 Ah Lithium Battery
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Led Console Trigger Throttle
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Controller Box
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Front

Summary

  • An affordable, all-inclusive electric bike kit available in many wheel sizes (front or rear) with a nice one year warranty
  • You get a standard 350 watt internally geared motor, 36 volt Lithium-ion battery pack and a trigger throttle
  • No display console or pedal assist modes come stock with this kit, just a simple LED power meter and throttle mode, EBO has several upgraded kits and can sell custom packages
  • Predominantly available online but finding their way to more and more dealers in the United States

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National eBike Shops

Electric Cyclery
900 N Coast Hwy
Laguna Beach,  CA  92651
Propel Bikes
134 Flushing Ave
Brooklyn,  NY  11205

Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Electric Bike Outfitters

Model:

EBO Commuter Kit

Price:

$704

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Commuting

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

30 Day Return, 1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

20152016

Bicycle Details

Battery Weight:

5.5 lbs ( 2.49 kg )

Motor Weight:

6 lbs ( 2.72 kg )

Gearing Details:

9 Single Speed or Shimano 6 or 7 Speed Cassettes or SunRace 8 and 9 Speed Cassettes

Brake Details:

Mechanical Wuxing Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy, Double Walled

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 36

Wheel Sizes:

16 in ( 40.64 cm )20 in ( 50.8 cm )24 in ( 60.96 cm )26 in ( 66.04 cm )27.5 in ( 69.85 cm )28 in ( 71.12 cm )

Accessories:

Optional Twist Throttle, Optional Cadence Sensor with 3 Mode LED Console and Controller for $31 at Time of Purchase or $105 Later (Because of the Additional Console and Controller)

Other:

Rear Motors Cost $25 to $50 Extra, Dropout Widths Front: 100 mm, Rear 120 mm or 135 mm, Brake Clamp Diameter 22.2 mm, 14 Amp Controller

Electronic Details

Motor Type:

Front-Mounted Geared Hub, Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

350 watts

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

396 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

15 miles ( 24 km )

Estimated Max Range:

35 miles ( 56 km )

Display Type:

LED Console

Readouts:

Battery Charge Level (Red, Yellow, Green)

Drive Mode:

Trigger Throttle

Top Speed:

20 mph ( 32 kph )

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Written Review

The EBO Commuter is the most affordable kit (at the time of this review) from Electric Bike Outfitters. This is a relatively new electric bicycle company based in Denver Colorado. The first things I noticed were the excellent price and all-inclusive setup. Unlike some kits, this one doesn’t tease you with a “battery not included” price tag. For well under $1k you get a modest motor and mid-mounted Lithium-ion battery that will take you 15 to 20 miles per charge and work on most traditional bikes. You can choose the wheel size from a wide selection of 16″, 20″, 24″, 26″, 27.5″ and 28″ which means folding bikes, kids bikes, cruisers, mountain bikes and city bikes will all work! The one hangup here is the slightly wider hub design that might not fit all fork widths, consider the EBO Phantom if you’ve got a single speed city bike because that hub was specially designed to be narrower and avoid scraping. Also, as you consider this kit, ask yourself whether you want pedal assist because it can be added for just $30 but costs over $100 after the fact (because it uses a different controller). This is the only kit from EBO that doesn’t come stock with assist and for many people that will be fine but your thumb might get a little tired after longer trips.

Powering the bike is a generic 350 watt planetary geared hub. It seems like the front-mounted design is a bit quieter but they both produce a bit of whirring noise and endure more wear than a gearless direct drive hub. The big benefits are small size, good torque at lower speeds and light weight ~6 lbs. The Pure City demo bike I was riding in the video review above weighed just 45 lbs with the kit installed! That’s pretty good… and the pricetag for the bike plus kit was under $1,200 making this a very affordable ebike option. Even though the motor you get here isn’t the most powerful and might not be the highest quality, it does offer a lot of value and you get an awesome all-inclusive warranty with the bike so that gives me peace of mind. Considering that it is a kit, you could also probably pick up a replacement on individual parts in the future should one fail.

The battery pack on the EBO Commuter electric bike kit is a mix of good and bad. The upside is that it’s downtube-mounting which improves weight distribution, frees up the rear portion of the bike for adding a rack and fenders and is pretty well protected by the frame. I like the canister design, it has a built-in LED charge level indicator and seats well once you’ve screwed the mounting bracket into the bottle cage bosses on your bike (your bike must have bottle cage bosses on the downtube for this kit to work). The downside is that while this battery pack is removable (for lighter transport and convenient charging) taking it off and putting it back on is a pain. Most downtube batteries (including those on the higher-end Electric Bike Outfitters kits) just click in and make contact with metal prongs, on this kit you have to manually screw the power cable into the battery and the space for getting your fingers in there and twisting the metal ring is very limited… It’s a pain but if you just leave the pack on and charge while mounted you’ll never have to do it.

Operating the EBO Commuter system is extremely simple in its stock form. You charge the battery, mount it and attach the power cable then click the on/off toggle switch at the base of the battery pack. Next you press the red button on the LED console near the trigger throttle and it lights right up. At this point, you can use the variable speed trigger throttle to your heart’s content. It can reach up to ~20 mph but also does well at lower speeds. I found myself juicing it from standstill then easing off once I hit a speed that felt comfortable for pedaling. Honestly, I think my thumb would get tired after too much riding with a throttle like this, especially given the grip style gear shifter on the right bar… this made the reach to the throttle a bit further and required more energy for me. You can screw around with the throttle position and find the perfect fit and as mentioned earlier, you can also upgrade to pedal assist but that requires more installation time and effort as well as an LCD display.

This e-bike kit is all about simplicity and in my opinion it’s a winner. While the ~$500 Pure City Bourbon that the demo kit was installed on felt great and had a lot of extras including an 8 speed derailleur, fenders, rack, nice grips and a comfortable swept-back bar… you could easily find a bike at Walmart with similar features for under $200 and get yourself a sub $1,000 electric bike that would work just fine. Keep in mind that this hub motor design is wider than the EBO Phantom and that you don’t get pedal assist stock but otherwise you do have the nice color coded wires that are easy to setup as well as upgraded brake levers with motor inhibitors. All kits tend to add a mess of wires to the bike so I usually go for black or dark colored frames that help them blend in. You’ll probably extend more time and effort with a rear-mounted kit but that’s usually my preference for traction and improved steering… especially if you have a weak suspension fork.

Pros:

  • Color coded wires are easy to setup, the motor cable has a quick disconnect point that makes servicing the wheel (front or rear) much easier
  • You get brake levers with integrated motor inhibitors here which could come in handy if you upgrade to pedal assist (much more affordable to do when you buy the bike ~$30 vs. later since it uses a different controller)
  • I like trigger throttles because they are easier to fit with existing grips and twist shifters, they also perform better for off-road use because they don’t compromise your grip, this one worked well but you can upgrade to a twist throttle if you prefer
  • Available in a huge assortment of wheel sizes including 16″, 20″, 24″, 26″, 27.5″ (650B) and ~28″ (700c) so you can convert folding bikes, kids bikes, road bikes, mountain bikes etc. and they all cost the same
  • Relatively light weight with the battery at ~5.5 lbs and the motor ~6 lbs so you aren’t going to end up with a heavy ride
  • The mechanical brake levers are compatible with traditional designs as well as disc brakes and the motor has a mounting pattern for use with a disc brake rotor

Cons:

  • Generic motor and battery cells might not last as long and produce a bit more noise under power but are still covered by the one year warranty
  • Basic LED display panel won’t show your precise battery level, speed, range or other details that the higher end kits will
  • The battery pack clicks into the holster easily but has a screw-in power connector that can be tricky and time consuming to connect, it also takes up most of the space where a bottle cage would mount… consider a saddle rail adapter, rear rack with a bottle bag or a hydration pack
  • The controller unit is built into a separate box vs. being integrated into the battery mount or motor, this just means more things have to be screwed onto the frame and possibly more wires
  • If you decide to upgrade and get pedal assist, it will require more effort to install and the units I saw only had a five sensor disc which isn’t as responsive
  • You have to power the battery pack on as well as the display unit to get the bike going… this adds a bit of time to each ride but also makes it easier to forget to turn the battery pack off when you park

Resources:

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cyclist2009
12 months ago

What are the dimensions of the battery?

Court Rye
12 months ago

I'm not exactly sure, this would be a great question to email Electric Bike Outfitters about because sometimes cases change and I reviewed their models last year.

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bazzapage
3 hours ago
Sounds about right @Embra If you can get a Turbo X at a good price ($2.5k) through your LBS and you want it now, I'd say its a really good bike (apart from those !^#%$# Formula C1 brakes). From what I can ascertain, the Vados will start at about USD3000 which might give you a similar spec to a current Turbo X. It will be a more versatile drive given the mid motor driving through gears and feel nicer (better weight balance). More complexity though so who knows, that could bring its own share of problems.
I'd be inclined to stick with Spesh, they have the best ebikes on the market in commuter and MTB categories IMHO and have great customer service.
bob armani
1 day ago
Ann M.
@Court, I like the simpler, cleaner layout suggestions. George's new topics idea and vincent's suggestion about news rings for me too. We have a lot of members from around the world who could add international ebike news. If you check out Jason Kraft on LinkedIn, he posts international and US news about electric bikes in the Electric Bicycle Industry group (he's the moderator there too).

There will be potential overlap issues with the Forums as you lay them out now, since some fat tire bikes are also mountain bikes are also commuter bikes. Some folks like the styling or feel of a mountain bike but use it and write about it as a commuter. Not sure how to address that; will have to watch as things change.

Maintenance or Ebike Repairs (to choose a newer label) together with parts & accessories should be called out. I currently spend a lot of time writing about how to fix stuff on ebikes but it's scattered in a bunch of bike forums so fewer people see the resources linked to or see the general repair or regular maintenance material.

The Guides are helpful education and overviews; I link to them regularly. Would like to see some updates to a couple of older ones like the Big & Tall Guide and the companion Small/Light Ebike Guide to include references to some of the newer brands or bike styles. Same for the Kits.

Incorporating links to specific brand forums alongside the Reviews is intriguing. I do know that a lot of people write comments after viewing or reading your Reviews but don't make their way to the Forum, so those links could drive more traffic here.

What is 'Trail Head' a name for General Discussion?

I'd like to see a specific area that discusses where folks commute and the issues they deal with to do that commute or where they go to do a weekend ride. This would be a great opportunity to see more pics (and read more of EddieJ's great adventures )
Having a lot of visuals included in this area along within the Repairs/Parts/Accessories section helps visitors to the Forum digest or better understand material. I try to include images or links to images & videos to support repair knowledge; written word alone doesn't always get the job done.

Don't know how the moderators at UK Pedelecs manages their Off Topic section but it is a fun read (could get out of hand!)
Ann- I agree with your comment 'We have a lot of members from around the world who could add international ebike news.' I am always finding the European versions of ebikes very interesting as well. ie: KTM and Felt series of ebikes not yet available in the US . The KTM bikes especially, are extremely sharp in appearance compared to the current US models. I spoke to Federico Zapata from KTM Industries and he indicated that those bikes have not been manufactured for the US and it will be sometime before they are shipped out of Austria to the US. There is a 108 page catalog on their website if anyone has any curiosities about their European versions. The styling is magnificent IMHO. Thanks for all your hard work and contributions to this site!
mrgold35
3 days ago
Gearing:
I think since the Radrover is a Class II ebike with a 20 mph top speed, the gearing is made to support that speed limit. I have a decline of 5400ft to 4900ft on my work commute and can reach speeds up to 23 mph in PAS 5 with watts at 000. Even if I had additional taller gears, I think I can only maintain the +23 mph on a decline anyways because the bike is so heavy and the upright riding position. That speed feels pretty fast to me on a bike considering I only have a helmet and my instincts to avoid cars, road debris, obstacles, and occasional non-attentive driver on public streets. I think I wouldn't want a Class III bike with a +28 mph top speed and skinny tires for that reason.

I kinda learned to pedal to around 60 rpms (+- 5 to 10 rpm) and keep my watts as low as I can when possible regardless of mph as the most comfortable speed to travel. That can be sometimes at PAS 3-4 and/or 4-6 gear depending on how level the terrain, type of wind, conserving battery power for +25 mile ride, how crowded the roads/trails are, or how tired I feel. I find myself only using PAS 5 in short burst or on long declines to keep my mph +20.

You also have the option of entering the LCD screen set-up options (press and hold the up/down arrow at the same time and use the mode button to scroll the options of tire size, motor cut off, LCD brightness, and km or mph setting). The second screen is the motor cut off speed and it should be set to 32 k/hr (20 mph). You can adjust the motor cut off in 1 k/hr increments from 12 k/hr (7 mph) up to 40 k/hr (25 mph). You might be able to adjust the motor cut off speed for the right pedal feel in PAS 5 on level ground where it doesn't feel like a hamster on exercise wheel. I set mine to 35 k/hr (21.7 mph) and that feels like the right rpms for me, maintains my speed, and keeps my watts low when commuting.

Weight:
The Radrover is really tail heavy, I have a rack+bag with panniers, I wear a commuter back pack with work cloths/warm weather gear/lunch, and I'm 6'3" and around 270lbs with winter gear on in the morning. The extra tail heavy weight (and top heavy for me) usually isn't a problem for straight level commuting. I can feel it when riding the dirt single track trails (sometimes take detours after-work to ride the trails before heading home). I've learned to lower my seat a little on the trails and that helps when I need to shift my weight back and low on steep declines and try to keep the bike balanced for traction. On inclines, I learned to lower my gear, stand up and lean forward, bring my torso down to change the center of gravity for front/rear balance and rear traction, and slowly apply the throttle when needed when heading up steep inclines (PAS is usually in 2-3 when trail riding). I added a thumb throttle from Amazon and that makes it easier to maintain my grip and regulate the throttle power much better than just the twist action. You can really teach yourself a lot about how to handle the heavy Rad on trail riding you can't get from paved bike or street riding. I'll say to hit the trails over and over until you can ride them by memory almost.

Battery:
I think the battery is doing a double function of showing its capacity at any given time and showing the load on the cells during high power comsumption. I've seen the battery indicator down to 1-2 bars at PAS 5 when I'm just 100 yards from my front door. Once I level out and get to cruising speed, it jumps back up to 4-5 bars depending on the incline/decline. When the hub is accelerating (especially hard in PAS 4-5), I think it is showing the amount of power being consumed. I try to concentrate more on the watts than bar % readings. If I can keep the watts at or below the 200-350 mark on average in any PAS level with occasional 500 watt or less peaks, I know I can get +30 miles from the battery. Consistently above 500 watts with more +650 watts peaks and plateau will drop my range by half. I wish our controller was smart like some ebikes that give you a distance till empty indicator depending on PAS level; but, I didn't want to spend $3000-$5000 just for that and end up in the same place.

Brakes:
My front and rear brakes squeak like crazy on both bikes. I don't know if it is the pad, rotors, or my fat butt. I will be checking into upgrading the pad material first and then rotor second down the road.

Fenders:
The new full Radrover fenders are very nice; but, a little too expensive since I have two bikes (have the original RR fenders). I don't like to ride when it is wet, snowy, or muddy out and the fenders choice I have work to keep road debris and occasional mud clump from hitting me (rear rack also keeps stuff from hitting me). Another issue I have is my vehicle platform bike rack (Saris Freedom SuperClamp 4) secures my bikes with a front/rear arm on the top of the tires right where the new longer fenders covers the tires. I don't think I could secure my bikes enough for transport just using the top of the fender?

Suspension:
You might want to check out a suspension seat post from Thudbuster, Cirrus body float, or Suntour NCX SP-12. I also added a larger seat from Sunlite called the Cloud-9 (it is 12.5 by 11.5 and very comfy). I'm also playing with PSI and leaning towards lower PSI on trail riding of 15-18 and higher PSI on commuting of 20-25. Still experimenting to find the right combo and sweet spot for both types of surfaces.
Over50
1 month ago
E-Wheels
Over50,
No pressure, but are we overdue an update of your Charger?
How are you settling in with the bike and does it meet your needs & requirements as a daily commuter
Have you made a video of your commute yet
Also, I would be interested in seeing how the headlight performs during a night ride
Pressure! The bike has been sitting here and I've made some adjustments that I am eager to test. Our weather turned cold and they resalted roads a couple of weeks ago. So last weekend I ventured out on one of my regular bikes and let the Charger stay dry. But we just had a big rain to wash the salt away and tomorrow is warm so I hope to get out tomorrow night and test the headlight. I switched out the seat post for a Body Float and I added supplemental head and taillights (battery usb). Supplemental headlight is the Blackburn Central 200. Supplemental taillight is a really cool one! The Lupine Rotlicht. It mounts under the saddle and has 5 power levels, 8 modes and a motion sensor and light sensor. I think the latter 2 are mutually exclusive. You can set it to act as a brake light or increase intensity if it senses a car's headlights. I still haven't added any reflectivity. Propel was kind enough to send reflectors for the suspension forks so just waiting for those. Video will lag a bit until I get the bike all setup and I'm comfortable that all is configured the way I want. I haven't purchased a camera yet but will start looking soon. I've got panniers on the bike but also have the Ortlieb Sport Packer Plus panniers on order from REI. I will see which bags work best for the commute and switch the others to my regular bikes.
E-Wheels
1 month ago
Over50,
No pressure, but are we overdue an update of your Charger?
How are you settling in with the bike and does it meet your needs & requirements as a daily commuter
Have you made a video of your commute yet
Also, I would be interested in seeing how the headlight performs during a night ride
Mark Peralta
1 month ago
TheProfaneAngel
Hi everyone,

I'm super new to this forum and actually everything bike-related because I haven't owned a bike since I was 13 haha.
Anyway, I need some help to find a bike that'll fit my needs. A bit about myself:
I'm in my twenties, 5 feet and weigh 110 pounds. I'm currently living in a farm in MA and need the bike to take me to the nearby cities (max commute would be 18 miles one way - although I can always cut that in half by taking the bus). I have opted for an e-bike because there are too many regulations around scooters in MA. However, a few years ago I suffered an accident in which I broke my tailbone, which makes it very difficult for me to ride bikes with the traditional saddle.

Here's what I'm looking for in a bike. I know I'll have to compromise some of these, but this is the "ideal" version of what it would look like:
- Foldable
- Light
- Can go 15-20+ mph
- Range of at least 20 miles w/o pedal assist
- Can go up some hills (not too steep)
- Removable battery
- Comfortable seat
- And of course, cheap. I really can't afford anything more than $800.

Of course some of these can be switched out. Like if it's super compact, I don't need a removable battery and if it goes less than 20 miles, pedals would be nice. LCD screen, basket and USB port would also be nice, but not necessary.

Some of the bikes/scooters I've been looking at are:
Genesis Transformer
Genesis Commuter
LEHE K1S
Airwheel E6
Airwheel E3
Urb-E Sport
So far I'm leaning towards the Genesis Transformer, but I can't find many reviews and the 15-mile range is a bit of a turn off.

Thank you for your help! Can't wait to hear what you have to say.
None of those you mentioned will survive a 15 mile regular trip. You need to pedal it so it can reach 15 miles in one charge. I think you should look at thus one instead;

Here's the full review
https://electricbikereview.com/vilano/ion/
Thomas Jaszewski
1 month ago
There's enough room for the newer packs that are 14Ah. When I do a long trip I carry a spare pack. There enough room for a triangle pack, 20-24 Ah.

Why is a rear rack difficult, I'd think the dealer ought to have a solution, I'm not a big fan but have r cently used a rear rack soft pack in a nylon rack pack.

Wow, I see, the review, "
  • No mounting points for fenders or a rear rack if you wanted to use this as a commuter + weekend warrior, drive system does not offer shift sensing and may mash gears, solid two year comprehensive warranty
I found a seat post clamp with threaded hole for mounting a rack. Then I bought longer stainless steel mounting straps. This was on a flat foot frame with the same problem. However if there are no lower mounting spots...it's just a bum design by a really nice company. A shame, it's a nice bike. Triangle pack.
Curtis Paddock
1 month ago
Ravi Kempaiah
BULLS is introducing Lacuba EVO E45 this year in the US market. This is one of top end commuter offerings from them along with a host of other Bosch Pedelec/S-pedelecs.

I have been anticipating this bike for sometime and quite excited about it. Brose system is one of the smoothest and this bike comes with the new speed engine. Their pedelec version runs on 250W motor but this one is 350W, speed engine. Perfect for anyone who likes to pedal.

https://www.bulls.de/produkt/bulls-lacubae45-569-69450

View attachment 10295

Attention to details and top of the line components make it a top contender for anyone looking for a well-balanced S-pedelec commuter.

I will highlight what I like in this bike.
  1. Quality components. Shimano XT shifters, derailleurs, both front and rear hubs are Shimano XT. Tektro Dorado hydraulic brakes with 203 mm !! rotors. Well, that's an overkill for commuting but why not?!

  2. B & M brake light + a decent headlight but they run off of the main battery. Ergon GP1 grips, adjustable stem and upright riding position. Reminds me of OHM bikes' geometry.

  3. 36V, 17.5Ah BMZ pack with 4A charger. Much better than 400Whr offered by Bosch. But because it runs at 36V, expect some voltage sag. This drive is perfect for stop and go traffic. Range ~ 45-50 miles.

  4. Of course, the water bottle cage! Kickstand, mirror. E-bike specific tires for extra puncture protection. Overall a fully featured commuter.
Now, what looks good on paper may not always translate to real world performance. But, this bike has the same engine that you would find on Specialized Turbo Vado. Why would Specialized engineers pick that engine if they were not convinced of its performance?

Finally, price point! I think the MSRP is ~ $4500. You may spend $700 on a bike and call it a complete waste of money or spend $5000 and think it's a great value. Totally depends on the use and for commuters, this bike would be a great choice.
Thanks Ravi, I have been zeroing in on the evo 45 for my first ebike/car replacement. I love that it has every feature I would want in a ready-to-ride package. Probably will add a Body Float and still stay under 5K. Moving to San Diego in 30 days and can't wait to test drive one. Alooooha!
Rick Imby
1 month ago
Ann M.
Cycling infrastructure and the vocal support of local bike groups does count towards successful cycling community growth. Austin just voted to invest $720 million in transportation with $120 million going to bike and pedestrian projects. Having ways for people to safely navigate within cities and regionally makes it more practical to utilize a bike as a commuter vehicle. For now, the majority of ebike sales are going to riders for health and pleasure. The increasing building density within our city, particularly focused near downtown and the bigger parks adds to the need for alternate forms of transportation.

@Rick Imby, as an electric bike dealer for 16 years, I know what these bikes cost, where the components come from and strongly disagree that the bikes are cheaper because they're crowd funded. No, the facts are that they are cheaper because they are using cheaper quality bike components including the frames, the motors, controllers & batteries. By the time you figure in shipping and lack of service or parts, they're not really a bargain. That's the illusion most of these folks want you to believe. Faraday Bikes was started with funding through Kickstarter but those are not cheap, $1K bikes, they are sophisticated, polished commuter ebikes...you get what you pay for. Those companies who funded initial production via the crowd funding route who decided to stick with it (not be a one time shot) went on to have other channels of distribution and provide support. They recognized that was vital to the long term success of their company and the industry as a whole.
Absolutely Ann M, I agree the crowd funded bikes are often cutting corners on their ebikes. The lack of support and the lack of warranty are a huge factor in why the bikes are significantly lower priced than dealer bikes.

Hopefully the flood of these often very low quality bikes will not turn off a lot of future users.
Ann M.
1 month ago
Cycling infrastructure and the vocal support of local bike groups does count towards successful cycling community growth. Austin just voted to invest $720 million in transportation with $120 million going to bike and pedestrian projects. Having ways for people to safely navigate within cities and regionally makes it more practical to utilize a bike as a commuter vehicle. For now, the majority of ebike sales are going to riders for health and pleasure. The increasing building density within our city, particularly focused near downtown and the bigger parks adds to the need for alternate forms of transportation.

@Rick Imby, as an electric bike dealer for 16 years, I know what these bikes cost, where the components come from and strongly disagree that the bikes are cheaper because they're crowd funded. No, the facts are that they are cheaper because they are using cheaper quality bike components including the frames, the motors, controllers & batteries. By the time you figure in shipping and lack of service or parts, they're not really a bargain. That's the illusion most of these folks want you to believe. Faraday Bikes was started with funding through Kickstarter but those are not cheap, $1K bikes, they are sophisticated, polished commuter ebikes...you get what you pay for. Those companies who funded initial production via the crowd funding route who decided to stick with it (not be a one time shot) went on to have other channels of distribution and provide support. They recognized that was vital to the long term success of their company and the industry as a whole.
rmasa
1 month ago
Depends on what you are going to use it for, and what you might use it for.
I seem to always have a weakness for buying bikes at a great deal (something that you just cannot pass up).
Problem is no matter what the super great deal the price was for the bike, I end up spending more than that upgrading or modifying the bike to fit me or my purpose.
Now, when I look at a bike, I picture everything I am going to do after I buy it, and add up all the upgrades (not just the cost, but if the parts are readily available and compatible).
It is overwhelming when you add up all the parts it takes to convert any bike over, even if it is little things, like making it a commuter (thats plus 500) or something as simple as changing the tires (plus 200).
Obviously with those bikes, you probably going to do aggressive offroading. But will you ride it on the street? low lights conditions? Purchasing a dropper?
And of course which one will be easier to get the drive serviced.
flymeaway
1 month ago
Rick Imby
The Avid cyclists who are buying $4k bicycles is not at this time interested in $4k electric bikes.
That's changing. I'm a good example. Living in a hilly region in New Hampshire and over my prime bicycling years, riding a bike for pleasure or exercise, began putting tremendous strain on my body, particularly knees. So I did give up my pedal bike for ebiking and it has made a substantial difference in my fitness and health. I'm physically more fit today then I was in my 50's because of ebiking. I also commute 28 miles round trip (when the roads aren't snow covered) which equates to about 7+ months on average 4 times a week. On weekends I bike with my wife, who almost never rode a bike because she's smaller and less capable of grinding it up grades and keeping pace. Enter the ebike and she now can ride with me anywhere, so we generally do a ride both Saturday and Sunday. This never happened before we got into ebikes. So I went from almost never riding to about 4+ thousand miles a year. As all those eager beaver bikers hit their elder years they'll perhaps "see the light". I doubt the general population will ever see bikes as the alternative to cars; just ingrained in our car-centric culture. As for the $4K bike, you can end up with an incredible commuter bike:

Titanium Frame
BBS02 750W with 52v Luna Shark
Rohloff Speedhub

A great 46 lbs. bike for around $4K.

Court J.
motostrano
1 month ago
2 of our riders were on Haibike SDURO models. Steven here was riding his iZIP PEAK hard tail which did just fine. Steven is in his 60s and brought with him his daily commuter that he uses to ride to work EVERY DAY from Marin to San Francisco across the Golden Gate Bridge. How's that for reliability and product satisfaction? He simply loaded up a couple extra batteries and his bike was ready for our 6 day Death Valley tour by ebike.

Steven is a happy ebiker and iZIP rider.

Nirmala
2 months ago
This is a unique take on a low maintenance commuter bike: http://giflybike.com/learnmore.html

The folding feature makes it easier to take the bike inside with you for theft protection, and it does roll when folded.

I am not sure you will be able to find everything you want in a bike with spoke-less wheels, so Dunbar's suggestion about making sure the wheels are trued by someone who knows what they are doing is probably a good alternative.
ROCebike
2 months ago
JohnT
For someone your height, a lot of bikes would work with minor modifications. At 300 lbs, you're pushing the weight limit of many, but adjusting your spokes regularly will help.

At our Pedego store, we've put people as tall as 6'6" on the Pedego City Commuter Classic 28", but with a longer aftermarket seat post. I think we have someone 6'3" on the stock post.

I'm sure we've put people 6'3" or so on our Pedego Interceptor Classic, but again, you might want a longer seatpost. If necessary, higher handlebars are a pretty easy swap. It's available with a mag wheel upgrade that will handle 400 lbs.
I second the Pedego but would choose the Boomerang with mag wheels. If your arthritis acts up you'll appreciate the low step through for mounting. It's featured on their web site as a testimonial from a former 300 lb woman.
Ravi Kempaiah
2 months ago
Great product!
Rakesh is very particular about the quality and reliability of his products. He also offers 5 year warranty on the drive system which is one of the best.
I am not sure how could anyone get 100 miles of range even in Level 1 (marketing blurb perhaps) but it does look like a neatly designed product.

I wonder why they chose dropbar version instead of a regular commuter type styling. An upright geometry is what most customers prefer and having additional features like lighting, fenders and rack would be very useful too.
Asunder
2 months ago
Alphbetadog
I've got the Thudbuster ST and a Brooks B67 saddle. It has the springs and a little wider than the B17. Designed for more upright riding position. I have it on my EBO kitted 1983 Trek 830 chromoly lugged frame and it works really well in smoothing out the ride. Keep in mind that the Brooks saddles take some time to conform to your bum. You'll hate it for the first few hundred miles, but once broken in you'll love it and won't want to ride on anything else!
After further review, I think I am going to go with the B67 instead of the B17. I ride fairly upright.

Jim in Arlington VA
Last spring, I had an REI city commuter converted to an eBike. The specific model converted is a 2015 Novara Gotham. The motor I had installed is a mid-drive 500w Bafang 8fun. The bike is pretty fast…20 mph with average pedaling at level 3 (of 5) pedal assist. And I can do 30 mph on the flat if I pedal hard. Anyway, I quickly discovered that the bike path between my Arlington, VA home and the downtown DC location where I work was beating the heck out of my spine. The bike I converted has no suspension (a clear mistake). So I purchased a Tamer Pivot Plus XC Suspension Seatpost. http://www.niagaracycle.com/categor...YobNxptHrQcobRYqwuqdsG23wRjmI7Jj9MBoCXf7w_wcB. It appears similar to a Thudbuster, but at lower cost.

I coupled that with a Bell Memory Foam Saddle https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001D16OCI/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Yes, I know…this seat is not a top of the line product like your Brooks saddle, but I’m an old guy and this combination made all the difference for my 10-mile commute. I ride to work effortlessly. My back and butt do not hurt when I get there or home. And I get some exercise, especially on the way home since it’s mostly uphill.

I've ridden this bike 40+ miles at a stretch along the bumpy C&O Canal tow path with that seat and seat post treating me almost as well as a full suspension bike. That said, I know there are higher end components that would perhaps serve you better, but this setup has worked out well for me.

Good luck to you in finding the configuration that works for you.

I would normally go with lesser expensive gear, but ,y family wanted to get me something for my bike this year for the Holidays. So I went with the more expensive.
Christopher
2 months ago
Joe Pipes
It may be more difficult to choose my second bike than selecting my first bike. When starting out, you dont know the questions to ask. Once you get into it, er- addicted, you get kind of picky.

I am currently riding a Pedego City Commuter. 45v 15a battery the range is awesome. and comfort is sweet.

Here is my spec list, if anything jumps to your attention of a brand / model to look into. Let me know.
Front Suspension, If my pedego had front suspension forks, I prop would not change.
Pedal Assist, not throttle only / pedal mode
I prefer longer range over top speed. I can ride three four five hours and enjoy it. up to 50 miles +
relaxed / easy / upright position. I enjoy the cruising, not racing or in a hurry.
Rear fender rack, either standard or add on I like to pack a lot, too much
Front rack. Yes I told you I pack way too much s*it. But hey I am never hungry or thirsty.
digital display, battery life - miles - speed

If a particular model / brand comes to mind, please share.
thanks
Joe
JoeT, you asked and Pedego listened!

Based on your needs listed above, I highly recommend the Pedego Interceptor Platinum Edition:

1.) New front suspension feature added (RST Zeus).

2.) New and improved Panasonic 48V 15a battery for longer range over top speed. Pedego is transitioning from Samsung to Panasonic battery cells (Tesla electric vehicles use the top of the line Panasonic battery cells).

3.) New and improved swept back handle bars for a more relaxed / easy / upright position.

4.) The Pedego Interceptor Platinum Edition is hands-down the ultimate cruiser-style e-bike on the market today.

5.) Rear fender rack with optional clamp.

6.) Solid frame built pannier blockers. Instead of a front rack, I recommend a pannier for increased storage since you like to pack a lot. Or you could always add a basket to the front if you need more storage than a pannier can handle.

7.) Last but not least, priced at the low end of your 3-5k budget, listed for $3,795.


Cheers,

Christopher


DrZarkloff
1 year ago

I can't find anything that will allow me to convert my 32 inch Kent.

Flo Mo
1 year ago

Your videos are great. Thank you. :) More and more people ride e-bikes.... maybe they view your videos. :) COOL.

Jay Gurung
1 year ago

Hey Mr.Court,can you do the review of the EasyGo Race by BH EasyMotion please.

Flo Mo
1 year ago

Very good video. I like your channel. And this bike looks like old school. I like it. Cheap and nice. Very good. Thank you. :)

mn3m0n1c
1 year ago

Would be nice if manufacturers consider integrating control unit with battery pack. One detachable box would be a lot more convenient to carry when it comes to leaving an e-bike unattended in not too safe area.

ForbinColossus
1 year ago

I looked at BionX, eRad, Copenhagen wheel, Belon Electron - all of which have quirks and limitations. Confusing array of choices - none offers it all - where do you want to compromise? I lean slightly towards the copenhagen wheel for ease of setup, assuming the company gets it sorted out.
For anyone thinking of a kit, be sure to look at EBR's website and use the *compare* feature.
http://electricbikereview.com/tag/kits/

Eskil Eriksson
1 year ago

+ElectricBikeReview.com What made it for me was the mid drive, the opportunity to use the gears on the bike for both torque and high speed.Being able to do both hills and good speed on the flats is perfect for me.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+ForbinColossus Yeah, even the kits that seem to nail most of the features end up being more expensive which is a big trade off for people. I personally really like BionX for a full kit setup because you get assist, throttle, several size and power options, battery size options, regeneration, integrated lights if you want etc. but they cost so much... The all-in-one solutions are cool and I really like the Zehus and FlyKly for simplicity but then you don't get gears... so the Copenhagen Wheel seems like the winner but then again it still isn't out, it only comes in red, limited wheel size options, no throttle mode and the battery isn't removable and has yet to really be proven in the motor like that. Lots of choices, but at least that means lots of potential for finding something perfect for your needs ;)

Jonathan Seagull
1 year ago

Golden Motor Canada 1,000 watt motor, built in controller, variable speed throttle etc with Lithium battery is under $1,000...buy torque arms tho.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+Jonathan Seagull Ha! Yeah... those larger motors can be pretty strong. Electric Bike Outfitters has two direct drive hubs at 500 and 750 watts (the Mountaineer goes 30+ mph and is more of an off-road thing). These cheaper kits are cool to keep things light and discreet ;)

R Valdez
1 year ago

Please do a review on "add-e" or "go-e" kit.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+R Valdez I'll keep an eye out for sure! Got a bunch more Daymak and Electric Bike Outfitters kits at the moment and a website redesign :D keep an eye out... thanks for the suggestions.

Eskil Eriksson
1 year ago

I have the same battery, and the connection is a big downside. Unless you can keep the battery on the bike most of the time, due to no extreme temperatures.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+Eskil Eriksson Hmm, glad to hear you've had the same experience with the plug, thanks for your feedback. Seemed like a big hassle to me but their other kits click right in without the screw bit so they're way more convenient if you're willing to pay a bit extra.