Electric Bike Outfitters EBO Commuter Kit Review

Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Kit Review
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter 350 Watt Geared Hub
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter 36 V 11 Ah Lithium Battery
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Led Console Trigger Throttle
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Controller Box
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Front
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Kit Review
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter 350 Watt Geared Hub
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter 36 V 11 Ah Lithium Battery
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Led Console Trigger Throttle
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Controller Box
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Front

Summary

  • An affordable, all-inclusive electric bike kit available in many wheel sizes (front or rear) with a nice one year warranty
  • You get a standard 350 watt internally geared motor, 36 volt Lithium-ion battery pack and a trigger throttle
  • No display console or pedal assist modes come stock with this kit, just a simple LED power meter and throttle mode, EBO has several upgraded kits and can sell custom packages
  • Predominantly available online but finding their way to more and more dealers in the United States

Search EBR

Video Review

Trusted Advertisers

Introduction

Make:

Electric Bike Outfitters

Model:

EBO Commuter Kit

Price:

$704

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Commuting

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

30 Day Return, 1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

20152016

Bicycle Details

Battery Weight:

5.5 lbs (2.49 kg)

Motor Weight:

6 lbs (2.72 kg)

Gearing Details:

9 Single Speed or Shimano 6 or 7 Speed Cassettes or SunRace 8 and 9 Speed Cassettes

Brake Details:

Mechanical Wuxing Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy, Double Walled

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 36

Wheel Sizes:

16 in (40.64cm)20 in (50.8cm)24 in (60.96cm)26 in (66.04cm)27.5 in (69.85cm)28 in (71.12cm)

Accessories:

Optional Twist Throttle, Optional Cadence Sensor with 3 Mode LED Console and Controller for $31 at Time of Purchase or $105 Later (Because of the Additional Console and Controller)

Other:

Rear Motors Cost $25 to $50 Extra, Dropout Widths Front: 100 mm, Rear 120 mm or 135 mm, Brake Clamp Diameter 22.2 mm, 14 Amp Controller

Electronic Details

Motor Type:

Front-Mounted Geared Hub, Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

350 watts

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

396 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

15 miles (24 km)

Estimated Max Range:

35 miles (56 km)

Display Type:

LED Console

Readouts:

Battery Charge Level (Red, Yellow, Green)

Drive Mode:

Trigger Throttle

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

Trusted Advertisers



Written Review

The EBO Commuter is the most affordable kit (at the time of this review) from Electric Bike Outfitters. This is a relatively new electric bicycle company based in Denver Colorado. The first things I noticed were the excellent price and all-inclusive setup. Unlike some kits, this one doesn’t tease you with a “battery not included” price tag. For well under $1k you get a modest motor and mid-mounted Lithium-ion battery that will take you 15 to 20 miles per charge and work on most traditional bikes. You can choose the wheel size from a wide selection of 16″, 20″, 24″, 26″, 27.5″ and 28″ which means folding bikes, kids bikes, cruisers, mountain bikes and city bikes will all work! The one hangup here is the slightly wider hub design that might not fit all fork widths, consider the EBO Phantom if you’ve got a single speed city bike because that hub was specially designed to be narrower and avoid scraping. Also, as you consider this kit, ask yourself whether you want pedal assist because it can be added for just $30 but costs over $100 after the fact (because it uses a different controller). This is the only kit from EBO that doesn’t come stock with assist and for many people that will be fine but your thumb might get a little tired after longer trips.

Powering the bike is a generic 350 watt planetary geared hub. It seems like the front-mounted design is a bit quieter but they both produce a bit of whirring noise and endure more wear than a gearless direct drive hub. The big benefits are small size, good torque at lower speeds and light weight ~6 lbs. The Pure City demo bike I was riding in the video review above weighed just 45 lbs with the kit installed! That’s pretty good… and the pricetag for the bike plus kit was under $1,200 making this a very affordable ebike option. Even though the motor you get here isn’t the most powerful and might not be the highest quality, it does offer a lot of value and you get an awesome all-inclusive warranty with the bike so that gives me peace of mind. Considering that it is a kit, you could also probably pick up a replacement on individual parts in the future should one fail.

The battery pack on the EBO Commuter electric bike kit is a mix of good and bad. The upside is that it’s downtube-mounting which improves weight distribution, frees up the rear portion of the bike for adding a rack and fenders and is pretty well protected by the frame. I like the canister design, it has a built-in LED charge level indicator and seats well once you’ve screwed the mounting bracket into the bottle cage bosses on your bike (your bike must have bottle cage bosses on the downtube for this kit to work). The downside is that while this battery pack is removable (for lighter transport and convenient charging) taking it off and putting it back on is a pain. Most downtube batteries (including those on the higher-end Electric Bike Outfitters kits) just click in and make contact with metal prongs, on this kit you have to manually screw the power cable into the battery and the space for getting your fingers in there and twisting the metal ring is very limited… It’s a pain but if you just leave the pack on and charge while mounted you’ll never have to do it.

Operating the EBO Commuter system is extremely simple in its stock form. You charge the battery, mount it and attach the power cable then click the on/off toggle switch at the base of the battery pack. Next you press the red button on the LED console near the trigger throttle and it lights right up. At this point, you can use the variable speed trigger throttle to your heart’s content. It can reach up to ~20 mph but also does well at lower speeds. I found myself juicing it from standstill then easing off once I hit a speed that felt comfortable for pedaling. Honestly, I think my thumb would get tired after too much riding with a throttle like this, especially given the grip style gear shifter on the right bar… this made the reach to the throttle a bit further and required more energy for me. You can screw around with the throttle position and find the perfect fit and as mentioned earlier, you can also upgrade to pedal assist but that requires more installation time and effort as well as an LCD display.

This e-bike kit is all about simplicity and in my opinion it’s a winner. While the ~$500 Pure City Bourbon that the demo kit was installed on felt great and had a lot of extras including an 8 speed derailleur, fenders, rack, nice grips and a comfortable swept-back bar… you could easily find a bike at Walmart with similar features for under $200 and get yourself a sub $1,000 electric bike that would work just fine. Keep in mind that this hub motor design is wider than the EBO Phantom and that you don’t get pedal assist stock but otherwise you do have the nice color coded wires that are easy to setup as well as upgraded brake levers with motor inhibitors. All kits tend to add a mess of wires to the bike so I usually go for black or dark colored frames that help them blend in. You’ll probably extend more time and effort with a rear-mounted kit but that’s usually my preference for traction and improved steering… especially if you have a weak suspension fork.

Pros:

  • Color coded wires are easy to setup, the motor cable has a quick disconnect point that makes servicing the wheel (front or rear) much easier
  • You get brake levers with integrated motor inhibitors here which could come in handy if you upgrade to pedal assist (much more affordable to do when you buy the bike ~$30 vs. later since it uses a different controller)
  • I like trigger throttles because they are easier to fit with existing grips and twist shifters, they also perform better for off-road use because they don’t compromise your grip, this one worked well but you can upgrade to a twist throttle if you prefer
  • Available in a huge assortment of wheel sizes including 16″, 20″, 24″, 26″, 27.5″ (650B) and ~28″ (700c) so you can convert folding bikes, kids bikes, road bikes, mountain bikes etc. and they all cost the same
  • Relatively light weight with the battery at ~5.5 lbs and the motor ~6 lbs so you aren’t going to end up with a heavy ride
  • The mechanical brake levers are compatible with traditional designs as well as disc brakes and the motor has a mounting pattern for use with a disc brake rotor

Cons:

  • Generic motor and battery cells might not last as long and produce a bit more noise under power but are still covered by the one year warranty
  • Basic LED display panel won’t show your precise battery level, speed, range or other details that the higher end kits will
  • The battery pack clicks into the holster easily but has a screw-in power connector that can be tricky and time consuming to connect, it also takes up most of the space where a bottle cage would mount… consider a saddle rail adapter, rear rack with a bottle bag or a hydration pack
  • The controller unit is built into a separate box vs. being integrated into the battery mount or motor, this just means more things have to be screwed onto the frame and possibly more wires
  • If you decide to upgrade and get pedal assist, it will require more effort to install and the units I saw only had a five sensor disc which isn’t as responsive
  • You have to power the battery pack on as well as the display unit to get the bike going… this adds a bit of time to each ride but also makes it easier to forget to turn the battery pack off when you park

Resources:

Trusted Advertisers

More Electric Bike Outfitters Reviews

Electric Bike Outfitters EBO Mountaineer Kit Review

  • MSRP: $1,180
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015, 2016

A high power, high speed electric bike kit capable of 30 mph top speeds, can be operated with pedal assist, trigger throttle or optional twist throttle. Heavier but sturdy 750 watt gearless hub motor, can be mounted in the front or…...

Electric Bike Outfitters EBO Front Range Kit Review

  • MSRP: $1,083
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015, 2016

A powerful gearless hub motor kit capable of being installed as a front or rear wheel, sturdy and relatively quiet. Gearless motors tend to be heavier and this one is ~12 lbs and does not…...

Electric Bike Outfitters EBO Phantom Kit Review

  • MSRP: $925
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015, 2016

An affordable electric bike kit with everything you need to get going: motor, battery, throttle, pedal assist. Custom designed casing is narrower than many other 350 watt motors and fits in 100…...

Electric Bike Outfitters EBO Cruiser Kit Review

  • MSRP: $925
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015, 2016

A feature rich, reasonably priced, electric bike kit with trigger throttle and cadence sensing pedal assist drive modes. The battery pack mounts into a sturdy universal rear-rack that can support ~55 lbs and…...


cyclist2009
1 year ago

What are the dimensions of the battery?

Court Rye
1 year ago

I’m not exactly sure, this would be a great question to email Electric Bike Outfitters about because sometimes cases change and I reviewed their models last year.

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Salim
6 hours ago

Hello everyone,

I am ready to purchase my first ebike and wanted to ask for advice on what the best "bang for the buck" ebike would be? I am 91kg, in the Army and stationed in Germany. My commute would be both on paved and dirt bike trails, with rolling hills, to and from work with a 1 way trip of 17km.

I am looking for a high quality, speed pedelec commuter that would hold up well off pavement and one that includes a city kit with a good lighting system. I am currently looking at the Specialized Vado Expert (comes out in July here in Stuttgart and I think it is the same as the Vado 5.0) and also a "used (10km)" 2016 Specialized Turbo S. They are both priced the same but the Turbo S does not have the city kit so that would be extra (if I can find a store online that will ship to an APO, AE address). Also, I'm not sure if a mid drive or hub drive would be best since both motors offered by Specialized have been praised for their performance!

I am open to any suggestions, or brands, so I spend my money wisely and can get a long lasting, quality machine.

Thanks in advance for your help,

Salim

YD51
17 hours ago

Thanks for the info @J.R. I just bought myself a 2017 EVO Cross and am planning on riding it year-round here in Colorado as a commuter. We don't get too many downpours but it's nice to know I don't have to take shelter under a bridge every time it sprinkles. :D

E-Wheels
1 day ago

Absolutely new to Ebikes, and this website, and with that comes outstanding ignorance.

I'm looking for an Ebike that can make it up hills with a bit of ease (so mid-drive?), that doesn't have too many wires and cables, uses a hydraulic brake system, has a rear and/or front racks, doesn't make much or any noise when using the motor, and looks "professional" or "polished."

This would be a commuter/urban/cargo bike. I am in the USA, male, 5' 11,'' 160 lbs.

I've looked at how some of the specs for an Ebike effect performance (motor output in watts, battery voltage in amp/watt hours, motor torque in newton meters), yet I don't know to what degree all of these matter. I've also seen some bikes were the variables are almost identical yet the mile range difference is drastic.

I also don't know what brands are quality and which aren't. I also don't know how much I should be paying for anything.

I've looked at these bikes so far:

Faraday Cortland: (https://electricbikereview.com/faraday/cortland/)
Gazelle NL C7 HMB (https://electricbikereview.com/gazelle/nl-c7-hmb/)
Walleräng M.01 (https://electricbikereview.com/wallerang/m-01/)

The Faraday is what I first started looking at, but I have no clue if it has enough power or not/if it's worth the price. It is, however, quiet and looks amazing.

The Gazelle has great colors, but some of the main parts of the bike look non-durable or ready to break, there are many wires hanging about, and front basket is too clunky.

The Walleräng looks fantastic, has mid-drive, 500w motor output at max, and has (what I think to be) high quality parts and pieces, but it's seems a bit loud. Is that standard? This is the best ebike out of the 3 I have really examined.

For anyone willing to help me out, this is a sizable post, I am open to all knowledge of Ebikes, opinions on brands, opinions on bikes I've listed, and any suggestions you have of Ebikes that would be best fit for me.

Thank you in advance.
The quietest mid drive on the market at the moment is the Brose motor. If you combine the Brose system that with a Gates carbon belt and an IGH (Nuvinci, Shimano Alfine, Rohloff......) then you will probably have the quietest mid drive ebike you can get at the moment. If you want to research some Brose mid drive ebikes I suggest you check out the Scott E-Silence, Specialized Vado and Bulls Lacuba range. What is your budget.

Zoumios
1 day ago

Absolutely new to Ebikes, and this website, and with that comes outstanding ignorance.

I'm looking for an Ebike that can make it up hills with a bit of ease (so mid-drive?), that doesn't have too many wires and cables, uses a hydraulic brake system, has a rear and/or front racks, doesn't make much or any noise when using the motor, and looks "professional" or "polished."

This would be a commuter/urban/cargo bike. I am in the USA, male, 5' 11,'' 160 lbs.

I've looked at how some of the specs for an Ebike effect performance (motor output in watts, battery voltage in amp/watt hours, motor torque in newton meters), yet I don't know to what degree all of these matter. I've also seen some bikes were the variables are almost identical yet the mile range difference is drastic.

I also don't know what brands are quality and which aren't. I also don't know how much I should be paying for anything.

I've looked at these bikes so far:

Faraday Cortland: (https://electricbikereview.com/faraday/cortland/)
Gazelle NL C7 HMB (https://electricbikereview.com/gazelle/nl-c7-hmb/)
Walleräng M.01 (https://electricbikereview.com/wallerang/m-01/)

The Faraday is what I first started looking at, but I have no clue if it has enough power or not/if it's worth the price. It is, however, quiet and looks amazing.

The Gazelle has great colors, but some of the main parts of the bike look non-durable or ready to break, there are many wires hanging about, and front basket is too clunky.

The Walleräng looks fantastic, has mid-drive, 500w motor output at max, and has (what I think to be) high quality parts and pieces, but it's seems a bit loud. Is that standard? This is the best ebike out of the 3 I have really examined.

For anyone willing to help me out, this is a sizable post, I am open to all knowledge of Ebikes, opinions on brands, opinions on bikes I've listed, and any suggestions you have of Ebikes that would be best fit for me.

Thank you in advance.

Thomas Jaszewski
2 days ago

I was thinking about getting a second set of rims and have commuter slicks on one and knobby for trails on the other set. It is hard to find an affordable fat/plus size tire mid-drive with a full power throttle on any PAS level like the Radrover.I shopped around and did just that. I have a set of rims with winter tires, studs, and a set with Maxxis Hookworms (2.5").

mrgold35
2 days ago

My Radrover is my starter bike to get me into the ebike world. I want to eventually upgrade to a full suspension mid-drive for lighter weight, balance, front/rear quick release rims, TQ, and longer range. I was thinking about getting a second set of rims and have commuter slicks on one and knobby for trails on the other set. It is hard to find an affordable fat/plus size tire mid-drive with a full power throttle on any PAS level like the Radrover.

Over50
2 days ago

I am in the Detroit area and I bought my ebike from Propel in Brooklyn. I really wanted to stay local but there just isn't much selection in my area. I was close to choosing the Trek XM700+ but the bike didn't fit me well. I have a local Focus/Kalkhoff dealer and I really liked the Integrale 11 speed. But that particular dealer didn't seem too concerned with getting my business inclusive of not returning a couple of phone calls. Also, I visited one local ebike shop that didn't seem very interested in helping me find the bike I wanted but rather only seemed interested in selling me on what they had on the floor. That dealer also let his bias against pedal assist bikes come out loud and clear when I mentioned a few makes/models I had researched. Finally, I visited a local traditional bike shop that sells some brands that also have ebikes like Scott or Felt (if I recall correctly). I inquired about the possibility of them ordering an ebike in one of those brands even though they only retailed traditional bikes. They steered the conversation to kit bikes and only seemed interested in building a kit bike for me (promising I could do 40mph on one of their kit bikes). So in summary, I had a really bad local experience on the shopping end (and conversely I found that Propel was eager to get me all the info I needed and respond to all of my silly inquiries). And I can report that now that I have had the bike for a few months, I've had it in to 2 different shops for brake adjustments. One is the Trek dealer where I almost opted for an XM700+. I have to say both places were very good about helping me out with service which was a pleasant surprise. It makes me optimistic that I can find someone to work on the bike should it become necessary.

I had a similar experience with one of my regular bikes. I did my research and kind of knew what I wanted but I couldn't find anything locally. I opted for a Spot Brand Champa because I was shopping for a steel frame city commuter with a belt drive. There were no Spot dealers near me so I purchased from a dealer in Chicago. The local Trek shop did the bike build for me, ordered and installed the fenders and now, over a year later, are building a front wheel/dynamo hub for me. So I have been pleasantly surprised that I've been able to get pretty good service from 2 different shops even though I didn't buy their bikes. Hopefully a good businessman sees those as opportunities to win customers if/when that customer decides to make another purchase.

E-Wheels
3 days ago

Vado 5.0 or Trek Super Commuter 8. What do you guys think? They are competing at the exact same price point. I think the Trek is better looking. Thoughts?
Trek Super Commuter 8 for me. Nicer looking IMO and I like the way they have integrated the Bosch battery into the downtube. With the Bosch system at least you know you will have more options to get replacement batteries going forward instead of the propriety Brose-Specialized setup which will eventually become redundant when Specialized drop the Vado range for something else as they have with the Turbo

Michael Bach
3 days ago

Vado 5.0 or Trek Super Commuter 8. What do you guys think? They are competing at the exact same price point. I think the Trek is better looking. Thoughts?

Matt A
4 days ago

Wow this is intriguing. When you say the shop fixed it was that Propel? Or did you take it somewhere else? Did they give you a full explanation? I'm very curious as to what the problem was, what caused it to occur and how it was fixed. Any more info you have would be greatly appreciated. I haven't had any trouble with my Nuvinci yet but I'm only at 500 miles. I asked my LBS if they had ever worked on them. The mechanic told me he had successfully repaired the mechanical Nuvinci without too much trouble but had an electronic/automatic Nuvinci that was a major pain in the rear. And with that he said the Fallbrook Technologies was really hard to work with. Just one mechanic's feedback.

Regarding the speed: I'm still glad I got the 28mph version but I have learned that I could have lived with the 20mph bike for commuting. My commute has so much start/stop that I rarely find myself over 20mph. The other day I hit 27mph but it was for only a very short stretch. When I do have open road, I find myself usually cruising right around 20mph in Tour mode. I find myself wondering whether the higher torque but lower speed Bosch motor would have been a better choice for my commuter bike just in terms of efficiency and battery range. The HS Charger is a blast to ride so no regrets at all so I was just referring to what the most "efficient" choice would have been. Over my last few commutes, I've averaged about 2 hours and 10 to 20 minutes for the 35-36 miles or about 15+mph. I'd say I have a few sections where I can get the speed up and cruise but for the most part it is start/stop commuting.
I will certainly get some more information on what went wrong with the NuVinci. I had it fixed at Propel and spent the day in Brooklyn with family so when I picked up the bike I was very tired. I asked about what was wrong and everything but I will ask again in a way that will allow me to explain it to you. Initially I went to Firth & Wilson in Philly and he re-aligned the gear range rings of the Nuvinci which were out of alignment. For some reason, this actually made it worse and instead of spinning like a clown at 24mph i was doing it at 20mph. That guy told me the Nuvinci had to be reset internally but he didnt have time to do it. I had propel fix it so I will ask when I go there in a week or so to pick up my girlfriends bike, she got the same as you I believe. Charger GT Nuvinci HS in matte black, but she got dual battery as well. Can never have too much lithium!

It works great now at least! I am almost at 1000 miles now, but I ride the bike really really hard sometimes. Since my Nuvinci was messed up I was discouraged from working since speed helps me make more money, so I took it up and down some rough terrain and in the city at night was jumping off all of the driveway curbs like I did when I was a kid, only this time I was going 20+ mph. It was so much fun, the bike really can take a beating but I am not sure why this Nuvinci thing happened to me. I was thinking about the electronic Harmony Nuvinci one day, but Kyle at propel told me it isnt smooth and feels glitchy. My only motivation for it was the fact that my cables were frayed multiple times for seemingly no reason. The 2nd time it happened it was from over tightening the cable into the metal piece at the end.

I drive through Center City Philadelphia constantly, but I ride quickly and pedal hard/fast so I end up hitting over 20mph even if I am stopping and starting 1 block at a time. I just like the ability to travel at a speed that cars behind me really cant complain when there is only one lane or the million other situations that require riding in the car lane. Honestly, I mostly travel in the middle of the car lane because I jump red lights, only yield at stop signs, and don't want to get doored. Cars never complain, it usually only takes a couple seconds off the line to hit 15-20mph, I can be at 25+ by half a block when actually putting in real effort.

I don't think efficiency is changed much between motors, just depends more on how you ride I guess. Really I think the dual battery gives more than double the range of a single battery. I took a test ride one night in all Turbo to see how far I could go. Mind you, I was riding in all Turbo, with about a 225lb load on the bike between me and all my tools, water, supplies, and my 10lb Abus chain. I went 52 miles before the range said 1 mile left, I didnt run it to dead but stopped when the range said 1 mile. Also, I have the Supernova M99 Pro, and used it on high beam for most of the ride but pointed down because my tail light only turns on right now if I turn the high beam on the light. Remedying that with the M99 tail light. Anyway, with all that weight, electronic usage (including phone charging), and I frequently travel 25+, and also this was all in busy city stop/start riding, I amazingly went over 50 miles!

With regards to your speed, it sounds like you go faster than you think! At 2 hours and 20 minutes for 36 miles, thats an average of about 15mph if you never stop and just do 15 the entire time. With all the stopping and starting you are doing you must be going faster :)

I ordered a Nyon a while back and it took 4 weeks for German Customs to just cancel it and send it back. I tried again using Ebay this time for an extra $100 compared to the bike-discount.de price, and in just 4 days since shipment its already just a couple towns away! The guy shipped it the day after I ordered, and it went through the exact same German facility. With the Nyon I will have a ton more stats to help decipher where the wattage really goes! After I get that, my final 'upgrade' will be the Sherlock bike tracker when it ships in a few weeks. I am very excited to have the Nyon though, I feel like for a $7000 bike, it should have more than the Intuvia. The Intuvia is great, but minimalist. The Nyon is feature rich, but most likely still has some glitches. I just feel like it really completed the whole feel of having spent car money on a bike if the bike has a serious headlight, and a serious smart computer with GPS. Other than that everything has been great on the bike, the only thing I ever get jealous of is the suspension setup and fenders on the Moustache Starckbike, even though the bike as a whole is something I'd never choose.

P.S. The day after I did that 52 miles all turbo test, I had charged the bike fully and it showed a crazy 154 mile range in Eco.

Oh I forgot one thing to mention but then I remembered you have only 1 battery. Charging on the bike is weird, no matter how much I charge it, my Range in Turbo will only go up to like 38-40. When I charge the batteries separately off the bike using 2 chargers, it will then show me a 5-54 mile range estimate. However, when I begin a ride 'fully' charged but only showing 38 miles of range, I can go 20 miles and the range will still say 30. Really weird, can't figure out why! At first I thought the batteries were only charging to 80% on the bike, but now I'm see the range is just inaccurate, can't imagine why....

ace20ri
5 days ago

Nice work @SuperGoop as usual! Great info on the add-ons. I definitely would like to add the ability to record my rides.

Since I haven't posted in a while here is an update to my current sense resistor swap. It was successful but had some temporary set backs. Here are some pics of the swap...sorry I was caught up in the moment and did not take a lot of them. If the solder job looks a little crappy it is because the pcba has conformal coating which sucks to remove.

Existing current sense resistor:

Current sense resistor removed:

New current sense resistor (Vishay 3W 0.005Ohm):

I improved the solder job after I took these pics (promise!). I also added more solder around the FET pads and the FET rail (right side of the picture above). The Vishay 3W current sense resistor improved the rated current to 24.5A so no more worrying about pushing the controller to hard (besides worrying about the FETS and capacitors but they seem to be pretty robust based on my research). Now I did run into an issue taking the bike out after this update. The motor would cut out every time I tried to accelerate from rest. The power reading would ramp to 500-600W and then cut out and start from 0. After it restarted then it would accelerate no problem. I was worried that resistance change caused to much ripple current and caused the motor to trip due to under voltage. BUT after unplugging the battery and fully charging it and reconnecting it seemed to have corrected itself. Not really sure how that is the case (I'm asking my electrical engineer coworkers to explain). I have been able to accelerate from rest without any cut outs and it's great. I can feel the difference on some of the hills I climb during my commute. I really want to take it to Half Moon Bay beach to really test it out.

One thing I did notice when I accessed the current parameter in the LCD display is that I can increase the current to 30A now. I was pretty sure that 20A was the previous limit. I'm not sure if it our controller is smart enough to know that it received an upgrade but somehow it does. @SuperGoop can you confirm that your bike max current setting is 20A? Or can you increase it to 30A (obviously don't leave it at 30A)?

Either way yay for me! All that I am missing is the ability to tweak the controller programming from the back end...need George's help with that! Since I live in Silicon Valley, I would really like to take advantage of every possible avenue to increase my speed for commuting.

I am looking into the magnetics side of our motor to see if we are truly limited by the windings of the coils or if Voltbike is limiting us due to country/state laws. I do feel that since we purchased the bikes we should have the ability to change the bike to how we see fit easily.

Lastly, here are some pics of my Classic 2.0 Garment pannier for commuting (https://www.twowheelgear.com/products/commuter-garment-pannier):

I have changed the bike a lot since these pics but they work for showing the pannier. Needless to say, I love my purchase and glad that I made it.

Okay, really lastly for this post if anyone is taking a trip to Cabo San Lucas, Mexico in the near future I highly recommend booking the Ebike outing with Cabo Adventures. They have a bunch of RadRovers (the Yukon is way better IMO) and take you for a 2 hour ride up and down the Pacific ocean coast. You then go to a remote pavilion to make real Mexican quesadillas and learn how to make Mexican margaritas! Ask for Hector the Protector! (I do not get anything for referals just wanted to share because my fiancé and I had a blast!).

1/5
paul14
5 days ago

We sell all models of 2015, 2016 and 2017 Specialized, Trek, Cannondale, Gary Fisher, Klein, GT, Scott, Cervélo, Giant, Santa Cruz, Rocky Mountain, Kona, Whyte, Ellsworth, Jamis, Litespeed, De Rosa, Pinarello, Colnalgo, Look, Time, Yeti, Felt, Focus, Fuji, Bianchi and Marin Bikes.

Brand New Original Bicycles. Full Factory Warranty

Buy Direct. Save Big. Free Shipping

Contact Information

Sales Enquiry:

Paymeny method is PAYPAL and Bandk TRANSFER

Open 7 Days a Week (CLOSED Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day)

Name: Paul Vaughn

E-mail: paulvaughn197@gmail.com

Phone Number : +16617765196

WhatsApp: +1(253)2719138

NOTE: Our prices are in U.S. Dollars!

2017 Specialized Mountain Bikes:

2017 Specialized S-Works Epic FSR Di2 $7500
2017 Specialized S-Works Epic FSR World Cup $6000
2017 Specialized Epic FSR Pro Carbon World Cup $3500
2017 Specialized Epic FSR Expert Carbon World Cup $2000
2017 Specialized S-Works Epic Hardtail World Cup $5000
2017 Specialized S-Works Epic Hardtail Di2 $6500
2017 Specialized Epic Hardtail Pro Carbon World Cup $2500
2017 Specialized S-Works Enduro 29/6Fattie $5500
2017 Specialized S-Works Enduro 650b $5500
2017 Specialized Enduro Pro Carbon 29/6Fattie $3500
2017 Specialized Enduro Pro Carbon 650b $3500
2017 Specialized S-Works Stumpjumper FSR 29 $5500
2017 Specialized S-Works Stumpjumper FSR 6Fattie $5500
2017 Specialized S-Works Stumpjumper FSR 650b $5500
2017 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro Carbon 29 $3500
2017 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro Carbon 6Fattie $3500
2017 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Expert Carbon 29 $2000
2017 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Expert Carbon 6Fattie $2000
2017 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Expert Carbon 650b $2000
2017 Specialized S-Works Camber 29 $5500
2017 Specialized S-Works Camber 650b $5250
2017 Specialized Camber Pro Carbon 29 $3500
2017 Specialized Camber Pro Carbon 650b $3250
2017 Specialized Camber Expert Carbon 29 $2000
2017 Specialized S-Works Fuse 6Fattie $3500
2017 Specialized S-Works Demo 8 $4500
2017 Specialized Demo 8 I Carbon $2500
2017 Specialized Demo 8 II Alloy $3000
2017 Specialized S-Works Turbo Levo FSR 6Fattie $6500
2017 Specialized Turbo Levo FSR Expert 6Fattie $4500
2017 Specialized Turbo Levo FSR Comp 6Fattie $2500
2017 Specialized Turbo Levo Hardtail Comp Fat $2000
2017 Specialized S-Works Fatboy $4000
2017 Specialized Fatboy Expert Carbon $2000
2017 Specialized S-Works Era FSR World Cup $6000
2017 Specialized Era FSR Expert Carbon World Cup $2000
2017 Specialized Rhyme Pro Carbon 6Fattie $3500
2017 Specialized Women's Turbo Levo FSR Comp 6Fattie $2500
2017 Specialized Turbo S $4000

2017 Specialized Road Bikes:

2017 Specialized S-Works Venge ViAS Disc eTap $8500
2017 Specialized Venge ViAS Pro Disc UDi2 $4500
2017 Specialized S-Works Tarmac eTap $6500
2017 Specialized S-Works Tarmac Disc eTap $6500
2017 Specialized S-Works Tarmac Dura-Ace $5000
2017 Specialized Tarmac Pro Disc Ultegra Di2 $3000
2017 Specialized Tarmac Pro Ultegra Di2 $2600
2017 Specialized Tarmac Expert eTAP $2500
2017 Specialized S-Works Roubaix eTap $7000
2017 Specialized Roubaix Pro UDi2 $3500
2017 Specialized S-Works CruX $4500
2017 Specialized S-Works Amira eTap $6500
2017 Specialized S-Works Ruby eTap $7000
2017 Specialized Ruby Pro Ultegra Di2 $3500

2017 CANNONDALE ROAD BIKES:

2017 CANNONDALE SUPERSIX EVO BLACK INC. $9450

2017 CANNONDALE SUPERSIX EVO HI-MOD DURA ACE 1 $6750

2017 CANNONDALE SUPERSIX EVO HI-MOD RED ETAP $4950

2017 CANNONDALE SUPERSIX EVO HI-MOD DISC ULTEGRA DI2 $3150

2017 CANNONDALE SUPERSIX EVO HI-MOD DURA ACE 2 $2650

2017 CANNONDALE SYNAPSE HI-MOD TEAM $4950

2017 CANNONDALE SYNAPSE HI-MOD DISC ULTEGRA DI2 $2950

2017 CANNONDALE SYNAPSE HI-MOD DISC ULTEGRA $2150

2017 CANNONDALE SUPERX TEAM $5450

2017 CANNONDALE SUPERX FORCE $2150

2017 CANNONDALE SUPERSIX EVO HI-MOD WOMEN'S RED ETAP $4950

2017 CANNONDALE SUPERSIX EVO HI-MOD DISC WOMEN'S ULTEGRA DI2 $3150

2017 CANNONDALE MOUNTAIN BIKES:

2017 CANNONDALE JEKYLL CARBON 1 $4950

2017 CANNONDALE JEKYLL CARBON 2 $3000

2017 CANNONDALE TRIGGER CARBON 1 $5200

2017 CANNONDALE TRIGGER CARBON 2 $2950

2017 Cannondale SCALPEL-IF BLACK INC. $ 9.750

2017 CANNONDALE SCALPEL-SI TEAM $6450

2017 Cannondale SCALPEL-RACE IS $ 6000

2017 CANNONDALE SCALPEL-SI CARBON 1 $4350

2017 CANNONDALE SCALPEL-SI CARBON 2 $3350

2017 CANNONDALE SCALPEL-SI CARBON 3 $2300

2017 F-Cannondale SI BLACK INC. $ 8,000

2017 CANNONDALE F-SI CARBON TEAM $5950

2017 CANNONDALE HABIT CARBON 1 $4950

2017 CANNONDALE HABIT CARBON 2 $2250

2017 CANNONDALE BAD HABIT CARBON 1 $2450

2017 CANNONDALE HABIT WOMEN'S CARBON 1 $2250

2017 Trek Road Bikes:

2017 Trek Madone 9.9 $ 8.950
2017 Trek Émonda SLR 9 $8450
2017 Trek Speed Concept 9.9 $7950
2017 Trek Domane SLR 9 $ 7,950
2017 Trek Émonda SLR 10 Race Shop Limited $7950
2017 Trek Domane SLR 9 eTap $7950
2017 Trek Madone 9.5 Women's $4950
2017 Trek Madone 9.5 Ultegra Di2 $ 4.950
2017 Trek Madone 9.5 $ 4,950
2017 Trek Émonda SLR 8 Race Shop Limited $4450
2017 Trek Silque SLR 8 Women's $3450
2017 Trek Domane SLR 8 $ 3,450
2017 Trek Domane SLR 7 Disc $3450
2017 Trek Silque SLR 7 Women's $2950
2017 Trek Domane SLR 7 $ 2,950
2017 Trek Émonda SLR 6 $2450
2017 Trek Domane SLR 6 Disc $2450
2017 Trek Madone 9.2 $ 2,000
2017 Trek Silque SLR 6 Women's $2000
2017 Trek Domane 6 SLR $ 2000

2017 Trek Mountain Bikes:

2017 Trek Session 9.9 DH 27.5 Race Shop Limited $6950
2017 Trek Top Fuel 9.9 Race Shop Limited $5950
2017 Trek Fuel EX 9.9 29 $5350
2017 Trek Remedy 9.9 Race Shop Limited $4950
2017 Trek Procaliber 9.9 SL Race Shop Limited $4950
2017 Trek Slash 9.9 29 Race Shop Limited $4950
2017 Trek Farley 9.9 $4450
2017 Trek Farley EX 9.8 $2450
Slash Trek 9.8 2017 29 $ 2,450
2017 Trek Remedy 9.8 $2250
2017 Trek Remedy 9.8 Women's $2250
2017 Trek Fuel EX 9.8 27.5 Plus $2250
2017 Trek Top Fuel 9.8 SL $2150
2017 Trek Top Fuel 9.8 SL Women's $2150
2017 Trek Powerfly 8 FS Plus $2000
2017 Trek Fuel EX 9.8 29 $2000
2017 Trek Fuel EX 9.8 Women's $2000
2017 Trek Session 88 DH 27.5 $2000
2017 Trek Super Commuter+ 8S $2000

Contact Information

Sales Enquirer:

Payment method is PAYPAL and Bank TRANSFER

Name: Paul Vaughn

E–mail: paulvaughn197@gmail.com

1/6
Over50
5 days ago

I had a problem with my Nuvinci where somehow the gears werent working correctly so something internally became misaligned. I do not know how it happened really but it was repaired fairly easily by the shop. But basically I only had low gears and was spinning at almost 100 by the time I hit 20mph. I see you have the high speed as well, but I had to mention, I was really REALLY frustrating only being able to do 20mph, I felt like I was jogging. I am really glad I got the high speed. But really, to maintain 19-20mph in Turbo, all I had to do was pedal one or two revolutions every 100 feet. I would have been so disappointed if I got the regular 20mph version.

Wow this is intriguing. When you say the shop fixed it was that Propel? Or did you take it somewhere else? Did they give you a full explanation? I'm very curious as to what the problem was, what caused it to occur and how it was fixed. Any more info you have would be greatly appreciated. I haven't had any trouble with my Nuvinci yet but I'm only at 500 miles. I asked my LBS if they had ever worked on them. The mechanic told me he had successfully repaired the mechanical Nuvinci without too much trouble but had an electronic/automatic Nuvinci that was a major pain in the rear. And with that he said the Fallbrook Technologies was really hard to work with. Just one mechanic's feedback.

Regarding the speed: I'm still glad I got the 28mph version but I have learned that I could have lived with the 20mph bike for commuting. My commute has so much start/stop that I rarely find myself over 20mph. The other day I hit 27mph but it was for only a very short stretch. When I do have open road, I find myself usually cruising right around 20mph in Tour mode. I find myself wondering whether the higher torque but lower speed Bosch motor would have been a better choice for my commuter bike just in terms of efficiency and battery range. The HS Charger is a blast to ride so no regrets at all so I was just referring to what the most "efficient" choice would have been. Over my last few commutes, I've averaged about 2 hours and 10 to 20 minutes for the 35-36 miles or about 15+mph. I'd say I have a few sections where I can get the speed up and cruise but for the most part it is start/stop commuting.

Saratoga Dave
6 days ago

Sorry you had such a colorful experience,but I would be very interested in hearing more about your opinions of the bike itself as you get familiar with it. I had thought my next one - and first torque sensor bike vs cadence - would be a Specialized Turbo of some flavor, but that ship seems to have sailed and I'm not loving the Vados. I'm getting very interested in the Bulls bikes, particularly the e45 Lacuba. My usual trip (non commuter) is around 30 - 35 miles mixed side roads and bike paths with lots of medium hills, right at and over the capacity for my battery, so I need to up the bike a couple of pegs.

I really love the way they've integrated the battery on the new ones, but again would enjoy following your experiences with mid drive and Bulls. I bet there's other Turbo aficionados with the same interest around here as well.

Ravi Kempaiah
1 week ago

After getting on on the first Radrovers from Rad Power Bikes almost 2 years ago, I broke my piggy bank and just bought this :
http://www.bullsebikes.com/product/e-stream-evo-2-27-5-plus-2/

I am very excited! Does anybody have the same bike or had a chance to try it ?

It's a very nice bike. My main gripe with the previous year model was that it did not have rack mounting points. So, I could not convert the 29er into a commuter. But, for 2017, they have solved that problem.
The bike looks great in person.

Check out this video:

Clifton Molina
1 week ago

Just want something reliable, comfortable, and sturdy. Really fascinated by belt-drive, internally geared for the low maintenance. My commute is 6 flat miles in hot/wet Florida. Stealth and Speed are not really a concern, smooth ride with accessories (fenders, lights, bags/racks) are a must. I've done a lot of reading around, and I want a Bull, but not sure how to get that shipped to my part of Florida.

Rick LaPraim
1 week ago

For long treks you need the lithium upgrade batteries. I have a schwinn with the Izip Trailz type kit ,a Ezip Trailz Commuter and an Izip Trailz AL. love them all for around town. Two batteries can make it to any destination in town. Since we have three the battery systems rock we just grab a battery and go. if one goes dead we have more just grab one and go. The SLA Batteries are easy and cheap to rebuild. If you crash the bike and tweak your rack you can just unbolt it and replace it for about $100.00 dollars. On other Ebikes you crush your weld on rack your screwed. It is heavy but who cares I live in an hilly area and have made it up just about every hill that i need to. wont climb a mountain but I didnt buy it to climb a mountain.
What i use it for is concerts in the park, Car show days , Parades "no parking issues", Trader Joe shopping, going to the post office, going to the park and trips to the bank. You get the Idea.
I also have seven grand children so the get to play on the bikes very very cheap fun.

As far as repairing one it does not get any simpler. Bad moter or gear reduction box just unbolt and replace no hub motor nightmares. hub motor loosen spokes and useually require a shop repair doubleing repair cost no thanks a new motor is only a hundred dollars. thanks for reading and I recomend these bikes for those on a budget

James Kohls
1 week ago

What do you mean by off-road? Hard packed dirt trails? Mud? Grass? Something you can take out on the weekends to the mountain bike trails? Pretty much any bike can "go" off-road, but tires and suspension are going to be two of the biggest factors to how enjoyable it is. For commuting, do you need fenders? A rear rack? Most full suspension bikes are not good options for racks and fenders (at least full coverage fenders).

If you want good off-road performance, getting a mid-drive mountain bike and a 2nd wheelset to swap out from knobby to road tires may be a good choice. Otherwise, if you are not going to be aggressive in your off-road riding, switching from road tires to gravel tires on a bike with a decent front fork may be sufficient—possibly add a suspension seat post into the budget as well. You'd loose some efficiency, but gain versatility.

There are certainly stealthy mountain bikes that do 28MPH, like the Bulls E-STREAM EVO 45 FS or the more road/gravel oriented Specialized Turbo X. Otherwise, just get a commuter style speed pedalec and put some more aggressive tires on it.

ROCebike
1 week ago

Im looking for an Ebike for riding around town. I want something that looks fairly like a regular bike but after a top speed of at least 28mph. It would be nice to take it off-road also but my main priority is city commuter riding

Ive got a budget of about 5k US.

If anyone can suggest the best bike for me it would be greatly appreciated! Thanks :)
I have a Pedego Ridge Rider and upgrading it with a Body Float and new saddle. This is an amazing bike for versatility, the torque sensor is very smooth engaging, and 20 gears of mountain biking provides lots of options. I love the throttle override for pushing off at intersections and a quick hit as needed. It's not a speed pededelec, but I can peddle over 22mph still with motor. Good battery (now using Panasonic) and stealthy MTB appearance. I might change the tires to Marathons next as I'm really 80/20 road and packed trails. Other than speed, this is a great bike for your specs and under budget.

Options I considered were the Riese and Meuller Charger Series. Great machines, not as stealthy with Bosch mid drives, but I really like the concept of belt drive and Rohlhoff geared hub. These bikes are built to order in Germany and I didn't want to wait. It's more expensive than your budget but I'll probably buy one in the future for a touring bike. Propel Bikes would be a great dealer for you.

Other option I considered was the Bulls Outlaw. It's got both speed and high torque, a rare combo since its usually a trade off between the two. Not at all stealthy with the battery case frame mounted, but it can meet your specs.

Lastly, a fabulous deal is available from Amego in Toronto. Virginia has been in the ebike business for over seven years and she really know her stuff. They got a deal on prior model Stomers which are still better than most competitors new best models. A great deal in CDN $ can be had with online order shipped to your home. Amego has just launched their own branded bike. The Infinity is really well spec'd and a great price. Available in May.

BTW, I'm 6'2" and now 220 lbs.. Down 5 lbs since owning the Ridge Rider. The benefit of riding a 60 lb bike with and without the motor. I m very satisfied. It does everything well and kitted out for $4k. I haven't needed service but I know Pedego is best in class for support. With your budget of $5k, don't underweight dealer Support in your list of requirements. It's a lot of money to potentially sit unused while waiting for a part delivery.

Barbara
2 weeks ago

My wife's City Commuter has a Walk mode, I expect yours would as well. I think you hold the Down selector button down for about five seconds and it kicks in.

Wow, now that is really interesting. Various manuals I have seen don't mention that, or say holding Down for several seconds does something else. How did you discover that? What year is your wife's bike? I can't wait to try that!

Saratoga Dave
2 weeks ago

My wife's City Commuter has a Walk mode, I expect yours would as well. I think you hold the Down selector button down for about five seconds and it kicks in.

Bicyclista
2 weeks ago

The basic difference is obvious: rear suspension vs. hard tail. Full suspension makes dirt riding easier and more comfortable—through ruts, loose sand, rocks, etc. But it comes at a cost: weight and efficiency of power transfer between your leg power and the rear wheel. The bobbing of the rear wheel changes the tension in the chain. But in an ebike both the extra weight and the inefficiency are substantially mitigated by the power of the electric motor.

Also, my full-suspension Haibike came with a dropper seat post. I believe the hardtail does not—please correct me if I'm wrong. A dropper seat post is great for going downhill at speed—it lowers your center of gravity and prevents your body from going over the handlebars (or, at least, makes it less likely). A dropper seat post is also great for getting off and on the saddle at stops.

A hard tail might be a better fit with a trailer in that the trailer will not be bobbing up and down. It will also be easier to mount a sturdy rack onto a hard tail. So, perhaps better as a commuter bike.

lark
2 weeks ago

Latest update from the Canadian Juiced Bikes blog. I got to ride an Ocean Current prototype at a local e-bike expo and was really impressed. The bike is super comfortable and the mechanical discs were much better than I thought they would be. Juiced is also coming out with a true step-thru commuter with no top tube. All of these new models based on the Cross Current drivetrain which is cool.

http://juicedriders.ca/blog/mid-january-2017-juiced-bikes-update/

Dunbar, do you have any idea why the pas speed on this is less then the CC by 4 mph? Perhaps it's the wider tires but on the other hand has 500 watt motor instead of CC's 350w so you'd think that would compensate. Cool bike!

bike_nut
2 weeks ago

Im looking for an Ebike for riding around town. I want something that looks fairly like a regular bike but after a top speed of at least 28mph. It would be nice to take it off-road also but my main priority is city commuter riding

Ive got a budget of about 5k US.

If anyone can suggest the best bike for me it would be greatly appreciated! Thanks :)

DrZarkloff
1 year ago

I can't find anything that will allow me to convert my 32 inch Kent.

Flo Mo
1 year ago

Your videos are great. Thank you. :) More and more people ride e-bikes.... maybe they view your videos. :) COOL.

Jay Gurung
1 year ago

Hey Mr.Court,can you do the review of the EasyGo Race by BH EasyMotion please.

Flo Mo
1 year ago

Very good video. I like your channel. And this bike looks like old school. I like it. Cheap and nice. Very good. Thank you. :)

mn3m0n1c
1 year ago

Would be nice if manufacturers consider integrating control unit with battery pack. One detachable box would be a lot more convenient to carry when it comes to leaving an e-bike unattended in not too safe area.

ForbinColossus
1 year ago

I looked at BionX, eRad, Copenhagen wheel, Belon Electron - all of which have quirks and limitations. Confusing array of choices - none offers it all - where do you want to compromise? I lean slightly towards the copenhagen wheel for ease of setup, assuming the company gets it sorted out.
For anyone thinking of a kit, be sure to look at EBR's website and use the *compare* feature.
http://electricbikereview.com/tag/kits/

Eskil Eriksson
1 year ago

+ElectricBikeReview.com What made it for me was the mid drive, the opportunity to use the gears on the bike for both torque and high speed.Being able to do both hills and good speed on the flats is perfect for me.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+ForbinColossus Yeah, even the kits that seem to nail most of the features end up being more expensive which is a big trade off for people. I personally really like BionX for a full kit setup because you get assist, throttle, several size and power options, battery size options, regeneration, integrated lights if you want etc. but they cost so much... The all-in-one solutions are cool and I really like the Zehus and FlyKly for simplicity but then you don't get gears... so the Copenhagen Wheel seems like the winner but then again it still isn't out, it only comes in red, limited wheel size options, no throttle mode and the battery isn't removable and has yet to really be proven in the motor like that. Lots of choices, but at least that means lots of potential for finding something perfect for your needs ;)

Jonathan Seagull
1 year ago

Golden Motor Canada 1,000 watt motor, built in controller, variable speed throttle etc with Lithium battery is under $1,000...buy torque arms tho.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+Jonathan Seagull Ha! Yeah... those larger motors can be pretty strong. Electric Bike Outfitters has two direct drive hubs at 500 and 750 watts (the Mountaineer goes 30+ mph and is more of an off-road thing). These cheaper kits are cool to keep things light and discreet ;)

R Valdez
1 year ago

Please do a review on "add-e" or "go-e" kit.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+R Valdez I'll keep an eye out for sure! Got a bunch more Daymak and Electric Bike Outfitters kits at the moment and a website redesign :D keep an eye out... thanks for the suggestions.

Eskil Eriksson
1 year ago

I have the same battery, and the connection is a big downside. Unless you can keep the battery on the bike most of the time, due to no extreme temperatures.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+Eskil Eriksson Hmm, glad to hear you've had the same experience with the plug, thanks for your feedback. Seemed like a big hassle to me but their other kits click right in without the screw bit so they're way more convenient if you're willing to pay a bit extra.