Electric Bike Outfitters EBO Commuter Kit Review

Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Kit Review
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter 350 Watt Geared Hub
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter 36 V 11 Ah Lithium Battery
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Led Console Trigger Throttle
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Controller Box
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Front
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Kit Review
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter 350 Watt Geared Hub
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter 36 V 11 Ah Lithium Battery
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Led Console Trigger Throttle
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Controller Box
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Front

Summary

  • An affordable, all-inclusive electric bike kit available in many wheel sizes (front or rear) with a nice one year warranty
  • You get a standard 350 watt internally geared motor, 36 volt Lithium-ion battery pack and a trigger throttle
  • No display console or pedal assist modes come stock with this kit, just a simple LED power meter and throttle mode, EBO has several upgraded kits and can sell custom packages
  • Predominantly available online but finding their way to more and more dealers in the United States

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Electric Bike Outfitters

Model:

EBO Commuter Kit

Price:

$704

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Commuting

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

30 Day Return, 1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

20152016

Bicycle Details

Battery Weight:

5.5 lbs (2.49 kg)

Motor Weight:

6 lbs (2.72 kg)

Gearing Details:

9 Single Speed or Shimano 6 or 7 Speed Cassettes or SunRace 8 and 9 Speed Cassettes

Brake Details:

Mechanical Wuxing Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy, Double Walled

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 36

Wheel Sizes:

16 in (40.64cm)20 in (50.8cm)24 in (60.96cm)26 in (66.04cm)27.5 in (69.85cm)28 in (71.12cm)

Accessories:

Optional Twist Throttle, Optional Cadence Sensor with 3 Mode LED Console and Controller for $31 at Time of Purchase or $105 Later (Because of the Additional Console and Controller)

Other:

Rear Motors Cost $25 to $50 Extra, Dropout Widths Front: 100 mm, Rear 120 mm or 135 mm, Brake Clamp Diameter 22.2 mm, 14 Amp Controller

Electronic Details

Motor Type:

Front-Mounted Geared Hub, Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

350 watts

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

396 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

15 miles (24 km)

Estimated Max Range:

35 miles (56 km)

Display Type:

LED Console

Readouts:

Battery Charge Level (Red, Yellow, Green)

Drive Mode:

Trigger Throttle

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

The EBO Commuter is the most affordable kit (at the time of this review) from Electric Bike Outfitters. This is a relatively new electric bicycle company based in Denver Colorado. The first things I noticed were the excellent price and all-inclusive setup. Unlike some kits, this one doesn’t tease you with a “battery not included” price tag. For well under $1k you get a modest motor and mid-mounted Lithium-ion battery that will take you 15 to 20 miles per charge and work on most traditional bikes. You can choose the wheel size from a wide selection of 16″, 20″, 24″, 26″, 27.5″ and 28″ which means folding bikes, kids bikes, cruisers, mountain bikes and city bikes will all work! The one hangup here is the slightly wider hub design that might not fit all fork widths, consider the EBO Phantom if you’ve got a single speed city bike because that hub was specially designed to be narrower and avoid scraping. Also, as you consider this kit, ask yourself whether you want pedal assist because it can be added for just $30 but costs over $100 after the fact (because it uses a different controller). This is the only kit from EBO that doesn’t come stock with assist and for many people that will be fine but your thumb might get a little tired after longer trips.

Powering the bike is a generic 350 watt planetary geared hub. It seems like the front-mounted design is a bit quieter but they both produce a bit of whirring noise and endure more wear than a gearless direct drive hub. The big benefits are small size, good torque at lower speeds and light weight ~6 lbs. The Pure City demo bike I was riding in the video review above weighed just 45 lbs with the kit installed! That’s pretty good… and the pricetag for the bike plus kit was under $1,200 making this a very affordable ebike option. Even though the motor you get here isn’t the most powerful and might not be the highest quality, it does offer a lot of value and you get an awesome all-inclusive warranty with the bike so that gives me peace of mind. Considering that it is a kit, you could also probably pick up a replacement on individual parts in the future should one fail.

The battery pack on the EBO Commuter electric bike kit is a mix of good and bad. The upside is that it’s downtube-mounting which improves weight distribution, frees up the rear portion of the bike for adding a rack and fenders and is pretty well protected by the frame. I like the canister design, it has a built-in LED charge level indicator and seats well once you’ve screwed the mounting bracket into the bottle cage bosses on your bike (your bike must have bottle cage bosses on the downtube for this kit to work). The downside is that while this battery pack is removable (for lighter transport and convenient charging) taking it off and putting it back on is a pain. Most downtube batteries (including those on the higher-end Electric Bike Outfitters kits) just click in and make contact with metal prongs, on this kit you have to manually screw the power cable into the battery and the space for getting your fingers in there and twisting the metal ring is very limited… It’s a pain but if you just leave the pack on and charge while mounted you’ll never have to do it.

Operating the EBO Commuter system is extremely simple in its stock form. You charge the battery, mount it and attach the power cable then click the on/off toggle switch at the base of the battery pack. Next you press the red button on the LED console near the trigger throttle and it lights right up. At this point, you can use the variable speed trigger throttle to your heart’s content. It can reach up to ~20 mph but also does well at lower speeds. I found myself juicing it from standstill then easing off once I hit a speed that felt comfortable for pedaling. Honestly, I think my thumb would get tired after too much riding with a throttle like this, especially given the grip style gear shifter on the right bar… this made the reach to the throttle a bit further and required more energy for me. You can screw around with the throttle position and find the perfect fit and as mentioned earlier, you can also upgrade to pedal assist but that requires more installation time and effort as well as an LCD display.

This e-bike kit is all about simplicity and in my opinion it’s a winner. While the ~$500 Pure City Bourbon that the demo kit was installed on felt great and had a lot of extras including an 8 speed derailleur, fenders, rack, nice grips and a comfortable swept-back bar… you could easily find a bike at Walmart with similar features for under $200 and get yourself a sub $1,000 electric bike that would work just fine. Keep in mind that this hub motor design is wider than the EBO Phantom and that you don’t get pedal assist stock but otherwise you do have the nice color coded wires that are easy to setup as well as upgraded brake levers with motor inhibitors. All kits tend to add a mess of wires to the bike so I usually go for black or dark colored frames that help them blend in. You’ll probably extend more time and effort with a rear-mounted kit but that’s usually my preference for traction and improved steering… especially if you have a weak suspension fork.

Pros:

  • Color coded wires are easy to setup, the motor cable has a quick disconnect point that makes servicing the wheel (front or rear) much easier
  • You get brake levers with integrated motor inhibitors here which could come in handy if you upgrade to pedal assist (much more affordable to do when you buy the bike ~$30 vs. later since it uses a different controller)
  • I like trigger throttles because they are easier to fit with existing grips and twist shifters, they also perform better for off-road use because they don’t compromise your grip, this one worked well but you can upgrade to a twist throttle if you prefer
  • Available in a huge assortment of wheel sizes including 16″, 20″, 24″, 26″, 27.5″ (650B) and ~28″ (700c) so you can convert folding bikes, kids bikes, road bikes, mountain bikes etc. and they all cost the same
  • Relatively light weight with the battery at ~5.5 lbs and the motor ~6 lbs so you aren’t going to end up with a heavy ride
  • The mechanical brake levers are compatible with traditional designs as well as disc brakes and the motor has a mounting pattern for use with a disc brake rotor

Cons:

  • Generic motor and battery cells might not last as long and produce a bit more noise under power but are still covered by the one year warranty
  • Basic LED display panel won’t show your precise battery level, speed, range or other details that the higher end kits will
  • The battery pack clicks into the holster easily but has a screw-in power connector that can be tricky and time consuming to connect, it also takes up most of the space where a bottle cage would mount… consider a saddle rail adapter, rear rack with a bottle bag or a hydration pack
  • The controller unit is built into a separate box vs. being integrated into the battery mount or motor, this just means more things have to be screwed onto the frame and possibly more wires
  • If you decide to upgrade and get pedal assist, it will require more effort to install and the units I saw only had a five sensor disc which isn’t as responsive
  • You have to power the battery pack on as well as the display unit to get the bike going… this adds a bit of time to each ride but also makes it easier to forget to turn the battery pack off when you park

Resources:

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cyclist2009
1 year ago

What are the dimensions of the battery?

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

I’m not exactly sure, this would be a great question to email Electric Bike Outfitters about because sometimes cases change and I reviewed their models last year.

Reply

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BernieS
2 days ago

I just did a demo ride of a 2016 Misceo IE in Missoula (I live in Hamilton) today. What a nice bike! It's very quiet and smooth. The gears shift nicely and quietly. I didn't have a chance to get it out to try anything other then ECO mode. The guys at the shop didn't know anything about the auto shifting but it probably would have needed a software update anyway. I plan to give it some thought over the weekend but I think I'll get it. I just want it for riding around Hamilton running errands. I'm 78 so I'm not going to go conquer mountains anymore . I understand the issue with the front fork and lack of suspension but it's a class 1 pedelec so probably can get away without the front suspension but I will get a ThudBuster suspension seat post straight away. With a nice Topeak rack and MTX trunk bag, fenders, kickstand, larger size pedals, and Ergo grips, it should be a great commuter/urban bike. I'm sorry there are no bosses for a bottle cage and/or pump.

Oops! Just did a little more research and discovered that the Misceo IE that I test rode was actually a 2015 model. The Raleigh dealer didn't know the difference. No bottle bosses, no kickstand, narrower tire (I think), and smaller diameter seat post. Won't be buying a Misceo IE. Raleigh says that it's the end of the model. I'll have to keep an eye out for what's shown at the upcoming InterBike expo.

mrgold35
4 days ago

I'm about 270lbs and have about 20-25lbs of accessories, commuter back pack, rack, rack bag, tools, flat kit, and water when I ride. You can ride the Radrover without power; but, I've only been able in 1st-2nd gear on mostly flat and no wind for the most speed. I've been on a few long rides when I ran out of juice under a mile from my home and it was slow going for such a heavy bike.

What really zaps my range are:
- head winds, can reach 15-20 mph certain times of the year. I don't ride at +20 mph winds.
- inclines
- riding position, pedaling feels easier during high headwinds if I lean forward like a road bike
- weight, I use about 20%-30% more power at 270lbs compared to my wife at 130lbs on the same ride.
- tires and/or tire PSI, Kenda tires have a lot of drag and you will use more power and have slower acceleration. Vee8, Maxxis Hookworms, or Origin8 tires will give you a few more miles. I keep the PSI about 21-23 on my Vee8 for increased range and trail riding.
- cold, freezing temp can effect your range. +100 degree temp seem to have no effect.
- amount of assist, lower the assist level with maximum sustained pedal power = longer range. I've gone as far as 37 miles at PAS 2 with a mph avg of 10-13 mph on mostly level ground with one bar left on the battery pack. I'm usually around 25 miles at PAS 3 with a couple of PAS 4+full throttles on intersections and short inclines.

I usually pack my wife's Radrover battery if I run into any of these conditions and planning a ride pushing the distance limits. I will change out the battery if the LCD battery level indicator starts to blink. I ended up getting a 3rd battery because the wife and I sometimes ride together. I also purchased another charger to leave at work to ensure I have max power when heading home.

Alexander T.
4 days ago

My wife and I bought Pedego City Commuter Classic bikes in early 2014; they are 2013 models rated at 48V, 15AH. They have been fun to ride but we have had issues. I had to have my handlebars replaced within the first year because they wouldn't stay firmly in place. This was done under warranty. We have found that the bikes sometimes derail when hitting potholes. One time my sensor got knocked out of position when I hit a pothole, disabling the pedal assist feature; it had to go to a dealer to be repaired, at my cost. My wife's computer failed when the bike was about 2 and half years old and had to be changed out at her cost. My entire power system failed a few weeks ago and now it is in the shop being diagnosed. The batteries have lost some of their power. Pedego says on their website that the batteries are supposed to last 2-4 years. I got a quote from a Pedego dealer for a replacement battery at $1,095. I have been checking on battery replacement costs for other brands and after 4 quotes from other brands I saw a range of $499 (Emazing) to $780 (Kalkhoff). So $1,095 for a new battery is high. Also, an Electra rep stated to me in an e-mail that the Bosch battery their Townie Go! uses will work at optimum capacity for 5,000 charges, which Bosch states is typically 8-9 years. The Electra/Bosch replacement battery is $750. While Pedego offered a good bang for the buck in early 2014, they would not be my first choice for a new bike in 2017.

Ravi Kempaiah
5 days ago

Ebike love or our conflicted love/hate relationships with them? I love Ebike commuting but Ebikes are ruining my finances. I bought a second bike because I liked the experience so much. I just had to buy several pairs of new jeans because my waist size has dropped an inch as I'm hitting 1300 commuting miles for the year. It just goes on and on: better bike bags, commuting clothes, lights etc.

Sounds like a good marketing idea and particularly for the industry events like the expos. Open up people's minds to the various applications for ebikes (commercial, cargo, commuting, exercise etc) and get them to make connections and open up their minds to possibilities not previously realized.

I like your "day in the life of a commuter" idea: it can really get bizarre to the point the stories sound like fiction. The other day on one commute I encountered two deer feeding at the side of the road, a block later I had to avoid a skunk crossing the road, and about a mile after that, deeper into the city, I passed three dudes with baseball bats walking down the street at 6am. On the ride home I almost crashed into a policeman who was crossing the street but changed his mind and reversed direction suddenly. Every commute something odd seems to occur.

E-bike commute is the best kind of commute. The freedom is unparalleled.
Re: Jeans, that's a good I suppose. You know the amount of money we spent on hospital treatment for my dad when he had stroke = 100's E-bikes. So, if investing in E-bikes helps someone stay healthy, avoid cardiovascular degeneration or keep their bones, knees and hips in great shape, then its a no-brainer.

I am glad you're having awesome fun on these bikes.

Over50
5 days ago

Ebike love or our conflicted love/hate relationships with them? I love Ebike commuting but Ebikes are ruining my finances. I bought a second bike because I liked the experience so much. I just had to buy several pairs of new jeans because my waist size has dropped an inch as I'm hitting 1300 commuting miles for the year. It just goes on and on: better bike bags, commuting clothes, lights etc.

Sounds like a good marketing idea and particularly for the industry events like the expos. Open up people's minds to the various applications for ebikes (commercial, cargo, commuting, exercise etc) and get them to make connections and open up their minds to possibilities not previously realized.

I like your "day in the life of a commuter" idea: it can really get bizarre to the point the stories sound like fiction. The other day on one commute I encountered two deer feeding at the side of the road, a block later I had to avoid a skunk crossing the road, and about a mile after that, deeper into the city, I passed three dudes with baseball bats walking down the street at 6am. On the ride home I almost crashed into a policeman who was crossing the street but changed his mind and reversed direction suddenly. Every commute something odd seems to occur.

Mike Nemeth
6 days ago

Hi. I'm new to e-bikes and highly value many posted replies on various subjects. I think the EBR reviews have turned me on. I'm 75 years old but still very active. Weigh 175 lbs at 5'9". I test rode my first ebike today and came away very excited. It was the Pedego city commuter, which suits me as most, if not all of my riding will be on the many bike paths here in northern CA. The Pedego is around 3k but I came across the E-Glide with similar equipment at $1700 plus shipping. After doing a specs comparison, I'm trying to figure why such a price difference. Does anyone care to comment?

Hi, I just saw your comment. When I was looking for my first E-bike I also noticed the huge difference in prices. There are a few E-bike stores in my city and most of the bikes also started at 2700.00. I think E-Glide keeps their price down by offering only two models and also you are buying it straight from the manufacturer with no middleman. The ST had the features I wanted and you want a nice size 500 watt motor if your going to do any hills. I have not had a single problem since purchasing it and I usually ride 18-25 miles every morning before it gets two hot. It's an amazing feeling riding along at 22 mph! Most of the time I keep the speed at level 3 and ride at about 16 mph. EBR has a video on the bike and also another on Dave and his shop in Santa Monica. Good luck. I hope you find the bike you'll be happy with.

Ravi Kempaiah
6 days ago

Recently, Elon Musk and Tesla conducted an interesting social experiment - Project Loveday.
https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/837113202030759937?lang=en

The idea was to bring out the creative abilities of Tesla customers in the form of videos and reward them. Several passionate customers of Tesla created their own unique videos and sent it. In response, Tesla received several million $$ worth of exposure. Here are top 3 videos.

Why can't EBR run it's own project Loveday?

The video may highlight how ebikes are used in day-to-day situations and how it has changed their life for the better. It could be completely utilitarian or fun-oriented. Now, what about those, who don't have the video editing skills? They could take pictures and express their creativity in a written form.

We all could pitch in $5 each and create a fund. Interested companies can announce new categories like and may be fund $500 each or something like that. Collectively, this should lead to a sizeable amount. There could be 3 winners in each category. [$500, $300, $200 or something like this]. People can vote for their favorite and rank them in a poll. The top 3 gets picked from each category via this poll. There could be a system to avoid any kind of rigging where fake accounts come into play.

Commuter [BULLS, Stromer, Trek, BH Easy Motion, Cannondale]
Topics could be like "A day in the life of a commuter" etc.
Mountain biking [Haibike, KTM, Trek, Scott, Giant]
Topics: Lots of photo-op here. How a MTB'er regained his passion for mountain biking etc.
Cargo and family [ Yuba, Tern, R&M]

In return, companies get lot of exposure, EBR gets to publish these unique videos/articles/photos on their social media and sites and the people who attempt this can feel a deep satisfaction of contributing to advancing a niche and growing technology space.

@Court , @Ann M.

If properly done, this could be as big as some events conducted at Interbike or Eurobike. This can't done be few people but collectively, it can be a fun and awesome thing. Just an idea that is already successfully employed by Tesla.

Denis Shelston
6 days ago

Thought I would post this here since a thread on the forks was already started. This I feel is aimed more for us "heavier" riders of the Teo, but maybe some of the average weight riders are experiencing the same.

Whats your honest opinion of the mozo suspension forks that come stock on the bike? I'm 250lbs, and in my opinion, for my weight, they aren't cutting the mustard. I'm not doing "drops" or any jumps etc., just trail riding and going down dirt hills and finding that they bottom out often and quite hard. I don't think the springs selected are meant for the heavier rider. I'm not even riding the bike hard to have then bottom out. Riding on the level the fork sags about 60%, so I find myself just locking them out at full extension and using them like a solid fork all the time now. Otherwise it makes my stance lean forward and is uncomfortable.

Just thought I would see how others felt about their performance, likes or dislikes.

After doing some research, I see Luna cycles has a replacement fork called the "luna lander" that looks very good. They have done some homework and it looks like a direct replacement for our Mozo fork( they aimed it at the sondors bike ), and it has an air spring in it that is fully adjustable. Pretty inexpensive as far as air spring forks go. I'm thinking seriously about ordering a set.

I decided to go take apart my Teo's head set and stem to see what size the fork was. Please correct the terminology if I'm wrong but it looks like a 1-1/8" threadless fork. It does not taper. It looks like it might as the top of the neck of the Teo is much smaller diameter than the bottom, but it doesn't. The crown race at the bottom comes off easily and the length of the steerer tube was 215mm. It measured 135mm between the dropouts. The Luna should fit....I think I'm going to order it.

Ok I ordered it.

I think this will make me completely happy riding now. I am having an absolute blast on this bike! Have had no complaints save the forks bottoming out on the trails. Hopefully this remedies that issue!

This looks like the fork you ordered. Posted here
https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/commuter-fat-bike-pictures.14233/

1/1
McSpiffy
6 days ago

Funny you ask that.
I live in Chicago myself and given the terrible road conditions here, I switched from Stromer ST2 to Haibike Trekking S Rx. While I absolutely enjoy the smoothness and quiet power delivery of ST2, hitting bumps and pot holes every 10m was not a nice feeling. I still use that for long distance travel.
I got my Trekking from Lenny's in Madison. Lenny has been like a father figure in my life and he even sponsored by Guinness Record ride last summer. So, mentioning him might be a conflict of interest here. But, I am happy to give you my honest answer.

Among your list, Trek Super Commuter 8+ would be a great choice. You could run those Super Moto X at low PSI and with the Body Float, you would have no problem on the Chicago roads.
Looks like you are a pretty seasoned cyclist (not everyone rides a Trek Domane 5.9 wth Di2). You should also consider the BULLS Dail-E Grinder. It does come with Di2, Bosch speed motor and the Supernova M99 lighting that you see on the Trek Super commuter. The geometry is more relaxed compared to the Trek but it's so much lighter than the ST2 and the trekking S Rx. At 48lbs, it really handles very well. 2" Marathon Supereme + RockShox paragon does a great job of mitigating bumps.
http://www.bullsebikes.com/product/dail-e-grinder/

The rack on the Dail-E grinder is rated for 60lbs. So, I don't see any problem carrying stuff like groceries or laptop/lunch.

I recently did a weekend ride to Milwaukee and back on my Haibike Trekking S Rx: https://www.strava.com/activities/1118854733. While I was able to do the trip on 2 batteries, I also came to realize that upright riding positions just doesn't cut it for long rides like that. I am looking to switch back to the Dail-E grinder myself and retire the Trekking S Rx. It has been a great bike. I rode it throughout the winter and it has performed flawlessly. If you have the opportunity to pick up a Trekking S Rx, I would recommend it because it's an older year model and most shops offer some sale on those. You could also switch out the batteries to the newer 500Whr ones.

I am hesitant to recommend the Vado 6.0. I rode that bike at the Chicago Bike Expo and it rode great. In theory, that would be a terrific bike for the Chicago roads but there are some glitches with the Specialized firmware, their mission control app but if you have a dealer near you who is willing to back you up, it is worth a shot.
If you already have a pretty good relationship with your Trek dealer, then Super Commuter 8+ would be a great choice as well. My thinking may be different from yours. I am not going to own any system that has super proprietary battery geometry and related hardware. If I get another Bosch powered bike (whether it is Tern GSD or Yuba Spicy cargo bike or even Mountain bike), I could switch out batteries and chargers. Also, if two or more family members have similar kind of bikes, then you gain additional battery for occasional rides and stuff like that. With Bosch, you have more flexibility. There are more spares and accessories available for Bosch than the Specialized. I am not trying to downplay specialized here but their mountain bike battery is different from road bike and both of these are very different from their Turbo bikes. Now, I could use Trekking S Rx batteries on Yuba Cargo or any eMTB and eliminate redundancy.

Wow!!!! Thank you for the prompt reply and all the information! I was really impressed by Court's video of the Specialized Turbo Vado 6.0 and thought it would be the one . . . for some reason, I keep coming back to the Stromer ST2. I don't foresee myself doing century rides with it but it would be nice for commuting (@5am) as well as running errands/shopping. The Haibikes (Trekking S Rx and the SDURO Trekking 5) look like great options. The Bulls LACUBA EVO E45 intrigues me even more than the Dail-E Grinder; as for lighting, I have the DesignShine DS-500 tail light and DS-1300 headlight ( http://store.designshinelighting.com ) - phenomenal lighting!

I really appreciate your genuine passion for e-bikes and sharing your knowledge with others to be a better consumer. I'd like to bend your ear some more but I'd be happy to repay you with your favorite beverage (coffee/beer - whatever your drink of choice is!) or meal. I'd like to make the pilgrimage to Madison to visit Crazy Lenny's and compare some of these before a final purchase.

I'm hesitant to try another Trek e-bike since my Trek FX+ was a disappointment. It did get me back into bicycling after a +15 yr hiatus, putting in 3500mi/yr commuting and casual biking. I have lost interest the past few years and hope that this next step will re-ignite the passion. I still plan to ride my Domane 5.9 and I also have a Madone 4.7 that spends most of it's life attached to a Wahoo Kickr Snap or on my Kreitler rollers.

Thanks again for all you do! I look forward to hearing more from you . . .

Ravi Kempaiah
6 days ago

Hi Ravi!

I hope you don't mind if I interject into this post but I've been following most of your posts, hoping to glean some information to make an informed decision on which bike to purchase. Have you separated yourself from Stromer? I originally narrowed my options to the yet available Specialized Turbo Vado 6, Trek Super Commuter+ 8s, Stromer ST2 and the Haibike XDURO Trekking S RX. I'm looking for a commuter bike that I can also use for carrying misc. gear (~30 lbs). I originally had a Trek FX+ but it was plagued with issues and I traded it in towards a Trek Domane 5.9 Di2. I was riding the Domane into December in the western suburbs (Naperville) but the narrow tires doesn't bode well for Chicagoland weather. I'd appreciate your feedback and also where you purchased your Haibike from. Is it worth jumping to the new Haibike SDURO Trekking 5?

Funny you ask that.
I live in Chicago myself and given the terrible road conditions here, I switched from Stromer ST2 to Haibike Trekking S Rx. While I absolutely enjoy the smoothness and quiet power delivery of ST2, hitting bumps and pot holes every 10m was not a nice feeling. I still use that for long distance travel.
I got my Trekking from Lenny's in Madison. Lenny has been like a father figure in my life and he even sponsored by Guinness Record ride last summer. So, mentioning him might be a conflict of interest here. But, I am happy to give you my honest answer.

Among your list, Trek Super Commuter 8+ would be a great choice. You could run those Super Moto X at low PSI and with the Body Float, you would have no problem on the Chicago roads.
Looks like you are a pretty seasoned cyclist (not everyone rides a Trek Domane 5.9 wth Di2). You should also consider the BULLS Dail-E Grinder. It does come with Di2, Bosch speed motor and the Supernova M99 lighting that you see on the Trek Super commuter. The geometry is more relaxed compared to the Trek but it's so much lighter than the ST2 and the trekking S Rx. At 48lbs, it really handles very well. 2" Marathon Supereme + RockShox paragon does a great job of mitigating bumps.
http://www.bullsebikes.com/product/dail-e-grinder/

The rack on the Dail-E grinder is rated for 60lbs. So, I don't see any problem carrying stuff like groceries or laptop/lunch.

I recently did a weekend ride to Milwaukee and back on my Haibike Trekking S Rx: https://www.strava.com/activities/1118854733. While I was able to do the trip on 2 batteries, I also came to realize that upright riding positions just doesn't cut it for long rides like that. I am looking to switch back to the Dail-E grinder myself and retire the Trekking S Rx. It has been a great bike. I rode it throughout the winter and it has performed flawlessly. If you have the opportunity to pick up a Trekking S Rx, I would recommend it because it's an older year model and most shops offer some sale on those. You could also switch out the batteries to the newer 500Whr ones.

I am hesitant to recommend the Vado 6.0. I rode that bike at the Chicago Bike Expo and it rode great. In theory, that would be a terrific bike for the Chicago roads but there are some glitches with the Specialized firmware, their mission control app but if you have a dealer near you who is willing to back you up, it is worth a shot.
If you already have a pretty good relationship with your Trek dealer, then Super Commuter 8+ would be a great choice as well. My thinking may be different from yours. I am not going to own any system that has super proprietary battery geometry and related hardware. If I get another Bosch powered bike (whether it is Tern GSD or Yuba Spicy cargo bike or even Mountain bike), I could switch out batteries and chargers. Also, if two or more family members have similar kind of bikes, then you gain additional battery for occasional rides and stuff like that. With Bosch, you have more flexibility. There are more spares and accessories available for Bosch than the Specialized. I am not trying to downplay specialized here but their mountain bike battery is different from road bike and both of these are very different from their Turbo bikes. Now, I could use Trekking S Rx batteries on Yuba Cargo or any eMTB and eliminate redundancy.

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Robert W Green
7 days ago

I recieved my UrbaNext wheel last Friday and finally got a chance to test it on a simulated commute to work. I wasn't sure of the range because that depends on how much weight you load on it, so I left with only me and 2 bottles of water. If the test had gone well I would have done another with two paniers -25lbs total and me 239 lbs but it didn't. The motor was strong and with pedaling I was able to go 9mph on level 1, 12 mph on level 2, and 14 mph on level 3. Was disappointed to discover that what they call pedal assist is really only cruise control with three differant levels but I'm ok with that the range is whats important. To engage the motor you must first achieve 5 mph pedaling. I settled on level 2 and with constant pedaling was able to do a comfortable 12 mph. I was only able to get 7.3 miles on a charge which left me with .5 miles to pedal. As neighborhood bike or a ride down to the corner store this wheel is great, but as a commuter it falls very short. To get the 30 mile range that they claim I'd have to carry an additional 3 battery packs ($199 each) adding 6 more pounds to my load.
Possible fixes to make this product better could be: a higher capacity battery pack (possibly lippo), a pedalec sensor and a universal sunvisor for cell phone screens (glare from sun). Your mileage may very.

BreakAes
1 week ago

Thanks, I'll also have to remember to fold the Rad Mini, and try to pick it up when I test it out. Does anybody know if the Fold X has the "auto-walk up the stairs mode" that the Rad Mini has?

I was going to go for a truck and truck camper, but it seems so much more expensive than an older class B van. And I think the roomier ones are the ones with the slide-outs that I'd want to avoid. I think it would be better if I owned a commuter vehicle and a camper van.

McSpiffy
1 week ago

I rode the Super Race for over 500 miles and just switched Trekking S Rx (heavier but has rack, fenders, wider tires, riser handlebar etc). Our store tech uses the SuperRace tight now.
I really enjoyed the Super Race and for summer time, it's a great bike to have. 28c skinny tires on icy roads can be troublesome, for now I am using the Trekking S Rx.

Race is not very different from the SuperRace in terms of performance. Both weigh around 40lbs and have great agility. TRP Zurich cable actuated hydraulic ones on the Race are quite good but I felt the Magura MT4's on the SuperRace to be tiny bit better.

There are mounting points for rack and fenders. 37 miles each way is going to be a lot of saddle time. Feel free to ask me any questions.

Hi Ravi!

I hope you don't mind if I interject into this post but I've been following most of your posts, hoping to glean some information to make an informed decision on which bike to purchase. Have you separated yourself from Stromer? I originally narrowed my options to the yet available Specialized Turbo Vado 6, Trek Super Commuter+ 8s, Stromer ST2 and the Haibike XDURO Trekking S RX. I'm looking for a commuter bike that I can also use for carrying misc. gear (~30 lbs). I originally had a Trek FX+ but it was plagued with issues and I traded it in towards a Trek Domane 5.9 Di2. I was riding the Domane into December in the western suburbs (Naperville) but the narrow tires doesn't bode well for Chicagoland weather. I'd appreciate your feedback and also where you purchased your Haibike from. Is it worth jumping to the new Haibike SDURO Trekking 5?

Soarcj
1 week ago

Here is pictures of my commuter fat tire bike

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Ike582
1 week ago

Thanks for the prompt reply, Ike!

What LBS did you purchase from? I'm also in the Chicagoland area (Oswego/Naperville) and would like to get my hands on one to try out. I'm also considering the Trek Super Commuter+ 8s and the Stromer ST2. Village Cycle Center has the Trek Super Commuter+ 8s listed $1000 under MSRP but by the time you factor in Chicago taxes its closer to $4500.

What other brands were on your radar before choosing the Vado 6.0?

Thanks again!
Paul

Paul,
I test rode both at Cozy's on Milwaukee in Chicago, but ordered the Vado from Erick's in Deerfield. Both were offering the same price and delivery times but Erick's is closer to my house.

I rode the Specialized Turbo Levo FSR Comp 6Fattie for three days this Summer on serious mountain bike trails in Telluride, Colorado. I was blown away by the design, ride and quality of that bike. The guys in Colorado at the rental shop confirmed the quality and reliability of the bike, and they tend to be a tough crowd to please. When I came back to Chicago, I was determined to get an e-bike for home. Given the flat terrain of the Chicago area trails, I decided not to go with the 6Fattie and instead focus on a bike more suited for the local bike trails. The 6Fattie made me really want to stick with Specialized, so while I rode the Stromer, I was already heavily leaning towards the Vado 6.0.

Ike

McSpiffy
1 week ago

I just ordered the 2018 Vado 6.0 from my local Specialized dealer in the Chicago suburbs. They did have the 3.0 in stock but I really wanted the 6.0. They are quoting me approximately a month wait. Paid full list, no discount unfortunately. I'll report back as soon as I have it!

Thanks for the prompt reply, Ike!

What LBS did you purchase from? I'm also in the Chicagoland area (Oswego/Naperville) and would like to get my hands on one to try out. I'm also considering the Trek Super Commuter+ 8s and the Stromer ST2. Village Cycle Center has the Trek Super Commuter+ 8s listed $1000 under MSRP but by the time you factor in Chicago taxes its closer to $4500.

What other brands were on your radar before choosing the Vado 6.0?

Thanks again!
Paul

Over50
1 week ago

The 2018 Powerfly 5 hardtail looks like it could be set up as a pretty sweet commuter. Nice battery integration and they've tilted that CX motor up similar to the Haibike design. The description says the PF 5 comes ready for lights, fenders, rack. Certainly for fenders and the rack you'll have some nice Bontrager options that will be compatible which really helps with finding bags/panniers. As for lights, I would bet they thought through this and would have options that can run off the electrical system w/out too much headache of rework. I'd suggest checking with a Trek dealer. My local Trek shop has sent a bunch of employees to Bosch school and last I heard they were working on their certification. So I'd ask about their Bosch certification when you talk to the Trek shops. As for taking the racks/fenders on and off - yeah, I would think that would be a major pain. For light trail riding I would think you should just leave them on. If you get good quality stuff and it is installed correctly I wouldn't think it would rattle much. All my rack and fender bikes do not rattle much and although I am not trail riding I am riding on some really crappy paved roads. I check periodically to make sure nothing is coming loose. Usually when I get noise it is from something I have attached (my lock, keys in a bag etc).

I recently purchased the Haibike XDuro 4.0 Trekking as a second commuter bike. I like it but if I had seen the 2018 PF 5 prior to ordering the Haibike I might have given the 2018 PF 5 some serious consideration dependent on my Trek shop's ability to install lights. For my purposes as almost solely a street commuter, I'd have changed the tires too.

Audrey WJF
1 week ago

I have ridden extensively a Gocycle 2 I purchased at the end of last year. First, anything on two wheels is the result of a lot of trade offs, its not an electric motorcycle, its not a 65 pound electric commuter with full pannier capability. At the US preset of 15.5 mile per hour, the battery lasts a long time, the recommended charging protocol is to charge the bike fully after a use so I have not tested the full range but at the 15.5 preset, I have ridden 20 miles and it registers a lot of remaining battery life. I personally like to ride at about 17.5 max speed, the bike is much more enjoyable to ride at that setting to me and at that setting, the battery draws down heavily after a 20 mile ride but it's a really enjoyable ride, its fun, stable and comfortable. Its a pedal assist bike, if someone wants it to run without pedal assist, maybe they want an electric motorcycle.

I would not be comfortable riding much faster than 17.5, because of its size and dimensions, it's stable but not as stable as a big 65 pound commuter or my road bike. Additionally, because of the gearing it would be difficult to ride much faster than that speed for me, it would need a fourth or fifth gear.

One of its big advantages is weight and general portability, I have to lift the bike up and down a few steps during my commute, I can do this easily and store the bike in my office and apartment easily because of the weight and its size. I would not be comfortable locking it and leaving it outside for any length of time and its easy to grab and carry and stick in a corner inside some place so I don't have to keep it outside. The fact that it is easy to lift, carry and store is significant to me, but the trade off is reduced battery life and maybe reduced cruising speed.

The best thing a person should do when they are considering this bike or other bikes is think about how they are going to use it, how many miles they are going to ride, how fast they want to ride, how much cargo they want to take with them, where they are going to store it at home and where they want to take it, and whether or not they will have to regularly lift and carry it,
for me it is perfect for relatively easy commuting because I can carry it and store it and its nice to ride. Tires are another long list of trade offs, I don't see how criticizing the tires the bike comes with is a legitimate criticism of the bike, they make different types of tires that offer whatever characteristics a person desires.

Mark23
1 week ago

Thanks for your suggestion - it looks like a nice bike, like many I've seen. But from the pics it looks like it lacks the swept-back handlebars we wanted. At one bike store we went to, they didn't seem to crazy about the idea of swapping out handlebars, so I don't know if that is an option. Thanks, Mark.

If you get some ebikes, I predict your biking frequency will go way up. I'm 64 and put on 2,000 miles last year, 1,700 so far this year. You can get lighter bikes, but will be short distance riding due to small battery packs. For your price bracket, I suggest the RadCity Commuter bike. It will give you racks to carry panniers and that let's you pack a lunch. I find that suspension forks, suspension seat post, and medium sized tires make for a very comfortable ride for my aging joints.

rich c
2 weeks ago

If you get some ebikes, I predict your biking frequency will go way up. I'm 64 and put on 2,000 miles last year, 1,700 so far this year. You can get lighter bikes, but will be short distance riding due to small battery packs. For your price bracket, I suggest the RadCity Commuter bike. It will give you racks to carry panniers and that let's you pack a lunch. I find that suspension forks, suspension seat post, and medium sized tires make for a very comfortable ride for my aging joints.

mrgold35
2 weeks ago

I was on the fence about a year ago between Sondors, Radrover, and Volt 4" fat tire bikes. I marked Sondors off the list because of the 30 day warranty and small motor. No one ever said "My ebike has too much power and I wish I've gone with a much smaller watt motor."

I'm about 270lbs and I add about another 20-25 lbs with bike accessories, rack+gear, and commuter back pack. The Radrover weights the same as the Radmini. I have zero issue pedaling in PAS 2-4 and/or using the throttle to get going across intersections in a hurry or up inclines. The Rad Power bikes have a nice feature of an on/off button for the twist throttle AND you have full 750 watts of power at any PAS level from 0-5. I added a clip on thumb throttle for easier access and better control. Also nice to have the throttle if you need to walk your bike up inclines or stairs. I trail ride a lot and thumb attachment makes it easier to access the gears, brake, throttle, and holding tight on handlebar grips. I would check with the Sondors X to see how the throttle works compared to the Radmini.

I ended up with purchasing two Rad Rovers and put over 3000 miles between them both in less than a year. I would also factor in a suspension seat post since the folding ebikes don't have a front suspension.

One side note: I always used PAS 5 on my work commutes with the standard Kenda tires and my top cruising speed was around 18-19 mph with peak (downhills) around 21-22 mph. I wore my rear Kenda out in around 800 miles and replaces with Vee8 tires. I can now cruise 19-20.5 mph in PAS 3-4 (depending on wind and how level) and my top peak speed is 23-25 mph on the same inclines. I never use PAS now and just use the throttle if I need full power for a short run.

Jim Dove
2 weeks ago

Thought I'd close the loop on this. Visited Sleek Ebikes in Tarrytown, NY to try out the Bulls line-up. Rode the Evo8 and various other Bulls bikes. My wife rode several as well. She went with what seemed to me a cheaper version of the Pedego from Ariel Rider. I think it's kind of goofy but she loves it. I ended up with the Bulls Estream Evo 45 FS. In the end, I came to like the full suspension on the Bulls. And, as a MTB, it offered some additional flexibility beyond their city commuter bikes. Appreciate all of the feedback from everyone and the great reviews to help guide the decision here. Great site...

Over50
2 weeks ago

..I was the typical guy who looked at a 5-8K dollar bike and wondered why anyone would not just buy a motorcycle or used car for that kind of money...Anyway, in doing the research I of course looked to see if there was anything used around me as I would with a car. There is literally nothing...
I see shock on the faces of folks that ask me how much my bike cost ($5500) and I keep getting the comment "I could buy a car for that". Which tells me they are looking at it solely as transportation whereas I was looking at a commuter bike as fun transportation enabling a healthy lifestyle. I see a ton of folks paying status symbol premiums for certain car brands (which I would never do) but I would spend money on a good bike - just a matter of preferences and priorities I guess.
The tech has changed so quickly and the latest generations of bikes are probably so much improved that perhaps there isn't a really good used market. Maybe bikes more than a few years old get scrapped more often than resold. If you have e-bike shops in your area they might have some used bikes. I've seen a few at the one e-bike shop in my area. That particular shop has a really poor web presence so you'd never find their used bikes by looking online - maybe that's the case for other small operators as well.

BernieS
2 weeks ago

I like the Redux IE a lot and am thinking of getting one from a nearby LBS. But I have a few questions regarding accessorizing the bike.

1. Lights — I would like a headlight and taillight that are integrated into the electrical system rather than being separately charged through a USB connection. I like the idea of the light always being on when the bike is under power (daytime running light) so that’s not an issue for me. Has anybody had any success with this kind of set up? Any other lighting ideas?

2. Fenders — I was thinking of getting a set of SKS Commuter 2 fenders. What other plastic fenders might I consider?

3. Mirror — I wanted a bar end type mirror. Any suggestions from experience? I don’t want to use a helmet mirror. Done that before.

4. Rear rack — I am considering a Topeak UNI Explorer (Disc) rack in order to carry grocery panniers and a trunk bag. Any thoughts?

5. Chainguard — I wanted a chain guard so I wouldn’t have to be rolling up my pant leg every time I ride. My dealer thinks it might be difficult finding a suitable chain guard that wasn’t very flimsy. Any ideas on this?

So those are the main accessories that I wanted to get input about from people experienced with the Redux IE. Thank you in advance.

DrZarkloff
2 years ago

I can't find anything that will allow me to convert my 32 inch Kent.

Flo Mo
2 years ago

Your videos are great. Thank you. :) More and more people ride e-bikes.... maybe they view your videos. :) COOL.

Jay Gurung
2 years ago

Hey Mr.Court,can you do the review of the EasyGo Race by BH EasyMotion please.

Flo Mo
2 years ago

Very good video. I like your channel. And this bike looks like old school. I like it. Cheap and nice. Very good. Thank you. :)

mn3m0n1c
2 years ago

Would be nice if manufacturers consider integrating control unit with battery pack. One detachable box would be a lot more convenient to carry when it comes to leaving an e-bike unattended in not too safe area.

ForbinColossus
2 years ago

I looked at BionX, eRad, Copenhagen wheel, Belon Electron - all of which have quirks and limitations. Confusing array of choices - none offers it all - where do you want to compromise? I lean slightly towards the copenhagen wheel for ease of setup, assuming the company gets it sorted out.
For anyone thinking of a kit, be sure to look at EBR's website and use the *compare* feature.
http://electricbikereview.com/tag/kits/

Eskil Eriksson
2 years ago

+ElectricBikeReview.com What made it for me was the mid drive, the opportunity to use the gears on the bike for both torque and high speed.Being able to do both hills and good speed on the flats is perfect for me.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+ForbinColossus Yeah, even the kits that seem to nail most of the features end up being more expensive which is a big trade off for people. I personally really like BionX for a full kit setup because you get assist, throttle, several size and power options, battery size options, regeneration, integrated lights if you want etc. but they cost so much... The all-in-one solutions are cool and I really like the Zehus and FlyKly for simplicity but then you don't get gears... so the Copenhagen Wheel seems like the winner but then again it still isn't out, it only comes in red, limited wheel size options, no throttle mode and the battery isn't removable and has yet to really be proven in the motor like that. Lots of choices, but at least that means lots of potential for finding something perfect for your needs ;)

Jonathan Seagull
2 years ago

Golden Motor Canada 1,000 watt motor, built in controller, variable speed throttle etc with Lithium battery is under $1,000...buy torque arms tho.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Jonathan Seagull Ha! Yeah... those larger motors can be pretty strong. Electric Bike Outfitters has two direct drive hubs at 500 and 750 watts (the Mountaineer goes 30+ mph and is more of an off-road thing). These cheaper kits are cool to keep things light and discreet ;)

R Valdez
2 years ago

Please do a review on "add-e" or "go-e" kit.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+R Valdez I'll keep an eye out for sure! Got a bunch more Daymak and Electric Bike Outfitters kits at the moment and a website redesign :D keep an eye out... thanks for the suggestions.

Eskil Eriksson
2 years ago

I have the same battery, and the connection is a big downside. Unless you can keep the battery on the bike most of the time, due to no extreme temperatures.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Eskil Eriksson Hmm, glad to hear you've had the same experience with the plug, thanks for your feedback. Seemed like a big hassle to me but their other kits click right in without the screw bit so they're way more convenient if you're willing to pay a bit extra.