Electric Bike Outfitters EBO Commuter Kit Review

Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Kit Review
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter 350 Watt Geared Hub
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter 36 V 11 Ah Lithium Battery
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Led Console Trigger Throttle
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Controller Box
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Front
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Kit Review
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter 350 Watt Geared Hub
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter 36 V 11 Ah Lithium Battery
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Led Console Trigger Throttle
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Controller Box
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Commuter Front

Summary

  • An affordable, all-inclusive electric bike kit available in many wheel sizes (front or rear) with a nice one year warranty
  • You get a standard 350 watt internally geared motor, 36 volt Lithium-ion battery pack and a trigger throttle
  • No display console or pedal assist modes come stock with this kit, just a simple LED power meter and throttle mode, EBO has several upgraded kits and can sell custom packages
  • Predominantly available online but finding their way to more and more dealers in the United States

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Electric Bike Outfitters

Model:

EBO Commuter Kit

Price:

$704

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Commuting

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

30 Day Return, 1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

20152016

Bicycle Details

Battery Weight:

5.5 lbs (2.49 kg)

Motor Weight:

6 lbs (2.72 kg)

Gearing Details:

9 Single Speed or Shimano 6 or 7 Speed Cassettes or SunRace 8 and 9 Speed Cassettes

Brake Details:

Mechanical Wuxing Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy, Double Walled

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 36

Wheel Sizes:

16 in (40.64cm)20 in (50.8cm)24 in (60.96cm)26 in (66.04cm)27.5 in (69.85cm)28 in (71.12cm)

Accessories:

Optional Twist Throttle, Optional Cadence Sensor with 3 Mode LED Console and Controller for $31 at Time of Purchase or $105 Later (Because of the Additional Console and Controller)

Other:

Rear Motors Cost $25 to $50 Extra, Dropout Widths Front: 100 mm, Rear 120 mm or 135 mm, Brake Clamp Diameter 22.2 mm, 14 Amp Controller

Electronic Details

Motor Type:

Front-Mounted Geared Hub, Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

350 watts

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

396 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

15 miles (24 km)

Estimated Max Range:

35 miles (56 km)

Display Type:

LED Console

Readouts:

Battery Charge Level (Red, Yellow, Green)

Drive Mode:

Trigger Throttle

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

The EBO Commuter is the most affordable kit (at the time of this review) from Electric Bike Outfitters. This is a relatively new electric bicycle company based in Denver Colorado. The first things I noticed were the excellent price and all-inclusive setup. Unlike some kits, this one doesn’t tease you with a “battery not included” price tag. For well under $1k you get a modest motor and mid-mounted Lithium-ion battery that will take you 15 to 20 miles per charge and work on most traditional bikes. You can choose the wheel size from a wide selection of 16″, 20″, 24″, 26″, 27.5″ and 28″ which means folding bikes, kids bikes, cruisers, mountain bikes and city bikes will all work! The one hangup here is the slightly wider hub design that might not fit all fork widths, consider the EBO Phantom if you’ve got a single speed city bike because that hub was specially designed to be narrower and avoid scraping. Also, as you consider this kit, ask yourself whether you want pedal assist because it can be added for just $30 but costs over $100 after the fact (because it uses a different controller). This is the only kit from EBO that doesn’t come stock with assist and for many people that will be fine but your thumb might get a little tired after longer trips.

Powering the bike is a generic 350 watt planetary geared hub. It seems like the front-mounted design is a bit quieter but they both produce a bit of whirring noise and endure more wear than a gearless direct drive hub. The big benefits are small size, good torque at lower speeds and light weight ~6 lbs. The Pure City demo bike I was riding in the video review above weighed just 45 lbs with the kit installed! That’s pretty good… and the pricetag for the bike plus kit was under $1,200 making this a very affordable ebike option. Even though the motor you get here isn’t the most powerful and might not be the highest quality, it does offer a lot of value and you get an awesome all-inclusive warranty with the bike so that gives me peace of mind. Considering that it is a kit, you could also probably pick up a replacement on individual parts in the future should one fail.

The battery pack on the EBO Commuter electric bike kit is a mix of good and bad. The upside is that it’s downtube-mounting which improves weight distribution, frees up the rear portion of the bike for adding a rack and fenders and is pretty well protected by the frame. I like the canister design, it has a built-in LED charge level indicator and seats well once you’ve screwed the mounting bracket into the bottle cage bosses on your bike (your bike must have bottle cage bosses on the downtube for this kit to work). The downside is that while this battery pack is removable (for lighter transport and convenient charging) taking it off and putting it back on is a pain. Most downtube batteries (including those on the higher-end Electric Bike Outfitters kits) just click in and make contact with metal prongs, on this kit you have to manually screw the power cable into the battery and the space for getting your fingers in there and twisting the metal ring is very limited… It’s a pain but if you just leave the pack on and charge while mounted you’ll never have to do it.

Operating the EBO Commuter system is extremely simple in its stock form. You charge the battery, mount it and attach the power cable then click the on/off toggle switch at the base of the battery pack. Next you press the red button on the LED console near the trigger throttle and it lights right up. At this point, you can use the variable speed trigger throttle to your heart’s content. It can reach up to ~20 mph but also does well at lower speeds. I found myself juicing it from standstill then easing off once I hit a speed that felt comfortable for pedaling. Honestly, I think my thumb would get tired after too much riding with a throttle like this, especially given the grip style gear shifter on the right bar… this made the reach to the throttle a bit further and required more energy for me. You can screw around with the throttle position and find the perfect fit and as mentioned earlier, you can also upgrade to pedal assist but that requires more installation time and effort as well as an LCD display.

This e-bike kit is all about simplicity and in my opinion it’s a winner. While the ~$500 Pure City Bourbon that the demo kit was installed on felt great and had a lot of extras including an 8 speed derailleur, fenders, rack, nice grips and a comfortable swept-back bar… you could easily find a bike at Walmart with similar features for under $200 and get yourself a sub $1,000 electric bike that would work just fine. Keep in mind that this hub motor design is wider than the EBO Phantom and that you don’t get pedal assist stock but otherwise you do have the nice color coded wires that are easy to setup as well as upgraded brake levers with motor inhibitors. All kits tend to add a mess of wires to the bike so I usually go for black or dark colored frames that help them blend in. You’ll probably extend more time and effort with a rear-mounted kit but that’s usually my preference for traction and improved steering… especially if you have a weak suspension fork.

Pros:

  • Color coded wires are easy to setup, the motor cable has a quick disconnect point that makes servicing the wheel (front or rear) much easier
  • You get brake levers with integrated motor inhibitors here which could come in handy if you upgrade to pedal assist (much more affordable to do when you buy the bike ~$30 vs. later since it uses a different controller)
  • I like trigger throttles because they are easier to fit with existing grips and twist shifters, they also perform better for off-road use because they don’t compromise your grip, this one worked well but you can upgrade to a twist throttle if you prefer
  • Available in a huge assortment of wheel sizes including 16″, 20″, 24″, 26″, 27.5″ (650B) and ~28″ (700c) so you can convert folding bikes, kids bikes, road bikes, mountain bikes etc. and they all cost the same
  • Relatively light weight with the battery at ~5.5 lbs and the motor ~6 lbs so you aren’t going to end up with a heavy ride
  • The mechanical brake levers are compatible with traditional designs as well as disc brakes and the motor has a mounting pattern for use with a disc brake rotor

Cons:

  • Generic motor and battery cells might not last as long and produce a bit more noise under power but are still covered by the one year warranty
  • Basic LED display panel won’t show your precise battery level, speed, range or other details that the higher end kits will
  • The battery pack clicks into the holster easily but has a screw-in power connector that can be tricky and time consuming to connect, it also takes up most of the space where a bottle cage would mount… consider a saddle rail adapter, rear rack with a bottle bag or a hydration pack
  • The controller unit is built into a separate box vs. being integrated into the battery mount or motor, this just means more things have to be screwed onto the frame and possibly more wires
  • If you decide to upgrade and get pedal assist, it will require more effort to install and the units I saw only had a five sensor disc which isn’t as responsive
  • You have to power the battery pack on as well as the display unit to get the bike going… this adds a bit of time to each ride but also makes it easier to forget to turn the battery pack off when you park

Resources:

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cyclist2009
1 year ago

What are the dimensions of the battery?

Court Rye
1 year ago

I'm not exactly sure, this would be a great question to email Electric Bike Outfitters about because sometimes cases change and I reviewed their models last year.

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J.R.
3 days ago

Great commuter anecdote! I don't think 20 mph headwinds are cake to anyone with PAS!

Mark Peralta
3 days ago

No, and that would be a deal breaker for me if I was in the market for a commuter. The new Specialized Vado will have suspension.
Dumbar, For the same price of the super commuter,
https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/bikes/city-bikes/electric-city-bikes/super-commuter/super-commuter-8s/p/1367000-2017/
you can get this full suspension ebike (STARCKBIKE Asphalt Ebike) with the same other features.
https://www.motostrano.com/MOUSTACHE-Starkbike-Asphalt-Ebike-p/mstarka.htm
This is another worthy alternative with front suspension.
https://www.motostrano.com/BULLS-Six50-E2-Street-Ebike-p/bulls-620e2.htm

Dunbar
3 days ago

No, and that would be a deal breaker for me if I was in the market for a commuter. The new Specialized Vado will have suspension.

Dunbar
4 days ago

Saw this on reddit.

Axud86
5 days ago

Very curious to hear how the biking community in Boulder reacts to your Ebike.
Please keep us posted

Boulder is slow to embrace "new" in the bicycling world. I'm sure I will get some looks from the boyz in their roadie kits.
I love all bikes
I'll just smile and wave.
I could care less what anyone thinks, but it will be interesting. I'll let ya know.
Ive been a 300 day per year bike commuter since 1978. I love the idea of going to 365 a year!

Hannah
6 days ago

Hi all! I'm based in the UK and looking for a good first electric bike. It's for my new commute to work which is about 4.5 miles along flat terrain. I'm not looking for a very powerful bike, just something that can give me a bit of a boost, especially against the wind or if I'm tired/having an asthma flare. I'm a regular cyclist and my previous commute was 2 miles which was fine on a regular bike. Complication: I'm pretty short (160cm, which is 5'3 I think?) and also would like a step through frame. It has to be able to run in all weathers, as it would be my regular commuter bike.

Can anyone advise? I've been looking through the reviews on this great website but it looks like a lot of the bikes are not available here in England. Ideally I'd like to be able to test-ride whatever model, before I bought it.

Thanks for any help you can give!

loginhater
7 days ago

I rode the Trek XM700+, the Raleigh Misceo iE with the Alfine hub, and the Raleigh Detour IE. I liked them in that order, although none of them were an XL frame. Hoping to ride a Juiced Cross Current next week.

Cross and 29er are similar but 29er is lot more versatile and has better componentry (better shocks, drive train and MTB rims). You could always run street tires on them and make it a nice commuter.
Also, the Large frame of 29er is slightly bigger than the cross. and I think for your size, large- 29er would be a more apt.

What bikes have you tried so far?

Over50
7 days ago

That's cool! I'm going to read up on the Lumos. I guess I didn't realize when I looked at it before that it had blinkers and brake light functions (or maybe I was looking at a different brand). Looks like a great commuter helmet for people like me (preferred work departure time is before 6am - still dark out).

e-boy
7 days ago

Thanks for the reply .
As stated , I'm just curious about touring e-Bikes , as I haven't seen as much press on this segment as on Commuter or Cargo ; all of which obviously benifit from pedal assist .

Jaladhi
1 week ago

Curious what do you all think about the new Stealth model they are launching on Kickstarter? So far, the response seems a bit tepid but that is expected with bikes that cost upwards of $4k - at least on crowdfunding platforms. Motor is 750 watts and max. speed is 20mph. There is an option to get a bigger battery with a 90 miles range. At this point, it is hard to say if they will reach their funding goal.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1357249345/the-stealth-p-7-electric-commuter-bike/description

Ravi Kempaiah
1 week ago

Thanks for the recommendations Ravi.

How is the Easy Motion Evo Cross vs, the 29er? I am wondering if maybe the Cross is a little better for road riding?

Cross and 29er are similar but 29er is lot more versatile and has better componentry (better shocks, drive train and MTB rims). You could always run street tires on them and make it a nice commuter.
Also, the Large frame of 29er is slightly bigger than the cross. and I think for your size, large- 29er would be a more apt.

What bikes have you tried so far?

WilliamT
1 week ago

I've done several aluminum forks and AL suspension forks with front motors up to 750W. I advised all against. However I was willing to help the builder IF they used two properly fit torque arms. I ALWAYS use the Grin products. No exceptions. The 750W is a daily rider. From April-November, or the first snow and is going into season 3 or 4 very soon. I would't for myself but from my limited experience two sided torque arms have not failed.
These are all commuter/city street bikes.

For me, 350W is about as high as I'm comfortable with on a front hub. At 750w, just a quick google search shows those motors producing on average 80 Nm. With numbers that high, I would definitely use 2 torque arms. One wouldn't be enough.

Thomas Jaszewski
1 week ago

I've done several aluminum forks and AL suspension forks with front motors up to 750W. I advised all against. However I was willing to help the builder IF they used two properly fit torque arms. I ALWAYS use the Grin products. No exceptions. The 750W is a daily rider. From April-November, or the first snow and is going into season 3 or 4 very soon. I would't for myself but from my limited experience two sided torque arms have not failed.
These are all commuter/city street bikes.

mrgold35
1 week ago

The wife and I have several trips planned to Utah, Arizona, and Nevada over the next 6 months. We wanted to check out as many of the "Mighty 5" National Parks in Utah (Zion, Bryce, Arches, Capital Reef, & Canyonlands) since they are only a slight detour on our travel paths. I wanted to find out how friendly are the Parks to bikers and especially ebikers in Utah? I figured we could see more and still be part of the environment on two wheels compared to just driving or hiking the park(s). We do have our Transeo GT 700c commuter bikes that can ride hard packed trails if they are not fat tire ebike friendly.

We took our ebikes to the Grand Canyon and Sedona in Nov/2016. The south rim of the Grand Canyon was ebike friendly and we were able to see more and stay away from the crowded tourist lookout points at bus stops.
In Sedona, no ebikes were allowed on trails shared with walkers, hikers, and MTB in city limits. I could only ride the trails with other motorized vehicles if I wanted to ride off road. High powered gas powered vehicle hauling butt down a twisty dirt road while I'm pedaling at 13-15 mph; what can go wrong. Might as well put up a sign saying "ebikes not welcomed!"

Prefer the paved roads/trails or at most hard packed "bunny trail" levels for the wife. The wife wouldn't want to ride if the local bike/ebike trails are more challenging.

Larry Ganz
2 weeks ago

hey Larry, how are you liking your PF7? I recently got one too--and was deciding among the xm700+ and other options. Like you I went with the PF7 since I'm a mountain biker. Even though this bike will be used for commuting I felt way more comfortable on it vs. the commuter style bike.

BTW, for the U-lock you could consider going to a rack and pannier setup. That's what I'll be doing since I needed the rack for commuting.

Thanks. I'm trying to avoid a rack if possible - I wear a camelback for my gear, but don't want the added weight of a u-lock inside that, as sometimes I'll have an oxygen C-tank in there if I'm riding above 7500-8000 feet elevation (one working lung, so without eBike I needed the tank for every ride around here).

I LOVE THE POWEFLY 7 - MINI REVIEW:

It's quite well built, with nice welds and workmanship - everything is perfect except the following. I was surprised that the rear axel is not a 15mm thru axel like the front, but is a 9mm mountain bike quick release with slots instead (didn't know if this was typical). The seat padding is nonexistent, but if you get your butt back far enough it's livable, although I replaced it with a slim foam seat that's a little thicker. They also didn't run the derailleur cable inside the frame like with their other eBikes, so it runs along the right side of the lower frame while the rear brake line still runs along the left side. Lastly, I was surprised that the Deore XT shift lever doesn't display which gear I'm in for reference, while the feature is on the other 3 bikes.

It FITS me much better than the 50mm XM700+ that they originally ordered for me, or the 18" Neko+ and 17.5" Dual Sport+ that they had in stock. They did put a 17 degree riser on the handlebar stem (I think a 17x90), after having seen the issues I had on the other 3 bikes. With the riser the riding position is perfect - I've been able to ride down the 1140 foot hill from my house to the shopping center and back up to my home twice (6 mile trip each time), and my hands never went to sleep like with the Dual Sport+ and Neko+. I can lift the front wheel about 1" off the ground when straddling the bar, and I can just get my toes on both feet down to the ground when sitting on the seat.

VS the DUAL SPORT+: Despite the higher weight I still can hop up curbs fairly easily, and the fatter tires absorb the bumps better. At high speeds downhill on the road the PF7 is more stable and not as scary as the Dual Sport+ which put too much weight on my hands and seemed absolutely twitchy. I also have more confidence in the PF7's larger brakes and it's fatter tires which have a tight enough knobby pattern to work well on pavement and dirt. With the PF7 I could lean the bike farther in turns with more confidence, due to the larger contact patch.

BATTERY RANGE: My only concern is that the battery clearly isn't going to last as long as the Dual Sport+. After the ride on hilly roads yesterday and then giving it a full charge, it was estimating the battery will give me 16-48 miles on my next ride (in high vs low power). That's vs 30-55 miles estimated by the Dual Sport+ after the same ride and re-charging procedure. This includes my going to ECO or OFF whenever the ride is flat but requires pedaling, or downhill without pedaling. Before my riding it hard yesterday, the PF7 was estimating 29-94 miles, after only 1/4 mile of an easy flat-ground test ride by the shop after they assembled it.

After a quick 4 mile ride today (with only a 600 foot climb) and before I put it back on the charger, the PF7 estimated that I still had 13-42 miles of battery left to keep riding (13 miles in TURBO, 16 miles in SPORT, 21 in TOUR, and 42 in ECO mode). I would have been able to complete todays ride in only ECO and TOUR mode in the low gears, but I really needed SPORT and TURBO to finish it with decent double digit speed.

So, with a mix of all 4 power levels I believe that I could go an additional 18-21 miles on this hilly terrain; however, I'd prefer to have 30 to last a weekend before charging. But the 32 mile round-trip ride that we have planned this summer is fairly flat with only a slight climb of 300-400 feet over the first 16 miles, and slightly downhill on the way back, with two short hills both directions. So I should be able to make that particular 30+ mile trip just fine.

POWER: I'm not convinced that TURBO (300%) feels stronger than SPORT (200%) when I'm pulling a hill while seated in higher gears with a slower cadence. However, in the lower gears with a higher cadence I can really feel the increase in power on the hills. Unfortunately I poop out with a cadence rate about 65+, and tend to cruise at 50-60 rpm in higher gears, so I wont get as much benefit from TURBO except on a really hard steep hill at low speeds.

CurryMonsterCA
2 weeks ago

hey Larry, how are you liking your PF7? I recently got one too--and was deciding among the xm700+ and other options. Like you I went with the PF7 since I'm a mountain biker. Even though this bike will be used for commuting I felt way more comfortable on it vs. the commuter style bike.

BTW, for the U-lock you could consider going to a rack and pannier setup. That's what I'll be doing since I needed the rack for commuting.

E-Wheels
2 weeks ago

I wouldn't go that narrow. You should have a tire that is slightly wider than the rim to protect the rim. I wouldn't go lower than a 50-584. If you want a narrow tire you should get the standard Charger spec, only the GX and GT come with the MD40. Are you looking for the ability to swap tires for different conditions?
Chris,
I am looking at options to use street-commuter tyres like the Schwalbe Marathon Plus on these rims

Tech Direct
2 weeks ago

Hi All !

Just a quick heads up here. Our new look and revamped website is up and running!
We are a portal for direct from factory to customer e-bikes and parts.
We use factories and warehouses in China, Taiwan, Russia and elsewhere.
We only deal with 5 star rated suppliers from various sites in china etc but save you the time of
browsing through hundreds of listings to find what you want. We've done all the hard work for you.
We have everything from basic 300w town cycles and commuter ebikes to 3000w 100km/h custom beasts.
Come and check us out. Our system is simple. You deal directly with the supplier at the best price guaranteed
with free worldwide shipping on many items included.
Check us out at:
https://www.techdirect.nz/shopcategory/ebikes/?orderby=price&order=DESC

Cheers!
Jay Barnett
Director
Queenstown
New Zealand
www.techdirect.nz

J.R.
2 weeks ago

In my opinion this is so spot on, I'm just going to second it and quote it.
I vote 'none of the above' to your poll.

My vote:

https://shop.juicedbikes.com/collections/e-bikes/products/crosscurrentair

Yeah, I know, it's 95 bucks above your budget but you'll save a ton of money in the long run. Think 'standard parts'.

I'd buy a CC if I were living in the US. It's a great commuter bike, and the drive & battery are super easy to source if the company goes under. It's a no-brainer if you ask me.

And that comes from someone who bought a Haibike... :)

Lost
2 weeks ago

I vote 'none of the above' to your poll.

My vote:

https://shop.juicedbikes.com/collections/e-bikes/products/crosscurrentair

Yeah, I know, it's 95 bucks above your budget but you'll save a ton of money in the long run. Think 'standard parts'.

I'd buy a CC if I were living in the US. It's a great commuter bike, and the drive & battery are super easy to source if the company goes under. It's a no-brainer if you ask me.

And that comes from someone who bought a Haibike... :)
I would second that. Standard parts are paramount in my estimation. The 350 watt motor seems a little small in comparison to what's out there. I bought a Rad Rover, it too is replete with standard parts.

JayVee
2 weeks ago

I vote 'none of the above' to your poll.

My vote:

https://shop.juicedbikes.com/collections/e-bikes/products/crosscurrentair

Yeah, I know, it's 95 bucks above your budget but you'll save a ton of money in the long run. Think 'standard parts'.

I'd buy a CC if I were living in the US. It's a great commuter bike, and the drive & battery are super easy to source if the company goes under. It's a no-brainer if you ask me.

And that comes from someone who bought a Haibike... :)

Josh Levinson
2 weeks ago

I do have a used Kuo+ that I can sell for a great price. Again, check it out on our website. It is a folding bike. The range is short 15-20 miles but a very nice short range commuter for those who want a compact storage form.

Thanks for your advice and information! However, my budget is pretty strictly capped at $1k as an upper limit.

86 and still kicking
2 weeks ago

Would you recommend the a2b bikes (specifically the metro)?
I do have a used Kuo+ that I can sell for a great price. Again, check it out on our website. It is a folding bike. The range is short 15-20 miles but a very nice short range commuter for those who want a compact storage form.

mrgold35
2 weeks ago

I'm 6'3", 34 inseam, +270lbs, long arms (38/39 length in dress shirts). I have two (his & her) Radrovers since Sept/2016 I use both about 80% for work commuting around 45-75 miles per week. I ride more than my wife and switch off bikes to keep mileage and wear/tear about the same (1500 miles between both bikes). The Radrover+shipping+accessories+light+rack+any upgrades was under $2000 for a very comfortable daily commuter bike. I like to trail ride on the weekend or after work and the fat tires can handle both paved road commuting and down to deep sandy trail duties with ease.

I find the Radrover a very comfortable bike for rough trail riding and long distance commuting. I've gone as far as 36 miles on a single charge at PAS 3 averaging around 12-14 mph on level ground. This is a Class II bike with 0-5 PAS and throttle. The throttle provide full 750w of power in any PAS level; which, is a very nice feature to tackle small inclines or moving across an intersection in a hurry.

My mods for extra comfort:
- 350mm (wife) and 400mm (me) Suntour SP-12 NCX suspension seatpost, $90, eBay
- Sunlite 11.5X12.5 Cloud-9 cruiser seat, $29, Amazon
- Sunlite 0-60 degree 95mm adjustable stem, $32, Amazon

The 350mm suspension seat post does also work for me. I'm at the max height limit for the 350mm seat post and the extra thick Sunlite Cloud-9 seat does give some additional height. The seatpost might be too short if I had a thinner seat. I later updated to 350mm Bodyfloat, $249, orange springs, for me; but, the Bodyfloat is touch shorter overall compared to the 350mm Suntour.

Sunlite Stem:

My Radrover during Grand Canyon trip Nov/16:

1/3
DrZarkloff
1 year ago

I can't find anything that will allow me to convert my 32 inch Kent.

Flo Mo
1 year ago

Your videos are great. Thank you. :) More and more people ride e-bikes.... maybe they view your videos. :) COOL.

Jay Gurung
1 year ago

Hey Mr.Court,can you do the review of the EasyGo Race by BH EasyMotion please.

Flo Mo
1 year ago

Very good video. I like your channel. And this bike looks like old school. I like it. Cheap and nice. Very good. Thank you. :)

mn3m0n1c
1 year ago

Would be nice if manufacturers consider integrating control unit with battery pack. One detachable box would be a lot more convenient to carry when it comes to leaving an e-bike unattended in not too safe area.

ForbinColossus
1 year ago

I looked at BionX, eRad, Copenhagen wheel, Belon Electron - all of which have quirks and limitations. Confusing array of choices - none offers it all - where do you want to compromise? I lean slightly towards the copenhagen wheel for ease of setup, assuming the company gets it sorted out.
For anyone thinking of a kit, be sure to look at EBR's website and use the *compare* feature.
http://electricbikereview.com/tag/kits/

Eskil Eriksson
1 year ago

+ElectricBikeReview.com What made it for me was the mid drive, the opportunity to use the gears on the bike for both torque and high speed.Being able to do both hills and good speed on the flats is perfect for me.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+ForbinColossus Yeah, even the kits that seem to nail most of the features end up being more expensive which is a big trade off for people. I personally really like BionX for a full kit setup because you get assist, throttle, several size and power options, battery size options, regeneration, integrated lights if you want etc. but they cost so much... The all-in-one solutions are cool and I really like the Zehus and FlyKly for simplicity but then you don't get gears... so the Copenhagen Wheel seems like the winner but then again it still isn't out, it only comes in red, limited wheel size options, no throttle mode and the battery isn't removable and has yet to really be proven in the motor like that. Lots of choices, but at least that means lots of potential for finding something perfect for your needs ;)

Jonathan Seagull
1 year ago

Golden Motor Canada 1,000 watt motor, built in controller, variable speed throttle etc with Lithium battery is under $1,000...buy torque arms tho.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+Jonathan Seagull Ha! Yeah... those larger motors can be pretty strong. Electric Bike Outfitters has two direct drive hubs at 500 and 750 watts (the Mountaineer goes 30+ mph and is more of an off-road thing). These cheaper kits are cool to keep things light and discreet ;)

R Valdez
1 year ago

Please do a review on "add-e" or "go-e" kit.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+R Valdez I'll keep an eye out for sure! Got a bunch more Daymak and Electric Bike Outfitters kits at the moment and a website redesign :D keep an eye out... thanks for the suggestions.

Eskil Eriksson
1 year ago

I have the same battery, and the connection is a big downside. Unless you can keep the battery on the bike most of the time, due to no extreme temperatures.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+Eskil Eriksson Hmm, glad to hear you've had the same experience with the plug, thanks for your feedback. Seemed like a big hassle to me but their other kits click right in without the screw bit so they're way more convenient if you're willing to pay a bit extra.