Electric Bike Outfitters EBO Front Range Kit Review

Ebo Front Range Electric Bike Kit Review 1
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range Kit
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range Gearless Motor Cassette
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range Battery Pack And Controller
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range Led Console And Twist Throttle
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range 500 Watt Direct Drive Motor
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range Battery Lock And Power Button
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range Controller Box
Ebo Front Range Electric Bike Kit Review 1
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range Kit
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range Gearless Motor Cassette
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range Battery Pack And Controller
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range Led Console And Twist Throttle
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range 500 Watt Direct Drive Motor
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range Battery Lock And Power Button
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range Controller Box

Summary

  • A powerful gearless hub motor kit capable of being installed as a front or rear wheel, sturdy and relatively quiet
  • Gearless motors tend to be heavier and this one is ~12 lbs and does not offer a regeneration option for regenerative braking
  • The display console is more basic (LED lights vs. an LCD screen) but also takes up less space, the kit comes stock with trigger throttle but has a twist throttle as an opion
  • Quality Samsung cells in the battery pack, larger capacity at 14.5 amp hours, solid one year warranty on all parts

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Electric Bike Outfitters

Model:

EBO Front Range

Price:

$1,083

Suggested Use:

Urban, Trail, Commuting

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

30 Day Return, 1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

20152016

Bicycle Details

Battery Weight:

7 lbs (3.17 kg)

Motor Weight:

12 lbs (5.44 kg)

Gearing Details:

9 (Single Speed or Shimano 6 or 7 Speed Cassettes or SunRace 8 and 9 Speed Cassettes)

Brake Details:

Mechanical 5 Brand Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy

Spokes:

13 Gauge Stainless Steel, 36 Spoke

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)27.5 in (69.85cm)28 in (71.12cm)

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Female USB Charge Port on Battery Pack, EBO Quick Connect Anti-Water Wiring, Optional Black or Silver Motor Color, Optional Black or White Battery Color, Optional Twist Throttle, Optional Wuxing Twist Throttle

Other:

Compatible with Disc Brakes or Caliper Style Brakes (Clamp Diameter 22.2 mm), Compatible with 100 mm, 120 mm, or 135 mm Dropout Sizes, Compatible with 26", 27.5" or 700C Wheel Size, 22 Amp Controller

Electronic Details

Motor Type:

Front-Mounted Gearless Direct Drive Hub, Rear-Mounted Gearless Direct Drive Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Battery Brand:

Samsung

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

14.5 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

522 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Estimated Max Range:

45 miles (72 km)

Display Type:

Fixed LED Console

Readouts:

Mode (Low, Med, High), Speed (5-33 MPH), Charge Level (1-4)

Drive Mode:

Trigger Throttle, Twist Throttle, Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

The EBO Front Range Kit is a mixed bag for me. I appreciate the more powerful 500 watt motor but given the gearless direct-drive design it weighs more than the more affordable planetary geared kits. Gearless motors are said to be tougher (no gears rubbing inside) and often allow for regenerative braking but that isn’t an option here. What you get is a relatively affordable, medium-power ebike kit. It operates quietly and should last well (you get a one year warranty which is great) but the display is more basic and there’s not throttle-only mode which can come in handy for off-road riding on bumpy terrain.

Even though the Front Range kit is compatible as a front or rear wheel motor, I would almost always choose to put it in the rear. The added weight in the front would definitely impact steering and might even spin out on loose terrain. At the rear, you get a more solid mounting point (especially if you’ve got a suspension fork up front as the demo bike I tried did) and you’re still balancing some of the weight forward with the downtube-mounted battery. The battery is actually one of my favorite parts of this kit because it uses quality Samsung cells, offers more capacity than some of the smaller kits and is easy to remove or lock onto the frame. This pack style is called a “Dolphin” and it can power your bike as well as a USB accessory given the female port on the right side. I’d mostly use this off the bike as a backup power source because when you’re pedaling it’s easy to snag this are of the pack (and any protruding USB plug and wire) with your shoe or leg.

I accidentally snagged the power cable running to the motor on this kit during the video review above and that goes to show how cable management can be a chore on any ebike kit. It’s nice to have your cables all zip tied up but even the best cable management can still look a bit tacky… that’s why all-black frames are a good choice because the cables blend in more. In addition to cables, this kit also has an independent controller box which can be mounted to the seat tube or possibly a rear rack. It’s just one more thing to deal with and it completely takes up the space for any kind of accessory or bottle cage when paired with the downtube style battery.

Overall, this is a solid package but generic gearless motors aren’t my personal preference. I’m a light weight guy who likes to pedal so I tend to opt for geared hubs or mid-drives. Some ebikes like the Stromer ST2 and Specialized Turbo show off what’s possible when you go high-end gearless because their motors are light, fast and offer regeneration but you’ll spend quite a bit more for that performance. I feel like the EBO Front Range motor could benefit from a 48 volt battery here to take full advantage of the extra copper windings inside but as it stands you’re going to get more power and drive than with some of their lighter kits. For true power however, I’m more excited about the EBO Mountaineer for just $100 more.

Pros:

  • There’s a built-in female USB port at the top right portion of the battery pack and this can be used to power a phone or other mobile device while riding the bike or as a backup source of power off the bike
  • Solid value at just over $1k considering you get a powerful 500 watt gearless motor and an oversized 14.5 amp hour battery! Most ebike kits offer 350 watt motors with a 10 ah battery, the cells on this bike are also Samsung and I trust that they are higher quality
  • Not only does Electric Bike Outfitters offer a one year comprehensive warranty, they also provide a 30 day money back guarantee and in my experience have been very willing to do custom swaps to get you the right wheel size or a different throttle unit (twist vs. trigger) free of charge or for very little money
  • Great wiring hardware (color coded makes it easier to setup and repair), the 5 Star brake levers are more generic but they do include motor inhibitor switches to cut power whenever you barke
  • Pedal assist is great for conserving the battery and getting some exercise and three modes is alright but I love that you’ve also got a throttle that can override at any time to help power up a hill or pass a fellow cyclist
  • The hub motor design on this kit is compatible with disc brakes but you can also use standard rim brakes as well, the one thing that requires a changeout is hydraulic brakes because the included levers only work with mechanical systems, you could use hydraulic levers of your own but if they don’t have electronic brake inhibitors built in you won’t be operating as safely (especially given the “all the time” pedal assist design)
  • The kit comes in several configurations to replace a 26″, 27.5″ or 700c wheel, to fit a 100 mm, 120 mm, or 135 mm dropout, and to work as either a front or rear wheel drive kit (though I’d highly recommend rear given the weight of the motor so as not to adversely impact steering)
  • The battery pack snaps on and off easily and quickly for convenient charging or lighter weight transport, you also get a solid locking core built into the battery for when it’s mounted to the frame
  • Especially for trail and mountain use the default trigger throttle works very well as it does not compromise your grip though it might take more space on your bars than the twist throttle (I just don’t like full-grip twists)

Cons:

  • I like the USB charging port but it’s positioned on the side of the battery which makes it easier to bump with your leg when pedaling or to snag the wire… would be better on the top or front end of the pack vs. the side
  • The controller unit for this kit is built into a separate black box which adds clutter to the frame and means more wires have to be dealt with
  • On the demo bike I filmed and photographed above the battery was mounted to the downtube using the stock water bottle cage bosses and the controller box was fit onto the seat tube so there wasn’t anywhere to add a bottle… Consider an aftermarket saddle rail adapter, a rear carry rack with bottle bag or using a Camelbak
  • The LED console offers several readouts (mode, charge level and speed) but is still more basic than an LCD which could show trip distance, time, max speed etc. the unit they chose is fairly small, tough and more affordable so it’s not too bad
  • The battery pack has an independent on/off button built into it which has to be activated before the display panel is turned on, this extra step makes the pack easier to leave on accidentally and can be confusing if you forget and try to activate the bike just using the display
  • There are no lights built into this kit and I think it would be difficult to wire them in, I like when I can run everything off of one battery but you can always get some aftermarket lights that are rechargeable if you ride at night a lot
  • While the cadence sensing pedal assist worked alright, it only uses a five magnet system vs. 12 on a lot of newer builds and kits I’ve seen which means it is less responsive (especially in higher gears where pedal rotation can be slower at low speeds)
  • Gearless motors are very durable and operate without producing much noise but they do weigh more and this one is ~12 lbs, the battery is also a bit heavier because it’s a larger capacity pack so ~7 lbs
  • Sometimes gearless motors offer regenerative braking which can extend rides by ~10% but that feature was not included with this kit (likely to keep the price down)
  • There is no throttle-only mode with this kit, you have to enable one of three pedal assist settings in order to use the throttle and this means that any pedal movement can also activate the motor which could cause instability for some applications
  • The pedal assist sensor is not a clip-on design so you actually have to remove the crank arms in order to mount it, once it’s on however it feels solid and is actually quite responsive

Resources:

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mrgold35
2 days ago

Once you add up two Radrover ebikes, shipping, and any extra accessories, you will be under the $2000 per if you picked the Radrover. Rad Power Bikes also makes a folding Radmini with 4" fat tires if you need a smaller storage footprint or you need something with a lower stand over height. The Radcity has pretty much the same specs as the Rover; but, has 2.3" tires, fenders, two different frame sizes, rear rack along with front suspension. I like the 4" fat tires because they can travel between paved roads, sandy beaches, and every where else in-between very smoothly. I work commute at 20-23 mph for 13 miles roundtrip on paved roads and sometimes take a detour to ride the hard packed to sandy single track trails before or after work without missing a beat.

You can find the same mix of bikes with Volt, Teo, and some others around the same price range. I would get something within the 2"-4" tire range, 48v, 11 to 17 A/h battery, twist or hand throttle with Pedal assist, front suspension forks, cargo capacity (or mounts for racks/baskets), 500-750 watts, and 180mm brakes.

Pretty much all ebikes in this range are around +60 lbs if that is a consideration. That weight is too heavy for my wife to lift on our platform bike rack even with the 7 lbs battery removed.

I don't have a RV; but, I do travel with my Radrovers on my SUV (Grand Canyon, Sedona, eastern NM). I had no problems travelling with the Radrover once I prepped for the road (removed battery, seat post with seat, rack bag, wrapped LCD in saran wrap, etc...). I even have a weather proof travel cover that encases both bikes and the rack if we run into really bad weather or if I want to cover the bikes overnight on the back of the SUV.

GuruUno
3 days ago

$999!!!!!

only 350 miles

Great deal and opportunity to get a great deal for a fantastic price.

Cash sale only, local pickup Metuchen, NJ 08840

Interested parties reply to this posting via methods here within, as me posting my e-mail and/or phone number only encourages spammers.

Also posted on Craigslist (CNJ)
https://cnj.craigslist.org/bik/6188270957.html
Back problems, getting a different style bike.

Although I love this, I'm too old for a mountain bike.

Hardtail trail-ready electric bike with powerful center-drive motor for effective climbing and balanced weight, ~28 mph top speed
Removable battery pack for convenient charging and reduced transport weight, lockout suspension fork by RockShox for improved efficiency on flat terrain, upgraded 180 mm hydraulic disc brakes with motor cutoff, quick release wheels for easy maintenance

MAKE: IZIP
MODEL: E3 Peak
MSRP PRICE: $3,100 USD
BODY POSITION: Forward
SUGGESTED USE: Urban, Trail
ELECTRIC BIKE CLASS: Speed Pedalec (Class 3)
MODEL YEAR: 2015

Bicycle Details
TOTAL WEIGHT: 49 lbs (22.22 kg)
FRAME MATERIAL: 6061 Aluminum Alloy
FRAME SIZES: 19 in (48.26 cm)
GEOMETRY MEASUREMENTS: (Wheelbase 1125 mm and 1150 mm, Stand Over Height 753 mm and 791 mm)
FRAME TYPES: High-Step
FRAME COLORS: Black with Orange Accents
FRAME FORK DETAILS: RockShox XC30 TK 27.5" Suspension with 100 mm Travel
ATTACHMENT POINTS: Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses
GEARING DETAILS: 10 Speed 1x10 SRAM X7, 11-36T
SHIFTER DETAILS: SRAM X7 Triggers on Right Bar
CRANKS: Lasco, 38T Sprocket
PEDALS: Wellgo Aluminum Alloy Platform
HEADSET: VP Semi-Integrated Ahead
STEM: Zoom 3D Forged Aluminum Alloy
HANDLEBAR: Tranz-X ATB, Low Rise
BRAKE DETAILS: Tektro Auriga E-Sub Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Rotors, Tektro Levers with Motor Inhibitor
GRIPS: Velo Locking, Flat Rubber
SADDLE: Velo Racing
SEAT POST: TranzX Alloy with Micro Adjust
SEAT POST LENGTH: 350 mm
SEAT POST DIAMETER: 31.6 mm
RIMS: Alex Volar 2.1 Doublewall
SPOKES: Stainless Steel
TIRE BRAND: CST Patrol 650b, 27.5" x 2.25"
WHEEL SIZES: 27.5 in (69.85cm)
TUBE DETAILS: Schrader Valve
ACCESSORIES: Aluminum Alloy Bash Guard and Chain Guide
OTHER: Quick Release on Front and Rear Wheels, Locking Removable Battery Pack, KMC X10eRB High Torque Rust Proof Chain

Electronic Details
MOTOR BRAND: TranzX
MOTOR TYPE: Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
MOTOR NOMINAL OUTPUT: 350 watts
BATTERY VOLTAGE: 48 volts
BATTERY AMP HOURS: 8.7 ah
BATTERY WATT HOURS: 417.6 wh
BATTERY CHEMISTRY: Lithium-ion
CHARGE TIME: 5 hours
ESTIMATED MIN RANGE: 25 miles (40 km)
ESTIMATED MAX RANGE: 35 miles (56 km)
DISPLAY TYPE: Backlit Monochrome LCD, Fixed with Adjustable Angle
READOUTS: Speed, Odometer, Battery Capacity, Assist Level (1-4), Range Estimation
DISPLAY ACCESSORIES: Independent Button Pad on Left Bar
DRIVE MODE: Advanced Pedal Assist, Twist Throttle (Measures Speed, Cadence and Torque)
TOP SPEED: 28 mph (45 kph) (6 mph Throttle Only, 20 mph Throttle with Pedaling)

1/1
Thomas Jaszewski
3 days ago

I was trying to make it home from my ebike commute before a rain front hit about a month ago. I was about 1 1/2 miles away from home base before I encounter the heavy rains and light hail (hail can really sting at 20 mph). The Luna bag did a good job keeping the battery dry when I got home and open the bag to plug in the charger. The bag was still a little dusty inside from all the trail riding from a few days earlier.
Electric Rider, EM3ev, and Falcon EV are bags in the $50-$60 range with better zippers and builds. Sadly none of the better bags use the zip ties.

opimax
4 days ago

When the Big Bs wear out on my wife's ST1 i will be doing the same, I have done this already on my ST2, mainly due to the fender rub issues. I need a new front fender ob her bike due to rubbing the inside of screws where the connector to the frame , where the light is mounted. They are loose and I cant tighten them, they are rubbed smooth. The rear is worse with the rack not being strong enough to carry a spare battery in each pannier eventually bends the arms on the rack.

We have Thudbusters and Bodyfloats along w/suspension forks on are bikes so I dont miss the balloon tires really. I may get a little less rolling resistance, more range and a little more torque since the outside diameter is a tad smaller

Moonshine
5 days ago

You are describing the ride of a Stromer ST2. Take one out for a test ride.
Gotta go through the gears with the Yamaha. And know exactly what you're doing...

Tend to agree with Rincon, what you're looking to achieve is exactly what the Stromer does.

I guess I can't ignore two people saying the same thing. I'm driving 2 hours today to test drive a Stromer ST2. I will report back the results.

What I have noticed is that most e-bikes have too narrow a range of gears. Not enough low low gears for steep hills and not enough high gears so when you are cruising along you can actually engage the pedals. The next bike I purchase will likely have an internally geared hub since a lot of those seem to have a much wider range .

That's what I was thinking too, I was thinking the next bike should have Nuvinci infinity or something.

It took a while, but I did a lot of playing around with my Specialized Turbo and went from 11-32T 10 sp cassette to an 11-36T 10 sp cassette. I also swapped the 48T to 44T on the front. This gave me a lower 1st gear and pretty decent cruising at 26 mph (top assist speed) at my normal cadence of 80-85 rpm. However, I found that I had nothing left for descents. I then changed from SRAM X7 10 speed to Deore XT 11 speed 11-42T rear and went back to the 48T front. This gave me an even lower 1st gear and about thje same 10th gear. But now I have a higher 11th gear for descents up to around 34-35 mph. In the end, I have a much lower 1st gear (42T instead of 32T) and the same top gear 11T with 11 speeds instead of 10.

Oh wow. If you don't mind me asking, how much did these changes c$$$st you?

dapope_22
2 weeks ago

I have two Radrovers (Black and White) since Sept/2016. Both arrived at the same time and the white Radrover box was in pretty good shape. The black Radrover box was beat up, dirty, and had a rip down the larger side.

I had an issue with my Black RR:
- front disk brakes out of true, used an adjustable wrench to bend back
- rear derailleur was bent in and the chain would rub on the fat tire in the 3 lowest gears, bent back into place by hand
- left pedal crank bolt wouldn't stay tq (the whole left crank fell off in the middle of my commute, had to throttle back home and take the car). RR replaced the crank and the bolt and 100% since
- controller had an issue of not re-engaging the motor if your speed got above the motor cut off to show "000" watts and your mph would slow down. I had to pause my pedalling for 2-3 seconds to get the motor to engage. RR sent me a new controller and 100% since.

Others on the forum had shipping issues like:
- loose spokes
- damage battery pack and it wouldn't fit in battery tray (one one person had this)
- minor dents and paint chips
- loose connections with wiring harness causing error messages on LCD
- brakes need to be adjusted
- power and/or brake cables on front handlebars don't have enough play (can't turn the wheel fully, re-doing the zip ties help)

Everything is fixable and I found it was a great way to learn about my bike. Rad Power Bikes has an excellent customer service and they resolve warranty issues pretty quick. I would charge the battery first because it might take a few hours or up to a full day to balance out the cells. The battery pack is only as strong as the weakest cell. Balancing out the cells ensures all the individual batteries have the exact same charge level and they discharge at the same rate for max power and range.

I e-mailed them several times and so did my Velofix tech and they went ahead and overnighted me the forks. Received the bike on Fri and I am extremely happy. The Radrover exceeded my expectaions.

1/3
GSA
2 weeks ago

https://www.shockebikes.com/bike/spark

Pedelec AND throttle

350 Watt

Front suspension

Disc brakes

Removable battery, two chargers (one for work and home)

Easily has a range of 40 miles per charge

Rack, fenders, headlight, turn signals

Original price $1699 + $170 shipping for $1869.

Upgraded tires to Schwalbe Marathon Plus e-Bike-rated tires with retroreflective sidewalls

Added monkey lights to front tire and BikeRegister kit (hundreds of microscopic dots printed with unique BikeRegister ID and BikeRegister ID etch)

Fewer than 50 miles on bike

gwenandersEn@yahoo.com

located in Maryland near DC

1/2
pcrdude
2 weeks ago

Many of you may have heard of the Xiaomi QiCycle. It's a 250 watt front hub drive foldable. Battery is 5.8 amp/hour based on Panasonic 18650 cells. Currently, it isn't available in the USA, but someone decided to import and sell on Amazon, so I bought one. Fit and finish are outstanding, but it is a 220V 50Hz charging system. The seller promised a step-up transformer, but it wasn't in the package. I bought my own, and the seller credited the price back to me. The transformer arrives today, so I plan on posting more information after a few rides.

I still have my first generation Currie E3 Dash, and it's still a much better bike for longer trips, but a small foldable with >20 mile range should be very handy.

More Info:
https://www.cnet.com/products/xiaomi-mi-qicycle/preview/

It cost $800......

DrewSkates
2 weeks ago

I'd look for a larger front sprocket first, before tires, since a high cadence seems to be your main complaint. If that's not enough then I'd look at tires in the hope that reduces your effort, but the tires wont help if the cadence at 25-28 mph is already too high for you.

I've found that the Powerfly 7 knobby tires don't have a huge contact patch with the ground (since there's a lot of air between the knobs) and that whether I'm running lower tire pressure or higher pressure that my pedaling effort is about the same.

I also think that I was getting more wear in the center of my rear tire when I was pressuring up to 50psi for my rides on pavement. Iit's no harder to pedal at 40psi, but I'm in a hilly area where I don't get to ride above 20mph that often (I think our tire's recommended range is 30-55 psi). I'm going to leave it at 40psi for pavement and hope to even our my tire wear.

It's funny but when I had an XM700+ on order so I'd be able to go 28mph, I was pricing the cost to install a Rock Shox front fork and knobby tires to be able to ride off road. I'm happy with my slower Powerfly7 because I like to ride with my wife and she doesn't like to ride fast.
Thanks Larry, I'm also currently looking into to changing my front sprocket to a 17/18t but what an experience I've had trying to get that done. I could go on and on...

Larry Ganz
2 weeks ago

I'd look for a larger front sprocket first, before tires, since a high cadence seems to be your main complaint. If that's not enough then I'd look at tires in the hope that reduces your effort, but the tires wont help if the cadence at 25-28 mph is already too high for you.

I've found that the Powerfly 7 knobby tires don't have a huge contact patch with the ground (since there's a lot of air between the knobs) and that whether I'm running lower tire pressure or higher pressure that my pedaling effort is about the same.

I also think that I was getting more wear in the center of my rear tire when I was pressuring up to 50psi for my rides on pavement. Iit's no harder to pedal at 40psi, but I'm in a hilly area where I don't get to ride above 20mph that often (I think our tire's recommended range is 30-55 psi). I'm going to leave it at 40psi for pavement and hope to even our my tire wear.

It's funny but when I had an XM700+ on order so I'd be able to go 28mph, I was pricing the cost to install a Rock Shox front fork and knobby tires to be able to ride off road. I'm happy with my slower Powerfly7 because I like to ride with my wife and she doesn't like to ride fast.

Cnugget
2 weeks ago

RE: Lock for Mariner.
Court has a nice over view vid on locking a bike in general.

I have the https://www.litelok.com/
It's rated at the Gold standard purchase overseas shipped to CAN. We bought two and they can be joined together to make one long lock or be used individually (two with the same keys).
The lock feels solid and is a large visible piece.. It is indeed wider and heavier than I pictured in my mind. You can see the lock on my bike back in photos on Page 4 of this thread.

I have struggled to get the lock closed sometimes because I'm a bit of a wimp but it gets easier with understanding. It more like setting a tight spring that would rather stay flat if you can imagine.
:rolleyes:
It does have a limited circumference as a single lock. The diameter is between 8-9.5" possibly more if you are able to squeeze it into a more oval shape but the might require fighting with the lock and the bike rack more than you'd like. The length when straight is 29"(one lock, not including the interlocking section). It weighs 39.2oz or ~2.5lbs for each lock. Now is that lightweight?

Because the tires are 4" and the spokes from a 20" wheel are closely spaced it leads to complications getting it around the rear tire/frame and what ever you are securing it too. It is possible, but not always. Usually this mean a compromise of just securing the frame to the bike rack or the tire (with the motor). I think I have only once been able to lock it with the rear tire, frame and bike rack. Perhaps it was due to lack of imagination or time.

With two locks joined together you get much more range of use. I could flatten the two together to get a radius of ~25?" (maybe a wee bit more even).. Lots of play to setup around something awkward or fold the bike in half and lock the frame front and back tires :D. The down side is you could give potential thief enough play to make it easier to cut. If someone wants something they will find a way to take it. This bike does catch the attention of others so it might be good to lock it down.

The exterior casing looks almost new (minus a few stray bits). Pretty sturdy and seems to shed dirt well.. (unlike my bike)..

1/5
mrgold35
3 weeks ago

I have two Radrovers (Black and White) since Sept/2016. Both arrived at the same time and the white Radrover box was in pretty good shape. The black Radrover box was beat up, dirty, and had a rip down the larger side.

I had an issue with my Black RR:
- front disk brakes out of true, used an adjustable wrench to bend back
- rear derailleur was bent in and the chain would rub on the fat tire in the 3 lowest gears, bent back into place by hand
- left pedal crank bolt wouldn't stay tq (the whole left crank fell off in the middle of my commute, had to throttle back home and take the car). RR replaced the crank and the bolt and 100% since
- controller had an issue of not re-engaging the motor if your speed got above the motor cut off to show "000" watts and your mph would slow down. I had to pause my pedalling for 2-3 seconds to get the motor to engage. RR sent me a new controller and 100% since.

Others on the forum had shipping issues like:
- loose spokes
- damage battery pack and it wouldn't fit in battery tray (one one person had this)
- minor dents and paint chips
- loose connections with wiring harness causing error messages on LCD
- brakes need to be adjusted
- power and/or brake cables on front handlebars don't have enough play (can't turn the wheel fully, re-doing the zip ties help)

Everything is fixable and I found it was a great way to learn about my bike. Rad Power Bikes has an excellent customer service and they resolve warranty issues pretty quick. I would charge the battery first because it might take a few hours or up to a full day to balance out the cells. The battery pack is only as strong as the weakest cell. Balancing out the cells ensures all the individual batteries have the exact same charge level and they discharge at the same rate for max power and range.

EddieJ
3 weeks ago

When you start to narrow your choice down, I would suggest that you ask the dealer some direct questions in relation to the replacement cost of the following items.

Front drive sprocket.

Any idler sprocket and bearing that may be fitted.

The rear mech hanger.

Rear suspension bearing and bush kit.

The reason for asking these questions, is that it might save you a nasty shock come service time, or in the event of a fall in the case of the rear mech hanger.

Also be very wary of the claims that are being made in respect of range, and watch out for 400wh batteries being fitted to the CX motor. It is not a good combination in respect of range.

JeffDG
3 weeks ago

Hello!
WOW! I knew e-bikes were emerging, but until my research research I had no idea the number of brands and offerings! Cost is still a factor, so I'm looking to merge the capabilities of a mountain bike with a commuter. Right now, I have a Trek 29er but because of the hills around here and asthma I don't go out much. That and I'm not overly sold on the 29er concept...

So...here is a rundown of my "must haves" and my "like to haves" followed by a couple options that seem to fit the bill.

Price: $2k (give or take)
Wheel size: strongly prefer 27.5"
Tires: not particularly relevant as I'd probably have to change to something amenable to both activities.
Drive: prefer a mid-drive
Suspension: Must have 100mm front suspension... full suspension would be wicked!!... could do front rack in that case (e.g., Thule pack n pedal)?????
Method of drive: prefer torque sensing with throttle
Accessories: needs to have the ability for a rack, fenders, and lights; prefer if they come pre-installed with lights integrated into the electric system
Class: Must be class III (20mph throttle / 28mph assist)

So far I found two that fit these criteria and two more that, well, might just be shooting for the stars:
1. Magnum Peak: a geared hub-driven mountain bike with bolt ons for racks etc.
2. M2S XC Sport - there is a dearth of info on this brand - but this site has done a review of the impressive drive system. The range seems low... are they just a conservative bunch?

is there an option for a 500W motor upgrade
is there an option for battery upgrades
Possible to add a throttle?
is there a gear-shift sensor?
Are the head/tail lights integrated into the electric system?

3. M2S Dual Sport - this is a full-suspension mountain bike...not sure it would work, but it would be incredibly cool if it could!
4. M2S All Go - this looks so cool! And so light! 37 lbs! What!?!?! Looks like there's an option for front suspension based on their photos, but it's not listed on the drop down menus.

It seems that Magnum has been around for at least 7 years...which is a good sign. The M2S fits more criteria but they seem to be an incredibly new company, which has its risks...on the other hand... the parts seem to be all available elsewhere (Bafang Max drive system... shimano shifters, etc.)... M2S' website, while looks great and is nicely navigable, does leave some questions.

I'm open to other options and/or input on the ones above...

THANKS!!

EDIT: Add to the short list the Biktrix Monte 1000... that also seems to fit the criteria. Has a BBS02 motor, hard tail, etc etc.

Chris Nolte
3 weeks ago

Update II

Surpassed 800km on Charger GX Touring today. Planning on writing a more extensive review at 1000km mark. So far everything is great except I'm noticing strange noises, creaking coming from seat or handlebars. No big deal. I don't think my rear tire is gonna last much beyond 1500km at which time I plan on replacing both front and rear with Schwalbe Big Bens. The most important issue that I'm concerned about is range. Today I did the longest tour yet. About 72 km. I rode the whole way on Tour mode and on return leg had plenty of head-wind. I arrived home with two bars remaining and a range estimate of 17km. If this range keeps up, I'm very pleased with the single battery configuration. The range of this bike is outstanding.

Rant & Ride on.

-Tbone
Glad to hear you're getting some good time on the bike. I recommend you opt for the Big Ben Plus when you change. They add a little extra puncture protection.

Tbone
3 weeks ago

Update II

Surpassed 800km on Charger GX Touring today. Planning on writing a more extensive review at 1000km mark. So far everything is great except I'm noticing strange noises, creaking coming from seat or handlebars. No big deal. I don't think my rear tire is gonna last much beyond 1500km at which time I plan on replacing both front and rear with Schwalbe Big Bens. The most important issue that I'm concerned about is range. Today I did the longest tour yet. About 72 km. I rode the whole way on Tour mode and on return leg had plenty of head-wind. I arrived home with two bars remaining and a range estimate of 17km. If this range keeps up, I'm very pleased with the single battery configuration. The range of this bike is outstanding.

Rant & Ride on.

-Tbone

Matt A
3 weeks ago

The frames of the R&Ms do seem well put together and strong. People comment to me about the sturdiness of the Charger so they'd probably be really surprised to see the Delite. I guess the welds are always going to be the weak spots on any bike frame.

That gear ratio thing I had mentioned before: I don't have hills on my commute just a gradual grade change. On the way to work I am descending a bit and on the way home ascending. When I'm on an open stretch and have good pavement I run out of gear range and the only way to increase my speed is to increase the assist level. Its like using the assist level as another gear I guess. In fact, I have the shift suggestion thingy turned on in the Intuvia and sometimes it throws me the arrow to shift when I actually can't shift anymore. I've maxed out my gear range and the Intuvia is telling me to shift. On good pavement I feel like I have enough leg and lung power to get the bike to 28 with only Tour mode. But I don't have the gear range to get it there. I actually haven't hit 28 mph yet on this bike. My max is 27.5 and that was a slight ascension. If I am maxed out on gear and I up the assist to Turbo, I just feel like I'm spinning ridiculously fast. There were some suggestions on this forum and even my LBS mechanics suggested that maybe I could change the front or back rings to alter that ratio - but I haven't really explored that avenue yet.

A couple of the 2nd commuter bikes I am considering are 20 mph bikes. I'm really curious as to whether the higher torque motor and lighter bike but lower top speed might actually make my commute more efficient (given all the start/stop riding I have). I mentioned it before but very little of my total commute is spent at speeds over 20 mph. I have a couple of stretches where I get there but on those I'm usually cruising around 22-23 mph and never hitting the higher top speeds of 28 mph. On the commute home I sometimes keep the speed down a bit on the open stretches trying to stay right around 20 mph in order to conserve battery. I wish my area had a strong e-bike presence wherein I could borrower a bike for a day or two to test out on an actual 35 mile work commute. Its one thing to test ride a bike but totally another to sit on it for a couple of long rides over multiple days with your gear/wind etc.
Oh yeah and also, if you too see your cadence being at about 85rpm at 26-27mph, then I would go with the different chain ring sizes. If you are spinning faster than that at 26mph+, then please get someone who knows what they're doing to fix your Nuvinci.

Matt A
3 weeks ago

The frames of the R&Ms do seem well put together and strong. People comment to me about the sturdiness of the Charger so they'd probably be really surprised to see the Delite. I guess the welds are always going to be the weak spots on any bike frame.

That gear ratio thing I had mentioned before: I don't have hills on my commute just a gradual grade change. On the way to work I am descending a bit and on the way home ascending. When I'm on an open stretch and have good pavement I run out of gear range and the only way to increase my speed is to increase the assist level. Its like using the assist level as another gear I guess. In fact, I have the shift suggestion thingy turned on in the Intuvia and sometimes it throws me the arrow to shift when I actually can't shift anymore. I've maxed out my gear range and the Intuvia is telling me to shift. On good pavement I feel like I have enough leg and lung power to get the bike to 28 with only Tour mode. But I don't have the gear range to get it there. I actually haven't hit 28 mph yet on this bike. My max is 27.5 and that was a slight ascension. If I am maxed out on gear and I up the assist to Turbo, I just feel like I'm spinning ridiculously fast. There were some suggestions on this forum and even my LBS mechanics suggested that maybe I could change the front or back rings to alter that ratio - but I haven't really explored that avenue yet.

A couple of the 2nd commuter bikes I am considering are 20 mph bikes. I'm really curious as to whether the higher torque motor and lighter bike but lower top speed might actually make my commute more efficient (given all the start/stop riding I have). I mentioned it before but very little of my total commute is spent at speeds over 20 mph. I have a couple of stretches where I get there but on those I'm usually cruising around 22-23 mph and never hitting the higher top speeds of 28 mph. On the commute home I sometimes keep the speed down a bit on the open stretches trying to stay right around 20 mph in order to conserve battery. I wish my area had a strong e-bike presence wherein I could borrower a bike for a day or two to test out on an actual 35 mile work commute. Its one thing to test ride a bike but totally another to sit on it for a couple of long rides over multiple days with your gear/wind etc.
Why the high end gear ratio of the Nuvinci is not ideal, I think it is enough. After reading your post I opened up the Nyon Fitness screen with the Cadence readout and found that the cadence in the highest gear ratio required to maintain 26.5-27mph was 85 for me. If yours is significantly more than that, I would consider having a shop take a look at your NuVinci, a shop that really really knows the Nuvinci. What worries me is that your Shift recommendations are going off while in the highest gear, this was my first clue that something was wrong with the Nuvinci. The bosch shift recommendation should not appear when you are already in the highest gear. This happened to me along with the spinning at high speeds which lead me to realize something has to be wrong.

It would be nice to have more ebike presence everywhere for test riding and reviews. If you rarely go over 20mph then I would get the CX drive, however one of your goals is fitness so the extra torque is something I feel you would never utilized. As you know, max torque is achieved at high RPMs, and if you are never doing top speed in Turbo, then you will never see that 75nm of torque. I am no expert so please don't take this as fact, but I absolutely highly highly doubt that the CX drive is going to hit the 75nm of torque unless you are either 1. close to top speed or 2. going up an extremely steep grade. I would opt for the optional higher speed even if I would rarely use it. Also, just as our HS bike starts to cut the motor down at 26mph, the CX drive I'm sure will start cutting your motor power out significantly at 18mph.

E-Wheels
3 weeks ago

There were some suggestions on this forum and even my LBS mechanics suggested that maybe I could change the front or back rings to alter that ratio - but I haven't really explored that avenue yet.

Over50,
At one time I was considering the R&M Nuvinci Charger but my concerns regarding the limited high ratio end of the N380 hub required for commuting steered me towards the R&M Charger Touring as it has the Shimano 10S cassette which has higher gearing options
I posted the below about possible Gates pulley sizes in the Nuvinci Hub thread https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/nuvinci-hub.11852/ just in case you were considering a change out at some point

Over50,
Thanks for posting your observations of the Nuvinci N380 CVT high-low ratio range
Your feedback on the R&M Charger is very useful and appreciated as I have included the 25km/hr Charger Nuvinci on my short list
Based on my current road bike gearing which allows me to comfortably cruise at 30-35km/hr, I have concerns if the N380 will give me enough high ratio range to cruise at similar speeds without having a too higher cadence
I am looking at gear ratio change out options if I was to buy a bike with the Nuvinci N380 hub and thought this might be helpful to you as well
Using the Gates Carbon Drive Calculator http://www.gatescarbondrive.com/Apps/DriveCalculator/index.html it appears as you may have a few options to change your current front and rear pinions to get higher gear ratios whilst optimizing your current 111t belt
This is providing you have enough adjustment at the dropouts to vary the chain stay lengths to accommodate the new pinions accordingly
I have assumed your bike has the below pinions and belt size which were taken from the R&M site listed for the Charger HS Nuvinci
Motor pinion 22t
Rear hub pinion 24t
Chain stay length 485
Belt 111t
Gear ratio 0.917

If so then the below options are available

New ratio option #1
Motor pinion 24t
Rear hub pinion 22t
Chain stay length 483.99
Belt 111t
Gear ratio 1.091

New ratio option #2
Motor pinion 26t
Rear hub pinion 22t
Chain stay length 478.45
Belt 111t
Gear ratio 1.182

Not sure what the cost would be to purchase new front & rear pinions from Gates, but it may be worth pursuing

Over50
3 weeks ago

...The aluminum on the Delite it much thicker everywhere, but especially the top tube where the Charger is literally half the thickness of the Delite. I assume this is because they wanted to make a super strong front triangle on the bike to support the suspension components. Losing the geometrical advantage of the diamond frame probably required more aluminum to strengthen the front triangle. But really, it looks like double the aluminum was used at least for the top tube...I am curious what you mean when you say you do not have the gear range for Turbo to be useful...

The frames of the R&Ms do seem well put together and strong. People comment to me about the sturdiness of the Charger so they'd probably be really surprised to see the Delite. I guess the welds are always going to be the weak spots on any bike frame.

That gear ratio thing I had mentioned before: I don't have hills on my commute just a gradual grade change. On the way to work I am descending a bit and on the way home ascending. When I'm on an open stretch and have good pavement I run out of gear range and the only way to increase my speed is to increase the assist level. Its like using the assist level as another gear I guess. In fact, I have the shift suggestion thingy turned on in the Intuvia and sometimes it throws me the arrow to shift when I actually can't shift anymore. I've maxed out my gear range and the Intuvia is telling me to shift. On good pavement I feel like I have enough leg and lung power to get the bike to 28 with only Tour mode. But I don't have the gear range to get it there. I actually haven't hit 28 mph yet on this bike. My max is 27.5 and that was a slight ascension. If I am maxed out on gear and I up the assist to Turbo, I just feel like I'm spinning ridiculously fast. There were some suggestions on this forum and even my LBS mechanics suggested that maybe I could change the front or back rings to alter that ratio - but I haven't really explored that avenue yet.

A couple of the 2nd commuter bikes I am considering are 20 mph bikes. I'm really curious as to whether the higher torque motor and lighter bike but lower top speed might actually make my commute more efficient (given all the start/stop riding I have). I mentioned it before but very little of my total commute is spent at speeds over 20 mph. I have a couple of stretches where I get there but on those I'm usually cruising around 22-23 mph and never hitting the higher top speeds of 28 mph. On the commute home I sometimes keep the speed down a bit on the open stretches trying to stay right around 20 mph in order to conserve battery. I wish my area had a strong e-bike presence wherein I could borrower a bike for a day or two to test out on an actual 35 mile work commute. Its one thing to test ride a bike but totally another to sit on it for a couple of long rides over multiple days with your gear/wind etc.

Matt A
3 weeks ago

Wow. You answered my question and with extremely thorough detail. I saw it in the pics! I wanted to target mode percentages as part of my fitness goal setting (ie "do this commute in at least 40% Eco"). Looks like the Nyon would give me the precision I need at least to analyze after the ride and see how close I came to the goal. I know there were a few threads in the forum on how to install/retrofit and possible warranty implications so I will have to go back and read those thoroughly. And the most interesting thing you informed me about are the custom modes. Because I too was thinking there was way too big of a gap between Eco and Tour. I honestly haven't used Turbo much at all. I bet I don't even have 1 mile of 850 miles accumulated in Turbo mode - and part of this I believe is because I don't have enough gear range with the Nuvinci N380. So whereas I don't feel Turbo has much value for me, I could really use a setting 1/2 way between Eco and Tour.
I can give you some more information on installing it and the implications. This will be what I've heard from Bosch dealers.

When I installed my kit, it was quite easy. Because I was worried about messing with the wires, the first thing I did was slide off my Intuvia and slide on the Nyon to see what happened. Everything worked fine, the Intuvia thumb controller still worked for the Nyon, changing assistance levels and scrolling through the different screens. So technically that would be all you needed to do until you had time to attach the new Nyon thumb controller. You just need to unscrew the Intuvia controller wire on the back of the Bosch Holder, and screw in the Nyon controller.

It took me a while to really customize the readouts on the Nyon, I was too lazy and busy for a while. You asking questions about it is what made me do it. I actually like the Nyon even more now, I adjusted the screens and definitely enjoy seeing the gradient, current Wh usage, Avg Wh usage, Torque data, etc.

One important thing about the whole Odometer situation. If you remember from the pictures there was 3 different options for some sort of trip. So my Nyon gives me automatically a trip distance just for that one ride, and then on the home screen it gave an Overall Distance. The weird thing is, this 'Overall Distance' is just like a trip meter. The only difference is that it does not reset each day. I don't know how to reset the value, but I switched the readouts and now the Nyon does in fact display my true Odometer.

I just took a second to look at the bosch connect website real quick, and now I see why they do it that way. My Overall Distance on the front is what they call User total distance. Since the Nyon was newly fitted I guess, it believes you are a new user to an old used bike. So it gives you 'your' odometer, and then the bike's real odometer. I guess they just did this for people buying used bosch bikes.

Anyway, about the warranty. Technically, just placing a Nyon on your bike voids your warranty. This is quite stupid and unfair, but it is simple to get around it. Bosch will never have a clue you used a Nyon, you just need to keep your Intuvia around so in case you ever need a serious service where diagnostics are taken. The Bosch diagnostics will 100% not know that you have used a Nyon in the past. If you plug the Nyon into the diagnostic tool, Bosch will know that the shop plugged in a Nyon, but has no idea who's bike it's on. This I am speaking from out of experience. Of course the shop's don't want Bosch to know they serviced a Nyon, because they are not supposed to. The warranty issue would never be an issue as long as you keep or can get another Intuvia.

Changing the suspension on my bike will certainly void the warranty! Perhaps I will keep the Suntour and Fusion shock just in case:) But I was told by multiple people that the odds of a frame cracking or anything are smaller than winning the lottery, even for off road use. My girlfriend has the charger, and the top tube is much thinner. The aluminum on the Delite it much thicker everywhere, but especially the top tube where the Charger is literally half the thickness of the Delite. I assume this is because they wanted to make a super strong front triangle on the bike to support the suspension components. Losing the geometrical advantage of the diamond frame probably required more aluminum to strengthen the front triangle. But really, it looks like double the aluminum was used at least for the top tube.

While I have been learning a lot about bikes recently, I still am an amateur. I am curious what you mean when you say you do not have the gear range for Turbo to be useful. I too find that the high gear range is lacking a bit, and perhaps it's a problem with the whole drivetrain setup, but once the motor cuts out at 28, it is extremely difficult to push it past 32 without gravity. On a perfectly flat road, I've never been able to get passed 32 mph. Riding the bike without assist kind of sucks too. Not just for not having the motor, but the gears are just so weird feeling with no motor. I road for miles and over a bridge with no motor, and it is not fun at all. I was doing 5mph the whole way up the bridge lol.

Matt A
3 weeks ago

Hey Matt - love that you're pushing the limits of your Delite. Due to a number of factors, most of which are not under my control, I've only got 500 miles on mine so far, which are mostly straight forward commuter runs.

Interesting re: the Nyon. I would purchase it for the more detailed battery stats more than anything else. Sounds like it needs a few firmware/software tweaks - hopefully, you can simply do upgrades via the usb port as they (inevitably) are offered. I have a Garmin 1000 Edge, which I switch out between bikes. It more than covers all those post-ride statistics and is nice since it automatically pushes the data to my phone as soon as I save the ride via Bluetooth and also to my tablet bv wifi or direct connection when recharging. All sorts of fun info to sort through - mapping, cumulative/comparative ride stats, profiles, temperature, course creation tools, etc. It does give you side streets, upcoming turn alarms, etc. So I certainly wouldn't need the Nyon for those functions. Too bad the Nyon reboots mid-ride on you. Maybe a connector problem? The light issue doesn't surprise me. For whatever reason, my Intuvia stopped turning on the rear light at around 100 miles, whatever mode you put it in (high beam, on-off, front light handlebar switch, etc). Don't know what that is about, but I'll put Propel on notice and eventually have them look at it. I think I read somewhere in this thread that the same thing happened to someone else? Was that you? I have an older model Dinotte tail light with the external battery that I put on when that happened so that works well - in fact, much better than the factory light - since it flashes in different modes and has quite the output. I'm o.k. as long as my headlight is still working . . . super pleased with the Supernova M-99 that came with the GX. In any case, I think I'll wait until the bugs are ironed out before I go for the Nyon.
Yeah the battery stats are cool, you get an exact percentage and there are stats that tell you how many watt hours of power your using and how much you use on average. There are a lot more stats that I never looked at before. I do like too that the Nyon syncs to my phone instantly and my computer as soon as I am in Wifi range. There certainly could be a connector problem, but it only happens rarely. I rode 50 miles the other day without it happening, most times it doesnt. But like I said, I wouldnt even know it happened if I just didnt look down for a few seconds. I don't think there are any bugs to speak of with the Nyon besides the restarting, even phones do that. The light issue for me only started with the Nyon, but I think I just have to have the lights changed to switchable from the dealer to fix it. How do you like the M99 Pro by the way? I love it, it does get some condensation inside, but it doesnt affect the beam at all. I like having mine mounted between the crown race and head tube.

I do love everything about this bike now that I customized it to me. The only thing left to upgrade is the suspension then I am done I swear. I convinced myself to spend all this money on this bike just to spend another $3,000+ on accessories and upgrades, kind of snowballed...

Rider1
4 weeks ago

This bike is less than two months old with about 150 miles of use.

Size: Medium

Location: Las Vegas, Nevada

The + means it has 27.5” tires that are 3.0” wide which mean great traction and stability! Check out the full specs written below.

It comes with a factory 5 year warranty on the frame and one year on components.

I bought the bike new thru Lectric Cycles (manufacturer of the e-Rad conversion kit) and had them install the complete 1000watt mid-drive system along with the biggest battery….48watt/17.5amh .

Range: I get about 90 miles from a full charge.

The mid drive system is warrantied thru Lectric Cycles for one year and the battery for one year or 1000 charge cycles.

The bike also comes with the BodyFloat seat post suspension system and a 5amp battery charger.

Tires are setup tubeless with schrader valves.

The bike rides GREAT and everything works very well.

This bike as equipped new costs….. $4400.

I am willing to sell it for ….$3200/obo.

Here are the bike specs, and a link to Lectric Cycles build kit that I used.

https://www.eradkits.com/shop/e-rad-1000w-mid-drive-e-bike-conversion-kit-68-120mm/#motor-assembly

Specific

Frame

Alloy 6061 Plus, Double Butted

Fork

Manitou Magnum Comp, 120mm Air Boost

Axles

Front: 110 x 15mm

Rims/wheels

Sun Mulefut 50, Tubeless

Hubs

Alloy Disc

Tires

Maxxis Chronicle 27.5 x 3.0, 120TPI, Tubeless completed by me.

Crankset

SRAM GX 1000 Boost 148

Chainrings

30T

Rear derailleur

Sram GX 1, 11s, Type 2

Cassette/rear cogs

Sram XG-1150, 10-42, 11s

Shifters

Sram GX 1, 11s

Handlebars

Alloy

Stem

Alloy Forged

Brake levers

Shimano BR-M396

Brakes

Shimano BR-M396, Hydraulic Disc, 180/160mm

Saddle

WTB Volt Sport

Seat post

Kind Shock E10I, Integra w/Remote

1/5
86 and still kicking
4 weeks ago

Take a look at the Catalyst from SmartMotion. 28mph speed pedelec with a 500w rear hub. Its a hard tail with front suspension and a perfect bike for both the road and trails. Great range with an available 17.5/48V battery. If you want more info you can find detail and reviews at www.velocitycommuting.com. You can swap out a seat on just about anybike. What we recommend is a suspension seat post called a Body Float.

Robert Wetzel
1 year ago

Nice review as always - you guys at the other side of the big lake sure have not only the nicer landscapes, but also the nicer e-bike laws. All we get here is 250 Watts / 25 km/h or 500 Watts / 45 km/h but in the latter case you already need a driving license, a helmet, a license plate, are not allowed on bike paths and so on.....bummer.

Anyways, is there a chance you might make a more general video explaining the differences between the geared and gearless hub motors? What are the respective advantages, and so on....
Thanks for the good work anyways, keep it up!

Robert Wetzel
1 year ago

+ElectricBikeReview.com
Wow, thanks for the quick and exhaustive answer! I can see how you are a very light person by most standards, and this affects engine performance of course. At 230 lbs, and another 70 lbs by the bike, I'd often wish for more than just 250 Watts.
Thank you also so much for the link, I'll read it right away. Your verdict about mid-drives is surprising, as most other reviews I came across laude the Yamaha over the Bosch as the former is supposed to be more powerful (70 Nm vs. 60 Nm, no idea how many lb ft that would be in your whacky system ;-)) as well as being quieter.
What positively surprised me about the Bosch was its endurance - we rented two mid-drive pedelecs in Switzerland and the battery lasted a little shy of 50 km with about 1500 meters height difference, and performed decently until the very end.
With my cheap system power will noticeably fall when passing about 70% battery.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+Robert Wetzel Yeah... I've heard about the restrictive laws in some parts of Europe. Fun fact, the 750 watt 20 mph law was passed under George W. Bush here in the US... it's like one of the only cool things he did while in office :P

Great question on the hub motors, I've created an article about it here: http://electricbikereview.com/guides/difference-between-ebike-motors/ with some great pictures and I'll probably do a video in the future. The short answer is that geared is lighter, peppier and usually more affordable but doesn't offer power regeneration and might not last as long (gears rubbing inside vs. just magnets). I'm an active type of rider and I don't weigh much so I usually choose geared. These days I've really developed a taste for mid-drive motors and you can get these awesome kits with shift sensing (to reduce wear and strain on your chain) from e-RAD which offer pedal assist and throttle actuation: http://electricbikereview.com/category/e-rad/ otherwise I really like Bosch (Impulse and Yamaha are pretty good as well but not as responsive and "quick" feeling in my opinion).

DrZarkloff
1 year ago

still the Sonders is more bike for the money. when will these kit manufacturers get with the program?

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+DrZarkloff The Sondors has been a decent deal for people in the US who got them delivered. I still get emails from people in the UK and Australia that haven't received theres (in fact I heard most of Australia was refunded because of legal restrictions?) not everyone wants a fat bike frame so kits like this can be great, Electric Bike Outfitters sells several others for even less like the "EBO Commuter" that's rated at 350 watts just like the Sondors http://electricbikereview.com/electric-bike-outfitters/ebo-commuter-kit/

James Jacocks
1 year ago

Court, you have a strong international following-very good show! Yes, Denver is a great place to live (or ride bikes). I an looking for a front wheel kit for my beloved Fisher hybrid from the early nineties. It is a light bike with a bumper shock. Any ideas? Great vid, per usual!

Flo Mo
1 year ago

Your bike tests are cool. Now I feel like I'm in Denver/Colorado. :) It's great to ride with you on the test bikes. You make very good shots. Thanks for that. Greetings from Berlin.

LUIZ FELIPE MENDONÇA RIBEIRO
2 years ago

Congratulations on video

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+LUIZ FELIPE MENDONÇA RIBEIRO Thanks, doing my best, lots more to come ;)