Electric Bike Outfitters EBO Front Range Kit Review

Ebo Front Range Electric Bike Kit Review 1
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range Kit
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range Gearless Motor Cassette
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range Battery Pack And Controller
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range Led Console And Twist Throttle
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range 500 Watt Direct Drive Motor
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range Battery Lock And Power Button
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range Controller Box
Ebo Front Range Electric Bike Kit Review 1
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range Kit
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range Gearless Motor Cassette
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range Battery Pack And Controller
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range Led Console And Twist Throttle
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range 500 Watt Direct Drive Motor
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range Battery Lock And Power Button
Electric Bike Outfitters Front Range Controller Box

Summary

  • A powerful gearless hub motor kit capable of being installed as a front or rear wheel, sturdy and relatively quiet
  • Gearless motors tend to be heavier and this one is ~12 lbs and does not offer a regeneration option for regenerative braking
  • The display console is more basic (LED lights vs. an LCD screen) but also takes up less space, the kit comes stock with trigger throttle but has a twist throttle as an opion
  • Quality Samsung cells in the battery pack, larger capacity at 14.5 amp hours, solid one year warranty on all parts

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Electric Bike Outfitters

Model:

EBO Front Range

Price:

$1,083

Suggested Use:

Urban, Trail, Commuting

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

30 Day Return, 1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

20152016

Bicycle Details

Battery Weight:

7 lbs (3.17 kg)

Motor Weight:

12 lbs (5.44 kg)

Gearing Details:

9 (Single Speed or Shimano 6 or 7 Speed Cassettes or SunRace 8 and 9 Speed Cassettes)

Brake Details:

Mechanical 5 Brand Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy

Spokes:

13 Gauge Stainless Steel, 36 Spoke

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)27.5 in (69.85cm)28 in (71.12cm)

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Female USB Charge Port on Battery Pack, EBO Quick Connect Anti-Water Wiring, Optional Black or Silver Motor Color, Optional Black or White Battery Color, Optional Twist Throttle, Optional Wuxing Twist Throttle

Other:

Compatible with Disc Brakes or Caliper Style Brakes (Clamp Diameter 22.2 mm), Compatible with 100 mm, 120 mm, or 135 mm Dropout Sizes, Compatible with 26", 27.5" or 700C Wheel Size, 22 Amp Controller

Electronic Details

Motor Type:

Front-Mounted Gearless Direct Drive Hub, Rear-Mounted Gearless Direct Drive Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Battery Brand:

Samsung

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

14.5 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

522 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Estimated Max Range:

45 miles (72 km)

Display Type:

Fixed LED Console

Readouts:

Mode (Low, Med, High), Speed (5-33 MPH), Charge Level (1-4)

Drive Mode:

Trigger Throttle, Twist Throttle, Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

The EBO Front Range Kit is a mixed bag for me. I appreciate the more powerful 500 watt motor but given the gearless direct-drive design it weighs more than the more affordable planetary geared kits. Gearless motors are said to be tougher (no gears rubbing inside) and often allow for regenerative braking but that isn’t an option here. What you get is a relatively affordable, medium-power ebike kit. It operates quietly and should last well (you get a one year warranty which is great) but the display is more basic and there’s not throttle-only mode which can come in handy for off-road riding on bumpy terrain.

Even though the Front Range kit is compatible as a front or rear wheel motor, I would almost always choose to put it in the rear. The added weight in the front would definitely impact steering and might even spin out on loose terrain. At the rear, you get a more solid mounting point (especially if you’ve got a suspension fork up front as the demo bike I tried did) and you’re still balancing some of the weight forward with the downtube-mounted battery. The battery is actually one of my favorite parts of this kit because it uses quality Samsung cells, offers more capacity than some of the smaller kits and is easy to remove or lock onto the frame. This pack style is called a “Dolphin” and it can power your bike as well as a USB accessory given the female port on the right side. I’d mostly use this off the bike as a backup power source because when you’re pedaling it’s easy to snag this are of the pack (and any protruding USB plug and wire) with your shoe or leg.

I accidentally snagged the power cable running to the motor on this kit during the video review above and that goes to show how cable management can be a chore on any ebike kit. It’s nice to have your cables all zip tied up but even the best cable management can still look a bit tacky… that’s why all-black frames are a good choice because the cables blend in more. In addition to cables, this kit also has an independent controller box which can be mounted to the seat tube or possibly a rear rack. It’s just one more thing to deal with and it completely takes up the space for any kind of accessory or bottle cage when paired with the downtube style battery.

Overall, this is a solid package but generic gearless motors aren’t my personal preference. I’m a light weight guy who likes to pedal so I tend to opt for geared hubs or mid-drives. Some ebikes like the Stromer ST2 and Specialized Turbo show off what’s possible when you go high-end gearless because their motors are light, fast and offer regeneration but you’ll spend quite a bit more for that performance. I feel like the EBO Front Range motor could benefit from a 48 volt battery here to take full advantage of the extra copper windings inside but as it stands you’re going to get more power and drive than with some of their lighter kits. For true power however, I’m more excited about the EBO Mountaineer for just $100 more.

Pros:

  • There’s a built-in female USB port at the top right portion of the battery pack and this can be used to power a phone or other mobile device while riding the bike or as a backup source of power off the bike
  • Solid value at just over $1k considering you get a powerful 500 watt gearless motor and an oversized 14.5 amp hour battery! Most ebike kits offer 350 watt motors with a 10 ah battery, the cells on this bike are also Samsung and I trust that they are higher quality
  • Not only does Electric Bike Outfitters offer a one year comprehensive warranty, they also provide a 30 day money back guarantee and in my experience have been very willing to do custom swaps to get you the right wheel size or a different throttle unit (twist vs. trigger) free of charge or for very little money
  • Great wiring hardware (color coded makes it easier to setup and repair), the 5 Star brake levers are more generic but they do include motor inhibitor switches to cut power whenever you barke
  • Pedal assist is great for conserving the battery and getting some exercise and three modes is alright but I love that you’ve also got a throttle that can override at any time to help power up a hill or pass a fellow cyclist
  • The hub motor design on this kit is compatible with disc brakes but you can also use standard rim brakes as well, the one thing that requires a changeout is hydraulic brakes because the included levers only work with mechanical systems, you could use hydraulic levers of your own but if they don’t have electronic brake inhibitors built in you won’t be operating as safely (especially given the “all the time” pedal assist design)
  • The kit comes in several configurations to replace a 26″, 27.5″ or 700c wheel, to fit a 100 mm, 120 mm, or 135 mm dropout, and to work as either a front or rear wheel drive kit (though I’d highly recommend rear given the weight of the motor so as not to adversely impact steering)
  • The battery pack snaps on and off easily and quickly for convenient charging or lighter weight transport, you also get a solid locking core built into the battery for when it’s mounted to the frame
  • Especially for trail and mountain use the default trigger throttle works very well as it does not compromise your grip though it might take more space on your bars than the twist throttle (I just don’t like full-grip twists)

Cons:

  • I like the USB charging port but it’s positioned on the side of the battery which makes it easier to bump with your leg when pedaling or to snag the wire… would be better on the top or front end of the pack vs. the side
  • The controller unit for this kit is built into a separate black box which adds clutter to the frame and means more wires have to be dealt with
  • On the demo bike I filmed and photographed above the battery was mounted to the downtube using the stock water bottle cage bosses and the controller box was fit onto the seat tube so there wasn’t anywhere to add a bottle… Consider an aftermarket saddle rail adapter, a rear carry rack with bottle bag or using a Camelbak
  • The LED console offers several readouts (mode, charge level and speed) but is still more basic than an LCD which could show trip distance, time, max speed etc. the unit they chose is fairly small, tough and more affordable so it’s not too bad
  • The battery pack has an independent on/off button built into it which has to be activated before the display panel is turned on, this extra step makes the pack easier to leave on accidentally and can be confusing if you forget and try to activate the bike just using the display
  • There are no lights built into this kit and I think it would be difficult to wire them in, I like when I can run everything off of one battery but you can always get some aftermarket lights that are rechargeable if you ride at night a lot
  • While the cadence sensing pedal assist worked alright, it only uses a five magnet system vs. 12 on a lot of newer builds and kits I’ve seen which means it is less responsive (especially in higher gears where pedal rotation can be slower at low speeds)
  • Gearless motors are very durable and operate without producing much noise but they do weigh more and this one is ~12 lbs, the battery is also a bit heavier because it’s a larger capacity pack so ~7 lbs
  • Sometimes gearless motors offer regenerative braking which can extend rides by ~10% but that feature was not included with this kit (likely to keep the price down)
  • There is no throttle-only mode with this kit, you have to enable one of three pedal assist settings in order to use the throttle and this means that any pedal movement can also activate the motor which could cause instability for some applications
  • The pedal assist sensor is not a clip-on design so you actually have to remove the crank arms in order to mount it, once it’s on however it feels solid and is actually quite responsive

Resources:

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medulla
4 hours ago

Suggested e-bikes in the $2500-3000 range:

If you have Trek dealer near you, you might like to try the Lift+ and Electra Townie Go! Both come with good quality reliable motors from Shimano and Bosch. The Townie Go! adds lights, fenders, twist-gear shifter, wider tires, cushier saddle, and a more relaxed cruiser bike style low feet-forward high handlebar riding position, versus the Lift+ weighs less, has more powerful hydraulic disc brakes, adjustable handlebar with ergonomic grips, and two extra gears (10 speed vs 8) operated by a trigger shifter.

If you have a local dealer who can get them in you might also like to try the Gazelle Arroyo C8 or 2017 Kalkhoff Agattu B8. Both are European made e-bikes with Bosch motors, Magura hydraulic rim brakes, and comfort features that include an upright step-through frame, a suspension seat-post, and a front suspension fork, easily adjustable handlebars with ergonomic grips, 8 speed internal gear hubs operated by a twist shifter, lights and fenders. The Kalkhoff has the more powerful Bosch Performance Line motor versus the Active Line of the Gazelle, so the Kalkhoff would be the better choice for climbing hills. Both use smooth combined cadence and torque sensing pedal assist. I test rode the Gazelle last year and it was very comfortable to ride.

Suggested e-bikes in the $1500-2000 range:

Raleigh Sprite iE or iZip E3 Vibe. These are the same bike branded differently, with a step-through frame, adjustable handlebars, basic 7-speed derailleur gears operated by trigger shifters, simple cable pull rim brakes, mid-drive Currie motor with simple cadence sensing pedal assist, and there is an optional 'boost' button throttle. The lower complexity should make either one easier for a local bike shop to service although you would need to take it to a Currie dealer for motor servicing. They are pre-wired for, but don't come fitted with, lights. You might want to add a suspension seat-post like a Suntour NCX or a nicer sprung saddle to soak up the bumps.

This thread and this thread talk about issues regarding battery storage if you are not planning on using the bike for a period of time. E-bike batteries don't like being left unused, should be kept above freezing in a dry place, and recharged at least every 2-4 months.

Now you have actually done me a huge favor. This is exactly what I wanted! I totally appreciat it!

I had a question. When you start looking into Electric bikes, Stromer is one the biggest names putt there and they've pretty muc become one of the biggest ones.

Is a stromer something I should stay away from beard on my requirements? Or is it good for my requirements?

Thank you.
A lot of people are excited by the idea of riding an electric bike, buy one, then use it a couple of times before they park it next to their treadmill.. jk.

Find a local ebike dealer, or find one in a city you want to explore by bike and test ride a few different types.. Only you know what makes you feel good on it... If you like the test ride find out where you can rent an ebike for an afternoon, and take a friend and have some fun.. Try this for a couple of weekends and see if you're still pysched about owning an ebike.. The worst ebike is the one you abandon cause those batteries never sleep.

That is exactly what I am going to do once I'm back to my city, I'll start calling up locally and seeing what's possible.

Dewey
15 hours ago

Suggested e-bikes in the $2500-3000 range:

If you have Trek dealer near you, you might like to try the Lift+ and Electra Townie Go! Both come with good quality reliable motors from Shimano and Bosch. The Townie Go! adds lights, fenders, twist-gear shifter, wider tires, cushier saddle, and a more relaxed cruiser bike style low feet-forward high handlebar riding position, versus the Lift+ weighs less, has more powerful hydraulic disc brakes, adjustable handlebar with ergonomic grips, and two extra gears (10 speed vs 8) operated by a trigger shifter.

If you have a local dealer who can get them in you might also like to try the Gazelle Arroyo C8 or 2017 Kalkhoff Agattu B8. Both are European made e-bikes with Bosch motors, Magura hydraulic rim brakes, and comfort features that include an upright step-through frame, a suspension seat-post, and a front suspension fork, easily adjustable handlebars with ergonomic grips, 8 speed internal gear hubs operated by a twist shifter, lights and fenders. The Kalkhoff has the more powerful Bosch Performance Line motor versus the Active Line of the Gazelle, so the Kalkhoff would be the better choice for climbing hills. Both use smooth combined cadence and torque sensing pedal assist. I test rode the Gazelle last year and it was very comfortable to ride.

Suggested e-bikes in the $1500-2000 range:

Raleigh Sprite iE or iZip E3 Vibe. These are the same bike branded differently, with a step-through frame, adjustable handlebars, basic 7-speed derailleur gears operated by trigger shifters, simple cable pull rim brakes, mid-drive Currie motor with simple cadence sensing pedal assist, and there is an optional 'boost' button throttle. The lower complexity should make either one easier for a local bike shop to service although you would need to take it to a Currie dealer for motor servicing. They are pre-wired for, but don't come fitted with, lights. You might want to add a suspension seat-post like a Suntour NCX or a nicer sprung saddle to soak up the bumps.

This thread and this thread talk about issues regarding battery storage if you are not planning on using the bike for a period of time. E-bike batteries don't like being left unused, should be kept above freezing in a dry place, and recharged at least every 2-4 months.

america94
20 hours ago

Wow! I spend a few days working and riding and look what happens to this thread! :)

After catching up on this thread I have a few things to share.

1. To MysticalFists: When I paid UPS for the COD charges, they didn't have an itemized invoice. I wanted my bike so I just paid. Two days ago I got another invoice from UPS with an itemized list. Fortunately, I have the receipt in hand from the first time I paid these fees... so not sending them another check! But it did give me something to share with you!

2. Hi america94! You really did make a difference in my decision to purchase. Yes, 27 MPH seems very fast on my bike... but what fun! Since then, I've ridden it to work and to town twice. That is roughly a 25 mile round trip. This past Friday, when I'm off work, I rode it in and several of my co-workers took it for a brief ride in the parking lot. Every person started off saying, wow, this is hard to pedal, immediately followed by "WOW!!! and laughter as the PAS setting of 3 kicked in.... The bike was in 9th gear, which explains the difficulty taking off. Even had the VP of Marketing on it, and he had the very same reaction. Tomorrow, when I go back to work, I fully expect to hear about distracting too many people during business hours.

3. I've followed america94's lead and added a few accessories to my bike. Mounted the same rack and pack on the back. I've also added an extra bar to hold my cell phone, a light (since the shipper broke mine), and soon, a GoPro (currently on my son's bike). Yesterday we rode to town and I bought a set of plastic fat bike mud guards that I'll try to mount today. I will post some pics if it works out.

4. Tire pressure. I started out with putting 20 PSI in both tires and that has been ideal for me on paved roads. It is a bit dicy on some of the gravel roads around here, but still way better than my other traditional mountain bike. Thought about different tires but after reading about america94's experience with the change in tire pressure, I'll stick with the original tires. Thanks for sharing that america94!

5. Hey, Draenar... I'm an old guy with fading knees. Will be 60 next year and I've been skiing too hard for too long... my knees just kill me on my old bike from all the hard pedaling. On my Teo, I can feel it if I am pushing, but with PAS 3, I don't feel any pain at all and at that setting I'm averaging 18 MPH on paved, flat roads.

6. On yesterday's ride to town, my wife went with me, on her newly converted 350 watt Bionix with the smaller 6.6Ah/317 Wh battery. She has had it about as long as I've had my Teo. All went well on the way TO town... but on the way home, we stopped at a light and she suddenly realized the condition of her battery. As you can imagine, that battery was getting very low so she was now riding without any PAS, saving the remaining charge for the hill she had to climb. Well, after a couple of miles of that, she told me to "just go get the truck!" So I put it in PAS 6 and sped home. Got the truck and went back for her. After we discussed this a bit, I learned that she is using the throttle WAY more than she should. We did switch on her regenerative system so she could build a bit of a charge to help and she nearly made it home before I got back. Moral of the story is that your range will depend on your riding habits. I suspect she will be taking her charger to work when she starts riding to work next month. Of course, I told her size matters and mine was so much bigger!

Bottom line, even after all the shipping problems and that extra cost, I'm still VERY happy with my purchase.

Anyone know where we can buy some of that fancy wrap the factory cable wrapping they put on? I'd like to use that same material to clean up my wife's Bionix conversion.
Great post and pictures @Idaho! glad to hear back from you and that you are happy with your purchase. I am curious as to how you attached the 2 front brackets of the pakrak on the frame? I had to go out to buy brackets to get the job done.

I really enjoyed your story with your co-workers :-) you have to ride it to understand the feeling right? I can totally picture their enjoyment.

You can change the PAS from 0-9 easily, which gives you even more tweaking options with gears and PAS. I prefer it that way... I also believe you do not get PAS zero with the stock setting... good for those like me who want to pedal without assist.

I mentioned this in a previous post but if you are stopped in 9th gear (or middle of a hill in lower gear), it can be very hard to get started. You can use the Walking assist mode to get the bike moving and then start pedaling a bit for PAS to kick in. Press and hold the bottom button (keep holding as it will turn off as soon as you release). Get ready as it bucks forward very fast. The bike will ride at 8 km/hr that way (5 mph).

Glad you noticed my post about the tire pressure. Since it is much easier to pedal at 25 vs 20psi, it should also have a measurable effect on the range as a bonus. I would expect you should feel a difference for your knees as well.

mrgold35
20 hours ago

You get a few more upgrades with the Radcity over the Radrover like:
- choice of frame sizes
- standard rear rack that can support panniers
- front and rear fenders
- urban tires (less noise+longer treadlife). The tires can do some trail riding (on improved and maintained dirt trails you might find a large tire stroller, wheelchair, comfort/cruiser bikes would go)
- public transportation friendly with the thinner tires
- smaller footprint for storage or with bike rack
- will fit 99% of bike racks as-is that can support ebikes extra weight (I had to purchase 4 fat tire trays for $80 on top of my +$550 Saris platform rack)

The Radrover has the added capability ride where you mostly see MTB, hikers, or horses on single track (or make your own) trails, sandy, rocky, or uneven terrain. The Radrover and Radcity weight about the same. Because the Radrover is so (tail) heavy, it can't climb/hop over obstacles like a balanced and lighter MTB. I end up stopping and lifting/pushing my Radrover over fallen tree trunks on the trails or making my own trail and going around.

I would only go for the Radrover if you plan to do trail riding and you have the means to transport with personal vehicle. I have two (his/her) Radrovers and I mostly use them for Work Commuting around 13 miles roundtrip. The fat tires are very comfortable at +20 mph on the main roads and they transition smoothly from concrete, on/off curbs, dirt lots, uneven dirt paths, and sandy trails. I sometimes take detours before or after work to ride the +30 miles of paved and single track dirt trials available near the Rio Grande river halfway into my commute without missing a beat. The 4" fat tires really come in handy with the wet, muddy, rocky, and deep sand in some of the trail spots. I think the Radrover would be overkill if you ride in a 85%-100% urban environment. Most folks change out the tires to something like Hookworms to lower tire noise and increase the treadlife on paved roads (I only got 800-900 miles from the rear knobby tires with 65-75% paved road riding).

A plus with having two Rad products are the batteries are interchangeable. You can double your range if riding alone with the extra battery handy. Hard to do with a different brand of ebike. Another advantage with Rover or City is they are Class II ebikes limited to 20 mph, 750w of power, and have PAS+throttle. "Most" state allow Class I & II ebikes everywhere regular bikes are allowed (parks, bike paths, sidewalks, wrong way down a one way street, etc...) unless posted to exclude ebikes. The 28 mph Class III ebikes (mostly PAS only with this class) are very close to motorized vehicle territory for some local and state governments because of their top speeds. They sometimes have more restrictions with requiring helmets, minimal age restrictions, must stay on roadways (no sidewalks), and sometimes 100% no-go on bike paths depending on local/state laws.

Another little secret with either bike is you can adjust the motor cutoff speed from 20 mph to a little under 25 mph in the LCD set-up screen in about 15-20 seconds. Both bikes don't really have the gearing for 25 mph (might have to use PAS 5 and fake pedal or 100% throttle to maintain that speed). The downside is you battery range will most likely be in the low double-digits.

E-Wheels
4 days ago

I really like the Bosche drive, and would go for the 4lb lighter Trek with better standover, and then just fit the bike to your body by changing out the handlebar stem with a shorter and steeper riser to get the more upright riding position (I changed mine out).

If you run out of battery power you're going to appreciate having a lighter bike, which would probably handle better as well. That's why I got the Powerfly 7 hardtail which is another 4 lbs lighter than the 8FS+ (At 46.5lb vs 50.7lbs). I also like that the Trek doesn't look bad without a battery installed.

Also, the Bosche drive system can give you assist pretty quickly, without taking off from under you if you accidentally lean on a pedal while standing over the bike (same as with the Giant). And power delivery when climbing slow bumpy technical sections on the trail is pretty smooth. My understanding is that the Bosche supports a wider range of cadence than the Yamaha (120 vs 100).

I like that you can charge the Bosche on or off the bike, but I can't see that the Giant allows charging without removing the battery. It looks like the Giant display has a larger USB port, while I have to use a $5 adapter from Amazon to turn my micro USB charging port to a normal USB-A port. The Powerfly also has walk assist like the giant,

The Giant has a nicer battery gauge, but only 3 levels of assist vs 55%, 120%, 210%, and 300% of the Bosche. I also can't tell if the Giant display can be removed for safekeeping. When the Bosche display is removed it still works to let you view your ride stats like miles ridden, time, avg speed, and max speed.

On level ground I will frequently turn off pedal assist with no problem, but with a 46lb bike you pretty much need a low levels of assist for more than a 1-2% grade, to make the weight disappear. The 50.5lb of the 8FS+ would make it harder to climb anything without assist, but with my 11 speed cassette (like the 8FS+) it really makes riding without assist possible. You can crawl along very slow in 1st gear and keep up your cadence to get power to the wheels, and still hit 25+ mph without assist on flat ground in 11th gear. It hurts to think about trying this with a bike that's another 5 lbs heavier than the 8FS+.

I treat my assist level buttons on the left side of the handlebar as if they were a front crank derailleur, and it would be confusing to me to have to deal with a 2x up front left as well. Nevertheless, the Giant looks like a sweet ride and I'd be very happy with one, and maybe the weight for one in medium to fit me wouldn't be so bad?
Good insights Larry,
Just to add that replacement Bosch batteries are readily available from any LBS or any other bike brand which supports the Bosch platform. The Bosch battery mounting/footprint on the Trek is also relatively future proofed for bigger or upgraded batteries going forward. With the battery integration into the frame on the Giant you will have limited price negotiating, supplier and upgrade options IMO

Larry Ganz
4 days ago

I really like the Bosche drive, and would go for the 4lb lighter Trek with better standover, and then just fit the bike to your body by changing out the handlebar stem with a shorter and steeper riser to get the more upright riding position (I changed mine out).

If you run out of battery power you're going to appreciate having a lighter bike, which would probably handle better as well. That's why I got the Powerfly 7 hardtail which is another 4 lbs lighter than the 8FS+ (At 46.5lb vs 50.7lbs). I also like that the Trek doesn't look bad without a battery installed.

Also, the Bosche drive system can give you assist pretty quickly, without taking off from under you if you accidentally lean on a pedal while standing over the bike (same as with the Giant). And power delivery when climbing slow bumpy technical sections on the trail is pretty smooth. My understanding is that the Bosche supports a wider range of cadence than the Yamaha (120 vs 100).

I like that you can charge the Bosche on or off the bike, but I can't see that the Giant allows charging without removing the battery. It looks like the Giant display has a larger USB port, while I have to use a $5 adapter from Amazon to turn my micro USB charging port to a normal USB-A port. The Powerfly also has walk assist like the giant,

The Giant has a nicer battery gauge, but only 3 levels of assist vs 55%, 120%, 210%, and 300% of the Bosche. I also can't tell if the Giant display can be removed for safekeeping. When the Bosche display is removed it still works to let you view your ride stats like miles ridden, time, avg speed, and max speed.

On level ground I will frequently turn off pedal assist with no problem, but with a 46lb bike you pretty much need a low levels of assist for more than a 1-2% grade, to make the weight disappear. The 50.5lb of the 8FS+ would make it harder to climb anything without assist, but with my 11 speed cassette (like the 8FS+) it really makes riding without assist possible. You can crawl along very slow in 1st gear and keep up your cadence to get power to the wheels, and still hit 25+ mph without assist on flat ground in 11th gear. It hurts to think about trying this with a bike that's another 5 lbs heavier than the 8FS+.

I treat my assist level buttons on the left side of the handlebar as if they were a front crank derailleur, and it would be confusing to me to have to deal with a 2x up front left as well. Nevertheless, the Giant looks like a sweet ride and I'd be very happy with one, and maybe the weight for one in medium to fit me wouldn't be so bad?

mrgold35
5 days ago

The Fat tire bike choices look like they increased 2X-3X more compared to last summer when I was looking. I was trying to pick from Sondors, Volt, and Radrover as choices back then. A lot of interesting choices now; but, the prices really start to creep up as you upgrade the factory accessories. At the Radrover price point, I purchased two Radrovers (his and hers) and had enough $$ left over to do any mods (rack, pedals, suspension seatpost, lights, new commuting gear, etc...).

I think folks are thinking about the up to 2X extra weight of the Radrover compared to a regular MTB when it comes to stopping power. I found the 180mm cable brakes worked fine for me for regular and emergency stops at any speed (260lbs+70lbs bike+20lbs of gear). I think the fat tires have a larger contact patch that helps in braking since you have more rubber on the road. I can see the front brakes being a little easier to convert compared to the rears since the rear brake cable runs inside the frame. I think I would try a cheaper route of different pad materials and/or upgrade to +200mm rotors before going with hydraulic.

One thing that pushed me over to the Radrover compared to Sondors or Volt was the standard ebike components (hub motor, charger, controller, LCD, battery). I could repair/replace/upgrade the parts from Rad Power Bikes or from a 3rd party like Luna Cycles. I could even remove all the Radrover components to turn it into a regular fat tire bike and put the e-components on full suspension MTB down the road. I like having that option down the road.

Luna Cycle have battery replacements in the 48v and 52v range (11.5ah to 13.5ah) you can purchase and they would be plug-n-play because of the beefy controller. Luna Cycle does have a 48v/17.5ah Killer Whale battery pack; but, you might need to re-wire a new battery tray to the harness (not sure if the larger battery will fit in Radrover triangle frame). Since I have two Radrovers with rear rack bags, I sometimes take my wife's battery for longer +30 miles rides (48v/11.5ahX2 = 48v/23ah).

mrgold35
5 days ago

There have been threads on upgrading to hydraulic brakes and I don't know if they did the conversion? Most upgrades for the Radrover are usually:
- tires for smoother commuting or knobby tires for better snow and off road fun
- upgrading front rotors to 203mm and/or brake pads
- suspension seat posts like thudbuster, Suntour, or bodyfloat
- upgrade of battery to plug-n-play Luna Cycles 48v/13.ah or 52v/13.5ah Dolphin battery packs
- upgrade of seat for more comfortable long distance riding
- adding adjustable handlebar stem to move handlebars to more comfortable position (Radrover is one size to fit most)
- hard wiring a brighter front lights into battery
- adding fenders, rear rack, or accessories for cell phones, locks, beer bottle openers, water bottle cages, etc...

Only being $1500+shipping+ 1 year full warranty for a complete 4" fat tire ebike give you a lot of wiggle room to make improvements. Volt Yukon 750 bike is another 4" fat tire bike that is in the same price range with very similar specs and capabilities. The Radrover is basically a 4" fat tire bike with ebike components. It would be feasible to converted the Radrover into a 1000w mid-drive down the road and reuse the battery to cut down conversion cost.

The Radrover is a jack of all trades and master of none type of bike. I can work commute very comfortably at +20 mph on main roads with all my gear (work cloths, lunch, riding gear, etc...) and detour off the road and ride single track dirt trails without missing a beat before heading back to work or home. Since the Radrover is a Class II ebike limited to 750w, I can go everywhere and on any trail/sidewalk/street a regular bike is allowed (a lot more restrictions on +750w and/or Class III ebikes). The all terrain capabilities and utility for commuting fits perfectly into the way I use my ebike.

PRW
6 days ago

I am looking at selling my Hanebrink X2 - the 48v version. I am not riding it as much as I thought I would - just too many bikes! Please, no silly offers - I would rather keep it for the future than sell it for a silly price. $3,000 plus shipping cost from Sunnyvale, CA

Details are here:

https://www.electricbike.com/hanebrink/

http://www.electricbikeaction.com/and-n ... different/

Highlight features:

FASTACE Dual Crown Triple Clamp 740mm 8" travel
Magura MT2 Hydraulic Brakes 160mm rotors
Full Speed Ahead Crank & FSA Pig Headset
Hussefelt Truvativ bar, stem and seatpost
Bontrager seat clamp & fasteners throughout
Anderson Connectors throughout
Shimano SORA components w dual left hand shifter (custom! Leaves all electric controls on right side, very slick)
20" x 8" Tubeless ATV tires on 1lb custom USA built rims
Custom low standover (for offroad) aircraft aluminum frame
Optional 48v system upgrade
Optional Megarange 14-32T 7th speed
Optional BOXGUIDE DH Chain Guide/Tensioner
Optional Cycle Analyst fully programmed
ODI grips

Pretty much will climb ANYTHING and does a steady 25mph on throttle only. 35+ with pedal assist. Of course it's mid drive with 2 front sprockets (after the front drive! Hanebrink exclusive) so you can pretty much dial in any gear and keep the motor spinning at peak torque. It's amazingly reliable and cool running.

Website Description: http://danhanebrinkbikes.com/models/hanebrink-x2/
A 750-watt/1200-watt peak brush-less electric motor drives a fourteen (14) speed gear configuration that drives this bike. Steep grades are easily handled by the motor’s unparalleled torque.

The 51″ wheelbase and 20 inch diameter x 8 inch wide tubeless monocoque wheels and tires, widest in the industry, provide stability in tight turns and traction on dirt, sand or snow.

Shock absorption is easily handled by the dual crown triple clamp fork. Eight inches of travel provides shock absorption in uncomfortable terrain and is able to manage the most unforgiving of mountain terrains.

Our made and designed in the USA frames are manufactured from aircraft aluminum which is both lightweight and durable. Carbon fiber handlebars and seat-post connect the rider to this extreme machine.

Hydraulic disc brakes, front and rear, provide stopping power to aggressively attack corners or steep descents.

Base Price: $7,650 USD (Reflects average range)
Color: Matte Black Standard, Custom Colors Available
Weight: 85lbs (38 kg)
Battery Pack: 48 Volt LiNMC
Range*: 40 miles
Motor: 750/1200 Watt Sealed Brushless
Gearing: Motor Integrated 14 speed with low-range gearing available
Tires: Tubeless 20″ x 8″ (50cm x 20cm)
Wheels: Monocoque, Aluminum Axles, Sealed Bearings
Wheelbase: 129 cm – 51 inches
Frame: 6061- T6 Aircraft Seamless Aluminum Tubing
Fork: Dual Crown Triple Clamp 8″ Adjustable Travel
Brakes: Hydraulic Disc Brakes
Derailleur: Shimano
Heavy Duty Rear Rack: 8″ x 21″ Aluminum

Additional notes: additional options
low range gearing,
higher capacity controller
cycle analyst.

1/1
Douglas Ruby
6 days ago

I just purchased a 2016 Turbo X. First commute 16 miles each way. I used 70% of charge for each direction. This seems very strange compared to the numbers everyone is reporting. Used ECO70. Medium head winds. Speed 22 - 25. 50 minute ride. Flat roads, minimal stop lights. I weigh 170 lb. Pedal effort was similar to a road bike at 10 - 15 mph. Battery 562wh, 250W motor. What are your thoughts? Is this something you would expect or should I talk to the dealer?
Thx

Steve, I ride a 2015/16 base Turbo. I find cruising at ECO 70 is a bit on the high side for range maintenance. Your numbers above suggest a range of just 22 miles which seems low. You are riding into a head wind which makes a big difference at speeds of 22-25 mph. What are your tire pressures? Do you have the stock Specialized Trigger Sport 700x47C tires? I am using much more efficient tires than the stock 700x45C Electrak tires that came with my Turbo. I have Michelin Energy 700x35C at 85 psi.

I find that if I cruise at ECO50 then I truly get twice the range I would get at full Turbo. With the 200W motor and the 691Wh battery, I get around 40 miles at full Turbo (last 20% at ECO70) and up to 100 miles at ECO30. Note that at 20% left, your battery will drop to whatever your ECO level is so my full Turbo estimate includes some amount of ECO70 for the last 20% of battery. I would estimate my ECO70 range at around 55 miles. If you multiply 55 miles by the difference in our motors (200W/250W) and the by the difference in battery capacities (562Wh/691Wh) you should get a range of around 35 miles for your Turbo X (all other things being equal) at ECO70.

I just finished a 26 mile "circle" ride today averaging 17.6 mph. I rode the first 4.1 miles at full Turbo (19.2mph with significant hills), the next 11.9 miles at ECO40 (15.2 mph flat), and the last 10 miles at full Turbo (21.1 mph with some hill). There was a total 738 ft. of elevation change. I had 58% left at the end of the ride suggesting that my range would be around 62 miles at that mix of power consumption. Strava's "power" estimates were around 290W for the first and last sections and around 115W for the middle section.

Some suggestions for optimizing range:

Run your tires at the upper edge of the allowable range.
Use ECO50 instead of ECO70
Keep your cruising speed at around 20 mph. Save the higher speeds for downhills.
lock your front fork

MysticalFists
1 week ago

Howdy,
First time poster, although I've been watching Court's videos and reading all your reviews for like 2 months now, and I'm getting closer to biting the bullet. Hell, I'd already have bought my RadRover if they were still in stock, but I'm still having to wait a week. Since I'm waiting, I've continued to look at more and more fat tire bikes and I'm curious what everyone else's thoughts are on 26x4 Fat Tire ebikes.

About Me:

I'm a daily bike commuter, 35 years old with a learners permit, so biking is my only form of transportation (I hate driving cars).
I also live in Minnesota, so this bike will be facing harsh conditions 24/7/365. We're also the land of 10,000 lakes, and I plan to ride this thing on whatever trail necessary to visit em all, LoL!
Minnesota state law requires 1000 watt or less motor, 20mph or less speed (although I have been looking at ones that go higher).
I'm mostly looking at bikes in a $1500 range, but am not against reviews of higher priced bikes.
Looking for class 2 or 3 (I like both pedal assist and some form of throttle)
Would like at least a front fork suspension.

Rad Power Bikes / RadRover 2016 $1,499.00
- Pros:

Class 2 (Pedal Assist w/ Twist Throttle)
Integrated design
Front Fork Suspension
Shimano Acera
Tektro Aries mechanical 180mm w/ motor inhibitor
750w Bafang motor w/ 48v 11.6ah Panasonic battery
20mph

- Cons:

1 year warranty
I have to wait a week before it's back in stock, lol

VoltBike / Yukon 750 2017 $1,499.00
- Pros:

Class 2 (Pedal Assist w/ Trigger Throttle)
Integrated design
Front Fork Suspension
750w Bafang motor w/ 48v 10.4ah Sanyo battery
20mph

- Cons:

1 year warranty
Shimano Tourney
Tektro Novela mechanical 160mm w/ motor inhibitor

Hype Bikes / HF1000 2017 $1,499.00
- Pros:

Class 3 (Pedal Assist w/ Trigger Throttle)
Front Fork Suspension
Shimano Altus,
Shimano BR-M375 mechanical 180mm w/ motor inhibitor
1000w MAC motor w/ 48v 13.2ah LG battery

- Cons:

1 year warranty
Non-Integrated
30mph would need a license
Not a lot of reviews on this bike or company that I could find
Better battery and torque sensor are optional upgrades raising the price.

M2S / All Terrain R750 2017 $1,550.00
- Pros:

Class 3 (Pedal Assist w/ Button Throttle)
2 year warranty
Integrated design
Shimano Acera
Tektro Hydrolic w/ motor inhibitor (no clue what size break rotors are though)
750w Bafang motor w/ 48v 17ah Panasonic battery

- Cons:

Suspension is optional raising the price
28mph would need a license
Appears this company simply orders bulk bike shipments from China and rebrands them, but I couldn't find a lot of first hand reviews either.

While doing these reviews, I've actually collected together specs and stats of nearly 50 fat tire ebikes in a spreadsheet (I'm a very analytical person) so if anyone's interested in that information, you can find it here:

Thoughts?

JRA
1 week ago

Battery on that bike is 48v/11ah/528wh and the motor is a 1000w Nine Continent. I also live in OR actually, those bottom pictures were taken in Maupin. I reside outside of Portland and am no stranger to logging roads.

Or the views you can get from them. That is downtown Portland in the distance.

OR allows for the use of 1000w motors btw but still caps top speed at 20mph. Just like any motor, the more power you ask of it the more energy it takes. E bikes are never going to be long range speed machines but for exploring the countryside, at as you say a reasonably sane speed, they are great. Having power on tap when needed is a good rule of thumb to go by but not always needed in the course of a ride.

I had a fat bike 5 years ago with the idea of putting a front hub motor on it but never liked how it rode personally so I sold it. I do think that motor assist is a good way to go with them but as I said at this point in technology I would go with a BBHSD mid drive to take advantage of using the bikes gearing when hauling a heavy bike up a 3-5 mile grade can be useful. I ultimately went with a narrower tired hub drive because I also like to do road rides on pavement and found it to be more the best of both worlds.

1/1
Al P
2 weeks ago

I'm using the lowest "gear" I can. This is a heavy fat tire bike on mountainous terrain. The inclines can get steep enough to require dismounting, but that was not the case with the n380. While I had to stand and pedal, I was able to power up the hill, but it sprang a leak. Might be a bit different than your riding. It's under warranty and will be, so I'll probably try replacing the front sprocket for a lower range. If it still fails, I'll have to replace it with a cassette.
You must be riding extremely steep hills. I have never had to use the lowest gear ratio, and this is with a 250w motor on some fairly steep hills. When ascending hills, it is very difficult to gear down unless I stop pedaling. Are you sure you are gearing all the way down?

I have not experienced skipping.

Over50
2 weeks ago

I'm using the lowest "gear" I can. This is a heavy fat tire bike on mountainous terrain. The inclines can get steep enough to require dismounting, but that was not the case with the n380. While I had to stand and pedal, I was able to power up the hill, but it sprang a leak. Might be a bit different than your riding. It's under warranty and will be, so I'll probably try replacing the front sprocket for a lower range. If it still fails, I'll have to replace it with a cassette.

Troubling to hear of breaking Nuvinci hubs given that I have the N380. I have few hills in my area however. Sorry for my ignorance but when it starts leaking where does it leak from (ie center of the hub or side or a cable etc)? I haven't noticed any issues with mine but I'd like to know what to watch for. I only noted wishing I had more gear range for flats where I could get more MPH out of Eco mode. A bike shop employee asked me the other day if I "had noticed any skipping in the Nuvinci". I didn't really know what he was referring to by skipping (and thought maybe he meant to refer to the Gates belt or perhaps he meant to say "slipping" but he didn't clarify).

BrockD
2 weeks ago

I'm using the lowest "gear" I can. This is a heavy fat tire bike on mountainous terrain. The inclines can get steep enough to require dismounting, but that was not the case with the n380. While I had to stand and pedal, I was able to power up the hill, but it sprang a leak. Might be a bit different than your riding. It's under warranty and will be, so I'll probably try replacing the front sprocket for a lower range. If it still fails, I'll have to replace it with a cassette.

JRA
2 weeks ago

I think that e road bikes make a lot of sense and made a couple based on drop bar bikes with front hub motors. I feel that for road use hub motors work plenty well enough and allow for more freedom of choice for gearing and separation of the gearing from the motors torque means you can shift whenever you want with impunity. This does not mean that a mid drive is bad, it is just my experience.

The reason I have a front hub motor is for more even weight distribution with the battery in the triangle and my weight mostly going towards the rear. I have a couple thousand miles now on this setup and really like it. The two wheel drive feature is useful also and I like the way the bike pulls instead of pushes. No odd handling traits that I can discern nor others who have ridden them. Even easy to unweight the front wheel when avoiding pot holes which surprised me even.

Having been mtb'ing for the last 35 years and only riding roads enough to get to the next trail these bikes have been a real revelation to me and the possibilities of e road bikes going forward. I am a bit put off at the manufacturers in that they are putting so much emphasis on e mtb's instead of e bikes potential for use on existing motorways. It does seem that a few of the makers are doing drop bar bikes and I am thinking they will become popular. I know that the majority of commuters where I live ride drop bar bikes and perhaps this will entice more of them to get with the e program.

The bikes have 1000w, legal in my state of OR, motors and run at 48 and 52v. I have found that I like to ride mostly in the low 20's as it affords the best range but also like the option to open it up now and then or have more on tap for hills and headwinds. I have gearing high enough to support the motor at all speeds and like to pedal on top of the motor for the most part to get a decent workout and help with range. I run as big a tire as I can at as low of a psi as I can get away with to absorb road chatter and don't feel the need for any other suspension. Fenders, lights and carrying capacity round out the utilitarian aspect.

I managed to drop a considerable amount of weight from v 1 to v 2 but they both end up performing pretty much the same in the end.

If anyone reading this is in the PDX and wants to try out the concept hit me up!

1/1
James Kohls
2 weeks ago

2000 mile update:

Spring is here and entering the new riding season with 2,000 miles on the OD.

I have to say, this bike has not lost its luster, in my eye. The motor and battery range continue to impress me and since having the brakes swapped under warranty, I've had not mechanical issues whatsoever. The only other slight degradation I've notice is some rust developing on parts of the chain. Can't say I'm surprised after riding it continuously through the cold Minnesota winters.

I did a fairly exhaustive bit of self-maintenance to prep for longer the longer spring rides. Tightened spokes and trued both wheels—the front was nearly perfect, but the motor-ladened rear was pretty wonky. I think I'll start doing this on the rear at least every 1,000 miles, if not more. Soaked the rotors in Simple Green degreaser to dissolve any grease buildup and replaced the pads.

Derailleur still shifts bang on. No loose screws after applying blue Locktite to them last fall. Schwalbe Energizer Plus tire show little to no wear, tho I only have about 500 miles on them. Still debating whether or not I'll take the fenders off. Sure makes it more difficult to remove the rear wheel with them on. A custom piece of wood I made for the top of my rack is sufficient to keep the rear spray off my back going through puddles. All of my shoes are waterproof, so I don't care if they get sprayed.

The new BodyFloat is great. More than sufficient for my needs without the added weight and bob of a full suspension ride. The seat post and Ergon grips are probably the best upgrades I made from stock. I've been quite underwhelmed with the Shimano Saint pedals I put on last winter—especially for the price. Lots of rust on the pins.

FUTURE

Still planning on getting a 2nd bike this year. I'm about 90% sure I'll be getting a fat bike now.

If I get a fat, I'l probably going to go with the Specialized version. I've found myself interested in the Haibike FullFat Six, but I like the Specialized's ability to take wider tires and I still have the bonus of a Specialized dealer that takes good care of me a few blocks from home—priceless.

There are some really nice off road trails near my house and after trying to ride them with my Schawlbe Energizer Plus road tires, I could use something a bit more grippy.

Unfortunately, nobody near me (or maybe anywhere, it seems) carries these bikes in stock. So, probably not going to get a test ride. My dealer has several Levos I can ride. So at least I'll know if I like the Brose motor. I figure I can use a Specialized FatBoy and the Levo to figure out what size I want to get.

Goodair
2 weeks ago

Aside from the Giant E1, there are really no road bikes out there, I had to do the conversation myself. This thing is fast, my range on Conti 700c 28mm is about 70 miles with climbing, not bad for a road bike. Front chainring is now a 44t FSA, 1X11 setup with Dura Ace rear derailleur, Shimano RS505 brake levers.

1/1
Mark Peralta
3 weeks ago

I'm trying to choose a bike that will enable me to ride to and from work. It's about 20mi each way. After poking around, the iZip ProTour seems to have everything i'd like in a commuter ebike, but the range is pretty lackluster at about 15-16mi minimum.

Is it possible to augment that range on a bike like this with an after market battery mounted on the back rack or something?

Anyone have any alternative recommendations? Things I like about this bike:
1. I'm short - it comes in several sizes
2. It has a throttle. I'm a type 1 diabetic and there are going to be days when I just feel shitty and i'd like to be able to use a throttle to mitigate that sometimes.
3. It's got a suspension fork in the front
4. COBI on the 2017 - not sure if this is a pro or a con yet, but it's interesting.

I checked the battery connector and terminals of my IZIP and these are proprietary, meaning it is not easy to mess around with the electricals.

Your other option is the hub driven ebike. Make sure you try it first and see if you are OK with the Gear whine / noise.

Or you may be interested on a comfortable feet forward / flat foot design (you easily reach the ground with the heels instead of the toes.)

Or the EG Oahu 500 EX.

Mark Peralta
3 weeks ago

I'm trying to choose a bike that will enable me to ride to and from work. It's about 20mi each way. After poking around, the iZip ProTour seems to have everything i'd like in a commuter ebike, but the range is pretty lackluster at about 15-16mi minimum.

Is it possible to augment that range on a bike like this with an after market battery mounted on the back rack or something?

Anyone have any alternative recommendations? Things I like about this bike:
1. I'm short - it comes in several sizes
2. It has a throttle. I'm a type 1 diabetic and there are going to be days when I just feel shitty and i'd like to be able to use a throttle to mitigate that sometimes.
3. It's got a suspension fork in the front
4. COBI on the 2017 - not sure if this is a pro or a con yet, but it's interesting.
In your situation where your battery might not be enough for the one way ride and the integrated frame battery is hard to find, I think you are better off with the Izip Dash since a spare battery can be more readily available.

Marc V
3 weeks ago

Hey All!

After owning the Juiced ODK U500 V3 for a few weeks and really liking it, I finally got around to doing a full range test.

Long story short I got about 50 miles with the 32ah battery on a single full charge.

Long story even longer see below lol

I chose to ride it in an almost worst case scenario for my "real world" conditions. I live in a city with mostly flat riding a few minor hills here and there and windy days etc.

I finally found a nice enough day where I was free to put it to the test.

I road the bike pretty hard, meaning I did little to no pedaling, using throttle even from dead stop. I know that is a lot to ask of from your motor and battery, but wanted to test it, like I said, in an almost worse case scenario where maybe there might be some days where I am injured and have a hard time pedaling. Bike is pretty heavy so even on normal everyday commuting I need to do a standing pedal down to get going if I don't use the throttle to deal with the weight. Good time to give bike and personal info...

Some info on my setup:
I have the heavier MoPed tires
Rear passenger seat kit from Juiced Bikes (works great! but be aware rpassenger will feel bumps etc so make sure to warn them if possible of upcoming bumps, we learned that the hard way hehe)
Milk Crate mounted on rear rack as well
Some basic accessories (couple of Ulocks with cables, Headlights, speed/odometer, phone mount)

Some info on me:
Around 185 pounds, 190ish with clothing give or take

So that being said i was asking a lot out of the motor and battery hauling that much weight with no assistance from me, but it hauls like a champ as I have ridden it with myself and another adult!

Took it all around northside chicago, down to the lake up to navy pier for those who are familiar with the area and back, I had so much juice left from that 30 mile trip was just cruising around the neighborhoods going down streets I've never been down, trying to remember which are the bad ones to stay away from haha :)

So dealt with traffic, people, stop signs, stop lights, so a lot of stop and goes and again riding it hard with throttle from dead stop and little pedaling. By the lakefront dealt with a lot of front winds so, motor was fighting with that as well. But never needed to pedal because the motor couldn't handle the job, I ended up catching myself pedaling out of pure habit! Had to tell myself, "remember you are doing a no pedal range test!" lol

There was still juice left when I had ridden it for some time on one battery dot/light, I considered the range test done and bike was still moving with this riding style but I did notice reduced performance so I called it then because at that point if I was out and about not in a semi controlled environment, I would be thinking I need to find a place to charge haha. So I might have squeezed more miles, but ~50miles covers almost all, if not all of my possible commutes (round trip! and if this wasn't a range test and I decided to charge in between here and there with the fast charger, forget about it! haha)

So had a great time as I have never seen the city from this perspective, I was an avid city bicycle rider before, but it was mostly point A to B and limited by my endurance/stamina lol. No joke, eBikes has gotten me out more and wanting to go cruise around weather permitting as I stopped riding bicycles for years for whatever reason :)

The ODK U500 V3 handled Chicago like a champ, but if you have researched or even ridden the bike, you will already know there is no suspension, so flats are great but you feel the bumps and if you have a passenger they REALLY feel the bumps lol.

Built in/standard taillight is bright at night and can be seen pretty far away, I added reflector stickers to my milk crate as well as my helmet hehe. Just mounted a LED flashlight DIY style to handle bars and works well at night both for my own visibility and being visible to others.

Oh also, it took me even longer to do the range test because eBikes are not as popular here in Chicago as compared to other big cities in Cali or NY, etc. I've only seen a handful on the road where I ride, so I kept getting flagged down and getting asked questions about the bike, which was fun lol

So conclusion, for real world city commuting for sub 200lb rider, expect 50+ range on a single charge with the 32ah batt if you ride it like a scooter/moped for days you are injured, tired, or plain LAZY lmao. I can easily see 80-100 mile range on a single charge that others have been reporting if you are lighter, pedal, and have great riding conditions (flat, downhills, tailwinds, etc).

Hope they keep going with this bike with V4, V5, etc!

Take care, ride safe!
Marc V

Ann M.
3 weeks ago

@lark, you can use suspension forks with a front hub motor; however, it does require good quality forks and I would suggest 2 torque arms. A bit of common sense that you pedal as you first apply power to reduce the stress on the forks; that's better for your range anyway when you don't ask the bike to do all of the work from a dead stop.

Any replacement fork may require special fitting and there is a trade off with a slight loss of power with suspension forks. If the ride seems a bit too hard on your upper body, consider using a stem with suspension and some not too tight gloves. The gloves help me with extra padding on the palms of my hands which then reduces stress on up the arms.

negativestraw
3 weeks ago

I'm trying to choose a bike that will enable me to ride to and from work. It's about 20mi each way. After poking around, the iZip ProTour seems to have everything i'd like in a commuter ebike, but the range is pretty lackluster at about 15-16mi minimum.

Is it possible to augment that range on a bike like this with an after market battery mounted on the back rack or something?

Anyone have any alternative recommendations? Things I like about this bike:
1. I'm short - it comes in several sizes
2. It has a throttle. I'm a type 1 diabetic and there are going to be days when I just feel shitty and i'd like to be able to use a throttle to mitigate that sometimes.
3. It's got a suspension fork in the front
4. COBI on the 2017 - not sure if this is a pro or a con yet, but it's interesting.

Marc V
3 weeks ago

I have a Juiced ODK U500 V3 and live in Chicago, I got it towards the end of winter so only road it a few times when there was snow. I mostly use it to commute to work (~20miles round trip) and Chicago is pretty good on clearing the roads when it snows but I felt the bike handles well in both light snow as well as wet conditions, it has been raining heavy the last few days here in Chicago. Of course with any mode of transportation in foul weather, you need to proceed with caution and reduced speed for safety.

I've had similar experiences of dialing in how I ride in certain conditions with braking at stop signs or lights. It varies with different loads, weather, etc. But I am getting the hang of it now.

I have taken my battery out many times messing with different stuff on the rack (easier to get different things mounted with the battery off) and I have done it so many times it doesn't bother me to do it, but everyone is correct, it is not easy to be removed compared to others :) Currently I have the rear passenger seat kit and a milk crate mounted on the rear rack which work well for most of my commutes.

I have the same issues with loading it with cargo, I have the standard kickstand that came with bike. When I go grocery shopping I like to load the bike while it is leaning against the bike lock/park pole thing :) if I am by myself, if I am with someone, I get on the bike and hold it up while they load then they get on. If it is light loading turning the front wheel the opposite direction of the kickstand lean helps a lot surprisingly for me.

Only clocked in a few hundred miles and no major issues, handlebars were loose as others have reported, I tightened them and haven't had a problem since. Did a range test recently and got 50miles in riding around Chicago with virtually no pedaling lol. But when after charging the bike over night I came in to unplug it and the standard charger that came with it was blinking RED, it still charged the bike, and I asked Juiced support and they mentioned that it was most likely the cells being balanced and that cut off the charge port (juiced support is great by the way, so that helps a lot in my book to know they got your back!). Been riding it the last few days and it has been charging and riding as normal and it has been heavy rain lately. Wish it had full suspension as I travel mostly on paved roads, but Chicago like most cities can have bumpy roads with potholes, and rear passenger kit seat rider feels it even worse, which we found out the hard way haha. So on my to do list is get a suspension float seat and look what I can do for my passenger, maybe a thicker heavy cushion or seat with springs/suspension to help with the bumpy rides :)

I park it outside with a couple of locks and try and wipe it down in my garage after it gets wet from riding and parked in the rain, during winter I only brought in the battery a couple of times, during winter. but I mostly leave it in the garage to charge, not heated but it is insulated so pretty cold still.

So to answer your initial question, the bike seems to handle the winter weather ok, you just need to be mindful of the conditions as it will mostly likely change how you ride, I mostly didn't like riding in winter because it got so dang cold lmao! But I'm still alive and the way Chicago is pretty soon I will be complaining that it got so dang hot! haha.

But I agree with everyone else, it aint perfect, but I really REALLY LIKE my Juiced ODK U500!!! hehe

Take care, ride safe!
Marc V

Robert Wetzel
1 year ago

Nice review as always - you guys at the other side of the big lake sure have not only the nicer landscapes, but also the nicer e-bike laws. All we get here is 250 Watts / 25 km/h or 500 Watts / 45 km/h but in the latter case you already need a driving license, a helmet, a license plate, are not allowed on bike paths and so on.....bummer.

Anyways, is there a chance you might make a more general video explaining the differences between the geared and gearless hub motors? What are the respective advantages, and so on....
Thanks for the good work anyways, keep it up!

Robert Wetzel
1 year ago

+ElectricBikeReview.com
Wow, thanks for the quick and exhaustive answer! I can see how you are a very light person by most standards, and this affects engine performance of course. At 230 lbs, and another 70 lbs by the bike, I'd often wish for more than just 250 Watts.
Thank you also so much for the link, I'll read it right away. Your verdict about mid-drives is surprising, as most other reviews I came across laude the Yamaha over the Bosch as the former is supposed to be more powerful (70 Nm vs. 60 Nm, no idea how many lb ft that would be in your whacky system ;-)) as well as being quieter.
What positively surprised me about the Bosch was its endurance - we rented two mid-drive pedelecs in Switzerland and the battery lasted a little shy of 50 km with about 1500 meters height difference, and performed decently until the very end.
With my cheap system power will noticeably fall when passing about 70% battery.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+Robert Wetzel Yeah... I've heard about the restrictive laws in some parts of Europe. Fun fact, the 750 watt 20 mph law was passed under George W. Bush here in the US... it's like one of the only cool things he did while in office :P

Great question on the hub motors, I've created an article about it here: http://electricbikereview.com/guides/difference-between-ebike-motors/ with some great pictures and I'll probably do a video in the future. The short answer is that geared is lighter, peppier and usually more affordable but doesn't offer power regeneration and might not last as long (gears rubbing inside vs. just magnets). I'm an active type of rider and I don't weigh much so I usually choose geared. These days I've really developed a taste for mid-drive motors and you can get these awesome kits with shift sensing (to reduce wear and strain on your chain) from e-RAD which offer pedal assist and throttle actuation: http://electricbikereview.com/category/e-rad/ otherwise I really like Bosch (Impulse and Yamaha are pretty good as well but not as responsive and "quick" feeling in my opinion).

DrZarkloff
1 year ago

still the Sonders is more bike for the money. when will these kit manufacturers get with the program?

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+DrZarkloff The Sondors has been a decent deal for people in the US who got them delivered. I still get emails from people in the UK and Australia that haven't received theres (in fact I heard most of Australia was refunded because of legal restrictions?) not everyone wants a fat bike frame so kits like this can be great, Electric Bike Outfitters sells several others for even less like the "EBO Commuter" that's rated at 350 watts just like the Sondors http://electricbikereview.com/electric-bike-outfitters/ebo-commuter-kit/

James Jacocks
1 year ago

Court, you have a strong international following-very good show! Yes, Denver is a great place to live (or ride bikes). I an looking for a front wheel kit for my beloved Fisher hybrid from the early nineties. It is a light bike with a bumper shock. Any ideas? Great vid, per usual!

Flo Mo
1 year ago

Your bike tests are cool. Now I feel like I'm in Denver/Colorado. :) It's great to ride with you on the test bikes. You make very good shots. Thanks for that. Greetings from Berlin.

LUIZ FELIPE MENDONÇA RIBEIRO
1 year ago

Congratulations on video

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+LUIZ FELIPE MENDONÇA RIBEIRO Thanks, doing my best, lots more to come ;)