Kranked EGO 2400 Review

Kranked Ego 2400 Electric Bike Kit Review
Kranked Ego 2400
Kranked Ego 2400 Front View Heat Sink
Kranked Ego 2400 Battery Pack Backpack
Kranked Ego 2400 Twist Throttle Led Console
Kranked Ego 2400 Motor Power Cord For Battery
Kranked Ego 2400 Bottom Bracket Electric Bike Motor
Kranked Ego 2400 Electric Bike Kit Review
Kranked Ego 2400
Kranked Ego 2400 Front View Heat Sink
Kranked Ego 2400 Battery Pack Backpack
Kranked Ego 2400 Twist Throttle Led Console
Kranked Ego 2400 Motor Power Cord For Battery
Kranked Ego 2400 Bottom Bracket Electric Bike Motor

Summary

  • One of the highest speed, most powerful mid-drive electric bike motors available, top speed ~44 mph varying by sprocket
  • Leverages a canister style gearless motor from EGO stepped down 9 to 1 with a planetary gearing system for increased torque
  • Motor weight is kept low and center for stability, battery weight is contained in a traditional backpack that plugs in with a long power cable (reinforced and designed to break away if you crash)
  • Very expensive but quite capable, well supported with a comprehensive two year warranty, not legal in many environments
Warning, in some configurations this electric bike kit is classified as a moped or motorcycle and may not be ridden on cycling trails or paths. It may require licensing, insurance and lights when used on public roads.

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National eBike Shops

Electric Cyclery
900 N Coast Hwy
Laguna Beach,  CA  92651
Propel Bikes
134 Flushing Ave
Brooklyn,  NY  11205

Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Kranked

Model:

EGO 2400

Price:

$3,998 ($4998 for the EGO 3400)

Suggested Use:

Downhill, Mountain

Electric Bike Class:

Moped or Motorcycle (Class 4)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

Worldwide

Model Year:

2015

Bicycle Details

Battery Weight:

11.24 lbs ( 5.09 kg )

Motor Weight:

12 lbs ( 5.44 kg ) (7 lbs Canister Motor Only, Gears and Mounting Plates Add ~5 lbs)

Cranks:

EGO Aluminum Alloy

Pedals:

Optional EGO Platform Pedals

Accessories:

EGO Motor, Controller and Twist Throttle, Custom Kranked Bottom Bracket, EVOC Rucksack Backpack for Battery Storage

Other:

Designed to Fit the Santa Cruz Heckler Bicycle, Cylinder Motor Driven Planetary Gear with 9 to 1 Reduction Ratio for Increased Torque, Battery Size: 10.5 cm x 14.7 cm

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

EGO

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Gearless Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

1200 watts

Motor Peak Output:

2400 watts

Motor Torque:

75 Newton meters

Battery Voltage:

43 volts (Optional 51 Volt)

Battery Amp Hours:

12.5 ah (Optional 17.5 Amp Hour)

Battery Watt Hours:

537.5 wh (Optional 892.5 Watt Hours)

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium Manganese

Charge Time:

1.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

25 miles ( 40 km )

Estimated Max Range:

30 miles ( 48 km )

Display Type:

LED Console

Readouts:

Battery Capacity

Display Accessories:

EGO Motor, Controller and Twist Throttle, Custom Kranked Bottom Bracket, EVOC Rucksack Backpack for Battery Storage

Drive Mode:

Twist Throttle

Top Speed:

44 mph ( 71 kph ) (Speed Varies by Gear)

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Written Review

The Kranked EGO 2400 is an electric bike kit that delivers power and speed more akin to an electric motorcycle than the low speed ebikes I usually test… It’s intended for off-road or private use and is capable of climbing 40 degree inclines, delivering 2400 watts at peak output (more than 5x traditional low speed ebike systems). With top speeds in excess of 40 miles per hour (65 kilometers per hour) I highly recommend riding with a full face helmet and downhill arm, leg and joint protective gear. For roughly $4k you get the EGO-made 2400 motor, controller and twist throttle along with the Kranked custom gearing system and mounting brackets as well as an impressive ~54 Wh Lithium-Manganese battery. I’m told this kit is compatible with roughly seventy percent of the standard mountain bike frames on the market today but the folks at Kranked love Santa Cruz and have optimized compatibility with the $2,500 Heckler model shown in the photos and video above. This full suspension model is sturdy, light weight and affordable with a popular all-mountain geometry. I had a blast riding uphill with this thing and appreciate the balance offered by the middrive motor. The 11 lb battery and required backpack worked alright but the straps made me sweaty and my movement was a bit restricted by the weight. The loud buzzing sound made by the motor wasn’t my favorite and definitely drew attention from fellow cyclists making me feel a little self conscious. While my time was limited, I’m sure the strain of so much power on the chain, derailleur and sprockets will shorten their expected lifespan. My uncle has been riding a 350 watt Haibike for the past year and had to replace his chain something like six times with two new derailleurs and that has shift sensing tech built in. The Kranked EGO kits are throttle only so you might not have mashing if you completely ease off the power when shifting.

The motor powering this kit is made by EGO and sold separately (with its own proprietary mounting hardware) for slightly less than the Kranked system. Kranked has tweaked and refined the mounting hardware for their version, sells it in different regions of the world (Canada in particular) and offers a two year comprehensive warranty with local support. As mentioned earlier, the motor produces some noise as RPM is stepped down with a planetary gearing system. this allows the the gearless canister drive to spin at a more optimal RPM and deliver more power for climbing without overheating. There’s a nice heat sink built onto the end of the drive but no easy way to tell how the system is performing… no LCD display here with speed, range or detailed battery level. You get a very traditional three LED readout near the throttle with red, yellow and green readouts. It may be tougher, simpler to install and more affordable but it also leaves something to be desired. I’d love to see how many watts were being put out and also how hot the system is running realtime so I could adjust my riding on the fly.

Powering the system is an awesome Lithium-Manganese battery brick that plunks down into the EVOC Rucksack backpack and connects via umbilical-power cord to the controller. It’s a unique design to be sure and there are definite trade-offs in balance. The bike is very balanced with the mid-drive motor and solid feeling, the backpack is padded and comfortable to wear… even giving you more space to bring food, water and tools… but you feel the weight and it impacts your stance and arm engagement. I love that the power cable is so strong and that it’s designed to break away in the event of a fall. I think the battery is well protected by the backpack and your body shouldn’t get too beat up by the 11 lb weight because of integrated padding but it’s very different from most bikes that have batteries built right into the frame or attached with a rack. If you’re coming from the motorcycle world everything here is going to feel super light weight but if you’re into downhill mountain biking it might feel heavy and restrictive. The benefit is that you get to ride up and down the mountains you want to bomb now vs. taking a chairlift or helicopter.

Operating the Kranked EGO 2400 system is very easy once the kit is installed. You charge the battery, which only takes ~1.5 hours using their quick charger, then put on the backpack and plug it into the loose wire coming out of the controller (usually kept in place with zip ties). Next, you press the power button and twist the throttle. It’s very intuitive and extremely responsive. Before my ride, the founder Bjorn cautioned me to be delicate with the throttle at first and get used to the power. You could easily wheelie the bike, spin the tire out and go careening out of control if you don’t respect it. Unlike many dirt bikes that use internal combustion motors, electric systems don’t require that you shift gears to go fast and that makes them easy to use but also easy to get carried away with. That’s really it, the bike is on and you go. To optimize for climbing or going fast you can shift the bicycle gears like you normally would on an unpowered bike but as mentioned earlier, I’d suggest easing off the throttle when you do this to avoid mashing. The first few rides should be done on smooth surfaces to get used to the throttle, when the terrain gets bumpy or your body begins to move a lot it’s easy to bear down on the grips for stability but this can also feed into the throttle.

If was more into downhill riding I think I’d be obsessed with kits like this… I’d also love to take it off of huge motocross jumps or go freeriding. This electric bike setup achieves the power and speed of a motorcycle and the maneuverability and light weight of a bicycle. Unfortunately, because the motor is so integrated with the bike it’s very sturdy but also not easily removable (nor is the controller and throttle) so prepare to have a dedicated e-mountain bike. It’s a lot of money to spend and the motor noise can be annoying but the rush cannot be denied. The potential for overheating and limited system feedback are areas for improvement and I’m excited to see batteries become even lighter. I don’t think the battery backpack thing is bad but it does impact your ride a bit and I’d go into this purchase with added budget for some serious pads. Also, as always… be considerate of how you ride and where you take electric bikes like this. You could seriously injure or even kill another rider or pedestrian and while that’s true of human powered bicycles to some extent (especially b-lining down large hills and mountains) the risk is everpresent with a 40+ mph ebike setup like this.

Pros:

  • Because you wear the battery pack with this kit (in a backpack) you don’t have to modify the frame of the bike much and the wire sending electricity from the pack to the controller and motor is heavily reinforced with a breakaway design in case you fall off the bike
  • The motor mounting plate is custom designed specifically for use with the Santa Cruz Heckler bicycle which is light weight, durable and high performing but the company says it’s also compatible with ~70% of other bike mountain bike frames
  • For those who ride motocross bikes this kit offers a much lighter weight, quieter experience that accelerates well and can still reach higher speeds ~44 mph
  • As a mid-drive motor, this system leverages any sprockets you’ve got setup in a rear cassette so you can optimize for torque or speed by shifting gears traditionally, the downside is that it definitely puts more strain on your chain and derailleur so shift consciously
  • The kit is very expensive compared to lower speed options but there are multiple motor and battery sizes to choose from to dial in the price for your needs
  • Given the type of terrain that this system is designed for (rugged off-road) the motor casing is super sturdy and they’ve integrated heat sink blades to keep it running well even under heavy load
  • Capable of climbing up to 80% incline or 40° degrees slope, that’s more than any other kit I’ve tried to date

Cons:

  • Due to the higher top speed and enormous power of this kit it’s not classified as a low speed electric bike and therefor not legal on most traditional paths and trails
  • As you can hear in the video, the motor makes a loud sort of buzzing noise… it’s not as bad as most gas powered motors but definitely louder than most other electric bicycles
  • Batteries are contained in a backpack which means the weight is higher up and may impact your comfort and ergonomics of riding at 10+ lbs varying by capacity
  • This system only offers throttle on demand, it’s variable speed and quite responsive but you end up using your wrist and arm muscles to control bike handling and speed which can take a toll on rough terrain, a pedal assist option would be nice

Resources:

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reoutput
4 months ago
2400 or so miles...my display went out
smitty
5 months ago
neilap
I had the same issue today. I have about 2400 km on my ST2 and today when I turned it on to commute home, I had a system error and the motor error message. I could not clear it after repeated attempts of removing battery. I finally got it to clear only to find my battery was only 54% charged, even though it had been plugged in for 6 hrs. Charged for a while, and then had the same thing with the error message happen again. Finally cleared it after repeated attempts again. What gives?
The issue I had has not to this point resurfaced, but another interesting battery charging development that I have experienced is that when I attempt to recharge the battery while in the "lock" mode, it does not seem to charge. So I now always charge it in off mode and this has seemed to solve that problem. I'm not a fan of removing the battery to charge it though I have done it before. Stromer indicates in their literature that the first three times you ride the bike, take the battery charge almost completely down, then recharge it. I wonder if everyone has adhered to this indication from Stromer? It's not much fun because unless you take some longer rides, it will take several shorter ones to wear down the battery to that level before recharging. Others have mentioned that the battery software is "buggy". Perhaps there will be an update that will start to solve that problem?
neilap
5 months ago
I had the same issue today. I have about 2400 km on my ST2 and today when I turned it on to commute home, I had a system error and the motor error message. I could not clear it after repeated attempts of removing battery. I finally got it to clear only to find my battery was only 54% charged, even though it had been plugged in for 6 hrs. Charged for a while, and then had the same thing with the error message happen again. Finally cleared it after repeated attempts again. What gives?
EddieJ
10 months ago
I'm still more than happy with my choice of Fenix BT20, especially now that I have cut the wires, and fitted a plug to enable six and eight cell packs to be used. The OE two cell pack is not big enough for an evenings use.

If the Fenix ever breaks or gets stolen, this might possibly be my replacement choice. http://www.mbr.co.uk/reviews/lights/magicshine-eagle-m2-2400-light-review
J.C.
10 months ago
Stromer ST1 Elite, purchased Jun 2013.
Motor failed at 2400 miles; warranty was only for two years apparently.
Cost to replace is $1500 (motor + shipping - 44% of the original bike purchase price) and doesn't include installation.
Really disappointed with Stromer.
Robert Clark
11 months ago
Bike_On
So the battery is getting on 4 years old? How far can you get on fast mode, 15-18mi? Does it kick into the flashing red light? That is the battery voltage hitting a low limit and going into Safe mode to allow 200W and limp home. If you recycle power on the fly, it comes back up, as I expect you have discovered.

I found the Opti power and speed to be addictive. Riding in eco at 17mph seemed so slow, but it really isn't that bad compared to normal ebikes.

That battery will work fine. The 1100 pulls about 25amp max, so a 21ahr is ok.

Do you have a clamp on rack? The battery is 13", so spec out a set up before you order.

Good rides!
The reason I went with the Optibike in the first place was all the accessories on the bike were first rate, from the Rock Shocks to the fantastic hydraulic brakes. Some people think the design is somewhat dated, but I find it a fine piece of engineering. Because of the extra weight of the bike, it is very stable at speed and the full suspension is smooth.

I travel on main traffic roads in Houston, Tx. It is not a very bicycle friendly place and not many bike lanes or trails to ride on for my commute. So I find it much safer to go as close to 30 mph as I can to reduce the differential speed between me and the automobile traffic. With that said, I know I'm above the 'legal limits' for E-bikes, but I'm not a speed demon. I much prefer to ride at 20 mph when I can. But a 10 mile stretch of road that I have to ride on, the speed limit is 45 mph

You are right, in fast mode, the battery goes about 15 miles, then kicks into safe mode. So I'm thinking maybe a cell or two are laying down. I'm thinking I have the 18 Ah battery in my bike and sometime in the future I would like to attempt to rebuild the battery pack with the new high density batteries. As my bike is out of warranty of any kind, I'm ready to try this route. but in the mean time, I'm thinking of a aux battery to hold me over till I get the skill of building my own battery packs.

I do have the Optibike rack on the back, so I have room for the battery pack, but I will have to build the battery cable to connect to the rear socket on the bike. I'll open up the rear socket to check for polarity. I hope the wires are the standard 'Red' for Positive and 'Black' for negative. I'm not sure what kind of plug that is on the bike, but if I search electronic supply or automotive stores, I should be able to find one.

I like the aux battery and case from Optibike, but at $2400 dollars, it is not a cost effective option for me at this time. I'm hooked on E-bikes.
J.R.
1 year ago
Voltbike
Hi J.R., we did not invent the folding fat bike. However we did it better and affordable to the North American market.

The Italian company you refer is selling their version for 2130 Euro (~$2400) which is significant price difference than our Voltbike model.

And I don't think anybody in North America want to deal with warranty in Italy on top of hefty shipping fees and duty/taxes from Europe. (For comparison we ship $70 USD in USA and $50 in Canada)

It's unfortunate that the name Mariner is used by other companies. Like Dahon is having Dahon Mariner for example.

However I would like to open this discussion if anybody have better name for our folding fat bike. We plan our folding electric fat bike to take prime spot in our line of products.
@Voltbike

I'm not suggesting this ebike is available better or less expensive by another. I was trying to make you aware that a Mariner ebike is already being marketed by another and has been for years. I'm not a keyboard warrior anywhere and my feelings are the more ebike companies the better! I do have issues when companies trade on the efforts of another. I don't believe the Dahon Mariner or Dash are electric. When someone Google's Mariner electric bike, what should they find? The ebike from a company that's worked for years on market share and reputation, or the startup that's being talked about today?

This discussion should further the public's knowledge of your company and that is even unfair business practice. Given you entered the North American ebike market, the same market as ProdecoTech and with the ease of information technology, there's really no reason to continue marketing a product with another's name.

I wish you and Voltbike success moving forward.

JR
Voltbike
1 year ago
Hi J.R., we did not invent the folding fat bike. However we did it better and affordable to the North American market.

The Italian company you refer is selling their version for 2130 Euro (~$2400) which is significant price difference than our Voltbike model.

And I don't think anybody in North America want to deal with warranty in Italy on top of hefty shipping fees and duty/taxes from Europe. (For comparison we ship $70 USD in USA and $50 in Canada)

It's unfortunate that the name Mariner is used by other companies. Like Dahon is having Dahon Mariner for example.

However I would like to open this discussion if anybody have better name for our folding fat bike. We plan our folding electric fat bike to take prime spot in our line of products.
George S.
1 year ago
I'm a little confused by the marketing profiles. The CX basically seems to be an EU spec motor, so 250 watts. In the end, for some things like carrying weight and climbing hills, watts are watts, no matter what gearing you have. It doesn't seem like enough power. But the style of frame is very friendly to older riders, who don't generally need so much power. On the other hand, many of us appreciate a throttle.

Haibike, by way of contrast, puts what is listed as a 500w (Yamaha) motor on the Sduro, referencing one dealer site. I can't find anything like a step through on an Sduro. At a retail of $2400, at least the Haibike is closer to the huge mid-drive market that Bafang has opened up. Haibike has references to 'young' in every Sduro ad I run across.

I don't suppose you would care to put the Yamaha drive in a nice package like the Haibike, add a step-through unisex frame, and a throttle? If you get something like that, close to $2000, you would be more compelling. EBNE offers the basic Sduro for $2379 with free shipping. How does it compare to the basic Cubes?

You give test rides for people. You offer service. But the sad fact is, you are way too far away to ever supply anything to me. So whatever dealer margin I pay is lost to me if you just slap a label on a box and put it in a big brown truck.

(I reviewed all the preview 2016 Sduros on your website and didn't see a step through.)
Bike_On
1 year ago
Kaldeem
Sounds like you want a dirtbike. For 10k you can go buy a Stealth Bomber. Full throttle, 10,000w full suspension. Everything your looking for.
It doesn't sound like that to be... what is a dirt bike? I thought they are ICE bikes with 80cc+ displacement, not a 1hp electric bike.

Are not all the Mountain Haibike, 350W Bosch systems being ridden on dirt trails? Does that make them dirt bikes?

If you have even ridden an Optibike mid drive, it is not made to be ridden on throttle alone. Why? The MBB spins at 2400 rpms and gets stepped down (like 30:1) to the chainring, 85-90 rpm. It can run down to 70 rpms under load, but it does not like it, it wants pedal assist.

the MBB mid drive is smaller in profile than a hub motor and spins about 10X faster. It tends to be more efficient, but within a smaller operating band. While the ddhub will perform from 0-350 rpms, the Opti MBB always wants to operate around 85 rpms and have you change gears. Thus, legs are needed between gear shifting and overall ride performance.

It is more satisfying to ride all MDs like a bike, as designed, and get the thrill of faster assisted mtn biking, than just throttle and change of gears.

If that's the case, then he's not looking for a zero pedal dirtbike.
Lowquality
1 year ago
JoePah
@Lowquality no offense but you are falling into that first time builder trap: buy the cheapest bike possible and install the cheapest kit possible.

Don't do it.

Buy a decent used bike like a Trek or Specialized or Fuji or Giant with disc brakes (mechanical) and a quality frame that actually fits you. Buy a decent ekit from a seller with a great reputation and who has been in business for a while.

Sellers with good reputations:
CellMan http://em3ev.com/store/
GoldenMotors Canada http://www.goldenmotor.ca/
Electric Rider http://www.electricrider.com/

I'm sure there are others. These companies have been around at least 7 years.
Are you saying the golden pie hub motor is a bad motor/kit?

And as far as the bike, it looks like I'll have to go with plan B , which is order the motor/battery , then go up to the bike shop and find a frame that fits the battery, and myself, and find a similar one with disc brakes or install them.

Earlier you mentioned just buying an off the shelf e-bike, but I've noticed every single one cost $2400 and uses subpar batteries (most 10ah and 32v) and 500w motors - the only one that even looked decent was the Radmotors one, but the $175 shipping makes it to expensive.

Earlier you asked about did I actually ride the donor bike (which will not be used) - i rode it about 2 miles this weekend, yet im surrounded by big hills, I was able to do it but i stayed off major roads. It wasnt much fun and the brakes sucked.

anyways, the total after shipping is right at $1000 for the motor and a 48v 20ah Samsung battery , was going to buy 2 torque arms from a different company. Then I was going to find a suitable bike.


** Yes, its for exercise, but its also for fun. If i ride the bike for 30 minutes and only pedal for 10 of those minutes, thats 10 more minutes then i would of pedaled sitting at home. If the smaller motors did not cost the exact same as the larger motor I would just consider a smaller one. If and when I have to travel on or across 4 lane highways, which I will always have to do at least once in either direction, I do not want to rely on pedaling, just want to get on and get off asap as neither will require extended time periods. When going up a steep hill (a few of those around here in my path) I do not want to risk burning up the motor if I want to rest or simply lightly pedal which I'd assume the smaller motors would do - much like my 1200w scooter which almost burned up, realized when the motor is having that much strain its better to just get off and walk it. Hope that clears up some confusion - as this was a learning process for me as well.



Feel free to point me to a better motor/kit
MLB
1 year ago
They had been selling very highly rated 2014 Izip Path+ for about $1700 new at Performance Bike and other places. They are 2400? this year. FWIW
Ann M.
1 year ago
Good information @Bike_On; thanks for the performance tweaks and details! Have been a fan of Rakesh's designs for a long time, so the kit is a good value for high performance. Remember, the BionX kits are around $2400, so the Falco pricing seems in line.
erutio
1 year ago
MLB
"You will want a new different bike shortly after your first. You can then consider all of the many variations on the market with a firm point of view from your daily commuter."

This: +1 Just do it. Buy a decent quality bike and if it's not the perfect one, you sell it and move on. I've found myself loving my full suspension mtb even for street use with street tires on it. Go figure.
It's my third E bike this year, but I haven't lost more than $200 on any swap (buying like new, used) so to me it's a no brainer to try what looks interesting/better, whatever.
From all that I've looked at, I would only (ME) buy the upper end 4k type bikes, but USED, for around 1/2 that or a bit more.
They really are built much better and heavier duty with hydraulic brakes and all that.
Motorized fat bike WOULD seem to fit what you need with the gravel and winter riding, and the relatively short commute. I would still get suspension, but certainly can get by without it.
Felt and Haibike both make gorgeous Fat bikes, both priced out of your range but again, buy used.
I bought a gorgeous Stromer ST1 that is a tremendous bike but I'm just not riding it since I got the mountain bike (loving trail riding) and my trike has boost too.
It was over 4k new in Feb to first owner. I bought it in April with 64 miles on it for $2600 (with full city kit lights/fenders $350) and I'm selling it for $2400 now with 120? miles on it. Not trying to sell you, just showing you what is out there and that you can play around a bit and try stuff without losing your shirt. I'd hoped my gf would ride the stromer with me, but it's not happening much. LOL
Prices of the upper/middle (4k) stuff are dropping. FWIW
Is the stromer St1 still for sale? And where are you located?
Henchman
1 year ago
eclipsedave
PayPal fixed my account in 3 days, because I was in the right. Then, to my surprise and without prompt, they refunded the remaining $70, because it was wrong for Aaron to keep it.

I hope you all get your bikes.

P.S. I'll be seeking out more info on the 2014 Currie Izip E3 Path+. I highly recommend it.

Yeah. Have fun with that for $2400
MLB
1 year ago
grench
Go with a purpose built Ebike for your first round. Drive the two hours and ride a rear hub drive and a mid drive. Decide what body position you are comfortable with...up right, slightly forward or forward. Get fitted for frame size and buy a bike with the above answers...no longer paralized. You will want a new different bike shortly after your first. You can then consider all of the many variations on the market with a firm point of view from your daily commuter.

Thoughts?
"You will want a new different bike shortly after your first. You can then consider all of the many variations on the market with a firm point of view from your daily commuter."

This: +1 Just do it. Buy a decent quality bike and if it's not the perfect one, you sell it and move on. I've found myself loving my full suspension mtb even for street use with street tires on it. Go figure.
It's my third E bike this year, but I haven't lost more than $200 on any swap (buying like new, used) so to me it's a no brainer to try what looks interesting/better, whatever.
From all that I've looked at, I would only (ME) buy the upper end 4k type bikes, but USED, for around 1/2 that or a bit more.
They really are built much better and heavier duty with hydraulic brakes and all that.
Motorized fat bike WOULD seem to fit what you need with the gravel and winter riding, and the relatively short commute. I would still get suspension, but certainly can get by without it.
Felt and Haibike both make gorgeous Fat bikes, both priced out of your range but again, buy used.
I bought a gorgeous Stromer ST1 that is a tremendous bike but I'm just not riding it since I got the mountain bike (loving trail riding) and my trike has boost too.
It was over 4k new in Feb to first owner. I bought it in April with 64 miles on it for $2600 (with full city kit lights/fenders $350) and I'm selling it for $2400 now with 120? miles on it. Not trying to sell you, just showing you what is out there and that you can play around a bit and try stuff without losing your shirt. I'd hoped my gf would ride the stromer with me, but it's not happening much. LOL
Prices of the upper/middle (4k) stuff are dropping. FWIW
EULITTLB
2 years ago
Thanks for that, there is no need or wish to go over old ground, why did I buy the BMW Cruise ebike at 3.5x the cost of the Sondors?

1) Developed solution with professional design - beautiful looking
2) Trusted BMW Marque of quality, 2 year guarantee, nationwide/European support - conventional way of doing business - invoice and payment, I know what I am getting and when I am getting it
3) Pedelec with range benefits and high-quality Bosch mid-drive system with Powerpack 400 and Intuiva (sp?) computer- I favour the pedelec system, if you are not putting any effort in at all then why bother in my view for my own circumstances?
4) 10 speed Shimano Gearing and integrated lighting system
5) Weakness of the Euro enables me to get 30% (not 40% as previously stated) discount on the horrendous £2400 ($3600) purchase price, as a business I am buying inclusive of VAT so effectively I am paying £1415 per unit initial outlay.

Why I feel that pledgers are throwing their money away with the Sondors even at the price of $698 for early pledgers

1) Hashed together solution and design, single bike in existence which has been used to generate lots of revenue (to applause)
2) No warranty, no assurance of quality, no transparency or consistency/honesty. IGG raises real concerns. For me a lack of trust in the Campaign. For shipping to be a "perk" also raises concerns, I believe there is some really shady taxation issues with "perks" and these will be exposed - Sondors is selling ebikes, simple as
3) No idea how long the bike or battery will last - or when or if the "perk" will be delivered
4) Single gear, it will be a pig to ride when the battery is flat
5) Although I like the looks of the bike after a short while it does really look like a kids toy more suitable for the 10-14 age group imo.

I applaud everyone who is willing to take a punt, who acknowledges the element of risk and is excited about the Sondors project. For me the Sondors Campaign is wide-open to abuse and exploitation by the Campaign owner, the Campaign isn't professionally run at all and the latest issues with the inflated shipping cost and fact there has been no volume discount s promised/the shipping cost is not MUCH LESS as stated will just be the first of many concerns,
Lenny
2 years ago
eDean
Hi,

Any suggestions for a kickstand? Found this:
http://www.amazon.com/Topeak-Flashs...&sr=1-11&keywords=kickstand+for+mountain+bike .
Kinda wish there was a pedal with a kickstand built in, one of Courts reviews had this on a mtn bike and it seemed pretty cool.
Earlier Haibikes had Pletscher ESGE kickstand. The latest 2015 models may not have it. The bike should have eyelets for adding the kickstand. I have linked all the relevant images and info here:
Let us know if you have any issues.

W/ kickstand FS RS

View attachment 2396

Kickstand used here is Standard ESGE (hard to find in the US)

View attachment 2399


W/o kickstand FS RX (notice the eyelets, thanks EBR)

View attachment 2397

Pletscher ESGE ( I suggest you verify the length once you have the bike)

Purchase link

View attachment 2398

It should look something like this ( thanks EBR)

View attachment 2400
JoePah
2 years ago
Dean
In our community, we have had several e-bike shops close and longstanding shops stop selling e-bikes. The lone remaining shop does sell Haibike and Stromer - great bikes, but the shop recommends servicing them every 100 miles. If this shop also goes belly-up, I can't imagine driving the bike great distances for so frequent service. Have any members gotten stuck with being unable to get LBS service?
Yeah it's unfortunate but it seems like the failure rate of eBike shops is very high. Which creates great buying opportunities!

Checkup every 100 mile is completely out of line, unless you're dirt biking every weekend or abusing it in some way.

On my Stromer i brought it in after 100 miles to fix a problem, they did a tune up and that was 2400 miles ago. Took care of the adjustments, brake pad replacements and lubrication myself.
All the routine bike maintenance you should be able to handle yourself no problem.
I can give you list if you want.
oilerlord
3 years ago
Vern
I feel your pain about the "guilt" issue. I am also in the same situation as you. I really want to support my local dealer(s) and quite frankly I will probably need their help when issues arrive. BUT, when I finally pull the trigger, I am hoping that my local dealers will at least meet me half way and give me a decent deal. if not then....
There's obviously an obscene profit margin in these things, and a big fat commission for the salesperson. If one dealer is willing to sell a Jumper at $2400 AND include shipping, I'm guessing dealer cost is somewhere around $2000. Notwithstanding the fact I don't have a "local" BH dealership, I wouldn't be able justify paying twice as much for the same bike even if there was. One dealer in Vancouver tried to instill fear that buying a bike in the USA would mean I wouldn't have a warranty. If I'm saving $1600...do I really care if warranty service means another vacation trip to the USA?

Another thread asked if American bicycle buyers are savvy enough. The answer is a resounding YES! With the exception of saddle time, anyone can find out everything about e-bikes, and make their purchase decision before even stepping foot in the store.
oilerlord
3 years ago
In Seattle now...went to the Bike Expo yesterday. We had the chance to talk with the BH rep that had a display set up with a local e-bike retailer. To my surprise, the event wasn't set up for test rides. They have a lot of space to work with (the show is at a cruise terminal) so they could have easily set up a temporary road course. After we mentioned we drove all the way from Alberta, and that we are planning to buy two bikes - the e-bike retailer took me out to ride the Jumper for a 15 minute ride.

As Ravi has mentioned, the Neo Jumper is everything (and more) than I expected it to be. SOOO smooth and powerful. They also had a new bike for 2014 called Cloud 9" which was very comfy.



As nice and helpful as the retailer was with us, he quoted me $3999 for the Jumper and $2600 for the Jet. He mentioned that they sell more BH bikes than anyone else, and that their prices were the best in the USA. That was a little bit of a stretch since they are obviously selling them at suggest list prices, and I've found a lot of places willing to discount them 30% and more. With Ravi's help, I was able to source the Jumper for under $2400, and I'd assume the Jet could probably be had for under $2000 - AND have both bikes shipped for free. Is it "showrooming" when I had already decided going in to see the bike that there was going to be a 99% chance I'd be buying that model? I've done all of my research on the Internet but I always feel guilty in these situations.

All I can do is be honest with the retailer and give him a shot at the business. That said, I won't be naming the competitor because I don't want them to get into trouble with BH. If they don't match the price, I'll send the salesperson a $50 Starbucks card for his time. I think that's fair compensation for a 15 minute demo.
Ralph
3 years ago
Court, I tend to agree with you for most of the same reasons you point out that the Zuma is the better choice for me. I think it just became a no brainer though. The 2014 Zuma was just priced at $2400 vs 2013 $3500 sale priced Nitro or Flight or 2014 $4000 Nitro. Combine that with a lean forward seating position on the Nitro and the more cushy ride on the Zuma and I think I am there. The lower center of gravity on the Zuma is likely a better balance. Just have to ride one to be sure it fits.

I have ridden the 2103 IZip Zuma (feels rock solid, very fast with 36v), IZip Vibe (nice ride but almost no boost, but very inexpensive and for a lightweight it could be a great choice), Pedego Comfort Cruiser (big wide handle bars, not as solid feeling bike as the Zuma, feels like a beach cruiser...which it is), the Pedego City Commuter ( beautiful, rides great and I would buy it if it fit me). You really need to ride the bike to know if it is the right fit.

I think the new Zuma has the Intelligent Pedelec system and disc brakes. The Nitro has hydraulic brakes and torque sensing. I guess the Nitro bits are better, but Zuma appears to be a smooth very maneuverable bike. Thoughts?

I wanted to mention that I emailed Currie at the highest level. I got a prompt and thorough reply and the local Currie rep is meeting with me at my dealer next week to help me sort it out. I have no doubt this is a really great company and I am extremely appreciative of their interest in helping get me into the right bike.
Fat Fat (Fat-one)
4 months ago

That's extremely expensive.

eksine
7 months ago

The host is an ass, he keep misquoting the specs and the inventor is right
there, why not let him talk instead. instead he just likes to hear the
sound of his own voice and looks like an ass

turbolevo
10 months ago

Auto Door operator motors

turbolevo
11 months ago

If I don’t see sign that say’s I can’t I will.

nigel dunn
1 year ago

That's one way to trash a decent bike, why would you do that, I don't get
it:-/

ytesb1
1 year ago

I'm afraid that noisy powerful ebikes like this one are going to get all
ebikes banned from trails.

GustSergeant
10 months ago

+ytesb1 This about the noisiest I've heard. The Bafang BBSHD (comparable
mid-drive, 1000w) is whisper quiet compared to this, and is perfectly
adequate for these kinds of things.

turbolevo
11 months ago

+ytesb1 What trails are you taking about??

FRANK ROBY
1 year ago

terrible idea.

nerdexproject
1 year ago

You forgot to mention the power output of the motor. Was trying to look it
up on your website but couldn't find the model there... Is it above 750w?
And does it come with pedal assist or is it throttle only?

eksine
7 months ago

MAKE:
Kranked
MODEL:
EGO 2400
PRICE:
$ 3998.00 ($4998 for the EGO 3400)
SUGGESTED USE:
Downhill, Mountain
ELECTRIC BIKE CLASS:
Moped or Motorcycle (Class 4)
Learn more about Ebike classes
WARRANTY:
2 Year Comprehensive
AVAILABILITY:
Worldwide
MODEL YEAR:
2015
Electronic Details
MOTOR TYPE:
Mid-Mounted Gearless Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors
MOTOR NOMINAL OUTPUT:
1200 watts
MOTOR PEAK OUTPUT:
2400 watts
MOTOR BRAND:
EGO
MOTOR TORQUE:
75 Newton meters
BATTERY VOLTAGE:
43 volts (Optional 51 Volt)
BATTERY AMP HOURS:
12.5 ah (Optional 17.5 Amp Hour)
BATTERY WATT HOURS:
537.5 wh (Optional 892.5 Watt Hours)
BATTERY CHEMISTRY:
Lithium Manganese
CHARGE TIME:
1.5 hours
ESTIMATED MIN RANGE:
25 miles ( 40 km )
ESTIMATED MAX RANGE:
30 miles ( 48 km )
DISPLAY TYPE:
LED Console
READOUTS:
Battery Capacity
DISPLAY ACCESSORIES:
EGO Motor, Controller and Twist Throttle, Custom Kranked Bottom Bracket,
EVOC Rucksack Backpack for Battery Storage
DRIVE MODE:
Twist Throttle
TOP SPEED:
44 mph ( 71 kph ) (Speed Varies by Gear)
Bicycle Details
BATTERY WEIGHT:
11.24 lbs ( 5.09 kg )
MOTOR WEIGHT:
12 lbs ( 5.44 kg ) (7 lbs Canister Motor Only, Gears and Mounting Plates
Add ~5 lbs)
CRANKS:
EGO Aluminum Alloy
PEDALS:
Optional EGO Platform Pedals
ACCESSORIES:
EGO Motor, Controller and Twist Throttle, Custom Kranked Bottom Bracket,
EVOC Rucksack Backpack for Battery Storage
OTHER:
Designed to Fit the Santa Cruz Heckler Bicycle, Cylinder Motor Driven
Planetary Gear with 9 to 1 Reduction Ratio for Increased Torque, Battery
Size: 10.5 cm x 14.7 cm

EgoKits
1 year ago

+nerdexproject
Hi.. thanks for asking! it has got 2400 watt power :-)
Throttle controlled :-)
Ready for tricks and action!

ski usa (nick)
1 year ago

Please do more mountain bike reviews find the really interesting and
helpful

Blake Garvey
1 year ago

$3299 just for the kit ,battery in back pack(couldnt be good for your back)
and cable hanging out the back .think ill pass .

turbolevo
11 months ago

+ElectricBikeReview.com amazing ride,way to much fun,everyone should have
one in their quiv

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

+Blake Garvey It's a unique setup... Very powerful and thrilling but also
loud and a bit uncomfortable with larger batteries. We rode with a smaller
pack and it felt fine but I really wasn't on for very long.