OHM Mountain Review

Ohm Mountain Electric Bike Review
Ohm Mountain
Ohm Mountain 10 Speed Shimano Deore Xt With Shadow Plus
Ohm Mountain 48 Volt Bionx Battery Charging Port Touch Ring
Ohm Mountain Bionx Removable Color Lcd Display Panel
Ohm Mountain Suntour Raidon Xc Lo R Air Suspension Fork 100 Mm Travel
Ohm Mountain Schwalbe Nobby Nic Plus Sized Tires
Ohm Mountain Samox Sealed Cartridge Hollow Spindle Bb Chain Guide
Ohm Mountain Branded Ergon Sport Gel Smc4 Saddle
Ohm Mountain Bionx D Series Motor Cable
Ohm Mountain Trp Zurich Hydraulic Disc Brake Levers Adjustable With Motor Inhibitor Switch
Ohm Mountain 3 45 Amp Ebike Charger
Ohm Mountain Electric Bike Review
Ohm Mountain
Ohm Mountain 10 Speed Shimano Deore Xt With Shadow Plus
Ohm Mountain 48 Volt Bionx Battery Charging Port Touch Ring
Ohm Mountain Bionx Removable Color Lcd Display Panel
Ohm Mountain Suntour Raidon Xc Lo R Air Suspension Fork 100 Mm Travel
Ohm Mountain Schwalbe Nobby Nic Plus Sized Tires
Ohm Mountain Samox Sealed Cartridge Hollow Spindle Bb Chain Guide
Ohm Mountain Branded Ergon Sport Gel Smc4 Saddle
Ohm Mountain Bionx D Series Motor Cable
Ohm Mountain Trp Zurich Hydraulic Disc Brake Levers Adjustable With Motor Inhibitor Switch
Ohm Mountain 3 45 Amp Ebike Charger

Summary

  • A sleek, extremely quiet, cross country style electric bike built around a custom hardtail frame that comes in four sizes (including stem, bar, and crank arm differences)
  • 100 mm air suspension fork from Suntour, larger 3" plus sized tires from Schwalbe, longer Boost hubs, sturdy thru-axles front and rear, the bike feels stiff and responsive
  • Torque sensing pedal assist is fluid and natural, the D-Series larger diameter hub motor provides great torque and stays cool, you get four levels of assist and regeneration
  • Can be setup as a Class 2 or Class 3 Speed pedelec, priced a bit higher and only available online or at the OHM store in Vancouver Canada, only one color choice, noisy kickstand and awkward pedals

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

OHM

Model:

Mountain

Price:

$3,455

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Trail, Mountain

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2), Speed Pedalec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

3 Year Electronics, 5 Year Frame

Availability:

United States, Canada

Model Year:

20172018

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

51.1 lbs (23.17 kg)

Battery Weight:

7.4 lbs (3.35 kg)

Motor Weight:

8.8 lbs (3.99 kg)

Frame Material:

ADVANCE™ Hydroformed Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

16.5 in (41.91 cm)18.5 in (46.99 cm)20.5 in (52.07 cm)22.5 in (57.15 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Medium 18.5" Measurements: 18.5" Seat Tube Length, 21.5" Reach, 29” Stand Over Height, 27.25” Width, 73.5” Length

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Matte Green with Orange Accents

Frame Fork Details:

Suntour RAIDON XC-LO-R Air Suspension, 100 mm Travel, Compression Clicker with Lockout, Rebound Adjust, Boost 110 mm Hub, 15QLC 15 mm Thru-Axle with Quick Release

Frame Rear Details:

BionX Proprietary, 142 mm Hub, 12 mm Axle with M6 End Cap Bolts

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

10 Speed 1x10 Shimano Deore XT with Shadow Plus Derailleur, 11-36T Cassette

Shifter Details:

Shimano Dyna-Sys Two-Way Triggers on Right

Cranks:

OHM Branded Chainway Custom Specced Crank Arms, Aluminum Alloy, 170 mm Length, 38T Chainring with Chain Guide, SAMOX Sealed Cartridge Bottom Bracket, Splined, Hollow Spindle

Pedals:

Wellgo MG6 Magnesium Platform with Adjustable Pins

Headset:

Ritchey Pro Logic Press Fit, Tapered 1 1/ 8"- 1 1/ 2", Three 10 mm Spacers, One 5 mm Spacer

Stem:

Promax Alloy, 70 mm, 6° Rise, 31.8 mm Clamp Diameter with Custom Light Mount

Handlebar:

Ritchie Comp, Aluminum Alloy, Low-Rise, 680 mm Length, 25 mm Rise, 31.8 mm Diameter

Brake Details:

TRP Zurich Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Rotors, Quad Piston Calipers, Three-Finger TRP Levers with Tool-Free Adjust Reach, BionX Motor Inhibitor for Regen Activation on Right

Grips:

Ergon GE1, Ergonomic Rubber, Locking, 135 mm Length

Saddle:

OHM Branded Ergon Sport Gel SMC4, Chromoly Rails, Nylon Composite Shell, Orthopedic Comfort Foam with Gel Pads

Seat Post:

Ritchey Comp, Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

30.9 mm

Rims:

Alexrims MD40, Alloy, Double Wall, 32 Hole

Spokes:

Sapim Strong, Stainless Steel, 14 Gauge, Black, Brass Nipples

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Nobby Nic, 27.5" x 3"

Wheel Sizes:

27.5 in (69.85cm)

Tire Details:

15 to 35 PSI, Performance, Reflective Logos

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Pletscher ESGE Adjustable Center-Mount Kickstand, Signal Bell, Optional BodyFloat Suspension Seatpost ($249), ABUS Bordo Combo Lite 6150 ($129)

Other:

Locking Removable Semi-Integrated Downtube Battery Pack, 0.9 lb 3.45 Amp BionX Compact Charger, KMC X10 EPT for MTB Chain, (Size Specific Handlebar 680 / 720 mm, Stem 70 / 80 / 90 mm, Crank Arms 170 / 175 mm)

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

BionX, D-Series

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Gearless Direct Drive Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Motor Peak Output:

1000 watts

Motor Torque:

50 Newton meters (Nominal 25 Nm)

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11.6 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

556.8 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4 hours

Estimated Min Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Estimated Max Range:

70 miles (113 km)

Display Type:

BionX DS3, Removable, Backlit, Color LCD (Hold the White Key on Setup for Settings Menu 24:26 in Video Review)

Readouts:

Three Display Layouts (Basic, Enhanced, Data View), Assist Level (1-4 Support, 1-4 Regeneration), Power Graph (Output, Regeneration), Speed (mph / kph), Battery Level (10 Bars), Setup, Odometer, Trip Timer, Trip Distance, Average Speed, Clock

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad (On/Off, Lights, +, -, Left Clicker, Battery Level (5 Bars), Assist Level (4 Dots for Power and Regeneration), Right Clicker), Optional Standard Sized USB Port

Drive Mode:

Torque Sensing Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle

Top Speed:

28 mph (45 kph) (20 mph Throttle Only)

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Written Review

OHM offers several high-quality electric bike models and for 2017/2018 they all share a similar frame design, the exact same battery pack (which seats in from the left and is positioned on the downtube), and are available in a range of sizes. The Mountain is their most rugged off-road e-bike and it comes with some excellent components such as TRP Zurich hydraulic disc brakes, a 10-speed Shimano Deore XT drivetrain, and an air suspension fork. What separates it from other cross country oriented electric mountain bikes is the hub motor design. In an age where many companies are turning to mid-motors, the hub motor offers a few trade offs. On the positive side, it is extremely quiet, offers regen drive modes and regenerative braking, does not interfere with shifting and is therefore easier on the chain, sprocket, and derailleurs, and it can be activated with a throttle as well as torque sensing pedal assist. On the negative side, there’s more weight in the rear wheel (which would impact suspension if this was a full suspension model) and there’s no quick release on the back wheel, just the front. You don’t get quite as much torque or efficiency because you’re not able to leverage the gears… but this does offer a more consistent ride which requires less shifting to reach full speed. And speaking of speed, the OHM Mountain can be setup as a Class 2 product with throttle and assist limited to 20 mph or you can ask for a Class 3 configuration where the top speed would be 28 mph in pedal assist mode and 20 mph with the throttle. If you wanted to use it as an “all terrain” commuter platform, you could add a rear rack for cargo or panniers and OHM can even add a USB charging port and integrated lights if you pay extra. The frame is Aluminum alloy and offers a high quality paint finish and upgraded head tube, bottom bracket and yoke. Thru-axles and wider Boost hubs provide stiffness and strength and the overall weight is ~51 lbs which is great given how powerful the motor is and how much capacity the battery offers. A few compromised were made around how the kickstand was mounted, and you can hear it rattling when we ride the mountain trails at Mount Fromme in North Vancouver Canada, but this is easy to remove. Stock, the bike comes with comfortable 3″ plus sized tires and a 100 mm suspension fork but I would probably opt to pay a bit extra for their BodyFloat suspension post option and keep an eye on the tire pressure to reduce vibration.

Driving this bike is one of the coolest hub motors I have seen (and I have reviewed it on several other e-bikes in the past including some from OHM). This is the D-Series 500 watt gearless hub motor. It’s very wide but skinny, and is encased in a composite plastic shell vs. heavier Aluminum alloy. The motor gets a good mechanical advantage from the wide design and because there is more air inside, it also stays cooler. Offering up to 50 Newton meters of peak torque, it’s very capable for climbing if you pedal along (even just a bit) and I found that it could climb moderate inclines with the throttle only, as long as I had a bit of momentum going in. Unlike most other hub motors, this one is connected just to the hub and spokes run around the casing instead of connecting to it. The benefit is comfort and durability, you get a more natural and consistent feel with this motor design. Perhaps the biggest drawback is that it looks kind of funky and unique. Gearless hub motors have fewer moving parts, nothing is rubbing inside and therefore, they tend to last longer

Powering the bike is an efficient and powerful 48 volt 11.6 amp hour battery. As mentioned earlier, it’s the same battery as OHM is using on their Urban, Step Thru, and Sport models. The sam color, size, and mounting design. Unlike some of the older BionX batteries that mounted in a rear rack or onto the downtube, this one seats into it a bit. This lowers the battery position, looks more solid to me, and provides some extra space in the triangle section of the frame for bottle cage bosses and a lower top tube. Notice how the top tube angles down a bit to make standing over the bike easier. Between the four frame size options, this lower top tube, and some changes between the stem, bar, and crank arm length of each size, the bike offers a great fit. This battery pack can be charged on or off the bike frame, and this allows for independent storage as well. I recommend keeping the battery away from extreme temperatures, aim for cool dry storage locations and if you don’t plan to ride for a bit, store at ~50% full. You can tell how full the battery pack is by using the display panel, the Bluetooth app, or the little control ring near the right grip… or you can touch the metal plug port on the left side of the battery and it will light up with green, orange, or red. This battery isn’t quite as hidden as some of the internal packs we are starting to see, but it clicks onto the frame easily, uses six rubber pads to reduce any kind of noise and scratching between the pack and the frame, and it charges quickly because BionX includes one of the nicest ebike battery chargers on the market today! This thing weighs less than a pound, is super compact, and yet it puts out 3.45 Amps vs. just 2 Amps on most standard chargers

The display options on this electric bike are many, whether you choose to use the minimalist LED readouts on the control ring, or the transflective backlit color LCD display, or your smartphone, you can control four levels of assist and four levels of regen. All of the most important control features are always available to you, and the + and – keys on the control pad are very intuitive. In it’s most basic form, you get to choose how much power the motor delivers or how much it works to slow you down! I used the highest level of regeneration -4 to help slow my descent for a half an hour and found that the battery recuperated about 3% during that time (about 2.7 miles). I had used up nearly 60% during the longer ascent, but I was frequently riding in the highest level of assist and using the throttle. We arrived back at the cars, having ridden over six miles total, with over 38% battery capacity and I am sure the regen feature also reduced wear on the brake pads and left my hands more relaxed because I wasn’t having to squeeze as hard or as much. So anyway, that’s the most basic function of the plus and minus buttons, but there is also a left and right key which can be used to navigate the LCD display to show different views. I preferred the basic view and loved that it shows 10 bars to illustrate how full the battery pack is… but if you arrow to the right twice, there is an advanced or data view display readout that shows battery percentage along with more trip stats and details. It’s so cool to have this as an option, in part because data view is black and white which could be less distracting for some riders. Note that you can also enter into a settings menu by arrowing right to setup and then holding the grey key for a few seconds. This is definitely one of the nicest displays I have used but I love how open and flexible it is… while still being simple.

All things considered, this is not the best platform for all mountain or enduro type riding with big bumps and rocks everywhere. The larger tires are designed to be stable, comfortable, and floaty so you can ride over obstacles and soft terrain vs. nimbling around them. It’s a blast to ride on packed dirt trails and performed very well on some of the wood bridge features we discovered in the forest. I thought it also handled very well on concrete, as we took a road for half a mile before and after the mountain trail sections. I feel like OHM has made some smart decisions by using the same motor and battery for most of their 2017/2018 lineup. This reduces cost, allows them to provide better support, and makes replacing parts easier. Priced at $3,455 I would not call the OHM Mountain cheap, but you get what you pay for, including one of the best warranties out there with three years comprehensive and five on the frame. OHM has been around since 2012 and BionX has been around much longer (and is part of a big automotive company in Toronto Canada). There’s great momentum and a track record of quality from both of these companies. I had fun pushing the bike and exploring new places with Liam, one of the OHM team members and avid downhill rider, and appreciate that they were able to price this model a bit lower because it doesn’t come with the lights, fenders, and rack, while still offering some of that as paid upgrades. Big thanks to OHM for partnering with me on this review, hosting me at their headquarters, and taking me out on some neat adventures around British Columbia. I feel that Liam was honest as we discussed some of the trade-offs and acknowledged the strengths and weaknesses of the hub motor design and other hardware like the kickstand. I love that the bike comes with a chain keeper to perform well on bumpy terrain, and that you get premium touch points like the Ergon grips and saddle along with the Schwalbe Nobby Nic tires.

Pros:

  • The OHM Mountain comes in four frame sizes to really ensure a good fit (even the stem, handlebars, and crank arms change length as you select different sizes, this could be a great e-bike for taller riders), the top tube is sloped so you get the strength of a diamond frame with the more comfortable, lower, stand-over height, this is possible in part because of the side-mount battery design vs. top-down like the Bosch Powerpack and some of the more generic brands, note also the custom yoke which has a cutaway to accommodate the chainring and standard Q Factor but allow for fatter tires while still being sturdy
  • Purpose built frame was designed to withstand off-road use, note the tapered head tube, upgraded bottom bracket with lightweight hollow spindle and protective plating in front of the cables, internally routed cables that are out of the way on most of the bike, and the well-protected motor power cable below the left chain stay with quick disconnect
  • Great drivetrain, the 10-speed Shimano Deore XT shifts quickly, allows for multi-shift action, should require less maintenance than a lower-end component, and has the Shadow Plus clutch so you can tighten the chain and reduce bounce (perfect for off-road riding, just click the grey lever into the up position on the side of the derailleur hangar), I also like that OHM either uses narrow wide sprockets or a chain keeper as seen here to reduce drops
  • More and more electric bikes are opting for plus sized tires to improve comfort and stability, I think it makes perfect sense to go with the largest 3″ plus sized tires here because it’s a hardtail cross country setup so it doesn’t need to be as nimble (you get reduced deflection and more rolling momentum instead), the Schwalbe Nobby Nic brand is high-quality and should perform well, the longer Boost hubs provide strength and stiffness for better power transfer and handling along with the thicker thru-axles (15 mm front and 12 mm rear)
  • Great suspension fork with lots of adjustability, you can opt for a suspension seat post to further improve comfort, just make sure you get it from OHM in the appropriate size (which looks like 30.9 mm diameter)
  • Considering this e-bike uses a gearless hub motor that looks big, and offers a higher capacity battery pack,
    I was impressed that it only weighs ~51 lbs, the weight seemed well distributed when I lifted it to weigh it
  • Gearless hub motors tend to be very durable and in this case, offers regenerative braking, and four levels of regen (to simulate climbing or let you slowly charge the battery on steep descents)
  • Pedal assist relies on a torque sensor that feels smooth and responsive, I love that you also have a variable speed trigger throttle, it stays out of the way but is very handy and fun to use on occasion, triggers are much more practical for off-road applications in my opinion because they don’t compromise your grip as a half-grip twist throttle would
  • OHM has been in business selling electric bikes since 2005 and offer an amazing three-year comprehensive warranty with five years on the frame, they produce high-quality stuff and pretty much stick with one system to make repairs, replacement, and upgrades easier
  • I love the little display panel, it’s highly adjustable, easy to read and understand in part because it uses color, and can be removed for secure storage or outdoor public parking, I do wish it had a USB port for charging portable accessories but this is something OHM will add for you near the right side of the downtube if you pay a bit extra
  • OHM has managed to squeeze in water bottle cage bosses on the seat tube, I love that they were able to fit these in because they can double as a place to mount a mini-pump or folding lock, OHM also sells their own rear rack solution if you want to transport stuff more easily without wearing a backpack
  • The battery pack is easily removable, for charging or storing off-bike, and I love where the charging port is mounted (high up and out of the way of the left crank arm), the battery charger is one of the most compact but high-speed in the market today offering 3.45 Amps vs. 2 Amps on a lot of others
  • Sealed cartridge bottom bracket and headset keep water out, they have been selective about hardware to eliminate rust and have tested the bikes in wet conditions at their headquarters in Vancouver Canada
  • For a hub motor setup, vs. a mid-drive, you get a lot of torque and I was able to climb for long periods without pedaling hard or at all (just using the throttle), the BionX D-Series motor is wide which improves the torque and mechanical advantage and there’s a lot of air inside to keep it cool
  • Great brakes, they offer plenty of power and heat dissipation in part because of the quad-piston calipers which allow for more surface area and force to be applied, apparently TRP hydraulic brakes are easier to bleed and use mineral oil which isn’t so hard on skin, is easier to clean up, and it uses a dual syringe system
  • The bike does come with some special inserts to allow for some experimentation with choosing your own rear rack, however, OHM sells a special custom rear rack or you could use a seat post mounting beam-rack design like this, just keep in mind that they can get bumped side to side easier and might not fit if you have a seat post suspension
  • I really like the trigger shifters they chose, SLX is is an upgrade from most electric bike shifters I see and that provides a two way high shifter lever and a three-click low shifter lever for more sporty performance and versatility
  • It sounds relatively easy to wire-in lights that would run off of the main battery pack, OHM can set this model up with the high quality Supernova LED e-bike lights seen on their Urban and Sport models at time of purchase which could be great for commuting in a mixed terrain environment
  • BionX has a Bluetooth smartphone app but the LCD display works very well on its own and you can even operate the bike just using the compact control ring (with the display off) so there are lots of options here and they are all really good in my opinion
  • The display panel is transflective and backlit so it works well in a range of lighting conditions, I like that it shows 10 bars for the battery capacity vs. just four or five on a lot of competing products (you can even see battery percentage in data view, click the right key to cycle through views), I feel that it boots up a little slow but is otherwise pretty great
  • The battery pack is minimalist and I love how you can touch the charging port and it lights up with a color to let you know how full it is, between 20%-70% is orange, below 20% is red, above 70% is green
  • Apparently OHM can unlock the bike to go 28 mph and become a Class 3 speed pedelec, and it would still have the 20 mph throttle mode as well, this is very unique and lots of fun if you commute or just enjoy a faster feel

Cons:

  • OHM has decided to pick just one color for each of their models, you could get grey or blue but that would require switching to a city model, I think it looks nice but you only get this green in the mountain setup
  • Priced at ~$3,500 this is not the most affordable hardtail ebike I have reviewed, but they have really outfitted it with great components and it feels like you get your money’s worth, this model is actually less expensive than some of the others because it does not have fenders, a rack, or integrated lights
  • The battery pack is IP67 rated against water and dust ingress but the charging port doesn’t actually have a cover, so I feel like it might be a little vulnerable, and the case doesn’t have a handle so it made me feel cautious carrying it around because it weighs ~7 lbs and could get damaged if dropped, I do like that it has little rubber feet on the bottom to reduce vibration when mounted to the downtube
  • The front wheel offers quick release but you don’t get that on the rear, so you might want to bring a toolset in case of a flat fix, thankfully the thru-axle seems easy to work with and align so the torque sensor shouldn’t be as delicate to work around and the quick disconnect power cable is convenient
  • This is a minor consideration, the throttle won’t activate until the bike is moving ~2 mph for safety reasons, this could be frustrating if you wanted to use the throttle to reduce effort when starting and stopping a lot, or if you have a sensitive knee and don’t want to push hard, the torque sensor design also requires a bit more leg effort than some of the simpler cadence sensors but it’s much more natural feeling and predictable which is important in off-road environments with unstable terrain
  • The model I tested only had a motor inhibitor and regeneration switch on the right brake lever, they both have adjustable reach which is great for people with different sized hands (or when you wear gloves) but it would be nice to have inhibitors on both sides
  • I want to love the pedals because they are lightweight and stiff, offer a large surface area, and have adjustable pins for traction but the middle spindle just feels weird under my foot vs. a more flat feeling, I felt uncomfortable on them like it was pressing on a narrow section under the ball of my fee
  • It’s great that this bike comes with a kickstand, but it did bounce around quite a bit when riding off road and is positioned at the middle of the frame where it could collide with the left crank arm when left down, I might take it off for the majority of my mountain biking rides

Resources:

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itsaulgoodman
10 hours ago

No point, at all. Other than separating people from their money.. obviously. Same goes for high end drive train components, you don't need the weight reduction on an ebike.

EDIT, well thinking about it a little more less weight does mean better handling for downhill mountain bikers so I suppose there may be something niche there like you suggest.. Shimano really focused on making their new motor and battery combo as light as possible as well.

hitoby
1 day ago

I regret to say I've purchased an Ancheer electric mountain bike from www.cndirect.com. Here's my review:
--
DO NOT buy this ebike! Especially do not buy it from CNDirect. I my experience, CNDirect ships expensive, bad quality products that break in 2 weeks. Their idea of customer support is to offer you $30 restitution for the $600 you paid for your product when it breaks. They will "try" to help you fix it, ask you to wait, then when your patience runs out, they say you cannot return it because they've stalled you longer than the 30 day return period. All the bike shops I've taken this ebike to say it needs a new controller to function. However, neither the manufacturer nor the seller are able to provide a replacement part.
My interactions with CNDirect have now included dozens of emails with videos and photos of the problem, and they just continue to suggest I get it repaired at a bike shop. I've taken it to three bike shops at this point, and no one can fix it without the new controller.
In summary: this is a $600 pile of garbage, but the headache of dealing with customer service for no result is very painful, so perfect ebike for the self-loathing masochist. You have been warned.
--
There are a lot of youtube videos that make this look like an attractive option, and perhaps it works for some. My experience has been spectacularly awful so far.

harryS
6 days ago

You can chew on these too .

The Ancheer 20" on ebay for $600 shipped.

Also the Voltbike Mariner fpr $1289 plus $70 shipping,
These fat tire folders weigh over 50 pounds. Not light. A 20" folder with 36V battery has a top speed around 18 mph. If your students want more speed, then a 48V battery is needed, although I don't know if I would want to ride over 20 mph in traffic. You're too small. Not easily seen, and your speed will be misjudged by motorists.

I'd treat them like bikes that can make a 15 mile trip less of a chore, but it will still take an hour and you will use up over half your battery so there's no guarantee you won't do the return trip on the motor.

FooDoDaddy
1 week ago

Thanks everyone! I have been working out strength training 2x per week with a personal trainer for the last year. I still have my 1995 IBOC Mongoose, Mountain Bike Magazine Bike of the year. I still ride it ($1500 new back then, no shocks at all). I am doing great with CHF. From stage 2 to stage 1, but wanted a mid drive for off road riding like I did 20 year ago. Shifting doesn't bother me, I even have a 2005 Christi AWD bike: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0007W2FOA/ref=oh_details_o02_s00_i00

Anyway the Brose just cuts out power at 18 mph, not 20 mph. I know 2 mph might not seem like much, but when your use to 20 on an older bike, and going slower on a new bike is not the best. Heck, I have my Honda 1800cc Valkyrie that will do 0-60 mph in 3.1 seconds for speed.

Anyway I found a solution on ebay, and ordered it. Coming from France, it's cut's the speed in 1/2, so effectively doubling it. It's not that I want to go 36 mph, but do want more assist to a higher speed. I will post the results of this mod: http://www.ebay.com/itm/tuning-kit-hi-speed-ebike-brose-POLINI-ebike-tuning-/232371698818?epid=2040617132&hash=item361a6ebc82:g:pHEAAOSw0j9ZQPrv when I get it, most likely not till November.

In the meantime I will continue to ride, at 16 mph, my bpm is at 129 with the brose and 119 with the hub motor. My 15 year old son in great shape has his bpm at the same level as mine with both bikes.

Mark Peralta
1 week ago

How many gears in a Tesla? (1) Are they slow off the line? Do they need more gears to climb hills?

Lots of posts here assume that Ebike motors need to "spin up" or that hub drives are slow off the line or that one drive train is "more efficient" than another due to torque multiplication that can take advantage of faster motor speeds.

DC motor have their highest torque at 0 rpm. Torque of a DC motor is mostly proportional to physical size. It is not the case that torque multiplication is important for ebikes unless the motor is too small (for example, a typical mid drive or geared hub drive) to provide enough torque to get up a hill. Big direct drive hubs have more torque to begin with and don't need any multiplication. And since the torque is there at the lowest speeds in any DC motor, a wheel speed rpm is fine.

Direct drive hubs have advantages - smoother, quieter, easier shifting, more efficient due to no mechanical losses, possibly more reliable due to fewer moving parts, less wear and tear on the drive train, and the ability to regenerate the battery (slightly) while riding. Mid drives have advantages - cheaper (do not underestimate the importance of this to manufacturers making design choices for their products), lighter, better front to back balance for going over big bumps (mountain bikes need mid drive) and no drag (albeit slight) from the motor when not pedalling.

And don't forget that a lot of the "feel" of an ebike is due to the controller systems that feed the motor juice and how they respond to pedalling, etc.

Teslas do have gear reduction in front of the one speed drive. But that is because a direct drive would require a physically huge motor to push a car without gear reduction, not because it would not work. E bikes can use direct drive with a reasonably sized hub motor.

Remember the 1 speed Tesla and just how fast it is before you buy the intuitively appealing but false argument that "torque multiplication" is important on a properly designed ebike and, in particular, that mid drives have an advantage over bigger hub drives in this regard.

How many gears in a Tesla? (1) Are they slow off the line? Do they need more gears to climb hills?

Tesla is not an ebike. The electric car trend goes toward single speed. The ebike trend goes toward light weight mid drive with multiple speeds. Two different things.

Lots of posts here assume that Ebike motors need to "spin up" or that hub drives are slow off the line or that one drive train is "more efficient" than another due to torque multiplication that can take advantage of faster motor speeds.

True, Bosch extensively did their research and development of their ebike motors, they actually engineered it so the efficiency window also falls within the efficient operating range of a human cyclist.
There is an efficiency window for an ebike motor.

DC motor have their highest torque at 0 rpm. Torque of a DC motor is mostly proportional to physical size. It is not the case that torque multiplication is important for ebikes unless the motor is too small (for example, a typical mid drive or geared hub drive) to provide enough torque to get up a hill. Big direct drive hubs have more torque to begin with and don't need any multiplication. And since the torque is there at the lowest speeds in any DC motor, a wheel speed rpm is fine.

That would be valid up to a limit. Try riding your hub drive and making stops along the way on a 30% grade hill. Your battery will drain much faster and your motor will quickly over heat. Sure it could go faster if given room to launch but the efficiency still goes down badly.

Tesla has been using AC motors not DC motors (for your information). Please be informed before you start your analogies and arguments. https://teslamotorsclub.com/tmc/threads/why-does-tesla-use-an-ac-motor.25917/page-2

Direct drive hubs have advantages - smoother, quieter, easier shifting, more efficient due to no mechanical losses, possibly more reliable due to fewer moving parts, less wear and tear on the drive train, and the ability to regenerate the battery (slightly) while riding. Mid drives have advantages - cheaper (do not underestimate the importance of this to manufacturers making design choices for their products), lighter, better front to back balance for going over big bumps (mountain bikes need mid drive) and no drag (albeit slight) from the motor when not pedalling.

Let's not forget that motor size and copper mass also has an inherent parasitic efficiency lose. The smaller the motor, the less parasitic lose.

Teslas do have gear reduction in front of the one speed drive. But that is because a direct drive would require a physically huge motor to push a car without gear reduction, not because it would not work. E bikes can use direct drive with a reasonably sized hub motor.

Actually, the automotive engineering vehicle propulsion guide for electric cars recommended a 2 speed transmission as adequate for the car's requirement, in contrast to a multiple speed transmission for the internal combustion engine cars. However, in actual practice the transmission did not hold up, so the solution was to use a more robust single speed with the gear ratio closer to the second gear for acceptable highway cruising but the motor has to be beefed up (HEAVIER) so it can endure a high power input (with assoc inc torque and heat) when moving from a stop or when climbing.
https://www.autoblog.com/2008/01/23/breaking-tesla-has-a-solution-for-their-transmission-woes-get/

Remember the 1 speed Tesla and just how fast it is before you buy the intuitively appealing but false argument that "torque multiplication" is important on a properly designed ebike and, in particular, that mid drives have an advantage over bigger hub drives in this regard

Once again. Tesla is not an ebike. The electric car trend goes toward more ROBUST single speed. The ebike trend goes toward LIGHT WEIGHT and EFFICIENT mid drive with multiple speeds. Two different things. You are making your own false argument.

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ferrellms
1 week ago

How many gears in a Tesla? (1) Are they slow off the line? Do they need more gears to climb hills?

Lots of posts here assume that Ebike motors need to "spin up" or that hub drives are slow off the line or that one drive train is "more efficient" than another due to torque multiplication that can take advantage of faster motor speeds.

DC motor have their highest torque at 0 rpm. Torque of a DC motor is mostly proportional to physical size. It is not the case that torque multiplication is important for ebikes unless the motor is too small (for example, a typical mid drive or geared hub drive) to provide enough torque to get up a hill. Big direct drive hubs have more torque to begin with and don't need any multiplication. And since the torque is there at the lowest speeds in any DC motor, a wheel speed rpm is fine.

Direct drive hubs have advantages - smoother, quieter, easier shifting, more efficient due to no mechanical losses, possibly more reliable due to fewer moving parts, less wear and tear on the drive train, and the ability to regenerate the battery (slightly) while riding. Mid drives have advantages - cheaper (do not underestimate the importance of this to manufacturers making design choices for their products), lighter, better front to back balance for going over big bumps (mountain bikes need mid drive) and no drag (albeit slight) from the motor when not pedalling.

And don't forget that a lot of the "feel" of an ebike is due to the controller systems that feed the motor juice and how they respond to pedalling, etc.

Teslas do have gear reduction in front of the one speed drive. But that is because a direct drive would require a physically huge motor to push a car without gear reduction, not because it would not work. E bikes can use direct drive with a reasonably sized hub motor.

Remember the 1 speed Tesla and just how fast it is before you buy the intuitively appealing but false argument that "torque multiplication" is important on a properly designed ebike and, in particular, that mid drives have an advantage over bigger hub drives in this regard.

Stromer2work
1 week ago

Hey there Over50. I to am in just into my 50's this month. Glad to hear I have company in the metro area haha. I will be commuting from 29/mound to Hall Rd and VanDyke. The path I plan to take is 13.5 miles one way and would take over an hour at average normal human speeds with luggage as I normally would ride a mt bike and not a fast road bike in this situation. I could do that commute without battery assist, however, I do plan to ride during dry winter, and inclimate wet weather with baggage, so I prefer the battery assist and to not be exhausted and overly sweaty when I arrive at work. When I lived in Grosse Pointe in my 30's, I commuted daily, even in the snowy winter, to my job in St Clair Shores. Right now I'm in Gainsville FL and commuting to work on a bike or driving to work so I can hit the trails after work 7 days a week. I got a job offer in my home state of Michigan days before I accepted a new assignment here in FL 6 weeks ago. I decided FL isn't for me, and I'm moving back to Michigan after 6 weeks here in FL.

I ordered from a well known place in Wisconsin :) having it shipped to my house in Michigan.

I assume you're familiar with the three eBike bills that just passed the Michigan state government legislature last month? Unlike all the elitists who say eBikes have no future and no place other than on the road, I disagree. My mother is into her 70's and enjoys cycling but has hard times getting up hills and with distance keeping up with her kids and grand kids. I also have a girlfriend who has Asthma issues every now and again and I prefer we ride together, so I ride a human powered fat tire mountain bike (makes me slower), and I intend on getting her a small battery assist for bad Asthma days so she can keep up. And then there's me who would prefer there's one less car on the road and who enjoys doing what I can to better my health, who is fanatical about cycling, and to support different solutions to issues.

david salisbury
2 weeks ago

I have had mountain bikes all my life ( I am over 50). First ebike.. loving it! Got it it in June or July.. As far as Haibike is concerned, I only care about them as far the frame is concerned as everything else is from someone else and because of the model I purchased its all low quality IMHO. ( 2016 RC 150 mm 27.5) I have swapped ALL but the rear mech, bars, headset, and front chainring. stock wheels only got it from the car to the garage. Shock is stock, but not for much longer. ( if your in SF and want all the parts from a stock RC.. let me know).

Likes

Cheaper than others researched - I rode a giant dirt e and it was a better bike , but it was it not special when i dropped the hammer.. found it later at the same price ( boo)
Available.. Still waiting for the focus Jam2 ( walked into monstano and had it in under 1 hour)
Handles. Its actually good implementation of FSR. - especially with the new MRP stage.. BEST fork eva! in fact my downhill times are improving over my tallboy LT2 ( considered one of the best bikes on the planet) as its SUPER Heavy i need 203 front and BACK!

Dislikes- All fairly small issues, but again Haibike only had to get the frame right to be a contender..

Cables rattle like mad in frame. trying the zip tie trick now.
Paint is softer than butter ( a bit like specialized a few years back) and way too thick. clear bra between the battery and frame was a good idea.
Bolt on shock needs checking often. Comes loose and paint chips easily head hex head
Stainless screws holding on cable guides either lock or strip. testing either 4 mm or helicoil now ( first BIKE i have ever had to do machine work on the frame directly!)
I guess they don't have locktite in germany or where ever they are assembled..
Yamaha sticker .. if its important enough to apply. Why put it where all the mud accumulates

Mine is a 2016..

Why the need to advertise its specs on the actual bike.. this is weird.. I thought they were stickers.. but no they are permanent.

On the motor.. and battery, which is what you actually purchase an ebike for.

PW motor cadence is too low.. SE or X would be better. the giant tune of the same motor was better
No walk mode!
400 KHH battery runs out too quick for me.. and last 1/4 capacity is weak and does not last at a linear rate..
Pedaling with the power off is really tough.. ( i have run out of battery a few times now..) you are pushing the motors gears.. if the power is off. why not completely disengage the motor.
Battery is crazy expensive.. I would love to be able to ride back to car, grab anther battery and go out agin immediately.. i purchased an inverter for the car, but it takes too long to charge between locations.

next.. Speed box 2.. when the replacement arrives. ( refer another thread for this story)
new Shock. Still researching.

ebike v regular bike.

ebike eats brake pads. easts chains and rear mech.. changes under load are not good for any bike.. perhaps the bosh or Di2 is worth the extra if it can ease off when changing.)
ebikes have over pedal.. Imagine driving on a winding road with the cruise set to on.. you have to remember to stop pedaling a second before you would do on a regular bike.. i kept overshooting corners.
Ebikes corner very well the extra weight keeps the wheel planted.
huck.. no Big jumps are ok as long s you have speed up.
20 mph is too low.. ( Speedbox 2 on the way).
you HAVE to pedal.. track stand is something i have yet to master..
Its a Strava killer.. now my downhill times are falling!

Conclusion..

The worst part of an ebike.. other trail riders.. either they want to talk about how they want one or how they wouldn't be seen dead on one.. either way, they just slow me down.

ebike.. a lonely but fast lifestyle!

Mark Adams
2 weeks ago

I ride three different kinds of eBikes, Sondors Fat bike, Haibike XDURO Full Seven S RX, and a Haibike XDURO Trekking S RX. I have over 1000 miles on the Trekking, over 1500 miles on the Sondors and Full Seven. The fat bike was my first ebike, found it on Craigslist. It has been relegated to snow and an occasional ride on a crushed rock rail trail. It rides like an old Jeep. Heavy physical weight and heavy response. You have to actually put effort into the handlebars to turn the bike. Those wide tires do not make for a nimble bike. Huge rolling resistance in the tires. The Trekking bike can be ridden on a gravel road, but much better suited for touring on pavement. The small tires do not make for a fun ride on the gravel. I would not take it into rock and tree roots. The full suspension mountain bike will go anywhere. It was a demo model, and came with Schwalbe Super Moto-X 27.5 x 2.4 tires. For me, this is the ideal go anywhere bike. The smoother tread pattern on the Super Moto-X is great on pavement, and by letting out a few psi they really grip on dry single trails. It will climb a really steep incline with the 11 gear cassette. The full suspension makes riding great for my 65 year old body, on any conditions. Rough city streets, gravel, or trails with rocks and roots, are all smoothed out in the ride. I now see no need for any bike with tires over the 2.4".
I don’t feel the fat tire is that cumbersome. But have not ridden a Sondors also have a Surly pugsly fat and my regular Mt bike sits most of the time . But everything is a trade off so best answer is a nice quiver of rides to choose from.

rich c
2 weeks ago

I ride three different kinds of eBikes, Sondors Fat bike, Haibike XDURO Full Seven S RX, and a Haibike XDURO Trekking S RX. I have over 1000 miles on the Trekking, over 1500 miles on the Sondors and Full Seven. The fat bike was my first ebike, found it on Craigslist. It has been relegated to snow and an occasional ride on a crushed rock rail trail. It rides like an old Jeep. Heavy physical weight and heavy response. You have to actually put effort into the handlebars to turn the bike. Those wide tires do not make for a nimble bike. Huge rolling resistance in the tires. The Trekking bike can be ridden on a gravel road, but much better suited for touring on pavement. The small tires do not make for a fun ride on the gravel. I would not take it into rock and tree roots. The full suspension mountain bike will go anywhere. It was a demo model, and came with Schwalbe Super Moto-X 27.5 x 2.4 tires. For me, this is the ideal go anywhere bike. The smoother tread pattern on the Super Moto-X is great on pavement, and by letting out a few psi they really grip on dry single trails. It will climb a really steep incline with the 11 gear cassette. The full suspension makes riding great for my 65 year old body, on any conditions. Rough city streets, gravel, or trails with rocks and roots, are all smoothed out in the ride. I now see no need for any bike with tires over the 2.4".

Verde
2 weeks ago

SIMI VALLEY, Calif. (Interbike 2017) – No matter the adventure, IZIP, a leader in fun-focused electric bikes, has a bike that will amplify your fun so you can travel further and faster. Whether you’re looking to explore endless miles of unknown dirt roads and trails, change your commute to work by skipping the car ride in favor of your city’s bike paths, or spending your weekend cruising along the coast in comfort, IZIP will enable and inspire you.

Heading into this year’s Interbike trade show, IZIP unveils four new models for 2018 that span a variety of riding styles that integrate modern performance – from pavement to trails.

E3 Moda (MSRP $3,749)
Bold style compliments practicality in the speedy new E3 Moda bike that combines a max 28 MPH pedal-assist German-made Brose motor that’s integrated into the downtube with bright lights and a rear rack for cargo versatility. A workhorse commuter, the Moda efficiently clocks miles on the way to work or while you're getting some extra exercise in on the way to yoga class. With a 504Wh battery, 27.5-inch wheels for fun and stability, disc brakes, and Shimano Deore 10-speed drivetrain, the Moda, simply put, is a practical speedster.

E3 Moda

E3 Moda

E3 Dash (MSRP $2,699)
The reputable E3 Dash is a proven performer that gets you where you need to go … fast. Well known in speed pedal-assist circles as a seriously fun transporter, the Dash flattens hills and takes on long commutes with ease. Sporting a 28 MPH TranzX Center Motor, 700c wheels, RockShox Paragon front suspension fork, robust alloy fenders, and a rear pannier rack, potholes and bumps are no match for the Dash as you comfortably ride in style.

E3 Dash

E3 Zuma (MSRP $2,299)
The E3 Zuma, inspired by the beach lifestyle found at world famous Zuma Beach in southern California, blends comfort with style. The relaxed frame geometry makes it feel like your flip-flops never left the ground, but the bike remains perfectly balanced with a low center of gravity thanks to a downtube-mounted battery pack and powerful mid-drive motor. The Zuma’s long-range 417Wh battery, 26-inch wheels, disc brakes, and lightweight aluminum alloy frame powers weekend surf adventures, as well as mid-week errands around town.

E3 Zuma

E3 Zuma

E3 Peak DS (MSRP $4,599)
With 130mm of RockShox full-suspension, 27.5-inch all-mountain wheels, and Enduro-inspired geometry, the new E3 Peak DS eMTB is built to conquer the toughest terrain – up and down. The super-responsive 6061 aluminum ally frame is built with proven trail engineering to inspire any rider, but it's the best-in-class Bosch Performance CX mid-motor with a 500Wh battery that really amps things up. Magura disc brakes, SRAM NX 1X 11-speed drivetrain, and short chainstays give the Peak DS excellent handling performance for an unforgettable ride on your favorite dirt.

E3 Peak DS

IZIP is also leading the charge in helping preserve our environment with its new, first in the cycling industry Call2Recycle battery-recycling program. Batteries contain hazardous materials, and if dumped or disposed of incorrectly the harmful elements can find their way into our water sources and adds to pollution. IZIP’s program disposes of old batteries in an environmentally responsible manner, and collection sites are located throughout the U.S. and Canada. After collecting and sorting, the batteries are processed and turned into new batteries, stainless steel products, and other products. For more, please check: call2recycle.org.

About IZIP
No matter how you ride, IZIP has a fun, fast, and efficient ebike for you. From commuters, cruisers, and cargo bikes to full-suspension, trail, and touring models, IZIP covers every riding option for leisure, trails, and pavement. With more than 10 years of experience in the ebike industry, IZIP is now a veteran and a leader in ebike technology in the U.S. A division of Accell North America, IZIP is supported by a network of authorized dealers and backed by the Electric Bike Competence Center of North America. For more about IZIP, please check: izipelectric.com.

MEDIA CONTACT: Keith Cozzens, Verde Brand Communications, keith@verdepr.com, 970-259-3555 x122

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elyhim
3 weeks ago

No mountain biking since the 80's and bought my Trek Powerfly and have been having a ball! No commuting but single tracks, and I ride a lot!!

I've lost a ton of weight and feel much better.

I rode so much I'm transitioning to non-assist for a couple times a week. I wouldn't have been still riding if not for an ebike where I can learn skills without being so tired I hit trees.

Danimal
3 weeks ago

I looked high and low for updated info on the 2017 eJoe Epik SE. eJoe's site is near-useless (what gives with that?), so I want somewhere to document what I've heard and experienced, and for updated discussion as needed.

I got the bike for commuting up to 5 miles each way and everyday errands. I'm 6'2" and 175lbs (fit), and no other folding eBikes appeared sufficient for my height, other than the Pedego Latch (which I was told is massively over-priced and has parts-supply issues) and the new (and dizzyingly expensive) $3400 Tern Vektron (coming out next year). The Tern is also heavier by ten lbs and harder to work on, with a mid-drive motor; I can't imagine having a folding eBike that weighs more than the eJoe's ~45lbs.

First, the bike seems quite good. 2017 changes: more powerful battery (12A) and a charging port *on the side of the bike* instead of the bottom. I'm happy with it and recommend it so far. Currently, I'd recommend this bike to someone who is willing to spend the $$ on upkeep of a bike and upgrading a couple key components, especially if they'll be using this bike as more than just a "last mile" method of transport.

Bike arrived from an online retailer through Amazon; i bought through them to get an extra 3% back on the purchase, thinking this would be a smart fiscal move. NOTE: It wasn't. I should have ordered the bike through a bike shop and have them put it together; to the untrained eye the bike was fine, but when I took it to a shop they pointed out some important issues and ended up charging me a fair amount of money to tweak and tune it. Takeaway: although an eBike may seem expensive, don't cut corners. If you get an eJoe, have it assembled at a bike shop. They may also throw in a better rack, better tires, and maybe other goodies.

I've had the bike about 2 weeks. I like the seat/handlebar adjustability for my height and the power of the 12A battery. I immediately noticed that my pedaling was overpowered by the pedal assist. I'd read here that one could replace the freewheel; I recommend this and so did the eBike shop I went to. Hey eJoe: Why not do this for all your bikes?

Suggestions by the bike shop: They said they sell a fair number of eJoes, but seemed like purists so take the following with a grain of salt.
First, they made great suggestions about taking care of the bike, a LOT of suggestions about checking your bike and cables once a week, and other maintenance. They had a handout which eJoe might do well to include in their user manual!

1) They suggested updating the freewheel, which they do as a matter of course when they get a new Epik into their shop. Will update with what type exactly.

2) Holy heavens, make sure that the fork is tightened down appropriately! They took a look at it and said that it was looser than it should be and could be dangerous. It did feel slightly loose.

3) The bike shop suggested replacing all the bolts on the bike asap with USA-made bolts. Their take was that the parts are made in China (battery is made in San Diego, though, and is quality) and higher-quality bolts will be a good step toward reliability.
A hole for the rack mount in the back of mine was mis-drilled. I don't feel like shipping the bike back to eJoe, so I drilled it smooth.

4) Use the plastic derailleur til it breaks, it's pretty cheaply made. Replace it with a higher-quality one, and consider buying one and having it ready to install.

5) Replace the disc brakes with either higher-quality pads or rim hydraulic brakes. The Epik's stock disc brakes may wear down very quickly. They recommended hydraulic rim brakes, which can be had for a $100-200.
Maintenance: check and adjust your brakes regularly, since eBikes often wear down brakes faster than regular bikes.
Buy: a long Hex Key for tightening brake pads down as they wear.

Helmet: After reading around, it sounded like getting a visor (not just glasses/goggles) for riding made sense. I got a Bell Annex that already has a visor. Plus, it fits people who have glasses.

Tires: I've read that Schwalbe Marathons would be good, and after seeing what they look like I'd probably agree. I hear Kenda Small Block 8s work well too, but are more like mountain bike tires so will net you less distance from 1 battery charge.

Rack: Spent WAY too much time researching this. In short: an Axiom adjustable Journey rack (not the regular one) at its highest setting should work fine if you want panniers AND are willing to attach the rack by replacing the quick-release collar on your seat with one having rack mounts. I'm currently looking for a quick-release collar that will also accommodate a rack mount; I'm sure they must exist. I read somewhere that panniers on a folding bike is a problem looking for a solution (to use a trunk instead) but I'd like to use both. I'll post which panniers I get that avoid heel-strike.

Stock Lights: A cycling friend commented they look really good and are bright. If you're switching out the rear rack, be prepared to find a different way to mount the rear tail light, especially on the axiom Journey. I haven't solved this one yet, but will update when I do.

Overall: I'm sure there are errors/oversights here, as I'm new to cycling, but I wanted to at least get my experience out there. Talking to local bike shops I just don't understand... they say that people aren't buying eBikes very much here and don't even know what a folder is. I live in a high-crime city that's hilly. Crime: get a folder so you can take it indoors. Hilly? get an eBike. It seems like a perfect solution, so this is my attempt to help anyone else looking to make the switch and save them the countless hours I spent making calls and searching google for eBike info.

I'm curious why eJoe doesn't have regular updates/news on their website. I had to be told by a bike shop about the 2017 model upgrades, which seems stupid. eJoe, wanna sell more bikes? Update your online shop and info on your own products!

Hey there, Dripdry!

I'm curious; how are you liking the Epic SE now that's it's almost been a year out?

Mark F
3 weeks ago

I would like to get an ebike for when I am travelling around the country. The brand is not important right now but I would like some advice on being able to store it. There are not enough options for folding mountain bikes right now. I will probably use the bike on all surfaces. My question is can these bikes be broken down so that I can store it while travelling ? The add on storage boxes for bikes are very expensive so I would store it under the camper in one of the many spaces already there. Any answers are appreciated. I am just having a hard time with this because I don't want to have the bike stolen and it is too big to keep inside the rv.Thanks

paulmartin
4 weeks ago

Past year Ebike with very low mileages (143m). Frame size 27,5. Original Manual include as well as manufacturing guarantee on different parts!

link from UK store (sold out) https://www.e-bikeshop.co.uk/Haibike-sDuro-All-Mtn-Pro-2016

-Amazing experience riding it up-hill with electric power battery BatteryYamaha 400WhPowerPack 36v

Made in (Germany) Price 3000$ negotiable

link on craiglist: https://losangeles.craigslist.org/lac/bik/d/2016-haibike-sduro-all/6313246797.html

I live in LA.

If you want more info google bike description, it's limited edition so i don't think you can find this model anymore.

email: pmartynov112@gmail.com

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Steve Pierce
4 weeks ago

Just received a new 2016 Bulls 27.5 ebike from SanDiegoFlyRides last Friday. Shipping only took a week and the bike arrived with just very minor damage. Front disk rotor was slightly bent and a couple of small dings to the paint job but overall in good shape. Thanks for the fast delivery.
The bike looks to be of very high quality. I weigh about 265 and was concerned with the suspension holding enough air pressure. Had to pump up the rear RockShox to 300 psi to get the right amount of sag. Seems to be holding the pressure. The ride is very plush. The drive system will get you to 20mph in a hurry. I have to get used to that because I ended up flying down a tight trail way too fast. 20mph through trees and winding trails is pretty intimidating. The battery is huge and well hidden in the frame. After riding for 2 hours, the battery indicator had only dropped one bar.
I am very please with this bike overall. It feels and looks like a serious mountain bike.
Very good price drop on the 2016 models also.

Steve

ReallyGoodEbikes
4 weeks ago

Did you read the electricbike-blog report from the Playa? Yeah, it's not hard to fall in love with an ebike. In your case, I might suggest you take a look at the Biktrix Juggernaut line-up (my favorite is the newly-released-this-week ULTRA- 1000W mid-drive fatbike - totally awesome). Need more suggestions, give me a call and we can talk! 805-881-3365

elyhim
1 month ago

Was turned on to e-bikes by the ad for the supercommuter by Trek. Went in and bought a Powerfly full suspension and returned to mountain biking 25 years after I had last had one. Love it! ride every day with good weather. Find a positive E-bike group to get more information and positive vibes like ebike smile or the like. When you find the right bike it's amazing!

america94
1 month ago

Hello everyone.

I have been a bike commuter for 2 years now. The only days I do not commute by bike are in rainy days. I have 2 bikes at the moment. My Specialized road bike (which I have nick named The Green Hornet):

And a mountain bike I picked up at a pawn shop(with its nick name the Silver bullet):

The Green Hornet I enjoy on the week ends when I do the extended rides every morning, 3 to 4 hours.

The silver bullet is my main commuter to and from work, also when I just wanna go for a bike ride. My commute consist of 25 Km each way. All seasons are great, only issue is the winter, from a 50 minute commute it turns into a 2 hour commute.

I found this site by chance through you tube video's I was watching, mainly from ebike review videos.
By the time August hit I brought it down from 10 ebikes to 2, Sonders and Volt bike. Both bikes had things I liked and disliked on them. Couldn't make up my mind. The in the forum for Volt bike i saw a thread from america94 about alternative for Canadians. After reading all the review from america94 and others who have posted and visited the website, I decided to pay a visit to the teo showroom.

Benoit was there and I didn't ask but believe his daughter too. They both took the time to walk me through the Teo bikes and describe the differences of the Sonders, Volt and Teo. I spent roughly an hour there and all questions I had were answered. I went on several test ride and confirmed the Teo is to my liking.

I put my deposit down and am waiting for delivery of my Téo S ltd Medium Red 750W.
I would like to thank america94, Denis , Falken and all others who have contribute in the Teo forum. Your reviews and such were what swayed me from the other 2 and proceed with Teo.

Redskulls

Thank you
Glad I could be of help @Redskulls ! I caught your post today as I came to check out the forum after a prolonged absence :) I hope to be more present again from now on... got a lot of catching up to do though!!!

I must say I share your excitement as I put the Kenda tires back on my bike about 2 weeks ago and just can't stop riding again, and man is the stupid happy grin back on my face with the constant off-road riding I do these days! You know the weather we have these days around here, gotta enjoy it before it's too late!

Welcome to our family of happy Teo owners, glad to have another Montrealer among us!

Court
1 month ago

Here's another press release update that Bosch sent out the other day in preparation for Interbike. The summary is: the new Active Line Plus, Active Line and eMTB mode. With zero resistance, Active Line Plus will produce new eBikes that finally feel like riding a natural bicycle. Plus, the motors are much smaller, lighter, quieter and smoother than before. The eMTB Mode is also like an iOS update for your bike – riders unlock it just by updating their bike’s software. Active Line is similar to Active Line Plus, but smaller and lighter. You’ll find all the details in the attached, and here’s a few accompanying photos.

Bosch introducing two new systems and eMTB mode at Interbike
Reutlingen, Germany / Irvine, CA – Bosch eBike Systems North America (www.bosch-ebike.us) is highlighting two new systems and the new eMTB mode for the North American market for Model Year 2018. These innovations and more will be on display at Bosch’s Interbike 2017 booth (#17177) and available for experiencing first hand at the Interbike indoor test track “The Circuit” (#C11).

Active Line Plus: Quieter with zero resistance

From the days of launching our very first eBike system in Europe in 2010, Bosch’s goal has always been to make an eBike retain the natural feel of a traditional bicycle. The earliest generation of our product came close and quickly jump-started the “pedal-assist” eBike market in Europe. Our 2nd generation system came even closer and has been a big factor in the rise of pedal-assist eBikes in the US since 2014. Through non-stop innovation at our Stuttgart headquarters, our latest drive unit generation, dubbed Active Line Plus (ALP), closes the gap even further between an eBike and bicycle.

Key improvements:

Smaller: the drive unit is 20% smaller (volumetric) which enables bike designs with a cleaner / integrated look, to more closely resemble traditional bikes. With the ALP, the drive unit is one step closer to disappearing within the frame of the bike.

Lighter: the ALP drive unit weighs approximately 7.1 lbs, a weight reduction of 19% compared with last year’s Active and Performance Line drive units. Lighter eBikes handle better during the ride and are easier to transport after the ride – both key enablers to eBike market growth.

Whisper-quiet: the completely re-designed drive unit features a new quieter gear concept and electric motor. As you pedal on a quiet road, now you just hear the wind in your face.

Zero pedalling resistance: due to this new gear concept, when the motor is in “off” mode or the rider surpasses the drive’s cut-off speed, the rider feels no more resistance in the pedals than on a traditional bicycle.

Multiple front chain ring possible: previously, all Bosch drive units allowed only one chain ring. ALP now features the ability to offer multiple front chain rings, for bikes that need a wider range of gears.

Superior range: the ALP combined with the 500Wh battery achieves 51 miles range (mixed-modes, favorable conditions), and a max of 130 miles-plus range (Eco mode, ideal conditions). This is achieved through key features such as high motor efficiency and lower max torque (50 Nm), which is set deliberately lower than Performance Line to cater to commuters & more casual cyclists.

“The New Active Line Plus is our proudest achievement thus far for pavement-style eBikes,” said Claudia Wasko, General Manager of Bosch eBike Systems Americas. “Active Line Plus gives riders the fun of an eBike with the feel of a bicycle.”

Active Line: Lighter and smaller

The new Active Line has all the same key features as Active Line Plus with three key differences:

40 Nm of torque rather than 50 Nm.
Weight is even less at 6.4 lbs.
5% percent smaller than ALP.

eMTB Mode for Performance Line CX

A mode for eMountain bikers: eMTB mode replaces the previous Sport mode of the Performance Line CX and switches between the Tour and Turbo riding modes. Depending on the pedal pressure, the progressive motor support automatically adapts to the individual’s riding style. Without changing gear, the motor always provides support at the ideal power level, even at low cadences. eMTB mode is available to dealers in the form of a software update.

“Our new eMTB mode is going to be a game changer for the e-mountain biker,” said Claudia Wasko, General Manager of Bosch eBike Systems Americas. “It takes trail riding to another level.”

Demo the future

Interbike 2017 show attendees will be able to demo many eBikes from Bosch’s new and existing brands at Outdoor Demo Day on Sept 18th and 19th and at the Bosch-sponsored indoor test track (“The Circuit”) on Sept 20th – 21st to try out Bosch’s new MY18 innovations. Dealers are also invited to attend seminars on eBike market trends, policy, technology, and more at the Bosch-sponsored “Electric Theatre”, located close to “The Circuit” Test Track, open Sept 20th and 21st 10AM – 5PM.

Photo 1: Active Line Plus

Photo 2: eMTB mode

About Bosch eBike Systems

A new generation of bikes is taking town and country by storm and is already a part of everyday life. eBikes are a modern means of transport for modern people: people in a hurry and people who prefer to take it easy, the fit and the comfort lovers, commuters and pleasure cyclists and, of course, young and old. The tailwind of technology-leading eBikes made by what are already more than 60 leading brands in Europe is powered by components that Bosch is developing to perfection. The Bosch portfolio ranges from the highly efficient drive unit (motor and gearbox) and high-quality batteries to a smart on-board and cycle computer that can be used intuitively. Perfect coordination of components holds the key to typical Bosch performance in terms of both comfort and efficiency.

Like other Bosch products, the eBike systems benefit from the Bosch Group’s technology and production know-how. From conception and engineering to manufacturing, marketing and after-sales service, Bosch eBike Systems constantly set new standards for the eBike industry. The Bosch Group’s experience in the areas of electric motors, sensor technology, displays and lithium-ion batteries ensures that Bosch eBike systems use technology that is invented for life and that eBike users have their fun.

For more information please visit www.bosch-ebike.com

About Bosch

The Bosch Group is a leading global supplier of technology and services. It employs roughly 390,000 associates worldwide (as of December 31, 2016). According to preliminary figures, the company generated sales of 73.1 billion euros in 2016. Its operations are divided into four business sectors: Mobility Solutions, Industrial Technology, Consumer Goods, and Energy and Building Technology. As a leading IoT company, Bosch offers innovative solutions for smart homes, smart cities, connected mobility, and connected industry. It uses its expertise in sensor technology, software, and services, as well as its own IoT cloud, to offer its customers connected, cross-domain solutions from a single source. The Bosch Group’s strategic objective is to deliver innovations for a connected life. Bosch improves quality of life worldwide with products and services that are innovative and spark enthusiasm. In short, Bosch creates technology that is “Invented for life.” The Bosch Group comprises Robert Bosch GmbH and its roughly 450 subsidiaries and regional companies in some 60 countries. Including sales and service partners, Bosch’s global manufacturing, engineering, and sales network covers nearly every country in the world. The basis for the company’s future growth is its innovative strength. At 120 locations across the globe, Bosch employs 59,000 associates in research and development.

Additional information is available online at www.bosch.com , www.iot.bosch.com , www.bosch-press.com , www.twitter.com/BoschPresse .

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Bicyclista
1 month ago

Could we discuss frame sizes? For the most part, I see maximum frame sizes of 55cm (22"). My old Raleigh was a 26" frame. My current bike, which I hate because I have to extend the seat post up to the max, and this leaves me leaning too far down to be comfortable on the handlebars - well that is a 23" frame. Are my long legs going to be a problem?

@Amflautist, you are correct in seeking the right frame size for you. IMHO its the most important metric in a bike. Bikes are like clothes. Nobody wants to wear garments that are too small or too large. Besides, the wrong size frame can be awkward, inefficient, and dangerous.

So perhaps the first order of business is to find an ebike manufacturer that makes extra large frames. Not easy. For example, the "search" function in this site has a category for frame size. Unfortunately, the slider tops out at 22 inches, and you're saying you need a 26-inch frame (like your old Raleigh).

Maybe you should pay a visit to your local bike shop and ask them whether any of the manufacturers they carry make a 26-inch frame ebike. (Or the equivalent, depending on the geometry; a mountain bike will have a shorter seat tube because the bottom bracket is higher off the ground.) Also, get them to fit you, so you know what size you need in a road bike, a mountain bike, or hybrid. I say that because perhaps the right size frame exists for you, but it may be a mountain bike with 29-inch wheels and plus-size (3-inch) tires.

If you should find that there are no manufacturers making the right size ebike for you, then the alternative is to convert a regular bike to electric. But you probably don't want to get into that...

I sympathize. I am in my seventies myself, and riding an electric bike makes me feel young again. I can climb any hill and my range has been extended. You will feel like superwoman! Don't give up until you find the right size ebike!

Over50
1 month ago

...We have a Trek dealer, and they JUST got a Super Commuter in the other day and offered to let me test drive it. That was my first experience with an EBike. I really liked it, but I just can't see spending that much...

I'll just throw this out there as an option since you have a Trek dealer: I posted a couple of times here that I would have considered the new 2018 Trek Powerfly 5 hardtail over the Haibike had I known it was coming out. It has the CX motor but Trek has done an even better job at integrating that battery. It has the Purion display vs the Intuvia. It is listed about $1,000 less vs the Haibike but it does not come set up as a commuter. But you can add a rack, fenders and lighting per their website. Once you add those items, particularly the lighting, you probably have an equivalent price tag. But with Trek and Bontrager I think you might find better access to accessories and to service. I had already ordered the Haibike when I learned of the Trek. I just mentioned it to my dealer as a 'what if' and they seemed to think the add-ons were not a big deal and concurred that the bike could be turned into a good all-around/commuter. I'd probably also change the tires if the commute is strictly street riding. I guess much depends on the e-bike prowess of your local Trek dealer (my local store is pretty good and has been getting some of its techs certified with Bosch). Perhaps also with Trek you might be able to find a bike to demo.

https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/bikes/mountain-bikes/electric-mountain-bikes/powerfly/powerfly-5/p/2914600-2018/

little bee
1 month ago

Stromers were nice
I like the Gates belt drive no maintenace and no derailer
Our Bulls climb hills at 15+ mph
They are up to the task
If you spend some time reading about these motors its about dc voltage and torque, so thebest hill climbers are the mountain ebikes
we werent going to be going crazy on mountain trails so I stayed with a more hybrid style
You should be able to rent an ebike for a day and give it a real test
Hi Art, I think the Bulls Lacuba is my favorite so far. thanks for sharing your experience.

Mark Peralta
1 month ago

My experience when it comes to frequent stops and rapid accelrations is that it is easier to do it on a hub driven ebike. I have 2 mid drives and 2 hub drives (one already sold), all of them 28 mph capable. On the hub driven ebike, there is no power interruption when accelerating and shifting and there is less stress to the chain and sprockets. Interestingly, the hub drives are not far behind when it comes to hills except on really really steep mountain trails which you don't encounter on paved roads anyway. Once the hub drive gains momentum, it is still faster than mid drives even on the hills. You might want to try hub drives too and see which one best serve your needs.

Here's another guy comparing his hub drive vs mid drive. I kmow this is not apples to apples but these are what's on the market today.

joes joey
4 days ago

Another great review Court,been waiting for this one ! great bikes i personally think these are top of the line bikes best combinations and made to perfections i mean go over it it literally has no flaws defects even charging hole is out of the way of pedals.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 days ago

So glad you enjoyed it! Yeah, I feel like OHM and BionX put effort into the details and have made something special with the 2018 lineup, the Mountain is one of my favorites :)

Gregory Alston
1 week ago

Will you be reviewing the new bike from Luna Cycles? The Apex? It looks awsome!

Paul Bamber
1 week ago

Hey Court, you seem to have used only 58% of battery going up that hill (not 68) so you should feel even more proud 😛😎

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 week ago

Ha! Good catch, thanks for the feedback... yeah, it performed great and I was using the throttle and high assist quite a bit

LeoInterHyenaem
1 week ago

The best thing about this bike's design is the Ergon seat post. And secondarily, the bottom tube. The seat stay / chain stay combo is hideous! And so is the top tube. And the rear wheel.
Today's "beautiful" is the endless ugly.

Johannes Nilsen
1 week ago

I reccomend using a timber bell or similar instead of a standard bell as you can just turn it on and it makes noise, no need to use the thumb all the time, so this is a game changer on gnarly fast trails.

Johannes Nilsen
1 week ago

if you want fenders, Mudhugger is a great option.

Johannes Nilsen
1 week ago

The chainring the guy has is Renthal narrow wide chainring, Renthal is a well known high end motorcycle and bicycle handlebar brand, but few years ago they started making chainrings too. I can tell by the Renthal gold color. http://cycling.renthal.com/shop/cycle-products/cycle-chainrings/1xr-chainring

Johannes Nilsen
1 week ago

38T chainring that's overkill, unless you have a huge wide range 11-speed cassette in the back.

Johannes Nilsen
1 week ago

Custom cranks?? these are just standard od shool cheap cranks, the black area on the TRP rotors is to remove dirt.

Steve Donovan
1 week ago

I would say you should charge the OHM guys a day's salary riding on that trail.

Greg McMahon
1 week ago

Nice bike on a cool trail.

Alex NC
1 week ago

Nice trails, nice bikes!

Joseph Gizzi Jr
1 week ago

Nice bike, I like the understated “sleeper” look.

Mark Elford
1 week ago

Very nice machine, what a cool mntn trail, im spoiled i live in BC ...

Martin Schmidt
1 week ago

I think Its a lil bit too expensive for a suntour fork and the weight.other bikes for the same price have more to offer.

joes joey
2 days ago

MY COMPANY? LOL im not a company and i dont work for ohm lol just from all the rugged tests ive done ohm has defeated all ebikes currently on the market.no point in continue this conversation you like bosch i like ohm lol.

Martin Schmidt
2 days ago

joes joey i know a lot of ebike dealer. They all say Bosch is the most reliable on the market. Fewest repairs etc.also a hub drive is Not as effective as a mid drive. Also the hub drives arent that robust bc the tires they sit in get Bend over time and the repair is more complicated than mid drives. Hub drives play No significant role on the Western ebike market. The Bosch drives are also used with s pedelecs which drive fast enough. Its obvious that you make Things up to defend your Company but i think i said everything. No need for further messages from you . Thx. :)

joes joey
3 days ago

bet if you raced your e bike with any ohm bikes you would lose so hard lol.

joes joey
3 days ago

Ive had most problemes with bosch systems.. first of all their blocked to 15mph lol second plastic frame protecting Bosch systems are really weak and will crack easly and a hudge pain to repair. havnt had one single probleme with bionx or ohm company ever no failure no damage plastic of bionx systems are so damn strong they dont even scratch,and bionx systems can be deblocked for high speeds not Bosch with a 200w motor.not hating Bosch just dont like the materials,power of the systems and overall setups.

Martin Schmidt
3 days ago

joes joey Sure Its a different area for using this bike. but Its a german quality Brand and a Bosch mid drive which is the most reliable on the market today. dont have to "study" ebikes for 25 yrs to know that. I dont think the ohm has a better frame. The parts of my ex6 are better than the ohm parts . Do you drive a canadian quality car also? ;)

Tristan Edwards
1 week ago

Nice how much for that model shipped to Australia Melbourne and how long is the waiting time

A Jolly Hiker
1 week ago

FYI. The e in Schwalbe is silent. See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yjPIkfgqmC8

stupidscum josh
1 week ago

That's very nice 😨😀

James Mason
1 week ago

is the D- series bionx top system

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 week ago

In a way, yes, it's the most powerful for sure and the design is more advanced. It just costs more and looks larger. I think it comes down to budget and type of ebike... like OHM is going to offer a 350 watt motor on their step-thru and price it lower for people who aren't climbing as much and that's cool

laurent sebbah
1 week ago

Nice bike

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 week ago

I agree, beautiful design and excellent performance, the BionX system is pretty solid... different, but solid, and OHM builds some of the best bikes with it in my opinion