ShareRoller Version 1 Review

Shareroller Electric Bike Kit Review 1
Shareroller
Shareroller Polyeurothane Roller Stored
Shareroller Front Handle Headlights
Shareroller Cockpit Throttle Mount
Shareroller Back Side Mounted
Shareroller Front View
Shareroller Mounting To Citi Bike
Shareroller Power Button Charger Slot
Shareroller Side Wound Throttle
Shareroller Throttle Winding
Shareroller Top Pressure Rod
Shareroller Trigger Throttle Mount
Shareroller Usb Charger Outlet
Shareroller Wheel Contact Roller
Shareroller Electric Bike Kit Review 1
Shareroller
Shareroller Polyeurothane Roller Stored
Shareroller Front Handle Headlights
Shareroller Cockpit Throttle Mount
Shareroller Back Side Mounted
Shareroller Front View
Shareroller Mounting To Citi Bike
Shareroller Power Button Charger Slot
Shareroller Side Wound Throttle
Shareroller Throttle Winding
Shareroller Top Pressure Rod
Shareroller Trigger Throttle Mount
Shareroller Usb Charger Outlet
Shareroller Wheel Contact Roller

Summary

  • Friction drive electric bike kit designed to work with major bicycle share programs
  • Quick and easy to install, operate and charge, includes LED headlights for safety
  • Optional mounting bracket lets you use the kit with Brompton folding bikes and others
  • Adds a bit of weight to steering and operates a bit noisier than some hub motor kits

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

ShareRoller

Model:

Version 1

Price:

$1,295 USD

Suggested Use:

Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Pedal Assist (Class 1)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2014

Bicycle Details

Motor Weight:

6.5 lbs (2.94 kg) (7.5 lbs with Extended Range Battery)

Accessories:

Two LED Headlights, Integrated Handle for Easy Carrying, USB Power Port for Charging Phone or Electronics, 5 amp Battery Charger, Optional High Speed 7 amp Charger for Upgraded Battery, Optional Mounting Brackets for Brompton Folding Bikes

Other:

Works with Most Bicycle Sharing Programs (New York, Chicago, Washington DC, Boston, Minneapolis, San Francisco - Bay Area, Columbus, Chattanooga, Denver, London, Montreal, Toronto and others),Throttle Only Activates When Pedaling (This is Why it's Class 1)

Electronic Details

Motor Type:

Front-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

750 watts

Battery Voltage:

30 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

8 ah (Optional 14 ah Extended Range Upgrade)

Battery Watt Hours:

240 wh (Optional 420 wh Extended Range Upgrade)

Battery Chemistry:

Nickel Cadmium Manganese Cobalt

Charge Time:

2 hours

Estimated Min Range:

15 miles (24 km)

Estimated Max Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Drive Mode:

Trigger Throttle

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

The ShareRoller electric bike kit is a friction drive system designed to work seamlessly with bike share programs all around the world. In short, these bikes have a triangular metal bracket protruding from their head tube which lock into a computerized rack. This is how the bikes are checked in or out, the metal bracket is used to secure them… With the ShareRoller system, this metal bracket is repurposed for mounting a briefcase sized battery, control unit and motor that propel the bike forward. It’s an impressive system because it’s actually smaller than a briefcase at 11″ x 8″ x 2.7″, relatively light weight at 6.5 to 7.5 pounds (depending on the battery size you choose) and feature rich (integrated LED lights and USB charger). The thing folds and unfolds quickly and looks pretty unassuming when it’s not mounted up.

The unit shown here is a V1 prototype that’s a bit larger and louder than the new ones. It was used in a Kickstarter campaign and sold to a limited number of customers in 2013/2014. The really neat part about this and future iterations is that in addition to bike share programs they can also be used with Brompton folding bikes and kick scooters, which is shown in the video. I’m told that the standard mounting bracket is almost ready and should allow the ShareRoller to be used with ~50% of bikes. Beyond that, they can design custom brackets for a bit more. The bracket is designed to replicate the triangular metal piece mentioned previously and you also get a handlebar piece that supports the throttle clip. When testing the system I was amazed to find out that different clips can enable different top speeds… it goes slower with kick scooters because they tend to feel wobbly at 20mph. That kind of attention to detail and integration can be found throughout the product which is really something special in my mind.

The motor driving this thing offers 750 watts of power which is at the upper limit of what’s legal in the United States. That doesn’t mean it goes extra fast (it adheres to the legal top speed of 20mph), it just means it’s capable of moving heavier bikes and riders. That’s a good thing because the bicycles used in the bike share program weigh about 50 pounds! By contrast, most normal bikes weigh between 20 and 30 pounds… Instead of using a hub motor mounted inside the wheel or mid-drive motor design to pull the chain, the ShareRoller uses a friction drive. Basically, it’s a small outrunner motor (a bit smaller than a can of soda) that’s mounted horizontally. When it spins, the outside canister (which is rubberized to provide grip in wet or dry conditions) rubs against the top of the bicycle tire and propels you forward. In my experience it works pretty well.

The battery powering the ShareRoller system offers ~30 volts of power and ~14 amp hours of capacity (depending on the size you get). It’s enough to ride ~20 miles without pedaling which is pretty impressive! The cells are all contained inside the rectangular plastic case and are made with a Lithium-ion chemistry that’s designed to be light weight and long lasting. You don’t have to worry about taking the batteries out to charge because the entire ShareRoller unit is so small… You can take the whole thing inside and plug it in using the two-hour fast charger. You also don’t have to worry about bringing your bike inside or even owning a bike because the unit is so easy to install and remove. This is a really disruptive concept here… In the same way that people who live in a large city don’t have to own cars (they can rely on cabs or rentals instead) the ShareRoller means you no longer have to own a bicycle because you can rely on share programs.

The control panel interface on the ShareRoller is minimal and easy to use. Once the unit is mounted to the front bracket of your chosen bicycle you just clip the trigger throttle to your handlebar, toggle the on/off switch at the back of the main unit and you’re ready to go. There’s no speed or range indicator here as with some purpose built electric bikes, just a small trigger that provides variable speed output. Before it will activate however, you’ll have to pedal one or two strokes (for legal reasons to qualify as pedal assist). When I was testing the unit I found the throttle easy to reach and use which made riding feel relaxed because I wasn’t distracted. I used it mostly to get up to speed before resuming pedaling on my own at a more comfortable cadence.

In a world where bicycle share programs are popping up all over it’s awesome to have a way to add some electric assist. These bikes are designed to be rugged and durable but they just aren’t very nimble or light… the ShareRoller makes riding them easier. Sure, there may be electric bike share programs someday but the big challenge is keeping the units charged and dealing with even more maintenance issues at the program level. With the ShareRoller you bring your own electric drive system and you take it with you meaning the battery isn’t exposed to potentially damaging cold or hot conditions or persistent severe weather. It’s a brilliant idea executed very well in my opinion. The addition of LED lights, a USB charger and versatile mounts for use with scooters and folding bikes is just icing on the cake and while the unit shown here is a bit loud, the V2 units are even more polished and should become available in mid 2014.

Pros:

  • Extremely creative design that’s durable, compact, easy to carry
  • Special rubber and grooves on front roller resists slipping when tires are wet
  • Built in LED lights and USB charger for your phone or other electronics are handy
  • LED state of charge indicator shows how much energy is remaining in the battery pack
  • Fairly powerful with 30 volt battery and 750 watt motor, able to propel 50lb city bikes with ease
  • Solid one year limited warranty that covers the motor, battery, throttle and electronics
  • Throttle system is easy to use, designed to only activate once the bike is at 2mph to comply with “assist-only” laws in New York and parts of Europe
  • Two battery sizes make the unit lighter weight and cost less depending on your needs
  • Built in handle and compact design reduces attention and makes it easy to transport
  • With this kit you wouldn’t need to buy a bicycle which means you don’t need to lock it up, carry it up stairs, repair it etc.

Cons:

  • Friction drive and motor create more noise than a gearless hub motor and some other designs
  • Requires a bit of fiddling around to mount each time (not that bad though, pretty easy once you get the hang of it)
  • Only provides throttle assistance, no pedal assist settings here
  • No LCD display panel to let you know how fast or far you’ve been going
  • Have to spend a bit more to buy a special mounting bracket if you plan to use your own kick scooter, standard bicycle or Brompton

Resources:

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Keith
2 years ago

We’re launching V3 on indigogo tonight at 12AM NYC time.

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Hi Keith! That’s awesome, so glad you guys are keeping with it and improving the design. I just visited your website and saw the link to pre-order. I’d love to check out the new model and do another review. Reach out to me with the contact form if you guys have a demo unit or will be in or around Los Angeles :)

Reply
Jeff Guida
2 years ago

Thanks Court! We’ll definitely find a way to get you to review the new ShareRoller soon. Or at least a V2! And here is the link for the ShareRoller V3 Indiegogo campaign – we’re offering some amazing limited-time only deals, so please be sure to visit soon: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/shareroller-world-s-best-bike-scooter-motor#/

Reply
Jack
2 years ago

This review illustrates one of Court’s special qualities: He digs up an amazingly eclectic collection of bikes & bike systems and even manages to get to them, ride them and video them for us. And here he is in downtown Manhattan!

This review is now way-dated given the current maturity of Shareroller’s V3 design. The feature evolution (e.g. Bluetooth throttle control) and fresh packaging are both impressive. Biggest issues for me are the noticeable presence of motor noise heard in the review and the suspected difficulty of a spring-loaded throttle switch, with perhaps 1/2″ of throw, to offer discrete enough positioning to provide a steady ride pace. Especially given the movement of the handlebars when riding on uneven surfaces. (Notice how Court, in his very brief ride, was either going ‘full steam ahead’ or releasing. I wonder how inevitable an issue this might be in the production version).

One big attraction of this system not mentioned is the reality that many of us who want to ride our bikes but also want to augment our bike’s capability electrically can’t find an ebike store. Many ebike owners mention how local non-ebike stores don’t have an interest in supporting ebike bikes, lack the skills and want to avoid warranty issues. And on-line ebike ordering, coupled with product quality issues, seems a mixed blessing. It’s an appealing option, for me at least, to consider supporting a local bike shop, get all the mechanical support there which I need, and yet can augment my bike’s (and my!) capabilities with a self-contained Shareroller. A smaller unmentioned benefit is how much easier it would be to load a non-ebike on a car bike rack, needing to only lift perhaps half the weight. Clever if unusual idea, I’m thinking.

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Thanks for the props Jack! I’ve been doing my best to include all kinds of ebikes in my reviews. The ShareRoller is such a cool concept and I’m hoping to review their latest version next year… There are many benefits but the ride for V1 wasn’t as fluid or quiet as many purpose-built models I test. You make great points about ebike shop availability (or lack thereof) and the reluctance of traditional bicycle dealers to service. Kits are one way to overcome this and the ShareRoller is one of the simplest “kits” if you could even call it that. The new version is supposed to be even smaller, lighter and quieter than the one shown here. Still, it’s throttle-only and now you can buy decent 2016 complete bikes from companies like IZIP, Volton and GenZe for ~$1,500 with assist and still take the battery off to reduce weight. Lot’s of variables to consider but yeah, this kit is awesome especially for folding bikes.

Reply
Nirmala
2 years ago

Hi Court,

The ShareRoller now does offer an add on PAS system for a little extra cost.

It also has an interesting built-in feature called Tailwind which adds a small but steady amount of power any time you are going above a preset speed of 8 mph. So it feels like you have a tailwind all of the time, and does not interfere with stopping as it cuts out once your speed drops below 8 mph. This can be overridden with the throttle also to work similar to how a low pedal assist level can work with added throttle for hills or passing other bikes. This may be enough for many people and would mean it was not necessary to buy or mount the add-on PAS unit.

I am really looking forward to trying this new friction drive and have preordered one.

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Cool! I’m looking forward to testing out the new version, Jeff and I stay in touch about updates but right now I’m visiting the West coast so it’s not convenient to meet. I respect the guy a lot and also appreciate your update comment here to help people learn about the new features.

Reply
jack thomas
2 years ago

How can I order one

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Hi Jack, it appears that you can go to their official website here and either pre-order or get one on Indiegogo “in demand” which is a program that lets you purchase successfully funded products. Hope this helps, the ShareRoller is a neat product and the founder seemed smart and caring.

Reply

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Ravi Kempaiah
20 hours ago

[QUOTE = "bluecat, post: 124272, member: 1217"] Sorry, the Pirelli Cylc-e just wants to come with the Stromer ST5 . Stromer in MY2018 wants to have the usual tires.

[ATTACH = full] 19611 [/ ATTACH]

Statement Pirelli:

A first version of the new line, which at the same time respects design and sportiness, was developed for the brand-new electric bike ST5 of the Swiss company Stromer, which is presented on the occasion of the fair.

The new tire offers maximum puncture protection, a young and trendy "look & feel" as well as the handling and reliability of a motorcycle, thanks to the patented profile, which is the fruit of the experience Pirelli has gained in the motor sector.

Cycl-e is born thanks to Pirelli's attention to sustainable mobility, a segment in which Pirelli is also a protagonist in the car world, and thanks to the tailor-made strategy of the Milan-based company, which translates into a complete range of products individual needs of the end user into account. [/ QUOTE]

I would be interested in knowing how much more puncture resistant these are compared to the Schwalbe Marathon plus tires.

bluecat
1 day ago

Pirelli - Eurobike 17 - Cycl-e tyre.jpg.
I hope to get these tires when they are available for my bike. Right now they say that they will only come on new Stromer's.

Sorry, the Pirelli Cylc-e will only come with the Stromer ST5. All other new or continued Stromer in MY2018 will have the usual tires.

Statement Pirelli:

Eine erste Version der neuen Linie, die gleichzeitig auf Design und Sportlichkeit achtet, ist für das brandneue E-Bike ST5 der Schweizer Firma Stromer entwickelt worden, welches anlässlich der Messe präsentiert wird.

Der neue Reifen bietet maximalen Durchstichschutz, ein junges und trendiges “look & feel” sowie das Handling und die Zuverlässigkeit eines Motorrads, dank des patentierten Profils, welches Frucht der Erfahrung ist, die Pirelli im Motorsektor gesammelt hat.

Cycl-e entsteht dank der Aufmerksamkeit Pirellis für nachhaltige Mobilität, einem Segment, in dem Pirelli auch in der Welt des Autos Protagonist ist, sowie dank der “tailor made”-Strategie der mailändischen Firma, welche sich in eine komplette Produktreihe übersetzt, die die individuellen Bedürfnisse des Endverbrauchers in berücksichtigt.

1/1
JRA
2 days ago

Yes lighter but only 80mm travel which is plenty for the way I ride, or should I say speed.

I wasn't impressed with the grip display because it has a funky grip throttle thing going on. I like the thumb version on the other side next to my grip shift better. I am so used to a CA3 that any display is second rate and the stock display is fine for my needs after I broke the stock mount and have it strapped on even. I was easily able to access the settings to adjust to my preferences and haven't done much with it since. As I said I use eco 99% of the time.

Good luck getting it to cruise that fast. I suppose it would but you will want to have pretty high gear ratio's to support it. I still prefer my hub bikes for that type of speed and the cadences associated with them. I have had mine up to 25 a few times on the pavé but mostly ride off road with mine so rarely see even 20 doing that.

The magic legs feeling that torque sensing gives you feels good to me up to about 70rpm and then it just starts to feel vague. Beyond that I prefer pure access to my gearing without motor interference at all and why I use a throttle on my road bikes.

Yes, Ft. Stevens. There is a single track trail system (outside of the paved ones) there that I have ridden off and on for years that I always say is one of my top 5 favorite in the U.S.. Can be ridden year round but sometimes the water table gets the low spots flooded so you have to get wet. I like to think that Lewis and Clark walked the same trails back in their time. The above pic of my FS bike was taken at Coffenbury Lake inside the park.

Nuno
4 days ago

I have a question regarding the top limit speed that this model has when is sale in Europe Market.

Is it possible to chenge the top speed via LCD screen as the US models? if yes what is the maximum speed that we can go?

For the US equivalent Ebike and via LCD settings is possible to change until 40 km/h the top speed, is the same with european model?

Thanks!

ebike Richard
5 days ago

IRA were you using a typical Direct Drive front hub motor with regen capability? If so, this is old outdated technology. Bionix which is considered to be one of the best in this type of power generator & having the most advanced controllers on the market had to apply for a Government loan in order to catch up with the new systems coming out. I suspect they are using a similar system to what you have. Formula 1, Formula E, Tesla & others have already started using K.E.R.S. systems & it is my belief that the Vello may be using a smaller similar version. It is a window into what is to come from Bosch, Panasonic, Sony & possibly Bafang or other Chinese manufacturers. As for Snake Oil, I cannot see these guys duping the most prestigous Engineering Award out of Europe - The Red Dot Award for excellence and the Formula 1 guys would not waste their time, money or effort on an idea that doesn't work. Would I buy their system? Probably not since I can build a better performing system that I don't mind plugging in.

The Vello is scheduled to come out sometime in February. I'll be very curious what Court comes up with when he evaluates the bike!

-Richard

Reid
6 days ago

I had that lock. It lasted about a month. Seemed great at first but the remote went bad. Had to wave it repeatedly close to the alarm to make it accept any input. Finally had to tear it off after it would not turn off while activated. Just an FYI all it took was a five second grab and smash with my bare hands to destroy it and make it shut up. I picked up different alarm off amazon about a week ago and it is leagues better. The remote works from 30-40 feet away and responds every time. A little different mounting arrangement, but nothing you won't be able to manage. Get as much use out of the one you have. It was great while it lasted, but I'm glad it failed. It led me to a much better product. Link
(I have edited my previous posts to make it clear that Bob and I have different versions of the identical looking device.)

Hi Bob, the version I use does not have a remote. Its features are different than the remote version you had. The units do look identical, however.

I push a button to arm it and push the button again in a particular way to disarm.

Mine is permanently mounted up under the saddle shell. It is glued. And besides the glue, it cannot be removed unless the saddle is taken off the seat post first. And that cannot happen because the allen socket holes are going to be blocked

I positively did not want a remote control alarm, fearing the instability yours had. But also I don't want to worry about a remote.

Will post a short video demonstrating the alarm later today.

No thief is liable to know my bike even has an alarm until he sets it off its first warning.

If the alarm gets set off again within 12 seconds, it will shriek for 30 seconds and then reset.

Theodore Deffenbaugh
1 week ago

here is something interesting from the "Grin Technologies" knowledgebase website and also from my cycling knowledge based from the Eugene Sloan's cycling primer book "Complete Bicycling"; as one can readily see this is an easily solvable problem at least according to: http://www.ebikes.ca/learn/wheel-build.html:

Seating at Bend

A common reason for spokes to fail on electric hub motors isn't because the motor puts extra strain on the spokes, or because the spokes aren't a thick enough gauge, it's because of fatigue failure from spokes that aren't held snug against the flange. If the spoke bend radius is too large or too far from the head, then it can flex up and down at the bend with each wheel rotation, eventually causing it to crack and fail.

This problem has been legendary with overseas built hub motors, and we had some Crystalyte shipments where about half the customers would experience spoke breakage on a recurring basis. Ideally the distance between the head and the bend in your spoke will match the thickness of the hub flange, and you won't have problems.

But if not, there are basically two rather effective cost effective ways to address the presented given case study situation as mentioned previously:

One is to basically insert a simple washer under the spoke head which is probably the simplest cost effective method;

The second way is to also lace the wheel in an over/under pattern, such that the spoke tension compresses the bend part of the spoke into the flange;

now using both of the two above basic commonly known wheelbuilding techniques in combination will go a long way towards helping to ensure that one is not likely to introduce unnatural and/or unknown undesireable torsional twisting forces about the "J" Spoke Bend radius at the hub flange; that will eventually directly cause and introduce premature metal fatigue failure at the "J" Spoke Bend radius at ones hub flange.

I have personally read from the excellent and comprehensive Sheldon Brown encyclopedic bicycle primer on everything about cycling must read "everything on cycling" primer, which includes "wheelbuilding" and according to him a properly hand built bicycle wheel built by an trained and experienced skilled wheelsmith's should easily be able to survive a direct crash into the back bumper of a car at twelve miles per hour(but not to exceed 12mpth); the resulting effects of that crash would "in fact" cause the bicycle fork to be bent and likely cause the immediate structural failure of the fork blade assembly itself;

but the properly expertly built bicycle wheel by the skilled wheelsmith builder will not only be able to survive but it will only be slightly bent but probably likely repairable with just "truing up the wheel"; that is the value of having a bicycle wheel built by a properly trained skilled wheelsmith with just standard rather ordinary average quality "DT Swiss Spokes" and just standard rather ordinary average quality double wall aluminum alloy "Alex Rims 700C sized rims"; so long as one follows the basic skills and principles used in typical wheelbuilding by skilled trained bicycle wheel wheel builders.

http://www.ebikes.ca/learn/wheel-build.html

As an alternative, Jobst Brandt--the late author of the Bicycle Wheel--never believed in spoke washers because it didn't make sense to him, and nobody could explain how it worked in detail. Jobst was a mechanical engineer, trained at Stanford and worked for HP, that wrote what many believe is the best description of how to building a sturdy wheel.

So what causes this breakage at the elbow? The short hand version of why elbows are so tricky is that the manufacturing process sets up the bend of the spoke so it is near it yield limits. When metal is near it's yield limits, it has a short fatigue life. (Metal fatigue was not understood when people first discovered it. It is actually microscopic cracks, but because people could not see the cracks, they assumed it somehow got "fatigued.")

So how to fix this issue? You do "stress relieving" when the wheel is newly built. Stress relieving consists of taking a heavy set of gloves, and squeezing parallel spokes so hard that the elbows deform as the spoke go above it yield limits. Now the spoke is nicely deformed around the spoke hole, and the section that had been close to the yield point has been stressed further than its yield point and deformed. When you release the spoke, this deformed section cannot spring back, and the stress is lowered as the other parts of the spoke do spring back and take some of the load off the stressed section.

This is nothing new as the early European bicycle mechanics supporting pro racing had stumbled on this but didn't understand why it worked so well. Their preferred way of doing stress relieving was walking on the side of the wheel! This could work if the wheel builder had an idea of what they were doing, but it could also permanent warp the rim. Jobst said to just squeeze hard for multiple cycles (hard enough that you'd need a pair of thick leather gloves.) The wheel may go a little out of true, but not enough to permanent hurt the wheel, and easy to true back to shape. I've been building wheels for 30 years, and Jobst's ideas always worked well for me, except when I got lazy and ignored his input.

Jobst said that >90% of wheels made by machines and low hour wheel builders were not tight enough. Why is this important? Because when you start having spokes break, it is tempting to say, "I'll just removed the stress by untwisting the spokes." Unfortunately, the stress is not there from the wheel tension (normal ranges for a wheel spoke tension that is properly built is only 30% of it's yield strength), but the aforementioned manufacturing process. Lowering the tension in the wheel makes it worse because the spoke can now move more setting up more metal fatigue, which means that the rest of the spoke heads will crack even sooner. If the bike shop "lowered the tension" without measuring the spoke tension, I would worry that they don't understand how a wheel works, so they need to measure the tension. Wheelsmith made a great tension spoke meter, but I don't think it is around anymore. The standard tool now is the Park TM-1. However, Jobst could basically just tell by the sound and feel. Unless there was a run away at the wheel subcontractor, the solution is not to lower the tension, but to stress relieve.

Unless your an ME with some history in metallurgy and/or material science, this may seem counter-intuitive, and indeed Jobst spent many a post on usenet (look it up kids) trying to explain this. While I'm an electrical engineer by training, his ideas seemed to be backed by my core engineering studies on mechanics, although I'm not a ME. However, I noticed that nobody that had a mechanical engineering degree ever objected to him on Usenet, but he had a ton of objectors who did not have a degree. I'll leave it to the reader to figure out if he was right, and I have no desire to restart a bunch of debates on how a spoked wheel works. Something so simple seems to be easily misunderstood.

Regardless, reading the Bicycle Wheel, still available on Amazon, will give you a much more detailed description. The trick is to realize that the metal is not failing due to lack of strength, but due to metal fatigue. The best solution Jobst would have suggested is not to find a stronger spoke, but to set up an alignment where metal fatigue is not the primary driver of the failure. Tora could have his subcontractors for the wheels add a stress relieving step into their process, and might help the reliability of the wheel.

Thomas Jaszewski
1 week ago

My apologies, my old brain lost track of the dates. It was the southern factory in the late 80's, and early 90's I was thinking about. Regardless, the bikes are Walmart quality and despite the claim of a premium version, I find them to be a great disappointment over the bikes I rode from 1959-1973. 1973 Sports Tourer and Paramount were my last Schwinns. However the same shop still exists, I've seen them all, and I remain disappointed. Not the quality of eBike that interests me. The scooters were accidents waiting to happen IME.

Thomas Jaszewski
1 week ago

[QUOTE=" The make4 is a bit difficul5 to work with.
Hi Tom, Seems I may be installing a TS mid-motor soon. Any advise? What did you mean by 'difficult to work with'?

The first version I got was without brake cutouts and throttle. There are different displays and controller for the configurations. I was sent a new display, throttle, brake levers, and controller. At which time nothing would get me into the program function on the display. Another display was sent, still no joy. The only joy was a no charge sample. I found its bit fussy getting installed on my KHS Smoothie. I took some jiggling about to finally get the bracket inlace and bolt installed. I'm also not wild about the motor position...I guess I got what I paid for...I not going to mess with changing back to torque sensing only until spring. I believe the units are better quality that Bafang. But there seems to be teething issues. ES dot COM has some happy users. For my personal use I see no point in a mid drive.

Reid
2 weeks ago

Agreeing with all the good advice already given! Below are some possibly helpful links.

That dark pin is the master pin in the CCS's KMC K99 128 link chain. I broke my CCS chain with a chain tool the other day, to take it off the frame and solvent wash it to remove the gunky factory lube that gets all pasty with the aluminum paint-like coating of the chain. It really picks up road grit.

Well, I pushed the master pin back home carefully, but that dark pin is somewhat riveted, mushroomed a bit: that's how the factory makes that special pin stay in place. The joint required a little bit of English on the chain tool to get the joint working freely again. I did not get it working perfectly freely, it was binding just a little, but it is OK enough.

Sidebar. I have long since settled on Finish Line "Dry" lube: PTFE solids and a very light synthetic oil in a hexane solvent carrier. I apply the stuff regularly and wipe the chain down frequently. I mention this sort of lube, of the many classes available, because its oil is so very thin and light that it grabs and holds less road grit; it does not make a thick pasted gunk collection of mud. And the worst of the dirt that does accumulate can be washed off with soap and water very easy and the "dry" lube reapplied. Upon re-application, the stuff (like any other liquid chain lube) will displace water and some dirt from the internal moving surfaces of the chain. Your chain will always blacken a clean rag, however. That's the nature of chain wear: the polished off micro particles of steel always look gray or black on a rag. The same principle as polishing metal, the rag darkens.

I found a video where the fellow explains a flex-fix technique on a Shimano chain similar to what we have on the CCS bikes

Here is a suitable master link to replace the master pin system. This is the common sort of master link and it is reusable.

It's easier to deal a master link with the Park version 1.2 pliers that both open and close the link.

The chain being the bike's lifeline, it is empowering to have the few simple tools needed to make the chain work, or replace it, or take it down for cleaning, etc. Here is Park's mini chain breaker. You might find it a few dollars cheaper if you shop around....

bob armani
2 weeks ago

Some of my friends who are waiting to buy are torn between focus which has a more limited battery life and Kenovo and waiting on the Pilot Shuttle. They want to pull the trigger on Trek's Powerfly new version as the support in North Carolina is amazing. In Raleigh you have a choice of multiple Trek stores. They are still waiting because they think there will be another motor/battery upgrade in the next year. Still Specialized does not care about Customer satisfaction as evidenced by their changing technology and not supporting the older styles. Other bikes have no local support so Trek is high on the list here and the Shuttle is high because, well..... have you seen the Pilot Shuttle?

FYI-I inquired about the Pilot Shuttle, and the rep indicted that it was only released in Europe and did not look like it will be coming to US anytime soon. They certainly make awesome MTBs along with Yeti, Ibis, Santa Cruz, Evil, and Canyon to name a few. Not sure if any of these companies will be getting on board with ebikes in the near future...

Mark Peralta
7 hours ago

I think the easiest way (most user friendly) to use a mid drive is to pair it with automatic transmission like the nuvinci harmony (or H/SYNC in the Bosch). It is also the most efficient since it will always keep your cadence at the optimum window, thus extending your battery range. Another advantage is it automatically shifts down to the lowest gear (first gear equivalent) when stopping and then upshifts by itself when you regained speed (just like your typical car with automatic transmission).

The system is so easy to operate. you just set it and forget it. Even a novice can fully appreciate the joy of riding a bicycle.

However, the cost is prohibitive as an aftermarket product (in fact it's not even openly offered as an aftermarket, only the manual version is available in the stores). I inquired FLX if they can offer Nuvinci Harmony and they said it's too pricey and a little heavier compared to the traditional gear cluster.

http://www.fallbrooktech.com/cycling/harmony

These are the ebikes that I'm aware of in the US to offer the OEM nuvinci automatic transmission.

1. Corratec Lifebike (H/SYNC). This ebike is originally designed in partnership with "Dr. Ludwig V. Geiger who developed the LIFE concept, aimed at encouraging people who would not normally ride to improve their life style with exercise." The frame is designed to handle heavy riders to almost 350 pounds. (You can use german to english google translator.)
http://e-bike-test.org/vergleich/der-vater-des-corratec-lifebike-bei-uns-im-interview/
You can change the setting on the youtube below for english caption.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=869&v=nXuYlbN2cRo
https://electricbikereview.com/corratec/lifebike/

2. CUBE SUV Hybrid SL 27.5 (H/SYNC)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=483&v=Ctq6QzD_eZ4
https://electricbikereview.com/cube/suv-hybrid-sl-27-5/

3. Piaggio Wi bike active plus (H/SYNC, 28 mph top speed).

http://www.wibikenyc.com/activeplus/
It can also be applied as a fitness trainer using a smartphone app.
--https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4bGnlk-W1Fs

4. Evelo Galaxy ST & TT (programamble top speed, I think), it uses the H8 controller.

https://www.evelo.com/electric-bicycles/galaxy-st/
https://www.evelo.com/electric-bicycles/galaxy-tt/

5. Tempo electric bikes, a company supposedly catered for the ladies, short people (lower seat tube), for seniors with limited flexibility, and also for the novice and the non-mechanically inclined riders. However, you'll be surprised to find premium quality parts in these ebikes. It uses the more simple H3 controller with 3 predetermined cadence settings (low, medium, & high).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=3&v=E5rmCe1T6Zw
http://tempobicycles.com/bikes/

There may be other models that I am not aware of.

ADDENDUM:

6. RIESE & MULLER CRUISER (H/SYNC)

https://propelbikes.com/product/riese-muller-cruiser/

7. eProdigy Logan (H8 controller)

https://electricbikereview.com/eprodigy/logan/

1/1
Christopher Cramer
2 weeks ago

The lattest version of the enduro comes with a longer seat post, and a quick release in the front rim. Does the enduro also have lockable back suspension?

Vagos
2 weeks ago

In that case, maybe you can ask Stanton about his first version for a bargain price, on the pulleys, belt, controller and esp the motor mount.
Now THAT'S a good idea!

Mark Peralta
2 weeks ago

Nice try... :p
Kepler is giving me advice for my project.
But i think i will give Stantons project a go, but with chainrings.
In that case, maybe you can ask Stanton about his first version for a bargain price, on the pulleys, belt, controller and esp the motor mount.

Mark Peralta
2 weeks ago

Yes i've seen Stantons ebike. I think i've seen ALL ebike projects on youtube :)
My worries are about products compatibility though.
You can communicate with the master himself (Stanton) and ask for his recommendation for your personal application, considering your DIY capability background and your location for the availability of parts. I think the first version itself (geared for 20 mph) is already a very good build.

Mark Peralta
2 weeks ago

Update, nothing happened with the motor i won ( the seller changed his mind).
I found a KEDA 63-64 190KV Brushless Outrunner and i'm thinking on getting one of these cheap ESCs
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/350W-24V-36V-DC-6-MOFSET-brushless-controller-BLDC-motor-controller-E-bike-E-scooter-electric/32814400714.html?spm=2114.search0104.3.9.M8CX5O&ws_ab_test=searchweb0_0,searchweb201602_4_10152_10151_10065_10344_10068_10342_10343_51102_10340_10341_5130013_5000013_10084_10083_10304_10307_10302_10312_5790015_10059_10313_10314_10534_100031_10604_10103_10605_5060013_10594_10142,searchweb201603_6,ppcSwitch_3&algo_expid=b13788ec-e0a6-49b7-8edc-afda0a8807fe-1&algo_pvid=b13788ec-e0a6-49b7-8edc-afda0a8807fe&transAbTest=ae803_5&rmStoreLevelAB=5
Do you think those two will be compatible?
There's another guy doing the same work as your plan. I think you should take a look at it so you don't have to make the same trial and error mistakes. Learn from it and maybe leap frog from where he left off.

This is the earlier version.

mid drive merv
2 weeks ago

So now that you have several months on the Jumbo Jim Snakeskins, any issues or additional insights gained from the intervening months riding on them? My best riding buddy wants to go the tubeless version on his fat tire ebike. Told him I would see what I could find on this forum and your first impressions seemed quite good and glowing. I will be at least trying to help my buddy with the tubeless setup on his bike. Neither of us has ever tried the tubeless thing to this point, but I am very interested to see how it works for him. He has so many flats on his present fat tire tubed Kenda tires. Maybe others who read this will share also their thoughts on the Jumbo Jims, whether running in the tubed or tubeless version. Thanks!

Mark Peralta
2 weeks ago

DC drive does not attend more than 120 rpm.
The performance of a drive unit is determined by the copper winding and the thickness of this.
More optimized for more newtom and less revolutions or less newtom and more revolutions.
All drive unit models have a button with more than 100% assistance, naturally both the drive unit and the battery and the controller setting have been designed for it.
The assistance level that exceeds 100% of the drive unit consumes more watts than the established design.
It also reduces autonomy or range in kilometers.
In the table with different drive units in turbo mode all burn more watts than originally established.(EBIKE MOTOR PERFORMANCE) Yamaha PW 250w drive unit burn 490w in high mode,Bosch cx 350w in high mode 575w,etc,etc,etc.

Minute 0.45 Comparison of extra high mode torque in pw-x, pw-x in standard mode and pw in standar or high mode.
Minute 2.20 low rpm the drive unit give torque.......same in pw with less torque.....Other drive units do not give torque at low rpm or cadence do not give torque.

You are climbing a mountain behind some cars, you stop, you need to start, you need a response from the drive unit now,do not wait to reach 40 or 60 rpm the others systems.
Speed zero/second zero.

The question is ... ¿do you really need 120/180rpm?
Disc of 48 teeth x 11 teeth cassette and wheel 42-622 speed 69.7km / hour/104,5 km/hour.....
Disc 44 63,9km/h 95,8km/h
Dish 38 55,2km/h /82,8km/h
Dish 22 31,9km/h / 47,9km/h
In terrain flat or downhill.
you need much more than 40 newtow at those rpm.
My top speed down the mountain with my trekking on a plate 48 x 11 is 62km / h, weight of the rider, pedelec, gravity, kinetic energy + human torque and outside assistance against wind resistance ....... on the ground Flat is not going to be better and climbing the impossible mountain, to maintain those speeds you need more torque.

Revolutions and torque should go the same way, because at more speed you need more torque for that same speed.

I do not know the graphics of newtow in bosch or spitzing,
theory the spizing gives 120 newtom and has version drive unit center,pedelec ,s-pedelec, R-pedelec.

¿How many minutes can a human pedal at 120/180 rpm?

Some people, such as most road cyclists, like to maintain high cadence. People with bad knees, like me, also prefer high cadence (to attain the same power) over the low cadence/high torque in order to protect my knees from getting hurt. Here's a video of long duration high cadence on a non-electric bike, with the rider explaining the benefits of high cadence.

Manu
2 weeks ago

DC drive does not attend more than 120 rpm.
The performance of a drive unit is determined by the copper winding and the thickness of this.
More optimized for more newtom and less revolutions or less newtom and more revolutions.
All drive unit models have a button with more than 100% assistance, naturally both the drive unit and the battery and the controller setting have been designed for it.
The assistance level that exceeds 100% of the drive unit consumes more watts than the established design.
It also reduces autonomy or range in kilometers.
In the table with different drive units in turbo mode all burn more watts than originally established.(EBIKE MOTOR PERFORMANCE) Yamaha PW 250w drive unit burn 490w in high mode,Bosch cx 350w in high mode 575w,etc,etc,etc.

Minute 0.45 Comparison of extra high mode torque in pw-x, pw-x in standard mode and pw in standar or high mode.
Minute 2.20 low rpm the drive unit give torque.......same in pw with less torque.....Other drive units do not give torque at low rpm or cadence do not give torque.

You are climbing a mountain behind some cars, you stop, you need to start, you need a response from the drive unit now,do not wait to reach 40 or 60 rpm the others systems.
Speed zero/second zero.

The question is ... ¿do you really need 120/180rpm?
Disc of 48 teeth x 11 teeth cassette and wheel 42-622 speed 69.7km / hour/104,5 km/hour.....
Disc 44 63,9km/h 95,8km/h
Dish 38 55,2km/h /82,8km/h
Dish 22 31,9km/h / 47,9km/h
In terrain flat or downhill.
you need much more than 40 newtow at those rpm.
My top speed down the mountain with my trekking on a plate 48 x 11 is 62km / h, weight of the rider, pedelec, gravity, kinetic energy + human torque and outside assistance against wind resistance ....... on the ground Flat is not going to be better and climbing the impossible mountain, to maintain those speeds you need more torque.

Revolutions and torque should go the same way, because at more speed you need more torque for that same speed.

I do not know the graphics of newtow in bosch or spitzing,
theory the spizing gives 120 newtom and has version drive unit center,pedelec ,s-pedelec, R-pedelec.

¿How many minutes can a human pedal at 120/180 rpm?

1/3
Brian Goolsby
2 weeks ago

Thanks for the review. We're looking for a pair of small folding bikes to take on trips in our Tesla Model S. I've been looking at second hand GoCycles since I like the thought that went into it folding and having a custom docking station with travel bag. The prices are a lot more than I want to spend though.

As a design improvement, having removable batteries would be better for us since we can then take them up to the hotel room at night to charge rather than charging from an inverter off the Tesla battery.

Any recommendations on similar lightweight, travel friendly, folding bikes that would fit our intended use?

Give me a call/email
The Gocycle GS version is a much better price for just about all of the same features!
305-310-3354
brian@theyachtgroup.com

Don M
2 weeks ago

Prodecotech is offering a long distance version of their popular full size folding Phantom X2 500w motor with a 400w (600w peak) direct drive through the end of the year for $1199 which is $400 off! Here is a link for finding this great deal - https://www.prodecotech.com/electric-bikes/phantom-x2-400-flash-sale/ This bike has quality components as well including the Samsung battery, Suntour forks, Velo seat, SRAM X4 derailleur/shifter and hydraulic brakes, Continental tires, etc. These bikes have been very popular with students and commuters in cities because of their comfort riding and their ability to fold and fit into small apartments, RVs and the like. Happy Holidays and shopping everyone!

1/1
elyhim
2 weeks ago

Some of my friends who are waiting to buy are torn between focus which has a more limited battery life and Kenovo and waiting on the Pilot Shuttle. They want to pull the trigger on Trek's Powerfly new version as the support in North Carolina is amazing. In Raleigh you have a choice of multiple Trek stores. They are still waiting because they think there will be another motor/battery upgrade in the next year. Still Specialized does not care about Customer satisfaction as evidenced by their changing technology and not supporting the older styles. Other bikes have no local support so Trek is high on the list here and the Shuttle is high because, well..... have you seen the Pilot Shuttle?

Ann M.
2 weeks ago

Marcus, a lot of the less expensive electric bikes are off the shelf product from China as you have noted above. Sometimes a "manufacturer" like Jolt or other companies will customize their products with upgraded bike or electronic components while using the same frame as the generic version. If you dig a bit the differences could be simple things like heavier, better grade cables or better pedals or a higher grade controller or a same brand motor that's wound differently for Jolt. We don't know this without very detailed specs from both the generic Alibaba bike and Jolt. Right now, we don't know whether it's the same brand of motor since the exterior of the motor case has no label or brand etched onto it. I also checked Jolt's Indiegogo page and the motor size and watts are listed but no brand.

The Asian ebike manufacturers have a lot of capacity and will produce customized ebikes for other companies. There's a lot of specialized equipment and labor involved to build a bike, so very few ebike manufacturers actually own their plants; they contract with these bigger international companies.

Xad
6 months ago

21:50 - _"you didn't hit that classic engineer thing where you design design design forever"_
I guess they did kind of get stuck in that design thing. Three years on and this thing still doesn't exist on the market and very few updates on their facebook with constant delays and promises of new features.

Lysle Basinger
7 months ago

Makes my $500 Ancheer electric folder look pretty good.

willie bezo
8 months ago

this guy is smart as hell

Othéra Flores
12 months ago

where is it now tho?

Logan Stewart
2 years ago

14:20 i legit thought he fell off 😂😂

Brompton bike Lover
2 years ago

$1350 buy a bike

NFS HOT PURSUIT VIDEOS
2 years ago

He on Indiegogo right now and there is 27 days left on his campaign which is already funded.

MotorheadRedo
3 years ago

It wouldn't surprise me if Citibike banned these portable electric motors if the motors were shown to cause increased tire wear or deemed a safety hazard. Problem for motor owners is NYPD would be used to issue tickets to riders seen using the motors as well as Citibike modifying the v-shaped adapter used to mount the motor making the motor useless. Good idea though for the scooters and folding bicycles.

Niel van Schoor
2 years ago

+MotorheadRedo I am laughing out of South Africa for all the Americans that just want to sue everybody for everything. If you bump your toe at work it is your own problem. Come on... man up a bit. This is a perfect concept with loads of potential.

Georgie Man
2 years ago

+MotorheadRedo Officers see hub motors on bikes all the time.  Yet nobody bats an eye.  But with a friction drive it's somehow different?  One accident and it's all downhill?  Until that happens, and it hasn't, we can't say for certain.  In my opinion there would have be a unilateral incident across the board by many people before eyebrows are raised.  Something explodes or the thing goes nuts and reverses itself.  But none of that has happened.  As with any technology people use, just because one thing happens it shouldn't spell the end of it all.  People fall off bikes all the time on their own.  You're more likely to run into user error than an error with the device.

MotorheadRedo
2 years ago

All you need is one Citibike accident using this contraption, and its all down hill from there. Insurance company gets involved and the party is over. Wouldn't take long to train officers to recognize the device. I wouldn't fork over the money for this motor and be dependent on Citibike.

Georgie Man
2 years ago

+MotorheadRedo CitiBike tires, like any utility bike tires, are beefy and tough enough to withstand the daily pounding of asphalt. The urethane of a little motor would be completely negligible. In any event, it grips the wheel tightly so there is no friction or loss of traction. Except in wet conditions that is but then again you can just pedal to regain traction. NYPD would not be issuing tickets because they have no idea what or where to look for this device. Most people don't even understand what it is. It fits nicely under the basket and blends right in. And as described it serves as an assist. Besides why would they if you obeyed the laws of traffic? For the most part reactions are that of wonder and astonishment. And if the v-shaped docking piece changes, it can simply be rescanned into a new mount.

bike share
3 years ago

Where do I find your face book

bike share
3 years ago

Thanks

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

It's at https://www.facebook.com/ElectricBikeReview :)

bike share
3 years ago

https://www.change.org/p/blacktown-city-council-public-bike-share-around-sydney-for-cleaner-air great pls let my council know if u come to australia u be happy to use their bike share trying get more ppl put their name saying they support it

bike share
3 years ago

https://www.change.org/p/blacktown-city-council-public-bike-share-around-sydney-for-cleaner-air great pls let my council know if u come to australia u be happy to use their bike share trying get more ppl put their name saying they support it

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Cool, I shared this on the EBR Facebook page to let other people in Sydney know about it. Cheers :)

bike share
3 years ago

if anyone Australia in nsw http://www.change.org/p/blacktown-city-council-public-bike-share-around-sydney-for-cleaner-air I like one in Sydney as well even if not in Australia would u like as tour

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

+bike share Me too, Australia is a beautiful country and I love your people :)

bike share
3 years ago

I hopeing one day sydney catches on like you

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Are you offering to give people tours on the bike share in Sydney? That's nice :)

Everton Burrell
3 years ago

Another great american mind, wish him all the best with such a clever device.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Great positive words! I agree that he's done an excellent job here and really offering something unique and useful :)

Bret H
3 years ago

Every item on the checklist seems to be marked .
I think this is the iPhone electric bicycles most impressive ...

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Yeah, it's a very neat kit. Easier to install than almost any other I've seen and very versatile :)

funsterkeyven
3 years ago

You could see the twinkle in his eye when he talks about it. It's obviously a labor of love and I wish him all the best. Can't wait for mine to arrive.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 years ago

Yeah, I think it's really something special and am excited to see the final version :)

Byron McBride
4 years ago

Brilliant. What thorough design. I bought a Brompton just for this and I’m waiting on pins and needles for it to arrive. Then I can get rid of my giant Giant pedelectric and have the best of both the Brompton world and an electric assist for a codger with a weak ticker.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

Nice, I hope it works well for you! Very excited to see the final production kit myself, was great to try this thing and see how versatile it is. I'd love to see your setup and hear thoughts on the system once you get it, I'll be adding a ShareRoller section to the forums soon at http://electricbikereview.com/community/

Mighty Tiki
4 years ago

Pre-ordered, wish you would've linked up with this guy earlier--could've saved a few bucks. Looks like an amazing product, looking forward to getting mine this August :)

Mighty Tiki
4 years ago

+Electric Bike Review I sincerely appreciate your in-depth review of this product, I'm amazed by it and plan to use it on both my Brompton and Xootr.  Safe travels and keep up the reviews :)

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

Cool! Yeah, I was trying to review this kit for a while. We missed each other and I drove all the way back from Maine to NYC to see him and get this footage. I've been on the road for two months traveling the US doing reviews and still have over a dozen videos to post once the trip slows down and I'm back with reliable internet :)

ytesb1
4 years ago

very impressive guy! really articulate. Happy to hear someone like him is working on ebikes.

Keith Olwell
2 years ago

+ytesb1 About to launch the V3 Indigogo campaign. Lots and lots of new crazy cool stuff to offer on the V3

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

I agree, Jeff is an awesome guy... really sharp and perceptive. Great to have him focusing like this on the space :)

4 years ago

WHAT!!!!!!!!! how this didn't get to their kickstarter goal? anyways glad they kept going. awesome video

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 years ago

I guess it just came down to timing, was neat to hear him talk about the history and mention the Kickstarter campaign like that. I'm glad he kept going with it :)

far77fae
4 years ago

Very innovative. I am betting this guy as other projects.  I wish him the best of luck.