Vintage Electric Bikes Cruz Review

Vintage Electric Bikes Cruz Electric Bike Review
Vintage Electric Bikes Cruz
Vintage Electric Bikes Cruz Gearless Crystalyte Hub Motor
Vintage Electric Bikes Cruz Custom Aluminum Battery Box
Vintage Electric Bikes Cruz Cruiser Bar Led Console Throttle
Vintage Electric Bikes Cruz Brookes Saddle Led Backlight
Vintage Electric Bikes Cruz Led Circular Headlight
Vintage Electric Bikes Cruz Leather Ergonomic Grips Locking
Vintage Electric Bikes Cruz Ebike System Wires
Vintage Electric Bikes Cruz Hydraulic Disc Brakes
Vintage Electric Bikes Cruz View From Top Fender
Vintage Electric Bikes Cruz Electric Bike Review
Vintage Electric Bikes Cruz
Vintage Electric Bikes Cruz Gearless Crystalyte Hub Motor
Vintage Electric Bikes Cruz Custom Aluminum Battery Box
Vintage Electric Bikes Cruz Cruiser Bar Led Console Throttle
Vintage Electric Bikes Cruz Brookes Saddle Led Backlight
Vintage Electric Bikes Cruz Led Circular Headlight
Vintage Electric Bikes Cruz Leather Ergonomic Grips Locking
Vintage Electric Bikes Cruz Ebike System Wires
Vintage Electric Bikes Cruz Hydraulic Disc Brakes
Vintage Electric Bikes Cruz View From Top Fender

Summary

  • A robust, high powered and potentially high-speed cruiser style electric bike styled to resemble the board track racing bikes of the 1920's, optional Race Mode pin for 30+ mph
  • built on a custom steel frame that dampens vibration but flexes more than the Tracker model which is built on Aluminum, the longer cruiser bars support a more comfortable upright body position
  • Gearless direct drive motor is sturdy but also heavy, since there are no moving gears inside it operates extremely quietly and also provides regeneration when activated
  • Solid year long warranty, lots of upgrades including pedal assist, a rear rack and custom paint, the battery is not removable and the bike is very heavy at ~87 lbs
Warning, in some configurations this electric bike is classified as a moped or motorcycle and may not be ridden on cycling trails or paths. It may require licensing, insurance and lights when used on public roads.

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Vintage Electric Bikes

Model:

Cruz

Price:

$4,995 (Up to $6,845 with Accessories and Upgrades)

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Urban, Cruising

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2), Moped or Motorcycle (Class 4)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive, 30k Miles

Availability:

United States, Worldwide

Model Year:

2016

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

87 lbs ( 39.46 kg ) (74 with Rear Rack)

Battery Weight:

20 lbs ( 9.07 kg )

Motor Weight:

16 lbs ( 7.25 kg )

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Sizes:

18.5 in ( 46.99 cm )

Geometry Measurements:

18.5" Seat Tube, 22.5" Reach, 31.5" Standover Height, 76" Length

Frame Material:

Chromoly Steel

Frame Colors:

Fiesta Red, Aqua Blue, Cola Brown, Custom (~$600 Extra) (High Grade Powder Coat)

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid Chromoly Steel

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses

Gearing Details:

1 (Single Speed)

Cranks:

F. Gimondi, 36 Tooth Chainring

Pedals:

MKS, Aluminum Alloy Platform, Silver

Handlebar:

Oversized Steel 31", Cruiser Style

Brake Details:

Shimano Alfine Hydraulic Disc with 203 mm Front Rotor and 180 mm Rear Rotor, Shimano Alfine Levers

Grips:

Leather with Lockers (Optional Leather Ergonomic with Lockers)

Saddle:

Brooks, Hand Crafted Leather, Sprung

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

300 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy, 55 mm Width, Color Matched

Spokes:

36 Spoke, Hand Laced and Tensioned, 14 Gauge Front, 12 Gauge Rear

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Fat Frank, 26" x 2.35"

Wheel Sizes:

26 in ( 66.04 cm )

Tire Details:

Reflective Sidewall Stripe, Available in Black or Creme Colors, Active Line K-Guard Puncture Protection

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Single Side Kickstand on Left, Aluminum Alloy Rear Fender Color Matched, CREE LED Headlight, Optional Rear Carry Rack with Integrated Leather Accents ~$290, Optional Rear Carry Rack with Integrated Leather Accents and Two Saddlebags ~$800, Optional Rear Light Integrated with Brooks Saddle $75 Extra, Optional Brooks Challenge Bag ~$100 Extra

Other:

High Speed 6 Amp Charger, Can Run at 40 Amps Continuous

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Crystalyte

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Gearless Direct Drive Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

750 watts

Motor Peak Output:

3000 watts

Motor Torque:

60 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung

Battery Voltage:

52 volts (60 Amp Continuous)

Battery Amp Hours:

13.5 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

702 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

2 hours

Estimated Min Range:

25 miles ( 40 km )

Estimated Max Range:

25 miles ( 40 km )

Display Type:

Fixed LED Console

Readouts:

Battery Level (Green, Yellow, Red)

Display Accessories:

Regeneration Button on Left

Drive Mode:

Trigger Throttle, Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist (Pedal Assist is Optional and Costs ~$130, 12 Magnet King Meter)

Top Speed:

36 mph ( 58 kph ) (Default 20 mph Mode, Race Mode Pin ~$150 Extra)

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Written Review

Vintage Electric Bikes creates these custom “vintage styled” ebikes that resemble the board track racing motorcycles of the 1920’s. I met with the founder, Andrew, for this review and test rode their newest model, the Cruz. There are several key upgrades for the bike including a Race Mode pin which increases the top speed from 20 mph to ~36 and ups motor wattage from 750 nominal to ~2600 and Amps to 40. And can get a rear carry rack for transporting cargo along with their beautiful panniers. If you’re not into the stock colors (which cover the frame, fenders and rims) you can pay about $600 more for custom paint. While the bike isn’t super cheap, you get a lot for your money including sturdy hydraulic disc brakes, integrated lights that run off the main battery and luxury Brookes saddle and leather ergonomic grips. The real draw here for me is style combined with quality and a sense of power and speed that rides more like a moped or motorcycle than an electric bike.

Pedaling on the Cruze or Tracker is limited by a single speed drivetrain and I noticed the default saddle position that Andrew had setup on the demo bikes was low. My legs bent too much when trying to pedal to be efficient… or really even comfortable. Pedaling is possible however and the gearing is set a bit higher so you can keep up at 20+ mph but starting from zero without power is a pain. Transporting the bike might also be a chore given the heavy footprint and non-removable battery but the front wheel does have quick release. The tires are large, comfortable and tough with Kevlar lining to reduce punctures and I love the reflective sidewall stripes. Overall, this is a more comfortable and upright ride than the Tracker model but it’s not compatible with their optional suspension fork for that model. They perform the same in terms of power, sharing the same motor, controller and battery and I was told that Vintage Electric Bikes will perform service and upgrades as they strive to keep their bikes on the road for as long as possible.

To me, Andrew and his company are authentic and their product is unique and fun. It’s different from other low speed pedelecs and possibly less legal depending on your local ordinances but it runs quiet and will stay much cooler than an internal combustion motor (which has made it a very popular choice in Indonesia). You can cruise around on this thing with the wind in your hair actually enjoying the sights and sounds of your environment… just make sure you’re extra careful because even in City Mode with the limited power and speed it still accelerates quickly and is so quiet that cars and other pedestrians might not notice you.

Pros:

  • More upright and relaxed seating position than the Tracker model, the slightly longer and swept-back handlebars dampen vibration and pair nicely with the ergonomic grips and balloon tires, the sprung saddle also helps but keeps it looking classy
  • Great safety features including a large circular headlight with classic styling and smaller LED backlight (which can be relocated to the back of the rack if you get that option), I like the reflective tape on the tires as well
  • Beautiful design, colors and accessories (including leather accents on the grips and saddle), I like the different styles of wood paneling above the battery box reminiscent of a beach cruiser automobile and tire colors
  • The battery box positions weight low and centered on the frame for improved balance and handling, it’s heavy but also rugged and keeps the controller and other wires well hidden
  • Cool power regeneration feature with a large red button near the left grip, it only recoups at ~10% efficiency but it will reduce wear on your brake pads and just feels cool
  • I love the oversized hydraulic disc brakes, they offer a good level of stopping power for something this heavy and powerful (especially if you get the Race Mode plug for increased speed)
  • The fender and rims are color matched to the frame, the fender is actually custom shaped to provide clearance for the chain
  • This is one of the zippiest and potentially fastest electric bikes I’ve tested, great for use as a pit bike or on private property (or in countries with relaxed laws like Indonesia)
  • I appreciate the inclusion of a kickstand and this one feels sturdy and stays out of the way… it’s not adjustable but given the weight of the bike that’s probably good because it would be less strong
  • Inspired by the board track racing bikes of the 1920’s era, the battery box resembles an engine and is even done in sand cast Aluminum which is how they did it back then

Cons:

  • Heavier than most low speed electric bikes I test due to the custom battery box, oversized direct drive motor and larger frame, the frame is a bit less stiff than the Tracker model because it’s Steel vs. Aluminum which improves ride quality but also produces frame flex and adds weight
  • No bottle cage bosses or traditional rack mounting points, you have to pay a premium for the official Vintage Elctric Bikes rack but it looks great, comes color matched and works well with their panniers
  • The optional pedal assist doesn’t have power level settings so it feels like twisting the throttle all the way and when you want to stop there’s a bit of delay and the brake levers don’t have inhibitors built in which could be a safety issue
  • Given the single speed drivetrain, this bike can be difficult to start or pedal around if you run out of juice, the chainring offers 36 teeth to make pedaling at higher speeds possible but the low saddle and body position are best suited to throttle mode
  • Only available in one frame size and it’s a cantilever high-step style which might be a little unwieldily for shorter riders (or those with short inseams), I measured the stand over height at 31.5″ which is about the same as the Tracker model
  • The battery is not removable for charging off of the frame or reducing weight during transport, the front skewer is quick release so this helps to reduce size and weight a touch

Resources:

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John ware
1 day ago
You are not alone...

My cellular link has been sporadic to nil for the past month and half. I found the following on a Santa Cruz County planning which was addressing their 2G highway callboxes.

"As part of AT&T’s strategy to address growing customer demand for mobile services, AT&T announced plans to phase out their current 2G network by year end 2016."

Let's hope Stromer does the right thing for their loyal customers. Imagine what would happen if you were in lock mode and accidentally triggered the theft mode. without a 2G connection you are in for some very tough pedaling or pushing.
Rincon
2 months ago
mrgold35
The wife and I just got back from the Grand Canyon and Sedona with our Radrovers. The weather was perfect for riding and we were able to see so much more away from the usual tourist spots.

Grand Canyon:
Stayed in the town of Tusayan just south of the park and rode the paved +6 mile bike path that goes directly to Mather Point. Ended up seeing a wolf and a lot of elk and deer along the way. You don't have to pay the $30 per vehicle fee for a 7 days pass when taking the Tusayan bike path to the park. We road 25 miles the first day up to Yaki Point and around +20 miles on the second day down Hermits Trail.
Thank you for posting this. My wife and I would love to go on some ebike trips, but I can't find any sources for information. There are plenty of sources for bikepacking, bike camping, off road mountain biking, and fully supported rides (camping). I want to stay in a hotel, have my own shower, and eat in restaurants. You provided some specific information that is really helpful.

We signed up for a hotel-based ride with Backroads through Bryce and Zion next spring, but also want to go off on our own. It is nice to hear that you didn't have any e-bike hassles from rangers. Thanks again for posting this!

I've been planning a Big Sur ebike trip for next summer. There are a few interesting rides available, including the Old Coast Road from Bixby Creek Bridge to Andrew Molera State Park, the 17 Mile Drive in Carmel, and a couple more through redwood groves in Santa Cruz. I'll post a travelogue after the trip.
reoutput
2 months ago
I have a 29x2.0 on the rear(WTB Cruz). Fit is tight but it works out nicely on my Turbo X.

52-622
007vsMagua
4 months ago
007vsMagua
Thanks Ann and everyone. I'll plug that in and take a look.
I plugged it in and saw what I was looking for. At the top of the list was the Vintage Electric Bikes - Cruz. Last week I saw that bike being tested by Jay Leno at his garage. He did a great Pee Wee Herman laugh. That's a cool looking bike, I love it. It's not quite my style but the other bikes listed give me a great place to start. I mentioned in another post that I'm a year out from making a purchase and I look forward to seeing how the market moves forward.
reoutput
5 months ago
I used a WTB 29x2.0 (622x52) Cruz out of necessity and actually like it better than the Nimbus. I was running 90psi versus 65psi in the WTB so that could account for the nicer ride.
NoDTMF
6 months ago
I do have Active line on my and my wife's bike. I put a 11-40t on my bike and a 11-42 on her bike. Stock was 11-36. I have been whining about the fact Bosch wouldn't let me upgrade to performance. That just bums me out. However, the riding in the Santa Cruz mountains Active line rules for range. There are a few hills that I have to get off. But even with Performance line I would probably get off as well. Basically the front wheel gets s light from hitting a rock and I bounce sideways and then it's over.

My goal is to make it to mount Umunum on this trail:
https://www.gaiagps.com/public/NgkrYgusLx95jz7yc3MntL3i
But I don't think I can do it on one battery. So I think I will try it taking a extra battery. But too hot and dry now, hate to get stuck back there if there was a fire.

When riding to work sometimes I wish I had assist to 20 mph, on our bikes it cuts out 15. (Basically I'm late so have to peddle hard).

I also like hardtail with suspension seat post. I have had lower back surgery for herniated disc, no problems. (I do have to give up Dirtbike riding, probable have to sell my KTM 300xc, perhaps one of the best dirt bikes ever....)
Metalusion
7 months ago
op! i believe this is what you are looking for. but get ready to open the wallet

http://vintageelectricbikes.com/pages/cruz-electric-bike 35mile range

also

http://www.boltmotorbikes.com/ 35 mile range

http://www.voltagecycles.com/

this company will custom make you a bike based on your needs

http://twowheelelectric.com/

you can also try local bike shops that do custom work.
BlondAngel
7 months ago
John ware
I've been asking politely and many places will say yes to allowing an non intrusive indoor parking for my ST2. The folks at the Pour Taproom in Santa Cruz get my business from now on! And not just for their great beer selection and unique self serve model.
Love the handlebars!
NoDTMF
8 months ago
> Just out of interest, what size front sprocket are you using?
15T

Today I bought a Praxis 11-40T because I could by it today Actually, Praxis is a Santa Cruz, Ca company, so I had to buy it (I live in the Santa Cruz Mountains). I wonder if I will be sad about 2 less teeth.
I will be putting on a new chain, front sprocket and the new cassette. I have a big long hill I'll try it out on.
NoDTMF
8 months ago
Oh hi,

My wife and I both have active line bikes. She has hardly ridden a bike in 20 years. Given that, she handles it pretty well. We have one hill, gravel and rutted around 16-18% grade that is a workout for me and she almost can make. Other than that , we go peddling around Santa Cruz - Capitola (various hills) area with no problems. She seems to get psyched out on the off road stuff...not really a bike issue. The nice thing about active line is the range, but sometimes I wish I had performance line when I go on serious off road ride. We are in our fifties, I'm slightly over weight and my is, umm well, move over weight than me
vincent
1 year ago
sorry i have not written in a while
had other life stuff pop up and the bikes have taken a back seat for a couple of months, havent done anything with them

have all the mods like handlebar and riser, lights etc for the cemoto and hope to get those done this week

wanted to talk about the pas and what i tried to modify it

i agree that it is horrible how it is on/off

sure i would be happier with a speed or torque type pas

the guy at cruz bikes said he gets lots of complaints from people about pas on his bikes even with selectable and he was not sure that i would b happy with a torque set up either and did not want me to spend the money not knowing

i rode one of his bikes with selectable pas and it was faster in 1 than mine is now...

we tried taking out a couple of magnets from the little disc and i thought it helped at first but it didnt
it was a cheap and easy thing to try, easy to replace the small disc if i want

would be very interested to hear if anyone adds torque type set ups how they like it and what they used

i did ride it for a bit and agree it kills your wrist etc with the regular handlebar set up, but will get that changed out before i ride it again, other than that for the short ride it seemed ok
Mark Troup
1 year ago
JoePah
@Mark Troup you must have been in phenomenal shape! Congratulations to you.

You and your next grand adventure are the least likely to want or need an electric bicycle.

I've taken shorter trips on bicycles with my buddies and no support van or anyone ready to bail us out, and can tell you simplicity and quality is the key.. Anything and everything can fail during your trip, usually at night and in the rain.. You want a bike YOU can fix and one where spare parts are easy to find.

Elecgtric bikes are very heavy, 50-60 lbs just for the bike plus your stuff.. not good for someone who may be hoofing it over rough trails.
Electric bikes do not like to be banged around and soaked on a daily basis.. something likely during a cross country trip
Electric bikes are very difficult to repair on the road, and it's not likely that some small town with some small LBS will have that Bosch part you need.
Electric bikes will only last a few hours then you need to find a electric source to charge for 3 hours.. something not likely during a trip you describe.

IMO, given your level of fitness a high quality folding bike would be nice.

The Montague Military Paratrooper is designed for people like you, and people swear by them. When you want to hop on a bus or train getting around will be much easier.

http://www.montaguebikes.com/demo-for-folding-bike.html

And if that's not your style then looking into hardtails from Specialized or Santa Cruz etc... FS bike tend to be higher maintenance so I'd avoid them.
I would also avoid hydraulic brakes.. which can be tough to fix on the road.. many fine mechanical brakes are around like the Avid BB7.

I'd also avoid fat bikes for tough trails.. They don't handle nearly as well as a DH or one track mountain bike.

Have fun planning.

Do you have a trip course yet?
Thanks for the input , Joe. I took a look at a bunch of non-electric options after seeing your post and pretty quickly fell in lust with the Surly ECR, a 29+ mid-fat that seems to be purpose built for exactly (almost) what I have in mind. I was originally thinking that an electric bike would allow me to really load up on gear and let me be a pack rat with regard to what I could bring on the trip. The Surly ECR will definitely require more of an ultralight set of camping gear than I originally had in mind, but I think the ability to handle my own trail maintenance (and the accompanying peace of mind) will probably make the tradeoff worthwhile. There is a site specifically dedicated to the kind of hybrid rugged biking-backpacking that I had in mind called bikepacking.com, and I'm finding it to be an excellent resource.

I'm still a fan of e-bikes in general, but I think in my specific case you may be right. I may need to scratch that itch with a Pedego Stretch at some point in the future.
JoePah
1 year ago
@Mark Troup you must have been in phenomenal shape! Congratulations to you.

You and your next grand adventure are the least likely to want or need an electric bicycle.

I've taken shorter trips on bicycles with my buddies and no support van or anyone ready to bail us out, and can tell you simplicity and quality is the key.. Anything and everything can fail during your trip, usually at night and in the rain.. You want a bike YOU can fix and one where spare parts are easy to find.

Elecgtric bikes are very heavy, 50-60 lbs just for the bike plus your stuff.. not good for someone who may be hoofing it over rough trails.
Electric bikes do not like to be banged around and soaked on a daily basis.. something likely during a cross country trip
Electric bikes are very difficult to repair on the road, and it's not likely that some small town with some small LBS will have that Bosch part you need.
Electric bikes will only last a few hours then you need to find a electric source to charge for 3 hours.. something not likely during a trip you describe.

IMO, given your level of fitness a high quality folding bike would be nice.

The Montague Military Paratrooper is designed for people like you, and people swear by them. When you want to hop on a bus or train getting around will be much easier.

http://www.montaguebikes.com/demo-for-folding-bike.html

And if that's not your style then looking into hardtails from Specialized or Santa Cruz etc... FS bike tend to be higher maintenance so I'd avoid them.
I would also avoid hydraulic brakes.. which can be tough to fix on the road.. many fine mechanical brakes are around like the Avid BB7.

I'd also avoid fat bikes for tough trails.. They don't handle nearly as well as a DH or one track mountain bike.

Have fun planning.

Do you have a trip course yet?
vincent
1 year ago
great, i am excited about going down to cruz bicycles and getting this done

to me with the handlebars up and the selectable pas the bike would be about perfect

trying to call them now to see if they are open on sat

if not i should make it there monday afternoon
Christopher85083
1 year ago
scmike
Christopher, I believe those tires are on a 20" Mongoose Massiff... the Dolomite comes with heavy cheap generic 6 1/2 lb. center bead knobby tires.. The Bridgestone supermotto motorcycle tires are great for a couple hundred bucks... The Kendas are really suffering on our gravely paved roads of Santa Cruz, Co...so I don't have much time or miles... I'll keep looking... but if I had to pick now I would probably go with the Vee Mission Commands...
I've found the same - too bad the right motorcycle tires are so expensive. I like the VRM 302 Monster, but yeah, also a bit pricey. The extra weight is a concern, too, of course, but I'm hoping to balance out the weight with the superior rolling resistance.
scmike
1 year ago
Christopher, I believe those tires are on a 20" Mongoose Massiff... the Dolomite comes with heavy cheap generic 6 1/2 lb. center bead knobby tires.. The Bridgestone supermotto motorcycle tires are great for a couple hundred bucks... The Kendas are really suffering on our gravely paved roads of Santa Cruz, Co...so I don't have much time or miles... I'll keep looking... but if I had to pick now I would probably go with the Vee Mission Commands...
86 and still kicking
1 year ago
There is a lot of misinformation and ignorance of ebikes in the general public. I am thinking that the reason for non-ebike regulations has to do with noise and speed. As you know many of todays ebikes are nearly silent and speed is something that can be abused whether or not you are on an ebike. I ride my bike every morning, for a mile or so) on a popular ocean side path for walkers, cyclists, and surfers. I go very slowly and am extremely polite to those who share the path. Not one problem ever. I believe that we, as a community, must introduce local officials who decide legislation, to ebikes as a wonderful and positive addition to the bicycle paths. This will take time as humans are often frightened of change. I know that more and more city managers are seeking out the counsel and experience of both Copenhagen and Amsterday city planning officials.

I know we have an e-bike organization (California Bicycle Coalition) dedicated to improving ebike education and asking riders to sign a petition to support revised (relaxed) legislation on ebikes. I also believe that we as a community must enlist one representative from each cycling community to be the public spokesperson/advocate for ebikes. I would certainly sign up to do this in Santa Cruz/Monterey counties if I had some political guidance.
Westheads Extractions
7 months ago

Awesome bike.

777
9 months ago

колеса восьмерят.

Monica Schwartz
11 months ago

why don't u call him out on the expensive product? on your other video on
the vintage electric bike u said u could use your own fuse, and for an
extra 150 for a pin? its greed?! thanks

ForbinColossus
11 months ago

Is the rear fender long enough to prevent road filthy water from hitting
your back? Glowing about style has its place, but is the motor long lived?
Thank you for hinting at the enormously bad two-cycle pollution
caused by junky technology in Asia. Plenty of research for those who care:
http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2014/140513/ncomms4749/full/ncomms4749.html
http://www.motherjones.com/blue-marble/2012/04/vietnam-motorbikes-pollution

smiley37greg
11 months ago

Did he mention what kind of range this bike gets? That battery system seems
to be purposely oversized "cool" it's not exactly my style but I can
appreciate the build quality

Jake Stimson
7 months ago

around 30

smiley37greg
11 months ago

Pee Wee Herman deluxe version

Les Hsu
11 months ago

Bit too expensive for me. I'm glad I got the RadWagon for $1599.00 instead.
Much more practical. Feel free to use my name (Les Hsu) for extra $50
savings if you order from their site.

clnmyjts
11 months ago

now that is one good looking cruse bicycle

Bryan Martin
11 months ago

The American People need fast Ebikes I.E 30-40mph. If the vehicle is safe
and purpose built why can't we operate them on the street? Change the laws
or create a new class of vehicle LEV for commuting purposes.

INCBMX
9 months ago

I think this is also a major reason why we don't have as many bikes as
other countries as a main transportation because of the speed and sweat
reasons.

Jesse Kramer
11 months ago

As with the tracker, there is a couple of things that really need to be
dealt with to somewhat justify the price he is charging here.

First, the cable management really needs to be more elegant, it brings the
look of the bike down, especially considering how much effort has gone into
the choice of parts and the design of the battery box.

Just look at this:
https://electricbikereview.com/wp-content/assets/2016/02/vintage-electric-bikes-cruz-hydraulic-disc-brakes-1200x600-c-center.jpg
And
https://electricbikereview.com/wp-content/assets/2016/02/vintage-electric-bikes-cruz-ebike-system-wires-1200x600-c-center.jpg

Secondly, the breaks should be beefed up. 200mm+ rotors front and back.

I think he should consider integrating some indicators too, maybe as an
optional accessory.

And finally, an old school instrument gage could be cool, big analog
looking speedometer, volt/current meter as a tachometer and an integrated
little LCD/e-ink battery gage. The bike is fast enough to break the speed
limit in some areas, and it would be a real shame to put a standard bike
computer on it.

Something like this:
https://www.google.com.au/search?q=1920%27s+motorcycle+instruments&safe=off&biw=1855&bih=1019&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjIt-fCiI3LAhVDnJQKHQEvBAoQsAQIJw


Nathan Comstock
8 months ago

+Jesse Kramer I'm with you, however there is another aesthetic at work
which falls into the "form following function" monkier. All those exposed
cables make maintenance and repair feasible for DIY. No fishing through
tubes, no housings buried within housings.

Here are a couple ideas on the off chance the designers read their YouTube
comments: #1 Hydraulic brake lines conduct electricity; with a chassis
ground, one could eliminate the throttle wire for most of the run to the
motor controller. #2 Magura would almost certainly be able to sell a custom
cut, shorter front brake hose to clean up the front end of this bike. #3 A
coaster brake (back-pedal) setup for the regen mode would be more elegant
than a push-button on the handlebars.

Mark Elford
11 months ago

Awesome ebike, looks comfy.

David Macdonald
11 months ago

I know it's not the same thing but , look at the yamaha concept bike , the
moegi , I think it's a motorcycle sculpture, so like this a lot , thanks .

DrZarkloff
11 months ago

is it true that white tires don't last as long as black tires? I hate to
just point out the possible weak points but it's just the way I roll. I
like the design of the handle bars. I like to kick back when I'm riding.
having to bend over in a tense position gives me a headache.

sloth011
11 months ago

I love your channel!!!

Tardisius
11 months ago

Very cool =)

David Gardner
11 months ago

Just a beauty. Well designed.

Arsene Wenger Is Overrated
11 months ago

How much does it goes for? Also, did they give you this free just for you
to review?

SuperPapadzul
11 months ago

+Sir Mastur Bates About 5k

sdushdiu
5 months ago

So many words to say that it is a direct COPY of a circa 1962 Schwinn (et
al) cruiser style 26" frame with a rear fender as introduced circa ~1965
with the Stingray. All for orders of magnitude (aka >10 times!!!) MORE
money than a full EBike (scooter) - that outperforms it - costs overseas.
Superfluous Western retro decadence at an obscene price.

Them Ustar Dprin Ce
5 months ago

+Jesse Kramer
Way to keep your cool, man. There's always one person who spoils an
otherwise perfectly decent and respectful comments section.

sdushdiu
11 months ago

+Jesse Kramer
Fuckwad, YOU are the illiterate dumbfk! As I already wrote, I don't read
your shit past the first two lines up to the "Read More (xx lines) you
fucking brain dead kangaroo butt fucking cunt. Sit down and read it again V
E R Y S L O W L Y. Or get one of the neighborhood kids you lure into
your bedroom and have them read it and explain it to you Before you bugger
them.
Now go find one of your suck buddies and wander back to the wimpy bar. Fuck
off.

Jesse Kramer
11 months ago

+sdushdiu
You aren't all that good at reading are you dude, my mother is dead. Guns
aren't all that common here either.

You seem a little touchy though, just asking questions about this grand
cultural tradition. Is it something you get to do in China? Or are the
locals ignorant of this predominantly black american tradition?

Why 'blacks' in quotes? Is this a trigger for you? Would you prefer people
of colour?

Also, kangaroos don't really run as such, they kinda hop or bound along.

If I get the last word in, does that mean I win?

sdushdiu
11 months ago

+Jesse Kramer
The culturally illiterate dumbfk continues in his tradition of
sanctimonious social arbiter as he now now pretends to tell others how to
do that which he clearly has no knowledge and for which he cites an aspect
relating to single parent families as if its an absolute - but then he also
thinks the tradition only applies to "blacks".
Fuckwad, until you know what you are talking about, stop trying to tell
others what to think and do.
No wonder the kangaroos run when they see you coming.
And tell you mom to stop PMing me as well. I realize she dreads you
pestering her to rim her, but she is simply going to have to deal with you
the best she can. I suggest a gun.

Jesse Kramer
11 months ago

+sdushdiu
"It refers to the fact that mothers were typically considered sacred and
off limits, and 'going there' was considered a more severe insult."

Wouldn't that lose its power after the first couple of rounds? If it really
is sacred and off limits, but you are constantly 'going there', doesn't
that just diminish the impact?

Is it part of the game to be really repetitive? Is there ever any subtlety
to it or is it always hyperbolic and childish?

John Moura
11 months ago

Vintage Electric makes two awesome bikes!

Z StHope
11 months ago

Gorgeous bike.