Rad Power Bikes RadRover Review

2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Electric Bike Review
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Bafang 750 Watt Fat Bike Motor
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Wellgo Pedals Ebike Controller Box
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Handlebar Shifter Throttle
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Backlit King Meter Lcd Display
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Stitched Leather Grips Integrated Bell
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Top Gun Suspension Fat Bike
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Two Virtical Bottle Cage Mounts
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Shimano Acera 7 Speed With Guard
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Side Mounted Kickstand Adjustable
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Removable 48 Volt Battery Panasonic Cells
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Black And White Colors
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Battery Charger
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Electric Bike Review
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Bafang 750 Watt Fat Bike Motor
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Wellgo Pedals Ebike Controller Box
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Handlebar Shifter Throttle
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Backlit King Meter Lcd Display
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Stitched Leather Grips Integrated Bell
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Top Gun Suspension Fat Bike
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Two Virtical Bottle Cage Mounts
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Shimano Acera 7 Speed With Guard
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Side Mounted Kickstand Adjustable
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Removable 48 Volt Battery Panasonic Cells
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Black And White Colors
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Battery Charger

Summary

  • Strikes an excellent balance delivering high power with mid-level components for a reasonable price, you get throttle and pedal assist with an on/off on the throttle! solid one year warranty for the original owner, flat rate $175 shipping in the US
  • Even though the battery and controller box are bolted on vs. integrated into the frame, they use extra bolts for strength and kept them mostly out of the way, both are mounted low for improved stability
  • Nice extras including an integrated LED headlight, stand alone rear light, USB charging outlet on the battery, handle at the back of the seat, quick release front wheel, bash guard on the chainring and derailleur... optional fenders and rack
  • Only available in one frame size but comes in black or white color choices, the 180 mm disc brakes work well enough but hydraulic would be nice, the grips spin a bit if you squeeze hard, excellent kickstand placement, clean wire integration

Search EBR

Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Rad Power Bikes

Model:

RadRover

Price:

$1,499 ($175 Flat Rate Shipping)

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Sand and Snow, Trail

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive (Original Owner)

Availability:

United States, Canada

Model Year:

2016

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

63 lbs (28.57 kg)

Battery Weight:

7.2 lbs (3.26 kg)

Motor Weight:

14 lbs (6.35 kg)

Frame Material:

Aluminum

Frame Sizes:

18.25 in (46.35 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

580 mm Top Tube, 463 mm Seat Tube, 1155 mm Wheelbase, 794 mm Standover Height

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Black, White

Frame Fork Details:

Top Gun Suspension with Lockout, Adjustable Preload, 5" Travel, 11 mm Quick Release Skewer

Frame Rear Details:

11 mm Axle

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Acera, 11-28T

Shifter Details:

Shiman SIS Index Shifter on Right

Cranks:

42T Chainring with Aluminum Bash Guard

Pedals:

Wellgo Aluminum Alloy Platform, Black

Headset:

VP-A41ACK

Stem:

Zoom ~6° Rise

Handlebar:

Zoom Low-Rise, 25" Length

Brake Details:

Tektro Aries Mechanical Disc with 180 mm Rotors, Tektro Levers with Motor Inhibitors, Rubberized Edge and Integrated Bell

Grips:

Stitched Ergonomic, Black

Saddle:

Velo Plush with Integrated Handle

Seat Post:

Promax, Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

320 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Double Walled Alloy, Black

Spokes:

13 Gauge, Stainless Steel, Black

Tire Brand:

Kenda Juggernaut, 26" x 4"

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)

Tire Details:

31TPI, Wire Bead, 5-30 PSI

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Spanninga Micro Integrated LED Headlight, Blaze-Lite RL1800 Independent LED Back Light, Neoprene Slap Guard, Side Mounted Adjustable Kickstand, Two USB Charging Ports for Portable Electronics (On Battery and Display)

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bafang

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

750 watts

Motor Torque:

80 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Panasonic

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11.6 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

556.8 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium Nickel Cobalt Aluminum

Charge Time:

5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

20 miles (32 km)

Estimated Max Range:

40 miles (64 km)

Display Type:

King Meter SW-LCD, Fixed Backlit LCD

Readouts:

Battery Gauge (5 Bars), Speed, Avg. Speed, Top Speed, Odometer, Trip Odometer, Watts, PAS level (1-5)

Display Accessories:

Independent 3 Button Pad

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Twist Throttle (6 Magnet Pedelec Disc)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

Rad Power Bikes has rapidly grown their business from a crowd funded single-product offering to include a cargo bike and a mini fat folding bike in just a couple of short years! But it all started with the RadRover… This classic fat tire electric bike offers some of the best value I’ve seen on the market without compromising comfort and quality. Upgrades like the Shimano Acera derailleur (which is two steps up from the standard Tourney I frequently see) should last longer and provide tighter shifting. There’s a beautifully integrated bell that doesn’t clutter the handlebars because it’s designed into the brake levers (which offer motor cutoff when pulled). You get a fat bike specific motor from Bafang that maxes out on power for what’s legal in the US at 750 watts. It includes two LED lights and while the rear is more basic, relying on stand-alone battery cells, the front is integrated and runs off the main battery pack… which is huge! Not only do you get a powerful 48 volt configuration, the cells inside are from Panasonic, one of the most trusted and longest lasting from what I hear at shops and from consumers. And! there’s a USB charging port mounted on the side of that pack so you can use it for backup power (charging a cell phone perhaps) or running extra lights on your bike. Unfortunately, the positioning is a little vulnerable because your leg and foot pass near the side of the battery. Consider a right-angle USB adapter if you intend to plug things in while riding. But the USB power doesn’t stop there, another plug is built into the display panel so you can still get energy without running a long cable.

Powering on the bike is a two step process where you press a silver button on the battery and then hold the mode button on the control pad. It’s an extra step that not every electric bike has but at least it’s not too difficult to reach. This may reduce phantom power draw from the battery if you take it off the bike and are using it to charge with one of the USB ports mentioned earlier. The button pad mentioned a moment ago, is mounted near your left hand so you can adjust pedal assist levels while riding without taking your hand off the grip. There are five levels of power and a level zero! In zero, the bike won’t respond to your pedaling but the throttle will (if you’ve activated it) and that’s kind of cool. In all normal assist levels the throttle can override with additional power for catching up with friends or topping a hill. I love having a throttle on fat bikes because snow, sand and hilly terrain can sneak up on you and being able to power through or get extra help on demand makes for fewer crashes and generally more comfortable riding. And, since the RadRover is using a more basic pedal assist cadence sensor (with just six magnets vs. 12) I found that using the throttle and brake levers can lead to more precise control. Cadence sensors aren’t generally as responsive as torque sensors but they are less complicated, less expensive and they don’t make you work as hard. In the future, maybe they will switch to a 12 magnet design but still, the throttle helps and being able to one step further and actually disable the throttle with the red toggle button mounted near its base, is fantastic. Sometimes you don’t want to worry about accidentally twisting that throttle (like on really difficult terrain or descending or when you’re loading the bike up). Turning it off means that 750 watt motor won’t accidentally get out of control.

Using this bike can take some extra practice just because there are more drive options and the display has a lot of readouts. I prefer it this way but as a more advanced rider, I don’t feel as overwhelmed. What you see with the display is the speed, assist level and battery gauge (along wth a lot of other little readouts). The display is backlit which is great for night riding and it can be swiveled to reduce glare but it is not removable. Some quick tips on the display panel: you can hold up to switch from average speed to max speed, hold up and mode to turn on the headlight and hold down to activate walk-mode which propels the bike gently forward so you don’t have to push it up hills (if you decide to walk vs. ride). In the video review you can see us riding in deeper sand and I share a few tips about accelerating slowly to maintain balance. Once or twice I decided to walk the bike to meet with a friend just down the way and using walk mode significantly helped because the bike weighs ~63 lbs and sort of sinks in when you’re on the sand. Yes, you could just twist the throttle but that’s more sensitive and tends to kick up sand if you accidentally twist too hard.

At the end of the day, Rad Power Bikes has proven that they can produce reliable ebikes at reasonable prices and deliver and support them well. This is why I recommended them as one of the possible platforms for Cabo Adventures (where this video review was shot). The resort wanted to buy some bikes that would empower visitors to ride on the beach even in deep soft sand and not get exhausted when it’s super hot outside. The bikes performed beyond my expectation and were some of the most comfortable I tried. The mid-rise handlebars, ergonomic grips and softer saddle just made it feel good. The suspension fork, while basic, did its job marvelously and kept my wrists, forearms and shoulders from getting sore. One of the bigger points here is that we rode the bikes in sand and near salt water and they did begin to rust after a week. Rinsing them off after this sort of riding is a good idea. Whether you’re in snow where salt has been scattered to melt ice or near the ocean the bikes will show wear. In my opinion, if that’s the sort of terrain you expect to encounter, it feels nice knowing you didn’t spend $5,000+ on a bike than one you can pour some money into ongoing for replacement parts. I don’t mean to say the bikes won’t hold up, even with rust on the chainrings they should continue to perform. There are so many bikes coming to market these days that do not have a throttle mode and in conditions like the ones we rode in it can be very very useful and almost everyone who tried the bikes there (including my girlfriend) said they loved the throttle. There’s more to say about this bike and I’ve done my best in the pros/cons below but you can also watch and read comments for the older RadRover model from 2015 here. Big thanks to Rad Power Bikes for partnering with me for this review.

Pros:

  • Given the upgraded 750 watt internally geared hub motor, I wasn’t sure how loud it would be running at full power but it actually stayed much quieter than some competing motors on fat bikes that I’ve tested, even lower powered ones, and I like how wide it is (custom for fat tires) because that supports the spokes
  • Lots of upgraded components here including a Shimano Acera derailleur with metal protector (in case the bike tips), premium Panasonic battery cells and 180 mm mechanical disc brakes
  • Given the mid-frame battery design, I love that they were able to angle the to-tube to reduce stand over height and still include bottle cage bosses! There are two vertical mounts just behind the head tube on the left and right which would be great for folding locks, mini pumps or standard cages
  • I’m ~5’9″ and this fat bike felt comfortable in terms of reach, the stem isn’t super long and the bars have a nice mid-rise in them… I also felt like the saddle was more comfortable than some competing offerings
  • Even though I’m used to seeing Top Gun as the most basic low-end suspension provider on on a lot of bikes, this one was upgraded to include lockout and worked fairly well, combined with the fat tires this ebike is pretty comfortable but a 27.2 mm suspension seat post could soften up the back if you’ve got a sensitive neck or back
  • I like that they included a little neoprene slap guard on the right chainstay… I noticed the chain bouncing when I was riding fast across the bumpy dirt road and without this pad the paint would get chipped up and there would be more noise
  • It’s cool that RadRover sells accessories like fenders, saddle bags, rear carry racks and even transport racks for your car all designed to fit their bikes, there are threaded bosses at the rear-end of the bike so you could easily add your own rack if you’ve got something like the Topeak slide-on bag system
  • I love that the mechanical cables for the brakes and shifters are all run through the frame, even the electronic wires are well organized and tucked away which prevents snags and just looks good (especially on the white frame where they would stand out more)
  • Rad Power Bikes offers flat rate shipping in the continental United States for $175 which is a pretty good deal given the weight and size of the bike in my opinion… do take this into consideration though on the price
  • I really like that there’s a handle built into the back of the saddle! This makes the bike easier to lift and position… also since the kickstand is mounted way towards the back, you can pedal the bike backwards and work on the chain more easily even if you don’t have a professional stand
  • The battery interface, the plastic slide where it mounts to the downtube, is bolted onto the frame with three bolts vs. just two on most kits and some cheaper ebikes so it doesn’t rattle and feels pretty sturdy, this is good considering you might ride it on bumpy terrain
  • I love that the bike offers throttle-only mode with zero assist, that gives you a lot of control and if you do turn on assist you can still override with more power using the throttle later

Cons:

  • At ~63 lbs this electric fat bike isn’t especially light weight but at least the front wheel has a quick release skewer and teh battery can be easily removed… this will reduce the space required by the bike and make it easier and lighter to lift
  • I was surprised that the cadence sensor only used six magnets? Many newer models use 12 so the motor will respond faster as you pedal (both starting and stopping), it’s nice that the brake levers have integrated motor cutoff switches so at least you can command a stop immediately in case of emergency
  • I like having a throttle and the twist version works well enough, especially with the integrated on/off toggle, but sometimes a trigger is nicer for off-road bumpy riding so that your grip is solid, I’ve also heard some riders with smaller hands prefer the trigger but it’s really personal preference
  • The bike handled well and was ridden by some individuals in the 200+ lb range during this review but both skewers are the thinner 11 mm style vs. some of the newer 12 mm and 15 mm thru-axles seen on a lot of mountain bikes used on tough terrain, thicker axles on fat bikes would support the weight and stresses of fat tires
  • You have to turn the battery pack on before you can power up the display panel, it’s a two step process that isn’t difficult but takes extra time and isn’t mandatory with some other electric bicycles
  • I like that there are two little USB charging ports integrated into this bike, running off the main battery pack, especially because the bike doesn’t come with an integrated tail light (you could buy an affordable USB rechargeable light to replace the rear Blaze Light if), but the positioning of this port is near where your legs and feet move as you ride… it would be much better if this was on top of the pack or maybe built into the display
  • The grips feel thick and comfortable, I personally enjoy the ergonomic leather style like this, but they aren’t locking so as you ride if you’re pulling and twisting hard they may begin to spin and given the off-road design of the bike and heavy footprint that can happen more easily
  • I prefer disc brakes for any type of off-road riding, be it snow, dirt or sand and feel that the 180 mm rotors chosen here are a good fit in terms of size but I wish they were hydraulic because those require less hand strength and are smoother to actuate
  • The chainring has a nice Aluminum bash guard protecting the teeth from the outside which is great if you’re riding over angled rocks or wood that might collide with it but there isn’t a plat on the inside which would act as a guide, this means you can drop the chain more easily, especially when riding in throttle mode on higher gears where there’s less tension in the chain
  • I think the price on the RadRover is really good and I like how it performed but there are some trade-offs in aesthetics here with the controller box and battery mounted on top of the frame tubing vs. being integrated or combined

Resources:

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dm nelson
10 months ago

Enjoyed the review, Court, as it mostly reflects the experience my partner & I have had with our Radrovers for the past month. These bikes are lots of fun, fat tires, throttles and all. I was able to swap the suspension seat-post off my regular mtn bike and immediately enjoyed the smoother ride experience on the rover. My partner is ordering a cane creek for herself. I upgraded a couple other components, also. When I noticed the chain bounce I swapped the Shimano Acera derailleur for an Alivio. Now the chain seems to have more tension and less bounce on bumpy, packed trails. Replaced stock brake cables with Jagwire mtn cables and now the brakes feel more fully responsive to me. While they do take a bit more energy to use than the hydraulics I have on another bike, these Tektro brakes stop this heavy bike adequately, even going downhill. I had not seen such a derailleur bashguard before like on this bike and was impressed. When one of the two bikes I ordered arrived with the box damaged, bashguard bent and Bafang motor cable damaged, I realized that protecting the motor cable is that guard’s primary purpose. With that part of the cable which goes directly into the motor hub damaged the only remedy was to replace the motor hub. Perhaps someday Bafang will make this cable replaceable without taking the motor apart.. Lastly I want to offer gratitude for the great customer and tech support from this Rad Power company. ~David

Reply
Court Rye
10 months ago

Great feedback David! Sounds like you really went to town customizing! Thanks for being specific about the parts you swapped out so others might benefit as well. Hope your partner enjoys her Thudbuster and you have many more fun and comfortable miles ahead of you ;)

Reply
Errol
9 months ago

What’s the model number of the Bell helmet your wearing doing the Radrover review? It looks good and is it also comfortable? Thanks

Reply
Court Rye
9 months ago

Hi Errol! That’s the Bell Super 2R MIPS with Star Wars “Trooper” theming. I bought it because I could mount my camera to the front jaw piece AND the jaw and the helmet can unbuckle and be packed easily. Since I travel a lot this is a great feature… did an overview/review story about it with more pictures and a video here :D

Reply
Joe
8 months ago

Are there any lightweight eBikes out there that are reliable and won’t break the bank? What are some of your favorite models? I really like everything I have read bout the rad rover other than the fact that it’s 60 lbs, although I know eBikes are going to run a little heavier with the battery.

Reply
Court Rye
8 months ago

Hi Joe! The advances search options here let you sort by weight (and I do weigh all bikes personally so it should be very accurate). With so many options on style of bike it’s tough for me to say. Do you want a fat bike, a city bike, are you okay with a folding bike? Check out my affordable category here for other models priced in line with the RadRover and dig into products that catch your eye… maybe even ask around on the forums for how durable people think they are. Most of the time I test brand new bikes for a limited time so it’s difficult to speculate on durability :/

Reply
Errol
8 months ago

Hi Count Rye, after some of your reviews I decided to buy the RadRover. Received it a couple of days ago and already tested it out. Great ebike for the price and also ordered the rear rack. Bought it on Cyber Monday so I saved on the shipping cost.. I agree it could use a plat on the inside to help prevent the chain falling off which already happened once when my wife was dismounting and the bike came to the ground. Also when first testing it out the derailer was not set right and the chain got tangled some, turned the bike upside down and readjusted it.

I’m looking for a fat ebike for my wife, mine is to tall for her, especially when dismounting. Which fat ebike does your girlfriend like best ( I believe her name is Moa ). I seen her with the Voltbike Mariner and the Radmini. Are their other similar fat ebike? Thanks for your reviews.

Reply
Court Rye
8 months ago

Hi Errol! Thanks for sharing your experience with the RadRover so far. My girlfriend Mony struggled with the height of the top tube as well but enjoyed the VoltBike Mariner much more. I’d say it’s fairly comparable to the RadMini but uses a trigger throttle vs. twist and has a narrower top tube and folding point. this was an area where she still bonked her knee once on the RadMini and felt a little sensitive after that. Another company to consider is E-Lux which has a full-sized fat tire bike called the Tahoe which you can get in high-step or step-thru and is very comfortable, powerful and clean thanks to integrated metal fenders. Another folding fat mini bike is the SSR Motorsports Trail Viper but I haven’t seen their latest iteration. Once you decide and get something for her I’d love to hear how it all works out!

Reply
Errol
8 months ago

Hi again Count Rye,

After much consideration and help from your EBR, we’re going with the Voltbike Mariner. I texted Voltbike and they said there going forward putting derailleur guards on. They also said prices will increase in January. Maybe your site had some good influence. Also they were offering a free motorcycle helmet with purchase. We also bought two of the Star Wars trooper helmets that I asked you about before.

Thanks,
Errol

Reply
Court Rye
8 months ago

Awesome! Sounds like you’re going to have a blast… Glad the site helped expose you to some different choices so you could narrow down. George is a great guy, it’s really cool that you’re getting the lower price AND he’s doing derailleur guards and the helmets. I love that he offers helmets :)

Reply
Matthew
5 months ago

Hello everyone, I am interested in buying the Rad Rover and I had a question. I was wondering if there is anyone who has found or modified cargo trailer to work with the Rad Rover? I live in Colorado and am intersted in this bike so I can commute to work (about 10-14 miles round trip, depending on which location I need to go to) year round and maybe do the occasional trail riding on the weekend. I would like to find a trailer that would work on the bike so I can go without my car entirely and so I can take my dog kennel. My dog had knee surgery and can’t really keep up with a bike anymore, especially an E-bike. Any advice would be much appreciated! Thanks for you time.

Reply
Court Rye
5 months ago

Hi Matthew! Great question, I have seen a range of trailers on Amazon and the suspension IBEX trailer from BOB Yak but can’t confirm whether they will work. Maybe your best bet is to ask in the Rad Power Bikes forums here, it’s a pretty active place and there are actual owners of the bike (I just reviewed it but don’t have one in front of me to confirm how a trailer would attach). Hope this helps, feel free to share what you end up with back here to help others :)

Reply
Matthew
5 months ago

Hi Court, thanks for the quick reply! I called Rad Power Bikes today and they said that while they are hesitant to recommend trailers for the Rad Rover, they did say that any seat post mounted trailer will work or any trailer that can attach to a Burley Trailer hitch will work (amazon link here). Super easy to get a hold of someone at Rad Power Bikes and they answered all of my questions in no time. Thanks to your awesome, highly detailed, website, write ups and youtube videos, I pulled the trigger and bought a Rad Rover and Rad Mini today! Thanks for the help!

Erik
1 week ago

Court, First of all I have to say your reviews are amazingly thorough and detailed. I started out looking for an e-cruiser and watched all of your videos on mid price 1500-3000 cruisers. I have finally concluded that I want a Fat E bike instead. I live in Arizona and my wife and I are in good shape in our mid forties and we have miles and miles of desert trails available to us and I think the ride will be better on pavement . I am really stuck between the Rad Rover and the Newport Tahoe. I wish the Rad Rover had a bigger battery AH capacity and hydraulic brakes and it would be the perfect bike! My question to you is if you could only have one of these bikes which would you choose and why? Lastly what can you tell me about the samsung battery vs. the panosonic. I see they use differnt technology. Which one do you think is better? Thanks alot and keep up the amazing work! Erik

Reply
Court Rye
1 week ago

Hi Erik! These days, most companies are using Lithium-ion batteries and while Panasonic is perceived as the highest quality by many people, I often cannot tell which cell rating they are using or if the brand they say is actually the brand used… I’d assume both batteries are decent in this case, name brand cells that are mid or high level in terms of quality. E-Lux has some beautiful looking electric bikes that include nice fenders. To me, they are more on-road oriented. If I was going to hit the trails and transport the bike in my car and expect to really work it, I’d probably get the RadRover. But if I was just enjoying the neighborhood, some packed trails and snow, and wanting the more relaxed body position (due to the long cruiser bars) I’d go E-Lux. I hope this helps :)

Reply

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mrgold35
3 hours ago

I would review EBR for both Voltbike and Radrover to look at the fine details of both bikes. I was on the fence a year ago trying to decide between the same two bikes for the same $$$ (cheaper shipping with Volt). What I liked about the Radrover was it was a fat tire bike with ebike components added. I could repair/replace as needed any parts once the warranty ran out. I can even transfer all the ebike components to another fat tire bike and convert the Radrover into a regular pedal bike. Because the battery is standard, I can also upgrade up to 52v/13.5ah version for more power and range from Luna Cycle because the standard Dolphin battery pack fits into the Radrover battery tray. What also pushed me towards the Radrover was:

- riding position was more upright with a shorter handlebar stem
- had ergonomic grips for added comfort
- has a twist throttle with on/off switch, later added an aftermarket thumb throttle attachment I use when trail riding
- throttle is available with full 750 watts of power in PAS 0-5, comes in handy if you need to walk your bike up inclines or stairs
- the controller is made to deliver full power you are set for until power is depleted (kinda like a car giving you full power until you run out of gas).
- front suspension has a lock-out feature
- 180mm brakes front and back
- neoprene slap guard for chain
- three built-in water bottle mounts (either side of upper top tube and one on down tube facing the ground)
- two different colors for his and her ebikes
- standard rack ready connections (went with Topeak fat tire rack)
- more comfy standard seat
- option for PAS 0
- quick release on front wheels
- I can add a triangle bag to cover the battery to dry, dust free, and warmer during winter rides
- you can adjust the motor cut off speed in the LCD screen setup, you can set the RR from 7 to 24.8 mph motor cut off.

This was a year ago and I'm sure Voltbikes has made upgrades since then.

Cristina
4 hours ago

Thanks for the replies. I did look at the Radmini and Mariner but they're not quite what I was looking for, though it did offer some advantages with a lower stand over height. Also great to see that the RadRover works for someone who is 4'11". I am 5'4" so hopefully it won't be too much of a struggle. I am guessing that the RadRover and Yukon are pretty similar in size, but the RadRover seems to have a more upright position for riding.

Pedego Trail Tracker looks very nice, but it is out of my budget at the moment, especially for a first e-bike. It is too bad because they are local for me.

I saw that M2S Bikes (https://m2sbikes.com/) offer different frame sizes which is nice, but it seems they are already out of pre-orders next month, and I haven't really seen a lot of reviews online about their bikes.

The touring saddle is a good idea. I have read some people trim the post of their bike, but I would rather not do that right away since I'm sure it would void the warranty. I am thinking maybe wearing boots with a heel might help out a little bit too. Really leaning towards the Voltbike Yukon at the moment, for all of the features for the price.

mrgold35
8 hours ago

I'm about 270lbs and have about 20-25lbs of accessories, commuter back pack, rack, rack bag, tools, flat kit, and water when I ride. You can ride the Radrover without power; but, I've only been able in 1st-2nd gear on mostly flat and no wind for the most speed. I've been on a few long rides when I ran out of juice under a mile from my home and it was slow going for such a heavy bike.

What really zaps my range are:
- head winds, can reach 15-20 mph certain times of the year. I don't ride at +20 mph winds.
- inclines
- riding position, pedaling feels easier during high headwinds if I lean forward like a road bike
- weight, I use about 20%-30% more power at 270lbs compared to my wife at 130lbs on the same ride.
- tires and/or tire PSI, Kenda tires have a lot of drag and you will use more power and have slower acceleration. Vee8, Maxxis Hookworms, or Origin8 tires will give you a few more miles. I keep the PSI about 21-23 on my Vee8 for increased range and trail riding.
- cold, freezing temp can effect your range. +100 degree temp seem to have no effect.
- amount of assist, lower the assist level with maximum sustained pedal power = longer range. I've gone as far as 37 miles at PAS 2 with a mph avg of 10-13 mph on mostly level ground with one bar left on the battery pack. I'm usually around 25 miles at PAS 3 with a couple of PAS 4+full throttles on intersections and short inclines.

I usually pack my wife's Radrover battery if I run into any of these conditions and planning a ride pushing the distance limits. I will change out the battery if the LCD battery level indicator starts to blink. I ended up getting a 3rd battery because the wife and I sometimes ride together. I also purchased another charger to leave at work to ensure I have max power when heading home.

mrgold35
10 hours ago

I had the same error on my 2016 Radrover back in March/2017 with 675 miles on the odo. The RR would randomly flash the "30 maintain" error and shutdown in the middle of the ride. It was very inconsistent and could happen 5-10 times during a ride or not for several days. Rad Power Bikes sent me a LCD, wiring harness, and Controller. I had the old controller programming set to mph cutoff and the new replacement controller was set to X watts per PAS.

I would recommend the long string tied to the end of the wiring harness trick when you pull out the old wiring harness out. Makes it easier to tread the new harness when you have the string to pull it through. My screws to the controller were so tight and I ended up stripping the head on one. I had to head to Home Depot for replacement screws after I used my Dremel to cut the screw in half.

I think the issue was with the controller compared to the wiring harness or LCD screen. It would have saved me a lot of time just doing the controller first, wiring harness second, and then LCD. I started out by replacing all three (LCD, harness, controller), and the problem got worst because I was getting the 30 maintain error everytime the PAS was engaged. Since the old LCD was the easiest to switch out, I did this first (just unplugged the new LCD and had the old LCD hanging by the wires). Zero errors with my old LCD and I now have about 1500 miles with the new controller+wiring harness with zero errors.

I have two (his/her) 2016 Radrovers purchased back in Sept/2016 and both controllers have been replaced under 700 miles. Both controllers had the old mph cuttoff and had errors. I now have the new watts limit per PAS controllers and they have worked perfectly with +1500 miles per Radrover.

roberto ferrando
11 hours ago

Welcome to the Radrover home :)
Hope to see lots of pictures,reviews and thoughts on all the Radrovers out there !!
in the process of replacing controller and electrical hardness.
Problems with 30 communication alarm ,rad bikes shipping both items,had difficulty removing controller
( hole for electrical plug is too small)
had to file a small slot for brake cable,tested controller at work looks like one of the mosfet burned out.

mrgold35
1 day ago

Depends on your height and leg length to see if the Radrover is too tall for you. I think the normal height range is 5'2" to 6'2" with around 31.25" stand over height for the Radrover. I'm 6'3" and I needed to get a longer 400mm seatpost and 0-60 degree adjustable stem for the Radrover to fit me a touch better. My wife is 4'11" and I move the adjustable stem down to 0 degrees and added the ISM Touring Saddle, Amazon, $60, to give her the extra room for stand over at a stop (she can straddle the Radrover at stop with both feet flat on the ground with the new saddle). Without the smaller ISM seat, she had to lean to one side with only one foot touching the ground because the nose of a regular seat moved her too far up the top bar at a stop.

Some folk said when they changed out the Kenda tires with Hookworms also lowered the straddle height of the Radrover a bit.

My wife's biggest complaint is the just the weight of the Radrover of 65-70lbs with rack, rack bag, accessories, gear, and water. Hard for her to maneuver slowly and getting started if there is an incline. Zero issues once she gets going. The Radrover is too heavy for her to put on our platform bike rack by herself even with the battery and rack bag removed. The Radmini folding bike is smaller; but, still weights the same as the Radrover.

You can see my bike with Cloud-9+Bodyfloat seatpost and my wife's bike with the ISM seat:

1/2
Cristina
2 days ago

Hi,

I am looking at the RadRover and Voltbike Yukon. RadRover comes with a a 18.25" frame, and 31.25" stand over. The Voltbike Yukon comes with a 19" frame, yet has a stand over height of 29.5". What is more important to look at when considering height between these two bikes, or should I be looking at a different measurement than stand over and frame size?

Would appreciate some input! Thanks.

Dan Edwards
2 days ago

Im 305lb I have a 'Teo it does very well for my size, Starting from stop on an incline is tough as you have to pedal to get going. Radrover would be another choice it can battery power from a stop

E-Wheels
2 days ago

My first ride on Radrover yielded 6 goat head thorn punctures up front, 4 in the rear. I've since added Mr. Tuffy liners to both and am trying a heavier duty Mongoose inner tub up front. While swapping the inner tube I took a few measurements I couldn't find online.

Stock Kenda:

Tube thickness: .9 mm
Total weight: 16 oz.

Mongoose MG78253-6 :

Tube thickness: 1.3 mm
Total weight: 27 oz.

I'll be riding with Mongoose front, Kenda rear for awhile (tire liners on both) to see if there's any noticeable puncture resistance.

Link for the Mongoose: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01CGDW290/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Have you considered going tubeless

TheWestPole
2 days ago

My first ride on Radrover yielded 6 goat head thorn punctures up front, 4 in the rear. I've since added Mr. Tuffy liners to both and am trying a heavier duty Mongoose inner tub up front. While swapping the inner tube I took a few measurements I couldn't find online.

Stock Kenda:

Tube thickness: .9 mm
Total weight: 16 oz.

Mongoose MG78253-6 :

Tube thickness: 1.3 mm
Total weight: 27 oz.

I'll be riding with Mongoose front, Kenda rear for awhile (tire liners on both) to see if there's any noticeable puncture resistance.

Link for the Mongoose: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01CGDW290/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Denis Shelston
2 days ago

2 of my local bike shops are pushing ebikes that start at $2400 - $5000 no different from the Teo or Rad. I have 1 Major issue that needs to be resolved the others I can work out. Power. I dont think I am getting 750 watts. the wife's Rad and a guy had a M5S bike both climb hills easier than me. wife cant even peddle mine up the same hill

Not sure how one can check that... Good question I sure would like to know how many Watts it's pushing. I think the Radrover has a watt meter, so you can see. I wish I had one. I've been looking at installing a Cycle Analyst but am unsure how to wire it on a Téo.

Denis Shelston
4 days ago

By Michael Skopes. August 2017
With permission

A 2017 E-Bike Adventure

One day, not so long ago, I opened a door to enter an area where I am employed. I was hit, full on, with the fact that I no longer have any passion for what it is I do there. My days there are only a passing of time spent wondering about other things more important to me; my family, my home,...me, and other more fun activities.

At the same time, I appreciate the compensation that my job affords me - money and health care benefits. You know, all that boring stuff like an IRA, 401k, and such. But, all that, is for the most part, pleasureless. The most pleasing aspect of that crap is the toys I can buy to make my life more FUN.

The following sentence involves a subject, which to me, borders on the surreal. Retirement...is...just...around...the...corner. Hell, retirement is something old people do. I don't qualify as an old person. At least, not in my mind, I don't.

I don't know how my twenties turned into my sixties so quickly. My brain, my heart, and my soul, all tell me it's time for another game of 500 in the park, or a few high dives off of top board at my hometown swimming pool. But, uh oh...the deep end no longer has those old diving boards! In fact, the entire pool has been completely re-built and almost unrecognizable. And, unfortunately, what my body tells me about physical activity is not quite the same as what my brain, heart, and soul communicate.

Go for a long endorphin filled cross country type run? Uh uh. Don't even think about it. My lower back and knees won't take the pounding. Damn, I loved running so much. Extend my body airborne for that long pass at the goal line like I once often did? Not a good idea. Hitting the green grass wearing pads at one time was exhilarating, not debilitating. Hey, how about attacking a radical mogul course on freshly fallen snow? Get real fella! Not anymore. Oh, the knees, the hips, the lower back. Skiing became my all time favorite winter activity while in my mid to late twenties.

Get this, though. Physical exertion is far from a thing of my youthful past. Hooray for the bicycle! Hip hip hooray for the electric bicycle! I'll get to the e-bike in just a minute. Allow me to back track for a moment.

One of my very first loves, as a young boy, was learning how to ride a bicycle. And, after mastering that marvelous activity, the extended range that became my daily excitement, grew longer and longer. Soon, I disappeared from my parents' view for hours at a time as I biked with my pals from one end of town to the other. Minutes, hours, and miles meant nothing to us. We had trusty mechanical steeds whose rolling wheels seemed capable of endless, small town, summer time adventures. If we weren't kicking up dust, pebbles, and basic dirt while racing around Chapin Park's baseball field, we were busy slamming on our brakes while screaming down swimming pool hill.

That excellent downhill activity, of melting bicycle tire rubber, left twenty foot long black streaks on the blacktop. Bald tires? We never cared. That was part of the deal. And when those rubber burning slides ended, we just might opt to take a little detour out to the long abandoned strip mines. Out there, on the outskirts of town, the giant coal digging machines of old left us with huge mounds of gray/white earth. Over time, outstanding trails developed throughout those sometimes treacherous hills which were intertwined with deep, blue pools of water that stretched for hundreds of feet. Riding those paths brought many a boy, and a few girls, to the point of total exhaustion, and in some cases...broken frames and fractured bones.

Yes, my childhood relationship with my Monark bicycle was a love affair. Many of my friends had that same love affair. Several of us participated in the annual Corn Festival bicycle parade. We decorated our bikes with crepe paper, flags and banners. Some kids wore costumes. I donned a Marlon Brando type motorcycle cap - the tough guy look like from his fifties movie, "The Wild One".

But that love affair broke my heart when some criminal stole my beloved Monark. Sadness became my middle name. Consolation on the part of my mother didn't even help. And I adored my mother, and how she did so much for me and my two sisters. My father offered a matter of fact response to my long face with a few well chosen words and a simple pat on my shoulder. All that did little to mend my deep psychological wound. But Dad had a quiet way about him that endeared me to him just as much as Mom.

In time, a replacement two-wheeler appeared. That tale is one whose details I won't divulge in this story. I would rather keep that for anyone interested in reading my book "My Little Skinny Greek Life: On Liberty Street". Find it on Amazon. I don't want to spoil that story here. What I will go into here, is the flash forward to today.

FLASH!

For years, various physical problems have kept me from fully enjoying the activity that I had loved for so much of my life. Before losing the ability to travel by bicycle, I had the pleasure of making two long road trips. The first, at age twenty nine and turning thirty, went on for 1500 miles from California to Illinois.

Some of the information written in an unsolicited newspaper article about that tour - going all the way to Maine, down to Florida, and back to California - never happened. Those plans had to be changed for several reasons. I actually can't recall the primary reason. It may have been that being a touring novice, I bit off more than I could pedal.

I have read, in my current research, that the number one reason for many new bike touring enthusiasts cutting their tours short is because of unrealistic goals. Their mental and physical preparations couldn't match up with their lofty plans. Really. Just imagine coming up with the idea of riding a heavily outfitted bicycle for 7,000 miles without ever having done any touring at all prior to that. Hmm...you see what I mean? However, I did go over 1,500 miles on my Centurion two wheeler.

My second major distance bicycle adventure took me from Monterey, California south to Los Angeles and specifically, Northridge to attend a Super Bowl party. However, I only managed to put in about 155 miles because I strained my knee and had to grab a bus for part of the remaining distance.

So, as I mentioned above, hip hip hooray for the electric bike. Because now, I am so happy to say that I have returned to the joyful activity of riding a long distance tour by bicycle. I am in the middle of one as I write this story. It is forty miles this time. Nowhere near 1,500...yet.

This time, so many calendar years later and with bike technology that is light years ahead of 1982, I now ride a RadRover from Rad Power Bikes, out of Seattle, Washington. They have created a beauty that comes in two colors; black or white. I chose black. It is an electrically powered fat bike which I have modified to fit my practical and esthetic needs.

It is known as a fat bike partly because it has four inch wide knobby, fat, tires. It is, in essence, a mountain bike which is very capable as a road bike at the same time. The 750 watt motor and the 48 volt battery can take me up to 25 miles with my leg power added. With a second battery stowed away in my Burley Nomad trailer, my distance doubles. When that runs out, I hopefully am already camped or in a hotel where I can re-charge for the next day of travel.

My interest in bicycle touring was recently re-kindled by stumbling upon a few videos on YouTube. Seeing the various examples of which panniers to purchase, how and what to pack in them, brought back memories of my past pannier preparations. There is a certain excitement related to the process of deciding upon what to buy, where, and how much to spend. So, familiar tour preparation became a big part of my daily thoughts. This was particularly true while at my personally unsatisfying job.

Every day, while at work, my mind wandered away from vocational duties to adventurous daydreams. I couldn't help it. Every day, as I commuted to and from work, all I could think about was bike touring. Could I even physically do it anymore? I would soon find out.

Suffering through the slow stop and go crawl of heavy rush hour traffic turned into something completely different. My mind turned off the disgust associated with this daily grind and welcomed the fantasies I conjured up instead. Rather than mutter under my breath my roadway discontent with hundreds of other cars and trucks that surrounded me, I was smiling internally at the prospect of my next, long awaited, two wheeled adventure. Hot damn!

Well, the days passed by. Each night after work I would stitch together more and more ideas that percolated in my mind in the hopes of making my fantasy adventure come true. I pulled down my old Centurion Super Le Mans twelve speed that had been hanging in the garage for years and started the process of giving it new life. Yes, the very same bike that took me to Illinois from California thirty five years ago. It needed new tubes and tires for sure, and a good amount of service all totaling $240. That figure was just under what I paid for the bike new from Joslyn's Bike Shop in Monterey thirty seven years earlier. Ouch.

After that, an expense that ultimately turned out to be an unnecessary one, I rode it around my neighborhood for about a mile with no bags other than the old handlebar bag. It felt very familiar and good. The next day, I added the matching rear Eclipse panniers I had stored away from those past tours. I partially filled them with a few items to ease into a touring weight. I rode for three miles. That was not bad, but I did feel the difference and the need to get into better shape if a real extended tour were to take place. By the way, I tried desperately to figure out a way to once again use those great old blue bags on my Rover. I couldn't quite get their proprietary configuration to conform to my new ride satisfactorily, so I had to let them go back into storage after the third and final test run coming up. Bummer!

The following day, for that final test run, I went out for six miles. This time I had to walk up a few hills and also stop for a good rest or two along the way. It occurred to me, that there was no way I could realistically take this sentimental bike for a long tour ever again. My hopes faded. The idea of embarking on another tour adventure looked pretty much impossible. Then, I stumbled upon the e-bike world and everything changed.

I discovered a video, among many others, that was created by a young man named Adamm Jarvis. He produced an interesting review of the RadRover. It can be found on YouTube easily enough. I watched it a couple of times and thought the Rover was worth a better look, so I went to the Rad web site to learn more. I was impressed with the company and its young founders. Still, I needed to look around for other choices, which I did, just to be sure I was satisfied with my research.

I kept going back to Rad. I spoke with them on the phone a few times, telling them my plans and they thought the Rover would work best for my touring idea. I saw more reviews - EBR, Electric Bike Review, was another good one.

I returned to Adamm's video. There was something about it that spoke to me. It had an easy going vocal delivery by Adamm himself, music, and good production value. Along with the bike itself, featured in the video, that twenty something minute video helped me make up my mind. The Rover is what I wanted.

It is now June, 30th 2017. Today, I have pedaled my Rover twenty miles to the Sycamore Campground at the beach near Malibu, CA. Roughly ten miles on roads and streets, and ten miles on the great trail from inland to the beach. I am the only person in the hike and bike area. My campsite begins to take shape.

This may only be a shorter overnight adventure, but boy, am I ever loving it. The ride was wonderful - not hot at all, but perfect. I took this trail part way three other times. Having taken this trail now for the fourth time, and adding the camp out element to it, I am filled with a sense of adventure. I've longed for this touring/camping feeling. This short bike tour brings back all the experiences that my other longer tours gave me - scenery, fresh air, camping, exercising by bike, saying hello to new people as they go about their camping fun. The little kids on their bikes smile as they ride past me among the camp sites. I think one of those smiling little ones was the same one who woke up early the next morning and would not stop screaming. Seriously, for well over an hour, I struggled with those screams and the incessant small dog barking that complimented the shrieking. So much for a peaceful way to wake up with the great outdoors.

My penthouse suite tent is roomy and functional, but it isn't sound proof. It has enough room to hold my Rover and trailer all secured, dry and safe without a need to lock it up. I think it is fine with me right beside it. Even so, ever since my first bike was stolen so many years ago, I have never forgotten the hollow feeling of having lost such a treasured possession to some cold hearted thief. However, in my actual garage at home, my Rover is kept securely locked.

I kid around when asked about the space inside my voluminous tent.
"I have a garage, a bedroom, kitchen, and bathroom."
When people hear me say that, they often chuckle. It's true. I really make good use of the giant tent...I create a garage, a bedroom, a kitchen, and a bathroom within the nylon walls.

Many a campground will have a tendency to gross me out when it comes to the bathroom facilities. I decided to take my self contained idea to new heights by incorporating the survivalist style bathroom. I have a sliced section of a pool noodle circling the rim of a small bucket lined with a plastic waste bag, a hospital urinal, a hospital wash basin (I've spent a few days in hospital care recently), plenty of t. p., small trash bags, wet wipes, wash cloths, towels, soap, and I fill up one or two gallon plastic bottles with water from the campground source. All these comforts ease the hassle of having to walk to the facilities in the middle of the night if necessary. In fact, I am now so spoiled by this, I can't help but think that this is the only way to camp by bicycle.

Having my indoor kitchen is convenient, too. Boiling water for morning coffee without going outside is great. Oatmeal and coffee at my fingertips - perfect. My only concern is if Yogi Bear's cousins come snooping around. I had better start keeping the bulk of my minimalist food stuffs outside during the night. Ya think?

My bedroom set up is an important one. I have to be comfortable with my necessary pillow configuration, and mattress combo. My ground tarp is the first protective layer followed by the tent floor, a one half inch thick layer of foam rubber, topped with my air mattress, the Klymit Insulated Static V Sleeping Pad. I researched the mattresses and knew I had to have a top of the line product. It inflates with only about twelve deep breaths. The Klymit I bought is not their most expensive version. That said, I was not going to sacrifice my comfort to save a few bucks by going any lower.

My new sleeping bag, the OutdoorsmanLab sleeping bag is not of the mummy type. I feel way too restricted if and when I can't sprawl as part of my comfort zone. The bag also allows for poking your feet out when it gets too hot. I like that for sure. Everything is lightweight, and compact. That, my friends, is more than just desirable when biking. It is imperative.

There is so much room to work in my tent garage. I'm away from any flying pests or crawling bugs as I work. I fabricated a kick stand/tent floor protector out of a plastic coffee can lid, cardboard and gaff tape. I need to prevent holes in the tent floor. Spreading out my tools and parts inside my tent near my Rover and Nomad bicycle trailer makes it easier to be a do-it-yourselfer. Very convenient.

Here are some thoughts as the sun sinks behind the dry mountain a few yards west of my camp site.

We're taught from an early age to share. Share that Popsicle, or candy bar. Back in 1982, a lanky gray haired gentleman walked out of a small grocery store in Glacier National Park and saw I was bicycle touring. He had just unwrapped his candy bar and offered to share it with me. I think it was a Hershey bar - kindness.

"Here, have a bite of my Slim Jim, or half of my sandwich." That's a comment that may sound familiar to many of us from times past. Similarly, at another stop at a campground in northern Montana, an older retired couple, who upon learning I was in the middle of a cross country bicycle tour, offered dinner and homemade blueberry pie in their motor home camper. I will never forget the look on the woman's face, and her exclamation;

"You're doing what?? You must be hungry!"

I find it touching when on the receiving end of kindness and generosity. At the same time, I see the compassion and satisfaction on the faces of those who offer it. Those moments lead me into a more spiritual place where I often ponder the bigger picture, and how little things we do can have so much meaning.

Ah, the wonder of it all. The world going by at 70 to 80 miles per hour in a car is quite different from the world I see at 5 to 25 miles an hour by bicycle. The world I witness from a slower perspective has a more complete way of becoming a part of me. I see more. I hear more. I feel more. I acutely sense the wonder of it all.

I guess my philosophical nature comes from being Greek. My ancestors managed to produce a few good ones way back when. I'm sure you can recall their names.

This trip is only the beginning. I'd like to make several of these e-bike journeys to help re-capture some of the youthful times I loved so much. I want to retire soon and take advantage of the physical abilities I still have before they wither away never to be again. I can't see myself spending anymore precious days than I absolutely have to working in an unsatisfying job. I want to feel the wind against my face as I bike along a secluded trail. I want to hear the birds calling, see the squirrels, lizards, and rabbits dart across the trail in front of me as they rush toward their own little palaces. I want to cross the shallow stream that meanders across the trail in three different locations and get wet, muddy, and laugh about it to myself.

I travel alone. I don't mind the solitude, the mud, the sweat, the tough hills, and the occasional mechanical repair. They're all part of the smile. My smile. And I will savor all of these moments as they find me - as nature comes to me. I won't wonder, one day, why I didn't take advantage of the mountains, the beaches, the nights under the stars. Nope. That little boy who ate up the streets of small town USA while pedaling on his Monark still exists. He is just a little bigger, wiser, and definitely more gray. He continues to occupy the space between my ears and the heart of my soul.

So, this is my camp/biking story that replaced the original, longer, Santa Barbara round trip which had to be cancelled. Some of you have been waiting for this documentary of sorts for too long. I apologize for the delay. Perhaps I will get to the Santa Barbara adventure before my legs tell me to give it up. I hope to make that tour soon. For now, I hope you found this little story interesting. Perhaps even inspiring. Thanks for taking the time to share my adventure.

mrgold35
4 days ago

Folk said the 52V can feel a bit more powerful compared to the 48v with similar watts. The Radrover controller is strong enough to handle the extra voltage. It just having to purchase another charger for the 52v battery adds to the cost of the battery compared to just sticking with the Luna Cycle 48v+radrover charger.

vadim1836
5 days ago

I'm researching fat bikes, comparing different brands/models. I really like Teo S fat bike, read and watched tons of postings and videos comparing it to Volt Yukon and RadRover bikes. However, there is another similar bike Daymak Wild Goose that I couldn't find any recent reviews (Jan 2016 is the latest) and there isn't much info on Daymak sub-forum either.
Spec-wise Daymak is similar to the above bikes and the price is very competitive, so I'm wondering if anyone can share their personal experience about Wild Goose.

Motor: 500W Hybrid Pie Brushless Hub Motor
Battery: 48V 10AH Lithium
Battery type: Lithium Ion Polymer
Battery life: 800 charges
Brakes: Hydraulic front and back disc brakes
Charger type: 48V
Max speed: up to 32km/h
Range: up to 40 km on throttle/ up to 80 km on pedal assist
Max load: 120 kg
Gross weight: 42 kg
Climbing incline: 15 degrees
Tire size: 26" x 4"
Gauges: Battery level, speedometer, odometer, 6 speed pedal-assist mode, 7 speed Shimano torney Gearing system
Lights: Front LED
Removable battery: YES
Key ignition: YES
Front Shocks: YES

mrgold35
1 week ago

I was on the fence about a year ago between Sondors, Radrover, and Volt 4" fat tire bikes. I marked Sondors off the list because of the 30 day warranty and small motor. No one ever said "My ebike has too much power and I wish I've gone with a much smaller watt motor."

I'm about 270lbs and I add about another 20-25 lbs with bike accessories, rack+gear, and commuter back pack. The Radrover weights the same as the Radmini. I have zero issue pedaling in PAS 2-4 and/or using the throttle to get going across intersections in a hurry or up inclines. The Rad Power bikes have a nice feature of an on/off button for the twist throttle AND you have full 750 watts of power at any PAS level from 0-5. I added a clip on thumb throttle for easier access and better control. Also nice to have the throttle if you need to walk your bike up inclines or stairs. I trail ride a lot and thumb attachment makes it easier to access the gears, brake, throttle, and holding tight on handlebar grips. I would check with the Sondors X to see how the throttle works compared to the Radmini.

I ended up with purchasing two Rad Rovers and put over 3000 miles between them both in less than a year. I would also factor in a suspension seat post since the folding ebikes don't have a front suspension.

One side note: I always used PAS 5 on my work commutes with the standard Kenda tires and my top cruising speed was around 18-19 mph with peak (downhills) around 21-22 mph. I wore my rear Kenda out in around 800 miles and replaces with Vee8 tires. I can now cruise 19-20.5 mph in PAS 3-4 (depending on wind and how level) and my top peak speed is 23-25 mph on the same inclines. I never use PAS now and just use the throttle if I need full power for a short run.

BVC
1 week ago

Nice video! Lots of energy in that video lol I liked it

Are you also a member on the rad power bikes owners group on Facebook?

Regarding the light.. we're about to release our plug-n-play replacement headlight for E-bikes. Wide & bright with a smooth retro style. You can check it out at www.1859NW.com

I started my search for an eBike a few months back and just purchased mine at the beginning of June. At that time I was still trying to decide between this bike and some others (Teo, Juiced, etc). I was really surprised to see the exact same thing you mentioned, people don't seem to mind at all if you ride one or the other and I fully expected to see people who like such and such bikes fight with others who like the other bikes. Instead, I see exactly the opposite and the community here seem to appreciate input regardless of the bikes a person choose. It was really refreshing and it's a main reason I continue to post here. Still chatting with the guy who bought the Teo about what types of lights he's trying because I also want to change out the s*it light that comes with the RadRover, lol. Truely an awesome community here :)

PS: .45 ACP 1911 all the way :p

mrgold35
1 week ago

Brand new Rad Rover Rider! One day old! Absolutely stunning! I like to ride or walk to and from work, but here in Colorado Springs, we live in the foothills, so it's either UPhill, or downhill. It would take me forever to crawl home UPhill, and my new Rover has definitely solved that problem! What a blast!

Now I'm off to the LBS for some accessories....

Al S.

I grew up as an Army brat in Colo Sprgs and grad from H.S. there (Harrison H.S. 84). I still hit Fargo's Pizza and the Yakitori every time I'm up there. Albuquerque and Santa Fe reminds me a lot of the Springs with the high elevation, weather can change from mile-to-mile from sun/rain/hail/snow, and are you are either going up hill or down hill most of the time. People talk about a rear hub not being a very good hill climber; but, I find the Radrover very capable at flatting hills and lessening the effects of head winds.

Don't have much as far as an ebike riding activities in NM; but, I'm willing to travel to the Springs if there is a weekend ride or event. Let me know...;)

bob armani
2 weeks ago

I've used Stans sealant in my 700X40C pedal bike for +4 years and never changed it out. I added a 2oz bottle to my old pedal bike when I got my first flat from a goathead thorn and it has been working ever since.

I've use Stans with my 4" fat tires on my Radrover since Sept/2016 with about 3000 miles between them now (two 2oz bottles per tire, Mr. Tuffy liner, Kenda tubes, Vee8 120tpi tires). My current set-up work very well for goathead thorns (usually picking out 1-8 from tires after every ride). I leave the thorns in the tires until I get home. If the tire starts to leak when removed, I just rotate the tire down until Stans does it job and check the PSI.

The combo let me down twice when I ran over road debris of metal or glass that put a 1/8" slash in my tires and when I ran over a 4" wood screw with about 3 1/2" in the rear tire.

Over time, I now keep all the tools I need from patching to replacing the tube in my flat kit:
- hand pump
- tire gauge
- tools to remove rear hub tire
- zip ties
- 2oz bottle of Stans
- knife
- latex gloves
- handy wipe package (for hands and cleaning tire for patch kit)
- spare tube
- flat kit with valve stem remover
- a couple shop towels (4oz of Stans makes a hell of a mess inside the tire if the hole is too big to seal)
- 4 velcro straps (used to wrap around the 120tpi tire to keep the soft bead in place when airing up)
- cell phone handy to call wife to pick me up if I just don't feel like dealing with the flat right then (used this option twice already)

Mr. Gold-Thanks for the great tips. You are very well prepared. I have been riding for a very long time and never carried anything for the exception of a hand pump. Not many flats though, on paved tarmac throughout my biking experience. No liners either, just regular inner tubes. Just lucky I suppose!

With all of these handy tools, how long does it take you to fix a flat? Many steps. Just curious. Thanks!

mrgold35
2 weeks ago

I've used Stans sealant in my 700X40C pedal bike for +4 years and never changed it out. I added a 2oz bottle to my old pedal bike when I got my first flat from a goathead thorn and it has been working ever since.

I've use Stans with my 4" fat tires on my Radrover since Sept/2016 with about 3000 miles between them now (two 2oz bottles per tire, Mr. Tuffy liner, Kenda tubes, Vee8 120tpi tires). My current set-up work very well for goathead thorns (usually picking out 1-8 from tires after every ride). I leave the thorns in the tires until I get home. If the tire starts to leak when removed, I just rotate the tire down until Stans does it job and check the PSI.

The combo let me down twice when I ran over road debris of metal or glass that put a 1/8" slash in my tires and when I ran over a 4" wood screw with about 3 1/2" in the rear tire.

Over time, I now keep all the tools I need from patching to replacing the tube in my flat kit:
- hand pump
- tire gauge
- tools to remove rear hub tire
- zip ties
- 2oz bottle of Stans
- knife
- latex gloves
- handy wipe package (for hands and cleaning tire for patch kit)
- spare tube
- flat kit with valve stem remover
- a couple shop towels (4oz of Stans makes a hell of a mess inside the tire if the hole is too big to seal)
- 4 velcro straps (used to wrap around the 120tpi tire to keep the soft bead in place when airing up)
- cell phone handy to call wife to pick me up if I just don't feel like dealing with the flat right then (used this option twice already)

Alacrity
2 weeks ago

I have a RadRover that is less than a month old (88 miles). My first bike in twenty years. I love riding it, but is has spent more time parked this last week than moving.

After having the rear brakes go out heading downhill the other day and getting them readjusted, I made it a mile before a flat rear tire. Everything that I have read and the couple of bike shops that I have spoken to were not very complimentary about the Kendas that come stock.

I am looking for a tire, tube, and/or tube liner that will make the bike more dependable and a bit easier to ride. Most of my rides are my daily commute on asphalt. Then the trail ride that is a mix of paved and hard pack gravel.

Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

Denis Shelston
2 weeks ago

Just curious about something.

In reading posts here and there from Radrover users, a model similar to our Téo, many talk about new firmware updates to improve or fix issues. The LCD on that model has a USB port, probably to perform those updates.

I'm wondering if Téo has provisioned for such upgrades or updates ? Not even sure there is a port you can connect to, maybe on the controller itself, dunno.

Im just asking, as I am wondering if our various levels of PAs are working as they should. Sometimes I feel the throttle responds slower to demand, sometimes I wonder if PA4 is not more powerful than PA6 for example.

I'm a curious kind of guy. :rolleyes:

mrgold35
2 weeks ago

I wonder what the manufacturers calculate as the life expectancy is for an ebike compared to a regular bike? I've had our his/her regular bike over 4 years and I know we've put under 1000 miles between the both of them (much less now since getting the Radrover last year). It has been a little over 10 months with two Radrover and I have 3000 miles between both ebikes.

I hope 6000 miles isn't the "over the hill" benchmark for ebikes like it was for car +30 years ago.:(

sanglee007
2 weeks ago

RadRover + North Road (sunlite)

Puts my hands close to my knees but it's comfortable for me and lets me sit up straighter. I also have the same bars setup for my Sondors Thin so I decided to try it with the rover and I've been riding it for a week+ and I like it.

Also a flipped north road option (http://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vintage/534842-show-me-your-flipped-north-road-bars.html)

Sang

1/3
mrgold35
2 weeks ago

Has anyone ever had their display cut out, mine died??

Does it flash an error code and then die or is it 100% dead?

I would get an intermittent error code (30 maintain) blinking in my display and then the LCD/power would shut off to the entire Radrover. It could happen every few minutes on a ride or no issue at all for hours. I would just have to be lucky to looking at the LCD when the error was flashing to see the error code (the bike would run as normal during error display before shutting completely off). I could just press/hold the Mode button to restart the bike while cruising at +15 mph. Replacing the wiring harness and controller fix the problem.

Sounds like a bad connection with loose or bent pins?

Sharon Lee Lockhart
1 week ago

Well, after watching your videos on the different Rad Electric Bicycles, we have ordered one. Now, about your helmet? Where did you get it? How much? Do you have a link you can post, so others can look for one, when buying a RadMini?
Thanks for these videos. They show a lot of stuff about these bikes and make them seem to be good for anyone to have.
We will be looking for more of these kind of videos, to keep up with what you are learning about them.

Allison Argent
2 weeks ago

how do you buy this and how much

Peter Piccolo
2 weeks ago

nice review man i love this fat bike.... i have a low budget but what would you recommend.. im 6 ft 2 weigh close to 240 and am super interested in getting a good ebike with at least front suspension and fat tires or at least 3" tires... whatt would you recommend as a good electric bike with a throttle and pedal assist and the option to change gears and pedal manually if i wanted to.... thanks in advance, i cant wait to hear some of your recommendations ive been doing research for more than 6 months now... id love to hear what you have to say.. i also like the sondors ebike but cant find anyplace online or local shops that actually sell it... do u know where u can get one of those? im just looking for a fatbike with front suspension and gears i can change if im pedaling uphill or using it with the throttle to reach higher speeds... let me know what you think what the best ebike for me based on the prior. thanks again,

-pete piccolo

Jeremy Jones
3 weeks ago

This is the whitest thing I had ever seen

xflyingtiger
3 weeks ago

Would it cost a lot more money to produce this bicycle with a torque sensor rather than a cadence sensor? Yes, it seems like 6 magnets versus 12 would make a difference.

Philip Samaniego
4 weeks ago

Thank you EBR! I purchased a Radrover after hours and nights of insomnia watching or reading your reviews and community blogs. I have become educated and confident in a short time knowing nothing only a few weeks ago. Despite the compromises this bike is amazing! Here's my details that may help the next buyer. I'm 5'6" 185lbs with 30" pant legs. The 31" standover is as far as I can comfortably stand flat over the bar, although, standing on the pedals I needed to raise the seat 4 7/8" to extend my legs properly. That was enough the add a Thudbuster ST with the minimum 3 3/4" lift pushed to the bottom. I wanted a Thudbuster LT but, I will never be fit properly. Short people use ST, taller folks use the LT if you can. After 175 miles in one week my biggest recommendation is to slow down when you are coming into hard curbs, rutts or bumps with the heavy rear hub. Using 2 and 3 PAS with some throttle, I can get 22 miles for 90 minutes and still have 3/5 bars. One journey home, I used all 4 and 5 PAS and rocked the throttled 6.8miles from work and used 1 bar. I was cold riding at 22mph average so, I bought a windbreaker. Trust me, you'll need it in July at night.... My last recommendation is to open up the settings and turn max speed up to 40 kmph to get 24mph throttle only max. That also increases the strength of your PAS power. I know, I know 20 mph BUT, My car does 160mph AND they Cannot give me a speeding ticket for 160mph UNLESS I am SEEN PAS riding OR THROTTLING past 20MPH. Does everyone understand that part well enough? GOOD, Now get some brand of ebike and you'll love it. Absolutely the best thing that I have treated myself with. THANKS AGAIN EBR!!!!!

Francis Kavanagh
4 weeks ago

Thank you
one of the best review videos I have seen!

gbird5000
2 months ago

Will one of these bikes fit on a bus bike rack?

VideoNOLA
3 months ago

I can definitely see wanting to "embiggen" my ride one day and go electric, but I am a huge rider (350 lbs) so must ask: "Do these 'fat-tire' bikes tend to come with beefier max load weight limits??"

Combustion69
3 months ago

Fatbikes serve no purpose and look gay

Joshua Huang
3 weeks ago

until u try riding one in the sand

sten beetlex
3 months ago

i do wish they have a gearless simpler version thats cheaper.......... i love this but hate the gears which i'm paranoid about getting stuck eventually..........!

Mainer Man
4 months ago

The greatest point is you would never be able to do this on a beach without an e-bike. That is the awesome part! It is a responsibility people need to be aware of. We are able to go place and see things quietly, clean, respectfully. Some if not most will never appreciate without an e-bike

Eddie Gelman
4 months ago

What beach were you on?

Eugene Moore
5 months ago

I ordered my RadRover yesterday. Thanks for your reviews. I live in Johnstown, Colorado and can't wait to hit some trails.

Drónos Vili
5 months ago

Hey there:-) how long is the battery less with 1 charge?

Rob True
7 months ago

Yack,yack,yack .............. what is the goddam range ?

Jim Williamson
7 months ago

Your videos are great. I have been researching ebikes since February 2016. Because of your videos, I ordered the RadRover yesterday. Very nice folks at Rad Power Bikes.

Dustin Casper
8 months ago

my commute is only 2 miles, I am going to get one of these for spring/summer

Marcin O
8 months ago

Shame you cant buy these here in UK

Josefwintzent Libot
9 months ago

can this be bought in the philippines?