Rad Power Bikes RadRover Review

2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Electric Bike Review
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Bafang 750 Watt Fat Bike Motor
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Wellgo Pedals Ebike Controller Box
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Handlebar Shifter Throttle
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Backlit King Meter Lcd Display
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Stitched Leather Grips Integrated Bell
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Top Gun Suspension Fat Bike
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Two Virtical Bottle Cage Mounts
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Shimano Acera 7 Speed With Guard
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Side Mounted Kickstand Adjustable
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Removable 48 Volt Battery Panasonic Cells
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Black And White Colors
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Battery Charger
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Electric Bike Review
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Bafang 750 Watt Fat Bike Motor
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Wellgo Pedals Ebike Controller Box
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Handlebar Shifter Throttle
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Backlit King Meter Lcd Display
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Stitched Leather Grips Integrated Bell
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Top Gun Suspension Fat Bike
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Two Virtical Bottle Cage Mounts
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Shimano Acera 7 Speed With Guard
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Side Mounted Kickstand Adjustable
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Removable 48 Volt Battery Panasonic Cells
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Black And White Colors
2016 Rad Power Bikes Radrover Battery Charger

Summary

  • Strikes an excellent balance delivering high power with mid-level components for a reasonable price, you get throttle and pedal assist with an on/off on the throttle! solid one year warranty for the original owner, flat rate $175 shipping in the US
  • Even though the battery and controller box are bolted on vs. integrated into the frame, they use extra bolts for strength and kept them mostly out of the way, both are mounted low for improved stability
  • Nice extras including an integrated LED headlight, stand alone rear light, USB charging outlet on the battery, handle at the back of the seat, quick release front wheel, bash guard on the chainring and derailleur... optional fenders and rack
  • Only available in one frame size but comes in black or white color choices, the 180 mm disc brakes work well enough but hydraulic would be nice, the grips spin a bit if you squeeze hard, excellent kickstand placement, clean wire integration

Search EBR

Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Rad Power Bikes

Model:

RadRover

Price:

$1,499 ($175 Flat Rate Shipping)

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Sand and Snow, Trail

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive (Original Owner)

Availability:

United States, Canada

Model Year:

2016

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

63 lbs (28.57 kg)

Battery Weight:

7.2 lbs (3.26 kg)

Motor Weight:

14 lbs (6.35 kg)

Frame Material:

Aluminum

Frame Sizes:

18.25 in (46.35 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

580 mm Top Tube, 463 mm Seat Tube, 1155 mm Wheelbase, 794 mm Standover Height

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Black, White

Frame Fork Details:

Top Gun Suspension with Lockout, Adjustable Preload, 5" Travel, 11 mm Quick Release Skewer

Frame Rear Details:

11 mm Axle

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Acera, 11-28T

Shifter Details:

Shiman SIS Index Shifter on Right

Cranks:

42T Chainring with Aluminum Bash Guard

Pedals:

Wellgo Aluminum Alloy Platform, Black

Headset:

VP-A41ACK

Stem:

Zoom ~6° Rise

Handlebar:

Zoom Low-Rise, 25" Length

Brake Details:

Tektro Aries Mechanical Disc with 180 mm Rotors, Tektro Levers with Motor Inhibitors, Rubberized Edge and Integrated Bell

Grips:

Stitched Ergonomic, Black

Saddle:

Velo Plush with Integrated Handle

Seat Post:

Promax, Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

320 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Double Walled Alloy, Black

Spokes:

13 Gauge, Stainless Steel, Black

Tire Brand:

Kenda Juggernaut, 26" x 4"

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)

Tire Details:

31TPI, Wire Bead, 5-30 PSI

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Spanninga Micro Integrated LED Headlight, Blaze-Lite RL1800 Independent LED Back Light, Neoprene Slap Guard, Side Mounted Adjustable Kickstand, Two USB Charging Ports for Portable Electronics (On Battery and Display)

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bafang

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

750 watts

Motor Torque:

80 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Panasonic

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11.6 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

556.8 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium Nickel Cobalt Aluminum

Charge Time:

5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

20 miles (32 km)

Estimated Max Range:

40 miles (64 km)

Display Type:

King Meter SW-LCD, Fixed Backlit LCD

Readouts:

Battery Gauge (5 Bars), Speed, Avg. Speed, Top Speed, Odometer, Trip Odometer, Watts, PAS level (1-5)

Display Accessories:

Independent 3 Button Pad

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Twist Throttle (6 Magnet Pedelec Disc)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

Rad Power Bikes has rapidly grown their business from a crowd funded single-product offering to include a cargo bike and a mini fat folding bike in just a couple of short years! But it all started with the RadRover… This classic fat tire electric bike offers some of the best value I’ve seen on the market without compromising comfort and quality. Upgrades like the Shimano Acera derailleur (which is two steps up from the standard Tourney I frequently see) should last longer and provide tighter shifting. There’s a beautifully integrated bell that doesn’t clutter the handlebars because it’s designed into the brake levers (which offer motor cutoff when pulled). You get a fat bike specific motor from Bafang that maxes out on power for what’s legal in the US at 750 watts. It includes two LED lights and while the rear is more basic, relying on stand-alone battery cells, the front is integrated and runs off the main battery pack… which is huge! Not only do you get a powerful 48 volt configuration, the cells inside are from Panasonic, one of the most trusted and longest lasting from what I hear at shops and from consumers. And! there’s a USB charging port mounted on the side of that pack so you can use it for backup power (charging a cell phone perhaps) or running extra lights on your bike. Unfortunately, the positioning is a little vulnerable because your leg and foot pass near the side of the battery. Consider a right-angle USB adapter if you intend to plug things in while riding. But the USB power doesn’t stop there, another plug is built into the display panel so you can still get energy without running a long cable.

Powering on the bike is a two step process where you press a silver button on the battery and then hold the mode button on the control pad. It’s an extra step that not every electric bike has but at least it’s not too difficult to reach. This may reduce phantom power draw from the battery if you take it off the bike and are using it to charge with one of the USB ports mentioned earlier. The button pad mentioned a moment ago, is mounted near your left hand so you can adjust pedal assist levels while riding without taking your hand off the grip. There are five levels of power and a level zero! In zero, the bike won’t respond to your pedaling but the throttle will (if you’ve activated it) and that’s kind of cool. In all normal assist levels the throttle can override with additional power for catching up with friends or topping a hill. I love having a throttle on fat bikes because snow, sand and hilly terrain can sneak up on you and being able to power through or get extra help on demand makes for fewer crashes and generally more comfortable riding. And, since the RadRover is using a more basic pedal assist cadence sensor (with just six magnets vs. 12) I found that using the throttle and brake levers can lead to more precise control. Cadence sensors aren’t generally as responsive as torque sensors but they are less complicated, less expensive and they don’t make you work as hard. In the future, maybe they will switch to a 12 magnet design but still, the throttle helps and being able to one step further and actually disable the throttle with the red toggle button mounted near its base, is fantastic. Sometimes you don’t want to worry about accidentally twisting that throttle (like on really difficult terrain or descending or when you’re loading the bike up). Turning it off means that 750 watt motor won’t accidentally get out of control.

Using this bike can take some extra practice just because there are more drive options and the display has a lot of readouts. I prefer it this way but as a more advanced rider, I don’t feel as overwhelmed. What you see with the display is the speed, assist level and battery gauge (along wth a lot of other little readouts). The display is backlit which is great for night riding and it can be swiveled to reduce glare but it is not removable. Some quick tips on the display panel: you can hold up to switch from average speed to max speed, hold up and mode to turn on the headlight and hold down to activate walk-mode which propels the bike gently forward so you don’t have to push it up hills (if you decide to walk vs. ride). In the video review you can see us riding in deeper sand and I share a few tips about accelerating slowly to maintain balance. Once or twice I decided to walk the bike to meet with a friend just down the way and using walk mode significantly helped because the bike weighs ~63 lbs and sort of sinks in when you’re on the sand. Yes, you could just twist the throttle but that’s more sensitive and tends to kick up sand if you accidentally twist too hard.

At the end of the day, Rad Power Bikes has proven that they can produce reliable ebikes at reasonable prices and deliver and support them well. This is why I recommended them as one of the possible platforms for Cabo Adventures (where this video review was shot). The resort wanted to buy some bikes that would empower visitors to ride on the beach even in deep soft sand and not get exhausted when it’s super hot outside. The bikes performed beyond my expectation and were some of the most comfortable I tried. The mid-rise handlebars, ergonomic grips and softer saddle just made it feel good. The suspension fork, while basic, did its job marvelously and kept my wrists, forearms and shoulders from getting sore. One of the bigger points here is that we rode the bikes in sand and near salt water and they did begin to rust after a week. Rinsing them off after this sort of riding is a good idea. Whether you’re in snow where salt has been scattered to melt ice or near the ocean the bikes will show wear. In my opinion, if that’s the sort of terrain you expect to encounter, it feels nice knowing you didn’t spend $5,000+ on a bike than one you can pour some money into ongoing for replacement parts. I don’t mean to say the bikes won’t hold up, even with rust on the chainrings they should continue to perform. There are so many bikes coming to market these days that do not have a throttle mode and in conditions like the ones we rode in it can be very very useful and almost everyone who tried the bikes there (including my girlfriend) said they loved the throttle. There’s more to say about this bike and I’ve done my best in the pros/cons below but you can also watch and read comments for the older RadRover model from 2015 here. Big thanks to Rad Power Bikes for partnering with me for this review.

Pros:

  • Given the upgraded 750 watt internally geared hub motor, I wasn’t sure how loud it would be running at full power but it actually stayed much quieter than some competing motors on fat bikes that I’ve tested, even lower powered ones, and I like how wide it is (custom for fat tires) because that supports the spokes
  • Lots of upgraded components here including a Shimano Acera derailleur with metal protector (in case the bike tips), premium Panasonic battery cells and 180 mm mechanical disc brakes
  • Given the mid-frame battery design, I love that they were able to angle the to-tube to reduce stand over height and still include bottle cage bosses! There are two vertical mounts just behind the head tube on the left and right which would be great for folding locks, mini pumps or standard cages
  • I’m ~5’9″ and this fat bike felt comfortable in terms of reach, the stem isn’t super long and the bars have a nice mid-rise in them… I also felt like the saddle was more comfortable than some competing offerings
  • Even though I’m used to seeing Top Gun as the most basic low-end suspension provider on on a lot of bikes, this one was upgraded to include lockout and worked fairly well, combined with the fat tires this ebike is pretty comfortable but a 27.2 mm suspension seat post could soften up the back if you’ve got a sensitive neck or back
  • I like that they included a little neoprene slap guard on the right chainstay… I noticed the chain bouncing when I was riding fast across the bumpy dirt road and without this pad the paint would get chipped up and there would be more noise
  • It’s cool that RadRover sells accessories like fenders, saddle bags, rear carry racks and even transport racks for your car all designed to fit their bikes, there are threaded bosses at the rear-end of the bike so you could easily add your own rack if you’ve got something like the Topeak slide-on bag system
  • I love that the mechanical cables for the brakes and shifters are all run through the frame, even the electronic wires are well organized and tucked away which prevents snags and just looks good (especially on the white frame where they would stand out more)
  • Rad Power Bikes offers flat rate shipping in the continental United States for $175 which is a pretty good deal given the weight and size of the bike in my opinion… do take this into consideration though on the price
  • I really like that there’s a handle built into the back of the saddle! This makes the bike easier to lift and position… also since the kickstand is mounted way towards the back, you can pedal the bike backwards and work on the chain more easily even if you don’t have a professional stand
  • The battery interface, the plastic slide where it mounts to the downtube, is bolted onto the frame with three bolts vs. just two on most kits and some cheaper ebikes so it doesn’t rattle and feels pretty sturdy, this is good considering you might ride it on bumpy terrain
  • I love that the bike offers throttle-only mode with zero assist, that gives you a lot of control and if you do turn on assist you can still override with more power using the throttle later

Cons:

  • At ~63 lbs this electric fat bike isn’t especially light weight but at least the front wheel has a quick release skewer and teh battery can be easily removed… this will reduce the space required by the bike and make it easier and lighter to lift
  • I was surprised that the cadence sensor only used six magnets? Many newer models use 12 so the motor will respond faster as you pedal (both starting and stopping), it’s nice that the brake levers have integrated motor cutoff switches so at least you can command a stop immediately in case of emergency
  • I like having a throttle and the twist version works well enough, especially with the integrated on/off toggle, but sometimes a trigger is nicer for off-road bumpy riding so that your grip is solid, I’ve also heard some riders with smaller hands prefer the trigger but it’s really personal preference
  • The bike handled well and was ridden by some individuals in the 200+ lb range during this review but both skewers are the thinner 11 mm style vs. some of the newer 12 mm and 15 mm thru-axles seen on a lot of mountain bikes used on tough terrain, thicker axles on fat bikes would support the weight and stresses of fat tires
  • You have to turn the battery pack on before you can power up the display panel, it’s a two step process that isn’t difficult but takes extra time and isn’t mandatory with some other electric bicycles
  • I like that there are two little USB charging ports integrated into this bike, running off the main battery pack, especially because the bike doesn’t come with an integrated tail light (you could buy an affordable USB rechargeable light to replace the rear Blaze Light if), but the positioning of this port is near where your legs and feet move as you ride… it would be much better if this was on top of the pack or maybe built into the display
  • The grips feel thick and comfortable, I personally enjoy the ergonomic leather style like this, but they aren’t locking so as you ride if you’re pulling and twisting hard they may begin to spin and given the off-road design of the bike and heavy footprint that can happen more easily
  • I prefer disc brakes for any type of off-road riding, be it snow, dirt or sand and feel that the 180 mm rotors chosen here are a good fit in terms of size but I wish they were hydraulic because those require less hand strength and are smoother to actuate
  • The chainring has a nice Aluminum bash guard protecting the teeth from the outside which is great if you’re riding over angled rocks or wood that might collide with it but there isn’t a plat on the inside which would act as a guide, this means you can drop the chain more easily, especially when riding in throttle mode on higher gears where there’s less tension in the chain
  • I think the price on the RadRover is really good and I like how it performed but there are some trade-offs in aesthetics here with the controller box and battery mounted on top of the frame tubing vs. being integrated or combined

Resources:

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dm nelson
9 months ago

Enjoyed the review, Court, as it mostly reflects the experience my partner & I have had with our Radrovers for the past month. These bikes are lots of fun, fat tires, throttles and all. I was able to swap the suspension seat-post off my regular mtn bike and immediately enjoyed the smoother ride experience on the rover. My partner is ordering a cane creek for herself. I upgraded a couple other components, also. When I noticed the chain bounce I swapped the Shimano Acera derailleur for an Alivio. Now the chain seems to have more tension and less bounce on bumpy, packed trails. Replaced stock brake cables with Jagwire mtn cables and now the brakes feel more fully responsive to me. While they do take a bit more energy to use than the hydraulics I have on another bike, these Tektro brakes stop this heavy bike adequately, even going downhill. I had not seen such a derailleur bashguard before like on this bike and was impressed. When one of the two bikes I ordered arrived with the box damaged, bashguard bent and Bafang motor cable damaged, I realized that protecting the motor cable is that guard’s primary purpose. With that part of the cable which goes directly into the motor hub damaged the only remedy was to replace the motor hub. Perhaps someday Bafang will make this cable replaceable without taking the motor apart.. Lastly I want to offer gratitude for the great customer and tech support from this Rad Power company. ~David

Court Rye
9 months ago

Great feedback David! Sounds like you really went to town customizing! Thanks for being specific about the parts you swapped out so others might benefit as well. Hope your partner enjoys her Thudbuster and you have many more fun and comfortable miles ahead of you ;)

Errol
7 months ago

What’s the model number of the Bell helmet your wearing doing the Radrover review? It looks good and is it also comfortable? Thanks

Court Rye
7 months ago

Hi Errol! That’s the Bell Super 2R MIPS with Star Wars “Trooper” theming. I bought it because I could mount my camera to the front jaw piece AND the jaw and the helmet can unbuckle and be packed easily. Since I travel a lot this is a great feature… did an overview/review story about it with more pictures and a video here :D

Joe
7 months ago

Are there any lightweight eBikes out there that are reliable and won’t break the bank? What are some of your favorite models? I really like everything I have read bout the rad rover other than the fact that it’s 60 lbs, although I know eBikes are going to run a little heavier with the battery.

Court Rye
7 months ago

Hi Joe! The advances search options here let you sort by weight (and I do weigh all bikes personally so it should be very accurate). With so many options on style of bike it’s tough for me to say. Do you want a fat bike, a city bike, are you okay with a folding bike? Check out my affordable category here for other models priced in line with the RadRover and dig into products that catch your eye… maybe even ask around on the forums for how durable people think they are. Most of the time I test brand new bikes for a limited time so it’s difficult to speculate on durability :/

Errol
7 months ago

Hi Count Rye, after some of your reviews I decided to buy the RadRover. Received it a couple of days ago and already tested it out. Great ebike for the price and also ordered the rear rack. Bought it on Cyber Monday so I saved on the shipping cost.. I agree it could use a plat on the inside to help prevent the chain falling off which already happened once when my wife was dismounting and the bike came to the ground. Also when first testing it out the derailer was not set right and the chain got tangled some, turned the bike upside down and readjusted it.

I’m looking for a fat ebike for my wife, mine is to tall for her, especially when dismounting. Which fat ebike does your girlfriend like best ( I believe her name is Moa ). I seen her with the Voltbike Mariner and the Radmini. Are their other similar fat ebike? Thanks for your reviews.

Court Rye
7 months ago

Hi Errol! Thanks for sharing your experience with the RadRover so far. My girlfriend Mony struggled with the height of the top tube as well but enjoyed the VoltBike Mariner much more. I’d say it’s fairly comparable to the RadMini but uses a trigger throttle vs. twist and has a narrower top tube and folding point. this was an area where she still bonked her knee once on the RadMini and felt a little sensitive after that. Another company to consider is E-Lux which has a full-sized fat tire bike called the Tahoe which you can get in high-step or step-thru and is very comfortable, powerful and clean thanks to integrated metal fenders. Another folding fat mini bike is the SSR Motorsports Trail Viper but I haven’t seen their latest iteration. Once you decide and get something for her I’d love to hear how it all works out!

Errol
7 months ago

Hi again Count Rye,

After much consideration and help from your EBR, we’re going with the Voltbike Mariner. I texted Voltbike and they said there going forward putting derailleur guards on. They also said prices will increase in January. Maybe your site had some good influence. Also they were offering a free motorcycle helmet with purchase. We also bought two of the Star Wars trooper helmets that I asked you about before.

Thanks,
Errol

Court Rye
7 months ago

Awesome! Sounds like you’re going to have a blast… Glad the site helped expose you to some different choices so you could narrow down. George is a great guy, it’s really cool that you’re getting the lower price AND he’s doing derailleur guards and the helmets. I love that he offers helmets :)

Matthew
4 months ago

Hello everyone, I am interested in buying the Rad Rover and I had a question. I was wondering if there is anyone who has found or modified cargo trailer to work with the Rad Rover? I live in Colorado and am intersted in this bike so I can commute to work (about 10-14 miles round trip, depending on which location I need to go to) year round and maybe do the occasional trail riding on the weekend. I would like to find a trailer that would work on the bike so I can go without my car entirely and so I can take my dog kennel. My dog had knee surgery and can’t really keep up with a bike anymore, especially an E-bike. Any advice would be much appreciated! Thanks for you time.

Court Rye
4 months ago

Hi Matthew! Great question, I have seen a range of trailers on Amazon and the suspension IBEX trailer from BOB Yak but can’t confirm whether they will work. Maybe your best bet is to ask in the Rad Power Bikes forums here, it’s a pretty active place and there are actual owners of the bike (I just reviewed it but don’t have one in front of me to confirm how a trailer would attach). Hope this helps, feel free to share what you end up with back here to help others :)

Matthew
4 months ago

Hi Court, thanks for the quick reply! I called Rad Power Bikes today and they said that while they are hesitant to recommend trailers for the Rad Rover, they did say that any seat post mounted trailer will work or any trailer that can attach to a Burley Trailer hitch will work (amazon link here). Super easy to get a hold of someone at Rad Power Bikes and they answered all of my questions in no time. Thanks to your awesome, highly detailed, website, write ups and youtube videos, I pulled the trigger and bought a Rad Rover and Rad Mini today! Thanks for the help!

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mrgold35
11 hours ago

I would also factor into your search cargo and water bottle attachments. My Radrover has 3 water bottle attachments and they really come in handy (two on either side of upper tube frame and one on the down tube facing the ground). I use one of the upper for water and the lower one for my GPS Boomerang tracker. Others used the extra bottle cage for beer openers, securing locks with bottle cage attachments, or just adding a second water bottle.

I find it might be harder to add a rear rack or have a wider choice of options for storage with full suspension bikes sometimes. You might be limited to the type that secures to the seatpost with no panniers for extra storage. It can be a pain to use a backpack if you don't have easy storage on your bike. You can never have too much space on a bike and adding a rear rack and bag with fold out panniers have taken care of me during work, fun, and errands rides year round.

Over50
2 days ago

I'm about to make a purchase of a RadRover. I would like to be able to use it to ride to my park and ride a few miles away where I would lock it an leave it for the workday but I am very concerned about theft or vandalism...even with a secure lock. Is anyone else doing this and what methods and tools are you using to deter theft and/or vandalism?

Thanks!
There are some threads going on security and locks. I'm commuting on my ebike and locking it at public racks in a busy downtown area. You can check this thread where I talk about technique and locks used:
https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/security.13572/#post-107952

This active thread, particularly one of the last postings, has a link to an eye opening review of some of the top locks:
https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/litelok-some-early-user-experiences-with-this-bikelock.5085/page-2#post-109337

Javagenki
2 days ago

I'm about to make a purchase of a RadRover. I would like to be able to use it to ride to my park and ride a few miles away where I would lock it an leave it for the workday but I am very concerned about theft or vandalism...even with a secure lock. Is anyone else doing this and what methods and tools are you using to deter theft and/or vandalism?

Thanks!

Javagenki
2 days ago

That is almost exactly the bike I am looking for - going in today to test the RadRover. May I ask what aftermarket enhancements you made? How do you like the bike?

Thanks!

mrgold35
3 days ago

Once you add up two Radrover ebikes, shipping, and any extra accessories, you will be under the $2000 per if you picked the Radrover. Rad Power Bikes also makes a folding Radmini with 4" fat tires if you need a smaller storage footprint or you need something with a lower stand over height. The Radcity has pretty much the same specs as the Rover; but, has 2.3" tires, fenders, two different frame sizes, rear rack along with front suspension. I like the 4" fat tires because they can travel between paved roads, sandy beaches, and every where else in-between very smoothly. I work commute at 20-23 mph for 13 miles roundtrip on paved roads and sometimes take a detour to ride the hard packed to sandy single track trails before or after work without missing a beat.

You can find the same mix of bikes with Volt, Teo, and some others around the same price range. I would get something within the 2"-4" tire range, 48v, 11 to 17 A/h battery, twist or hand throttle with Pedal assist, front suspension forks, cargo capacity (or mounts for racks/baskets), 500-750 watts, and 180mm brakes.

Pretty much all ebikes in this range are around +60 lbs if that is a consideration. That weight is too heavy for my wife to lift on our platform bike rack even with the 7 lbs battery removed.

I don't have a RV; but, I do travel with my Radrovers on my SUV (Grand Canyon, Sedona, eastern NM). I had no problems travelling with the Radrover once I prepped for the road (removed battery, seat post with seat, rack bag, wrapped LCD in saran wrap, etc...). I even have a weather proof travel cover that encases both bikes and the rack if we run into really bad weather or if I want to cover the bikes overnight on the back of the SUV.

mrgold35
3 days ago

Welcome to Rad Power Bike family!

I've had my two his/her Radrovers since Sept/2016 and have about 1200 miles each on them. I'm amazed on the amount of choices now in the fat tire ebike price range of the Radrover compared to when I was looking last summer. I think I would still would have picked the Radrover in the end.

I found out day and night paved or dirt trail riding is a lot of fun with the Radrover. I just had to add brighter lights and an extra headlight to my helmet.

RonDog1957
4 days ago

I would agree a torque based controller would likely suit me best. I haven't done the research, but am guessing that technology is priced beyond the very reasonable price of the RadRover.

mrgold35
4 days ago

I run my Radrover in Sandy conditions sometimes and keeping the PAS in 3, good pedal effort in 1st or 2nd gear, keeping the tires straight, keep my speed up, and a few hits on the throttle can get me through most sandy conditions. Moist beach sand shouldn't be a problem. Extremely loose, hot, dry, and +3 inch deep sand still kicks my butt every time. The 4" fat tires do ride through sand a little better if you lower the PSI in the 10-15 PSI range. I just keep it around 20 PSI because I have mixed terrain from paved roads down to sand on most of my rides.

mrgold35
4 days ago

I did take a 22 mile all paved bike ride loop around the city starting at 2:30pm just to see how hot is too hot on an ebike. It showed 101 degrees on the internet; but, it was probably 100-107 depending on the part of the city (started heading east from work near downtown, headed to north side of ABQ, cut down towards the west to the north/south river trail, and back home on west side). The Radrover rode like a champ the entire way. Never felt under powered, zero issues with braking, or it had any issues maintaining PAS 3 at 17-21 mph. I did up the PAS to 4 for longer inclines to maintain my speed and used the throttle at full 750w on short but steep inclines.

SPEED is your friend! It really helped keeping my speed +17 mph because it aided in the cooling. I never felt overheated during the ride (commuter Osprey backpack, vented bike helmet, sunglasses, half finger glove, long sleeve bike shirt, extra long baggy bike shorts with spandex under, and regular running shoes). I like the long sleeve shirts to keep from getting sun burned when riding.

I ran into a few other bikers and they could only travel 1/2 to 3/4 of my speed on the same paved trails. A few were walking their bikes or taking breaks in the shady spots along the river. I did the same loop on my old pedal bike last year during the summer and that left me tired into the next day.

Lost
4 days ago

I'm thinking they would be options you can check during checkout. You can add as much or as little you want from the base Radrover. I just added different tires and brighter front/rear lights and that was over $300+time to install. That was $300 that went to someone else instead of Rad Power Bikes. It kinda suck having to ride on the Kenda for +1000 miles before I switched to the Vee8.
This.
Like buying a car.
I'm pretty sure these bikes all come from China completely assembled and boxed, and therefore Rad would have a hard time customizing to a punch ticket. But they should offer a limited version or something, with Hydraulics, Racks, Fenders, Street Tires, a Non Joke Headlight, etc.

mrgold35
4 days ago

Sounds like the heart of the ebike (hub motor, controller, battery, wiring harness, and LCD screen) seem to be A-OK? What is the possibility of transferring the ebike components to another more robust non-ebike to convert? I don't know how different the Radrover differs from the Radwagon other than the fat tires and front suspension as I rack up the mileage? I figured the battery or hub motor would die before any major mechanical bike parts would?

Brayden is RAD
5 days ago

Hey Lost,

I have a Radrover battery that fails to charge; but, it discharges normally. The battery thinks it is fully charged and doesn't take any juice from the wall charger (the second wall charger light stays green). Even the battery indicator light on the side of the battery pack shows full bars all the time. I can only see the battery charge level when I turn on the RR LCD screen. The external fuse on the battery pack is not blown.

The battery was replaced under warranty by RR and I now have a 7 lb paper weight in my garage. Is there any internal fuse, circuit board problem, or wiring that you saw with your battery cover exchange that might explain the problem? It would be nice to fix the battery for a spare.

Hey i figured out how to fix a dolphin pack that wont charge it happened to me and so i opened it up and there is a 5 amp blade fuse you just pull it out and put new 5 amp blade fuse there you go put it back together and put it on the charger it will charge i wwas so wxcited i did it last night in 25 minutes cheers

dapope_22
5 days ago

Hi dapope_22,

I have an ibera pakrak 5 (https://www.amazon.com/Ibera-Bicycle-Touring-IB-RA5-Frame-Mounted/dp/B00AA8GFSI) on my RadMini but I prefer the Topeak Super tourist disc (https://www.amazon.com/Topeak-Super-Tourist-Tubular-Bicycle/dp/B000ZKHN6Y)

A couple of things that annoy me about the Ibera pakrak5;

The bottom part of the rack is too high and my panniers with hooks cannot be secured
The seat stay mounts, while super solid, are tubular instead of the 'floppy' flattened steel mounts a lot of racks use

If I had to do it over, I would probably find a more fatbike specific Topeak (https://www.amazon.com/Topeak-super-Tourist-Rack-Black/dp/B0187ZSMYA)

EDIT: I also had the Topeak on my RadRover, and I preferred having that extra security when attaching my panniers.

Sang

I just installed the same Ibera system on my Radrover and I am super happy with it. Fits perfectly on the Radrover and installation was super easy. I don't think you can beat it for the money. I do like the Topeak system, I just didn't like the price. I could see how it might sit too high on your RadMini though.

sanglee007
5 days ago

Does anyone have an Ibera pakrak ? I was thinking of getting this for my RadRover. Is a little less expensive than the Topeak system. Both the rack and the quick release commuter trunk can be had for about $80. I'm not doing any serious trekking, just want something to keep my locks and cables in once in a while. Any recommendations?

Hi dapope_22,

I have an ibera pakrak 5 (https://www.amazon.com/Ibera-Bicycle-Touring-IB-RA5-Frame-Mounted/dp/B00AA8GFSI) on my RadMini but I prefer the Topeak Super tourist disc (https://www.amazon.com/Topeak-Super-Tourist-Tubular-Bicycle/dp/B000ZKHN6Y)

A couple of things that annoy me about the Ibera pakrak5;

The bottom part of the rack is too high and my panniers with hooks cannot be secured
The seat stay mounts, while super solid, are tubular instead of the 'floppy' flattened steel mounts a lot of racks use

If I had to do it over, I would probably find a more fatbike specific Topeak (https://www.amazon.com/Topeak-super-Tourist-Rack-Black/dp/B0187ZSMYA)

EDIT: I also had the Topeak on my RadRover, and I preferred having that extra security when attaching my panniers.

Sang

RonDog1957
5 days ago

I would have to pause my peddling for 2-4 seconds and my motor would engage after that when I had the old speed based controller. Once I hit the mph cut off and watts hit 000, it would start all over again. Radrover did suggest raising the motor cutoff speed to 40 km/hr (around 24.8 mph) to keep the motor engage longer on the downhill runs. I didn't like this solution long term because the Radrover's gearing is only made for around 22-23 mph max.
Interesting. I haven't tried to wait to begin pedaling until the speed is below the PAS cutoff. I'll see if that makes a difference. I already have the cutoff speed maxed out (we have some fast dogs around here - that is my escape method). This whole thing is more of an annoyance than a fatal flaw at his point - unless it gets worse. I appreciate your reply and active participation on this board.

mrgold35
5 days ago

My April/May 2016 vintage RadRover (600 miles) has developed a quirk. On occasion (not always) if I make a steep descent at a fairly high speed (30+ mph) quickly followed by a steep ascent the PAS does not kick in at the appropriate speed (nor does the hand throttle work). Once I come to a complete stop and restart, all is well. It's almost like the controller cuts out power assist due to the high speed (as it should) but fails to recognize I have slowed back down - sounds somewhat similar to the problem MrGold described with his controller. It's livable for now (maybe it's always been that way and I failed to hit the right conditions?) and I am hoping it doesn't worsen. I don't want to replace the controller as I am a big fan of speed based PAS and have little interest in the new power based PAS.

I would have to pause my peddling for 2-4 seconds and my motor would engage after that when I had the old speed based controller. Once I hit the mph cut off and watts hit 000, it would start all over again. Radrover did suggest raising the motor cutoff speed to 40 km/hr (around 24.8 mph) to keep the motor engage longer on the downhill runs. I didn't like this solution long term because the Radrover's gearing is only made for around 22-23 mph max.

mrgold35
5 days ago

I have two his/her Radrovers with 4" fat tires, 750w rear hub motor, and just front spring suspension forks. My ebikes see double-duty as a weekday work commuter and morning/evening/weekend paved or single track rider. I usually 2X-4X my mileage fun riding compared to 13 mile round trip work commuting. I added a larger seat and suspension seatpost and that improved work and trail riding (Sunlite Cloud-9 and Bodyfloat V2.0 with orange springs).

We have about 20-30 miles of paved, dirt service roads, horse trails, and single track paths along the Rio Grand River in ABQ. I wasn't able to ride the single track trails much for a few months because the spring run-off from the mountain snows raised the Rio Grande river and flooded a lot of the trails nearest to the river. The trails are almost completely dry with the lower river height and 95-103 degree temps. I like the north/south river run because it is half way on my east/west work commute, mostly level paths, and a few degrees cooler because of the river and tall trees. There are around the same amount of trails near the foothill at the base of Sandia mountains starting at 6000 feet (a little steep in spots and can be really rocky). My tail heavy Radrover didn't do as well on steep rocky terrain because you need to "bunnyhop" up some of the rocks that are +6 inches tall.

I also purchased very bright Niterider lights for my handlebars and helmet for night rides along the river trails. I really like night riding and I usually have the trails to myself once the sun goes down. I did have to purchase elbow and knee pads because of a few spills and got tired of scratching my arms and legs on branches on the single track trails. I always wear a helmet, gloves, and eye protection day and night when riding. My head has hit a few branches and had a lot bugs in my face on the trails day or night.

The only downside to trail riding is having to clean and lube your bike afterwards (and getting use to all the dents and scratches).

RonDog1957
5 days ago

My April/May 2016 vintage RadRover (600 miles) has developed a quirk. On occasion (not always) if I make a steep descent at a fairly high speed (30+ mph) quickly followed by a steep ascent the PAS does not kick in at the appropriate speed (nor does the hand throttle work). Once I come to a complete stop and restart, all is well. It's almost like the controller cuts out power assist due to the high speed (as it should) but fails to recognize I have slowed back down - sounds somewhat similar to the problem MrGold described with his controller. It's livable for now (maybe it's always been that way and I failed to hit the right conditions?) and I am hoping it doesn't worsen. I don't want to replace the controller as I am a big fan of speed based PAS and have little interest in the new power based PAS.

mrgold35
6 days ago

We usually don't get above 100 degrees in June in Albuquerque. We are +10 degree hotter than our usual 80s-90s for May and June. Even our morning lows are 10-15 degrees warmer than the avg of 50s-60s (low/mid 70s around the city when I hit the road at 5:30 am).

I haven't noticed anything out the ordinary with my Radrover in this extreme heat so far during my the 13 mile round trip work commute. I have a Luna Cycle triangle bag and I'm debating about using my heat or freeze gel packs I only use with my winter riding Bar Mitts handlebar covers and putting the cold packs in the triangle bag to keep everything cool for my mid-afternoon ride home (we have small fridge with freezer in break room).

I had to change how I ride a little bit because of the heat like:
- sidewalks are starting to buckle and they make cool ramps to jump off
- freshly paved roads and road tar are getting a little gooey and I try to avoid getting tar on me
- no more after work rides on the trails. I now leave to work around 5am to hit the trails when it is cool (I've seen about +10 riders, joggers and walkers at 5:30am when I usually see none).
- I'm up from two to three 22 oz camelbak water jugs in a day

Any thoughts on how hot is too hot for ebike commuting and any extra thing you are doing to fight the heat?

RonDog1957
6 days ago

I follow any of these threads on controller configuration with interest. I am a 59 yo male (Mechanical Engineer) living in Western Massachusetts. I ride my April/May 2016 vintage RadRover primarily on 2 lane paved and dirt country roads - lots of rolling hills with some reasonably long/steep inclines on every ride. I am not commuting so overall speed has little value to me - I ride for recreation and my love of the RadRover is that it takes at lot of the effort/pain out my frequent uphills without necessitating constant adjustment of the PAS level.

There seem to have been several versions of the controller since I got my bike. Mine is the speed controlled version with PAS 1 being 10 mph cutoff, etc. Mine limits applied power to 500 Watts in PAS 1. Even though the manual says otherwise, PAS 2 and above use the full 750 Watts - I just find anything over PAS 1 more than I need/want. I believe the next version controller after mine was still speed controlled but lowered the speed values of the PAS settings (for more versatility) and of course the current version is power based. I fully appreciate the surge effect that others mention with the speed controlled version - it can get your goat. I have learned to be careful that I am headed straight when I start pedaling so I am not unpleasantly surprised when the assist kicks in - and best to have the brakes on slightly when doing a U-turn to shut the assist system down.

To me personally, I like the speed controlled version - a lot. I ride almost exclusively in PAS 1 and hardly ever touch it. I never have to worry about overloading the motor, and the assist comes and goes as I need it without constantly fiddling with the PAS level. I have not experienced "jerkiness" around the PAS cut in/cut out speed (in fact I'm impressed by how smooth it is, but maybe that's just my particular bike) and the start pedaling "surge" doesn't bother me (but I can see how others object).

Where I am going with all this is that I have seriously considered buying another RadRover, but I really don't think the new controller configuration is right for my style of riding (and a smaller frame size for my 5' 3" wife would be attractive as well). I want the assist to come and go as needed and I don't want to be constantly selecting a different PAS level to get me up a hill or prevent me from getting assist when I just don't want it (level/downhill). It sounds like Duane has the same preference bias that I have. I wonder how many of us there are out there.

I am sitting back seeing if a future version allows for selecting speed or power mode (ultimately with user define setpoints for each). Perhaps this level of complexity would allow/require a user interface via laptop as Duane suggests. Rad is such a young company I expect it will take them awhile to come up with a (near) perfect solution.

Tora Harris
7 days ago

I was reading through the Blog page and have a few questions.
I just started researching Mountain e-Bikes and live around Lake Tahoe Nevada. I was about the pull the trigger on a Rad Rover
https://www.radpowerbikes.com/products/radrover-electric-fat-bike
(but glad I came across the Juiced HyperFat)

I'm excited to get a fully loaded HyperFat (placing an order very soon!)

I was reading through the Blog page and have a few questions.

http://www.juicedbikes.com/updates/

The Blog says:

"Mud Guards/Fenders:
There are surprisingly few mudguards made for fat bikes at the moment. We are working to find some models with a good performance and sporty style — stay tuned! The bike has mounting points to accept most any 3rd party Fat tire fenders. "

Are there any 3rd party Mud Guard options that might/will fit this? (Links?) If not, what is an approximate guess/wait time for Juiced to offer something? (this year or next year?)

The Blog also says:

[Here is the size breakdown:
S: 16.5"
M: 18.0"
L: 20.0"]

When I go to check out though, the drop downs has M L XL (instead of S M L)
https://shop.juicedbikes.com/products/hyperfat-e-bike

M 16.5"
L 18"
XL 20"

Either way I want 18" so I'll choose what the numeric value says and won't worry about the Letter then. (but wanted to ask just in case) I'm 5'10" 170lbs (32" Leg)

We will soon post the stylized CAD drawings of the new frames to show the geometry. The number is what matters. We recently changed the Size designation so all the bikes match up as much as possible.

dapope_22
1 week ago

Does anyone have an Ibera pakrak ? I was thinking of getting this for my RadRover. Is a little less expensive than the Topeak system. Both the rack and the quick release commuter trunk can be had for about $80. I'm not doing any serious trekking, just want something to keep my locks and cables in once in a while. Any recommendations?

mrgold35
1 week ago

I have a Radrover hub drive bike at around 70 lbs fully loaded (accessories, rack, rack bag). It does have 2 mph walk feature; but, I've never tried to use it up inclines or stairs. I just use the throttle (converted from a twist to thumb throttle). I have tried the throttle up 2 flights of stairs and it work great because it only turns the rear wheel and you can modulate or hold between zero and full 750w of power with the thumb throttle I added.

Even at +70 lbs, the Radrover is very easy to walk down stair just by using both hand brakes (not ride down; but, walk beside it). When I work commute, I store my Radrover in my server room next to my office on the 2nd floor. Elevator up in the morning at 6am and down the fire escape stairs well out the back door at 3pm.

Rad Power Bikes does make the Radcity with the same programming and 750w rear hub motor (2 sizes, headlight, throttle and PAS levels 0-5, rear rack, front/rear fenders, front suspension forks included). The only difference is it has smaller 2.3" tires for city riding; but, it still comes in at +60 lbs like the larger Radrover (minus 7 lbs without battery). Even the small Radmini folding bike still comes in at +60 lbs.

mrgold35
1 week ago

I have two light on my Topeak rear rack:

Vis 180 for rearward visibility for day and night riding

Brightz LED under the rear rack for night time side visibility only.

The second pic is what my Radrover looks like before heading out at 5:30am. My helmet light might not show how bright everything is at that time in the morning. I just wanted to make sure a sleepy eyed distracted driver will recognized my bike that early in the morning from any angle (also have front/ rear helmet lights and wear reflective clothing).

1/2
gbird5000
3 weeks ago

Will one of these bikes fit on a bus bike rack?

VideoNOLA
1 month ago

I can definitely see wanting to "embiggen" my ride one day and go electric, but I am a huge rider (350 lbs) so must ask: "Do these 'fat-tire' bikes tend to come with beefier max load weight limits??"

Combustion69
1 month ago

Fatbikes serve no purpose and look gay

sten beetlex Darma
2 months ago

i do wish they have a gearless simpler version thats cheaper.......... i love this but hate the gears which i'm paranoid about getting stuck eventually..........!

Mainer Man
2 months ago

The greatest point is you would never be able to do this on a beach without an e-bike. That is the awesome part! It is a responsibility people need to be aware of. We are able to go place and see things quietly, clean, respectfully. Some if not most will never appreciate without an e-bike

Eddie Gelman
2 months ago

What beach were you on?

Eugene Moore
3 months ago

I ordered my RadRover yesterday. Thanks for your reviews. I live in Johnstown, Colorado and can't wait to hit some trails.

Drónos Vili
4 months ago

Hey there:-) how long is the battery less with 1 charge?

Rob True
5 months ago

Yack,yack,yack .............. what is the goddam range ?

Jim Williamson
6 months ago

Your videos are great. I have been researching ebikes since February 2016. Because of your videos, I ordered the RadRover yesterday. Very nice folks at Rad Power Bikes.

G G
6 months ago

my commute is only 2 miles, I am going to get one of these for spring/summer

Marcin O
7 months ago

Shame you cant buy these here in UK

Josefwintzent Libot
7 months ago

can this be bought in the philippines?

Maine Explorer
7 months ago

Thanks for the great info. I just ordered a Rad Rover and told them your videos were very helpful.

Gone TROPPO
8 months ago

wicked bike , thanks

Steven
8 months ago

I have a RadRover and put lil over 350 miles on it so far. I do street riding, dirt trails, rock trails. Only problem I have ever had is chain coming off going down hill while in a low gear. Besides that not one problem. I would like to see grip lock outs as well.

MrMike47274
6 months ago

Steven My knees are starting to bother me some also. last year I ride my first CENTURY and since then... well,,, I'm getting nervous. So,,,, in turn I may need one of these for myself down the road. I love biking and hate to think I may not be able to ride anymore. I'm glad you can get out still and enjoy the outdoors. :)

Steven
6 months ago

I was donated the bike from "The Independence fund", they help out disabled veterans. I have many problems from my knees to having massive migraine headaches from multiple Traumatic brain injuries. If I over exert my self I get these massive headaches. So with this bike I do what I can and when it is too much I have the assist I need. This bike has open up my life from just staying in my room.

MrMike47274
6 months ago

Steven Glad to hear you like these bikes. I'm really wanting to buy one for my wife. She likes to ride with me. But do to aches and pains in her body,, she doesn't have the stamina. So, our rides together are very short lived.

Ephesus RH
8 months ago

Im thinking of getting this for my commuting to school instead of car

babsisfish
8 months ago

Thanks to this bike I now expect more bang for my buck out of everything I buy! Had a couple warranty issues that were immediately resolved by Cory. I have both the rover and mini, both great bikes.

madogblue
8 months ago

Great video. I bought a Framed Alasken fat bike ,non electric and I love it

choski76
8 months ago

cables under yhe bottom bracket are vulnerable.