Rad Power Bikes RadWagon Review

Rad Power Bikes Radwagon Electric Bike Review 1
Rad Power Bikes Radwagon
Rad Power Bikes Radwagon Shengye 500 Watt Motor
Rad Power Bikes Radwagon 48 Volt 11 6 Ah Battery
Rad Power Bikes Radwagon King Meter Lcd Console
Rad Power Bikes Radwagon Independent Rear Light And Fender
Rad Power Bikes Radwagon Integrated Headlight And Deflopilator
Rad Power Bikes Radwagon Shimano Alivio Crankset
Rad Power Bikes Radwagon Shimano Tourney Derailleur
Rad Power Bikes Radwagon Tektro Novella Disc Brakes Qr Wheel
Rad Power Bikes Radwagon Electric Bike Review 1
Rad Power Bikes Radwagon
Rad Power Bikes Radwagon Shengye 500 Watt Motor
Rad Power Bikes Radwagon 48 Volt 11 6 Ah Battery
Rad Power Bikes Radwagon King Meter Lcd Console
Rad Power Bikes Radwagon Independent Rear Light And Fender
Rad Power Bikes Radwagon Integrated Headlight And Deflopilator
Rad Power Bikes Radwagon Shimano Alivio Crankset
Rad Power Bikes Radwagon Shimano Tourney Derailleur
Rad Power Bikes Radwagon Tektro Novella Disc Brakes Qr Wheel

Summary

  • Affordable, feature rich cargo style electric bike with a stiffer and lighter frame because it's not quite as long as some others
  • Offers five levels of pedal assist, throttle mode and throttle override as well as regenerative braking to recoup power and reduce wear on brake pads
  • Standardized rear rack and runners should work with traditional cargo bike accessories, several nice extras are already included such as wood decks, plastic wheel guards, full length fenders, lights, adjustable stem, oversized kickstand, deflopilator, adjustable stem and ergonomic grips
  • Only available in one size and color, no quick release on the rear wheel, some cheaper components, solid one year warranty

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Rad Power Bikes

Model:

RadWagon

Price:

$1,599 USD

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Urban, Commuting, Cargo

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

20152016

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

75 lbs (34.01 kg)

Battery Weight:

7 lbs (3.17 kg)

Motor Weight:

9 lbs (4.08 kg)

Frame Material:

Steel

Frame Sizes:

17 in (43.18 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Reach: 22

Frame Types:

Cargo, Mid-Step

Frame Colors:

Orange

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid

Attachment Points:

Fender Bosses, Rack Bosses

Gearing Details:

21 Speed 3x7 Shimano Tourney TX (Rear Derailleur) and Shimano Alivio (Front Derailleur), 28-33-48 Tooth

Shifter Details:

Shimano Tourney SIS Thumb Shifters Left and Right

Cranks:

Aluminum Alloy

Pedals:

Wellgo M111 Aluminum Alloy Platform

Headset:

Neco

Stem:

Zoom, Adjustable Angle, Aluminum

Handlebar:

Zoom, Aluminum Aloy, Low Rise

Brake Details:

Tektro Novella Mechanical Disc with 180 mm Rotors, Tektro Levers with Motor Inhibitor

Grips:

Velo, Semi-Ergonomic (Black and Gray)

Saddle:

Velo Plush With Integrated Lifting Handle

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Double Wall Aluminum Alloy, 30 mm Width, 36 Hole, CNC Side Wall

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 12 Gauge

Tire Brand:

Kenda K-Rad All Purpos, 26" x 2.3"

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

28" Cargo Rack With Wood Pannels, Integrated 200 Lumen LED Headlight, Battery Powered LED Rear Light, Deflopilator Spring (Keeps Front Wheel Straight for Loading), Sturdy Spring-Loaded Double Leg Kickstand, Full Length Plastic Fenders with Mud Flaps, Neoprene Slap Guard, Basic Flick Bell

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, 48 Volt 15 Amp Sine Wave Controller (20 Amps Peak), Regenerative Braking, KMC Z7 Rustbuster Chain, Female USB Charging Port and Fuse on Battery, USB Port on Display

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Shengyi

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Gearless Direct Drive Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Motor Peak Output:

750 watts

Battery Brand:

Samsung, 29E Cells

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11.6 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

556.8 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

15 miles (24 km)

Estimated Max Range:

40 miles (64 km)

Display Type:

Fixed Backlit Monochrome LCD, SW-LCD by-King Meter

Readouts:

Speedometer, Wattmeter, Odometer, Assist Level (0-5), Battery Charge Level (5 Bars)

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad near Left Grip, Throttle on/ off Near Right Grip

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Twist Throttle (12 Magnet Pedelec Disc)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

The RadWagon is the second electric bicycle from Rad Power Bikes which started out with a fat ebike called the RadRover (crowdfunded through Indiegogo in early 2015) and has been working in the space since 2007. The Wagon emphasizes value and is one of the most affordable electric cargo bikes I’ve ever seen… To keep the price low a few components have been stepped down including the Shimano Tourney TX drivetrain, basic adjustable stem, independent rear light and cheap grips. But where it counts, things are done right and there’s a lot to appreciate including wood platforms on the rack and running boards, full length fenders, front and rear lights, oversized 180 mm disc brakes and a sturdy double legged kickstand. Compared with similar electric offerings from Yuba and Xtracycle the Rad Wagon is shorter in length and quite a bit heavier at ~75 lbs. It’s built on a steel frame that helps to dampen vibration and features large Kenda tires and a Velo Plush saddle to smooth things out further. The most impressive aspect to me is the price… which is enabled through the “online only” sales model that Rad Power Bikes uses. You will have to assemble parts of the bike on your own (or with the help of a shop) and cannot try it in person first which means the ~17″ frame may or may not fit your body perfectly (I’m ~5’9″ and it felt comfortable). You do get a one year warranty here and even though the company is relatively new I feel like they are well funded and operating in a professional manner.

Driving the bike is a quiet and smooth 500 watt gearless hub motor. Not having gears, this motor is able to offer regeneration as well as power but it also weighs more and isn’t as strong at low speeds. Many people ask “can you pedal an electric bike to charge it” but that’s not really the point here given the 10% to 15% efficiency. Basically, with a larger and heavier bike like this the regen feature just lets you save wear on your brake pads and extend range slightly if you’re coasting down hills for part of your ride. The top speed of the bike is ~20 mph and you can operate in either pedal assist or throttle mode. I love that there’s a throttle only setting (level zero) and that you can override assist at any time with full power using the twist throttle. You can also completely disable the throttle using the red on/off button near the right grip. I noticed a quick disconnect point in the wire running to the hub motor which will make tuneups and fixes easier but there’s no quick release back here… just in the front. The bike uses a sine wave controller that puts out up to 20 Amps and controls power in a smooth way.

Powering the motor and front light on the RadWagon is a high quality 48 volt 11.6 amp hour battery. Inside are Samsung 29E cells that use a Lithium-ion chemistry aimed at being light weight and long lasting. To extend their life, store the pack in a cool dry location (avoid extreme heat and cold) and if you’re not going to be riding for a while leave the pack at ~50% instead of plugging it in. Check in on the battery every few months and fill it back up if power has been draining. I like the mounting location of the battery here because it’s out of the way and somewhat protected by the frame. The pack weighs about seven pounds and that weight is kept low and center for improved handling and balance. I did notice that when braking the rear tire can skid more frequently than on shorter non-cargo bikes because there’s less weight over the rear wheel. Getting back to the battery, one of the downsides I noticed is that you have to turn the pack on independent from the display console (so that’s two on/off steps). It’s not a huge deal but there is more potential for accidentally leaving the battery on which could drain its power. Same deal for the rear light, it’s independent from the main battery and runs on separate cells… if you turn it on but forget to turn it off while parking overnight you may come back to a non-functioning light in the morning. I would prefer that all systems run off of one main battery and that there be only one on/off switch to make it fast and easy but this design still gets the job done and saves money. The battery casing is a generic “dolphin” style and the rear light doesn’t require extra wires as it would if it were integrated.

Operating the bike requires a couple of extra steps but also includes some nice extras. Once the battery is charged and locked to the downtube you press on and then on again at the button pad near the left grip. The LCD display comes to life and shows your power, assist level, speed and distance stats. At this point, you can hold mode to activate the headlight and then reach back to click the on/off switch for the tail light. At any point if you want to go, make sure the red button on the twist throttle is in and then twist! For improved range and a bit of exercise you can arrow up through five levels of assist and the 12 magnet cadence sensor (near the right crank arm) will sense movement and activate the motor. It’s great that they used a higher end cadence sensor because it’s very responsive but the brake levers are wired in to cut power to the motor so if you ever feel out of control just squeeze. Another benefit to cadence sensing vs. torque on an e-bike like this is that you don’t have to push hard to get the motor going, it just listens for movement and then puts out the specified power and speed (low for level 1 and higher for level 5). I tend to ride in level two or three and then use the twist throttle for a boost of power when passing fellow cyclists or topping hills.

In recent years, established electric bike companies have been investing more and more money into designs. Some bikes like the EdgeRunner have a smaller rear wheel for lower center of gravity when hauling and use a mid-drive motor for increased torque and efficiency. This is awesome but it also costs 2x to 3x as much money. The RadWago is a competent electric cargo bike that could empower you to haul groceries, bring kids along or completely eliminate your car or motorcycle. It’s a solid platform with thoughtful accessories, a good warranty and a lot of potential. It might not go as far as a mid-drive bike but the charger is small and light weight… in ~1 hour you could refill to ~70% and easily get home. If you’ve been considering a utility oriented bicycle but weren’t sure about the added weight and size, this bike addresses those concerns by adding electric power and being a bit shorter. It feels sturdy and stiff and also comfortable but you could add something like a Thudbuster to smooth things out even more. Just remember to turn that battery and light off when you’ve reached your destination ;)

Pros:

  • Compatible with many of the leading cargo bike accessories from companies like Yuba and ExtraCycle, add a child seat, sidecar, extra set of handlebars and many other utility-oriented extras
  • Shorter wheelbase than traditional cargo bikes, makes it stiffer to ride and somewhat easier to store if you have limited space
  • Durable gearless motor operates quietly and offers regeneration to help recoup energy when coasting down large hills (and save wear on your brake pads)
  • Quick release on the front wheel and removable battery pack (makes bike lighter for transport) there’s also a quick disconnect in the power cable going to the motor but taking it off requires a wrench because it uses standard nuts
  • Very stable when parked thanks to the oversized double legged kickstand, there’s also a deflopilator spring running from the fork to the downtube to keep it straight when loading gear
  • Protective clear plastic guards are mounted to both sides of the rear wheel, this should keep strapping from packs away from spokes and the tire (reduced rubbing and snagging potential)
  • Useful accessories including full length plastic fenders with mudguards, front and rear lights (though the rear light runs off of independent batteries and not the main pack) and reflectors
  • Comfortable saddle with integrated handle for easy lifting when repositioning the bike, larger tires smooth out bumps, ergonomic grips relax hands a bit and the adjustable stem helps to optimize body position when riding
  • Offers throttle only mode as well as throttle override offering full power that overrides assist, five levels of pedal assist help to conserve power and extend range
  • Responsive pedal assist uses 12 magnets vs. 5 or 6 on more basic ebikes, this helps it get going quicker and stop when you discontinue pedaling, I like that the brake levers have motor inhibitors and also activate regeneration mode
  • The steel frame helps to reduce vibration but you could add even more comfort by adding a seat post suspension like the Thudbuster (just make sure you get the 27.2 mm diameter to fit or use a shim if you buy a smaller post)
  • Two integrated USB charging ports! One is located on the right side of the battery pack but can get in the way if you’re pedaling so the second one is right up on the display (right side) so you can charge your phone or other portable electronic devices

Cons:

  • Adjustable angle stems like the one used here can come loose over time if you go off-road or ride off of curbs… consider checking it regularly
  • Only available in one medium ~17″ frame size, the mid-step frame and low seat post makes it accessible to shorter riders but some larger people could feel cramped
  • Currently only available online so it may be difficult to test out in person, the warranty is solid and Rad Power Bikes has been in business for many years
  • In order to start the Rad Wagon you first have to activate the battery pack and then press power again on the button pad, this adds time and makes it easier to forget to de-activate the battery after a ride
  • The battery pack takes up most of the space where a bottle cage might mount and the controller box is already fastened to the seat tube so no bottle cages… consider a saddle rail adapter or something like a Camelbak

Resources:

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Kelley
2 years ago

Thanks for your review. You mention the bike should be compatible with some Yuba and ExtraCycle components. Do you know if specific components are compatible or if there is a resource for this information?

Court Rye
2 years ago

Hi Kelley, I got the impression that all or most accessories would be compatible (at least with the rear rack tubing portion of the bike) but I’ve reached out to Rad Power Bikes to get more info and will chime in again once they respond :)

Mandy
2 years ago

Thanks for all the great review on your site, they are extremely helpful! I am interested to hear the reply about the accessories, in particular the Hooptie and/or Monkey Bars. I will purchase this bike if one of those options work. With a three year old I’ve been very interested in the “family style” options of cargo bikes with the rear decks, but have been put off by the price point of the assisted Xtracycle and Yuba. The RadWagon seems like it may be a great choice, but would love the added piece of mind the inner and outer rails of the Hooptie and Monkey Bars provide for kids on the back.

Sharon
2 years ago

http://cambriabike.com

I ordered my Rad Wagon accessories on line from the link above. I ordered the handlebars, breadbasket and padded seat. Hope this helps.

Sharon
2 years ago

I just googled accessories for Yuba Mundo and several sites appeared….Merry Christmas!!!!

Court Rye
2 years ago

Cool, thanks Sharon!

Mohcine Chaouki
1 year ago

Do you know if anyone was able to retrofit the Monkey bars on this bike? ~Thanks!
I bought the bars from the cambria site, but they are a bit longer than the back seat dimensions.

Mike
1 year ago

Hi Mohcine,

We will have a great solution for this listed on our website for sale within the next 30 days. The length and mounting hole locations of the other accessories on the market make it challenging to install on the RadWagon, but we expect that you will really like what we will be offering, stay tuned, and thanks for the support!

-Mike from Rad Power Bikes

George
1 year ago

Radwagon owners, how is the bike holding up? Also, to the company–how long have you been in business? Are parts readily available? Tech support offered? Thanks.

Rad Power Bikes
11 months ago

Hi George,

We have been in business since 2007 and replacement parts are readily available and stocked in our Seattle warehouse. We have an experienced tech support team ready to help as needed and we strive to provide same day responses as well as same day replacement part shipments if anything is needed on your end!

– Mike from Rad Power Bikes

N. KANTH
11 months ago

How to buy please send the details, about price and buying

Court Rye
11 months ago

This bike is sold through their website here. You can buy it and other models and they will ship them directly to your house :)

TenBlinkers
11 months ago

My RadWagon experience so far. I have 1,500 miles on it since February, and I like it a lot.

Pros:

  • Motor has a lot of power. Me+bike+a bunch of gear = 400lbs, and I’ve yet to meet a hill I can’t climb.
  • Speed is rated at 20mph, but you’ll get assist for a bit more than that. I can maintain 21mph+ for 10+ miles.
  • You really can carry just about anything/everything you can think of.
  • I love that RadPower doesn’t have proprietary batteries! This means if you need another battery (my commute is long – one won’t get me there), you can get the most up-to-date cells at market prices, not 2-year old tech at a stiff markup, like most other ebike companies.
  • RadPower’s light they sell separately is good, and I recommend it.
  • Great price. Can’t be beat for the money.

Cons:

  • Beware the spokes. They use 12g spokes for durability. That’s good. Very few shops can cut or thread 12g spokes. That’s bad. And the ones that can, don’t stock them. When I broke mine, RadPower was out of spokes with no ETA, and the shop didn’t have any, so I had to order a box of them myself from Amazon. That’s fine I guess, but it sets you back a week waiting on them (2-day delivery wasn’t available). Also, the spokes get loose about every 300 miles. Finally after 1200 miles and 4 trips to the shop to have them tighten them (which I could have done myself, but was afraid to knock the wheel out of true), the shop recommended a full rear wheel rebuild. They rebuilt it with 13/14g spokes instead. Again, not the end of the world, but the bike was out of commission for an extended period.
  • Invest in some kevlar tires. Non-kevlar tires + ebikes = nonsensical.
  • My LBS isn’t all that happy when they see me coming. They don’t appreciate the 75lb weight, nor how difficult it is to get the rear wheel on/off. This is no fault of RadPower, just the nature of cargo bikes with hub motors.
  • Their Ballard Bags are just ok. Don’t try using them without the runners, and don’t expect them to be waterproof. Decent enough for the price.
  • Caveat Emptor on the cargo bike. If you’re picking the Wagon, you no doubt understand the pros/cons of cargo bikes, but sometimes it’s a hassle. They’re hard to fit in cars, hard to buy racks for with the extended wheelbase, they don’t fit on bus bike racks.

On balance though, for my first ebike it’s been a lot of fun and I don’t regret the choice. Now to convince the wife I need a speed pedelec for ‘backup’…

Court Rye
11 months ago

Excellent points, I enjoyed reading your cons and can relate to some of the difficulty working with shops (either for parts or just outside of their specialty). Most of the bikes I test are new so spokes aren’t loose but I have asked about this sort of thing before and heard that Loctite Blue can help to keep them secure. I hope the 13 and 14 gauge spokes hold up for you!

Lyn
10 months ago

I’m seriously considering the rad wagon as my first e-bike. Tested the spicy curry and a couple front boxes and loved them, big am balking at their price tag. On the other hand, I’m reading a few reviews that indicate that quality may be list due to the lower price. Given that I’m not an experienced bike person, how much maintenance will I be doing in this bike? How much more did you spend on the upgrades? I currently commute to work by bike and will now be adding a stop to drop off my son at preschool. It’s a total commute of four miles one way. In a perfect world, I don’t drive at all when in town. Thanks for any guidance you can provide. I’m really trying to make the right choice here. Oh yes, and finally, do you find it easy to keep the bike safe from theft?

George J
9 months ago

Purchased my bike 3 months ago and already logged in over 700 miles. Runs well and no issues yet. I was worried about the non standard spokes so purchased a few –just in case. Last week I was caught in a very heavy down pour 10 miles from home, soaked when I got home but bike ran without difficulty. I would buy it again. No regrets.

Court Rye
9 months ago

That’s awesome feedback George! Ride safe in the rain, glad the spokes are holding up and the bike hasn’t had any issues even with the weather :D

bill
6 months ago

Eventually, the electronics will fail. The company Rad may not exist by then. Will I end up having a non functional e-Bike? Are there any third party electronic controllers?

-bill

Court Rye
6 months ago

Hey Bill, sure! There are companies that repack batteries and others that sell controllers. Rad Power Bikes uses less proprietary stuff and the controller box is separate. Given their success and the thousands of people that own the product I’m guessing a third party after market solution would pop up. There might already be options you could find on Ebay. I’m not much of a hacker when it comes to ebikes but you can check out Endless Sphere forums and ask for tips in the event that you need technical help… also the forums here to some extent :)

Antia
3 months ago

I have now had my Radwagon for over a year. Overall I am pretty happy with the bike but as a learned more about e-bikes and about my own use, I have modified the bike to better fit my needs.

I use the bike for commuting and for taking my kids (2 and 4) to daycare, a total distance of 7 miles each way. I also live on a very steep hill. I bought the aluminium accessory deck and the caboose to transport the kiddos. The bike works great as stock but it is limited in the amount of torque it can provide at low speeds, which meant that I could not get up the hill I live on with the two kids on board and I could just about manage with one and pedaling furiously. I have to say that the hill is beyond the specified capabilities of the bike, so this is not a ding on rad but rather a reality of where I live. Once on the not so hilly areas, the bike worked great and my kids absolutely loved riding in the back. This issue with the hill made me look into possible modifications and I ended up mounting a mid drive motor (BBSHD) onto the frame, which was straightforward. I took out the rear wheel with motor and associated electronics and moved them only another bike. With the mid-drive motor, the radwagon frame is fantastic and works perfectly for my application. I like that it is just slightly longer than a normal bike and behaves in a very natural way. I use the motor as an assist and pedal all the time, so I appreciate that the bike behaves “normally”. The battery was plenty for my commute and back with either the original motor or the middrive, I never had any issue. As someone mentioned in one of the other comments, rad uses non-proprietary batteries so I was able to use my original battery with the new motor without any issues. Recently I also upgraded the stock handlebar to a Jones loop handlebar. Again, there was nothing fundamentally wrong with the original, I just find that I don’t particularly like straight handlebars and prefer a different geometry. I originally bought the Ballard cargo bags and I have to say they are just ok. One of them had 2 of the holding straps break off within the first few months. The way to mount them to the bike is also not very convenient if the deck is installed (which typically would be). I would not buy the bags again if given the opportunity. The caboose is very nice for carrying the kids. I just changed the nuts they provided with butterfly nuts so that it is easier to take on and off.

Overall, I really like the frame of the bike and the fact that it is fundamentally a non-proprietary design, just a very sensible selection of parts that work well together. This meant that I started with a reasonably priced bike that works great and was able to slowly upgrade bits and pieces to customize it to my use case. It is a shame rad does not offer this bike as a pure frameset as it makes for a great platform for a custom ebike.

Court Rye
3 months ago

Hey Antia, great overview… thanks for checking in after a year of use with this bike. I’m glad the frame is holding up for you and that you took a risk and tried modifying it to fit your needs better. Sounds like you and your kids are enjoying it :)

John
3 months ago

I’m 6’2″ — will the Radwagon be too small to ride comfortably?

Court Rye
3 months ago

High John, you might be at the upper end but with a raised saddle slid back on the rails and maybe a longer solid stem it could work well. There aren’t many cargo ebikes that come in multiple sizes, especially at this price. You’d be well served to look at different bars, different stems and even a longer seat post to make this work. I like suspension seat posts and Thudbuster makes longer ones. Hope this helps… you didn’t mention your weight but there are a number of mid-drive cargo bikes now from Xtracycle and Yuba that would climb better if your budget permits. I’m about to review the Bosch powered Yuba today so it’s kind of top of mind :)

Robert W Green
2 months ago

Court, I love this bike, it’s like a two wheel pickup truck! Those mtb handlebars have to go though. I’d rather have cruiser handlebars so I can ride sitting up straight. Next year when I get my tax refund I’m going to get one of these and cruiserize it. Only kink in the plan is I don’t see any slack in the wires and that will make populating the extra real estate on the longer bars very difficult. Can they add extra long wires and cables to accommodate different handle bars?

Court Rye
2 months ago

That’s a great question, Robert… Now that Rad Power Bikes has a retail outlet in Seattle Washington, I bet you could call and ask for some feedback and maybe even a customized version. I can’t say for sure, but maybe they would be able to adjust yours before shipping it out?

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WilliamT
6 hours ago

So after 2 front hub builds, I decided to do my first mid-drive build on a Specialized Rockhopper. The kit I purchased from Luna Cycles with a 48v 13.6 ah dolphin battery that I can swap with my RadWagon commuter.

Things to consider before doing the build.

1) Get yourself come tools for the bottom bracket. I purchased the small toolkit from Performance Bikes and it had almost everything I needed. The only other tool I purchased was the Luna Wrench but I think the Spin Doctor kit (~$50) had the same tool

2) The kit comes with 2 hex bolts (M6 1.0 x 10 mm) used to attach the motor to the frame. On this bike, it was too short so I had to go to home depot to get longer ones. Luna supplies some additional washers and 2 (M6 1.0 x 25 mm). I needed 15 mm length bolts along with the washers. Cost was an additional $0.80-$1.20 I think for 2 (M6 1.0 x 15 mm)

3) Because I have a small frame and the battery went into the bag, I had to get an extension cable to connect to the battery. I got a 12 gauge 2 ft cable for $9.
https://powerwerx.com/powerpole-connector-extension-cable
BBS02 kits use Anderson power pole connectors.

4) If you want to keep your existing chain, count the number of teeth on your current chain wheel so you can order the same teeth size for the Lekkie chain ring. Mine was a 42 tooth.

Overall, the build was very easy to do with the tools. On this bike the front derailleur guide couldn't be opened to slide out the chain but luckily the chain had a link to easily pull apart and re-attach.

The build was originally for a bike with manual disc brakes so I ordered the standard override brake levers. That didn't work out so I put the kit on this bike with hydraulic brakes. From my past experience with the hydraulic brake sensors, they are a pain to align. Luna sells a hydraulic cable set with motor override features for I'm not ready to shell out another $120.

This time around, I hooked up one of the manual brake levers with the override below my left brake to control shutting off the motor. This allow me to cut off the motor when braking and also cut off the motor when shifting. It serving as my "clutch" because I'm too lazy to install the Gearsensor that I purchased lol.

1/4
Al_R
22 hours ago

The newer Radwagons have different firmware than mine. my understanding is they are meant to cut out once they get you to speed. Not sure how mine works but it stays on although it still seems to maintain a max assist at about 20MPH.

I would HIGHLY RECOMMEND not taking the Radwagon at speeds over 23-25 miles an hour. In short, the bike was not built for that speed. Due to the weight and size, there is already a considerable amount of stress on the parts. A catastrophic failure is more likely at higher speeds and if the motor is still engaged (lets say a front tire failure) all of that energy has to go somewhere. I get it up to 29 MPH at the bottom of a few hills daily and have tried to test out a rapid stop. It is harrowing.

If you do plan on uping your max speed (which can be done with some hardware modifications and will void your warranty as well as make you eligible for a citation depending on your local laws) , you may want to switch out the quick release on the front tire. My LBS says there is a chance of the wheel coming off at high speeds when breaking. They adjust my front break to be a little soft in order to prevent this. Not sure what he said to do instead, lock nuts I think.

I also dream of going faster, just a little, just sometimes. I wish the throttle was independent and was more like a super booster. Same deal with the assist but the throttle gets you up to 30 with gusto. That would be awesome!

Thanks for the advise! I've sent an email to Rad describing the issue and I'm waiting for a response now. The bike's motor drives the bike up to 20 mph so I'm not sure about coasting 5 to 7 MPH above that is all that bad, but I understand what you are saying. I'll let you know what Rad responds with.

Barkme Wolf
22 hours ago

I have a 4 month old Radwagon or rather two of them and they both do the same thing. When we go down the bridge we hit 25 to 27 MPH. The motors on both bike will not kick back in until we slow to around 15.5 MPH, then everything work again and we accelerate back up to just under 20 MPH. I need to try increasing the cutoff speed I guess.

The newer Radwagons have different firmware than mine. my understanding is they are meant to cut out once they get you to speed. Not sure how mine works but it stays on although it still seems to maintain a max assist at about 20MPH.

I would HIGHLY RECOMMEND not taking the Radwagon at speeds over 23-25 miles an hour. In short, the bike was not built for that speed. Due to the weight and size, there is already a considerable amount of stress on the parts. A catastrophic failure is more likely at higher speeds and if the motor is still engaged (lets say a front tire failure) all of that energy has to go somewhere. I get it up to 29 MPH at the bottom of a few hills daily and have tried to test out a rapid stop. It is harrowing.

If you do plan on uping your max speed (which can be done with some hardware modifications and will void your warranty as well as make you eligible for a citation depending on your local laws) , you may want to switch out the quick release on the front tire. My LBS says there is a chance of the wheel coming off at high speeds when breaking. They adjust my front break to be a little soft in order to prevent this. Not sure what he said to do instead, lock nuts I think.

I also dream of going faster, just a little, just sometimes. I wish the throttle was independent and was more like a super booster. Same deal with the assist but the throttle gets you up to 30 with gusto. That would be awesome!

Al_R
1 day ago

Interesting. I haven't tried to wait to begin pedaling until the speed is below the PAS cutoff. I'll see if that makes a difference. I already have the cutoff speed maxed out (we have some fast dogs around here - that is my escape method). This whole thing is more of an annoyance than a fatal flaw at his point - unless it gets worse. I appreciate your reply and active participation on this board.

I have a 4 month old Radwagon or rather two of them and they both do the same thing. When we go down the bridge we hit 25 to 27 MPH. The motors on both bike will not kick back in until we slow to around 15.5 MPH, then everything work again and we accelerate back up to just under 20 MPH. I need to try increasing the cutoff speed I guess.

Barkme Wolf
2 days ago

After putting 5300 on my Radwagon it was due for an overhaul.

Barkme Wolf
2 days ago

Good news! My LBS says they can overhaul it all with things they have in stock.
Switching out front shifting components for better quality (cables keep breaking, has never shifted smoothly through all gears)-
Replacing worn cassette-
Replacing worn drive chain (takes 2 chains)-
Replacing pedals (trashed)-
Possible upgrade of bottom bracket if necessary-
Complete tune up-

So far the only mystery is why I am going through so many spokes.
I am currently waiting for some Sapim spokes for my rear wheel.
I am hoping this will solve the issue.

Hopefully this with solve my shifting issues which I have had since I got the bike.
The rear tire might be repairable. I really like the feel of that balloon tire and am hoping I can keep it.
The Radwagon it a rough ride. Reminds me of my old Jeep Wrangler. Having that balloon tire seemed to take the edge off some of the bumps.

Barkme Wolf
3 days ago

To be specific- I have 120 staples in my left lung which was glued in place with acid. I am unable to lift more than 40 lbs. Because of the weight of the bike and the physical contortions required to access the mechanics- It is impossible for me to do any work on the bike other than general cleaning and upgrades without enduring considerable amounts of discomfort.
Additionally, whenever I have had to get a new component for my Radwagon it has been a special order, sometimes because of sizing and sometimes because I am looking for an item that is not regularly kept in stock. Spokes have been the biggest issue but I think I have a source now.

Lost
3 days ago

I have a hard time with the bike being "shot". A component or two, but what, specifically, is wrong with each component? The crankset?
What was the size? Can you add a link?

I've actually taken it to several different shops. I don't work on my bike myself because I have a health condition. It is nearly impossible to work on the radwagon by oneself due to its size. Removing and replacing the rear wheel is a two-man job. I have seen several people try to do it by themselves and they get very very angry.

Missing teeth on a cassette? The shifting system? The shifters can be bought on ebay for 20 bucks a set or so. As far as the cable breaking, it sounds like it is rubbing somewhere, look near the break area to see where. Derailleurs are available everywhere, and upgrade to Deore is only about $30 or $40. Pedals? Just pick your flavor and buy. Tires and flats are no mystery, happens all the time to everyone, especially if you have goat heads in your area.
This is the beauty of buying a Rad Product, all the components are off the shelf, not specific to to Rad at all. If it were an expensive boutique bike, you would be at the mercy for many of the components at the whim of the brand.

mrgold35
3 days ago

Sounds like the heart of the ebike (hub motor, controller, battery, wiring harness, and LCD screen) seem to be A-OK? What is the possibility of transferring the ebike components to another more robust non-ebike to convert? I don't know how different the Radrover differs from the Radwagon other than the fat tires and front suspension as I rack up the mileage? I figured the battery or hub motor would die before any major mechanical bike parts would?

Barkme Wolf
3 days ago

I Understand that, and went with Rad Power Bikes because they offer the best balance of price, and quality for my needs. With the upgrades and modifications I've made, I feel my Radwagon is now just as good as a Yuba, or Extracycle, yet still less than half the price.

I replaced it with a Shimano Deore. I actually like the shifter because it allows one to drop to first in one shift.
What was the size? Can you add a link?
Wow, that's insane!
On the whole, it sounds like "bikey" issues and not ebike issues? Anyone really into biking would do well to have a complete set of decent bike tools and a willingness to get down into it. Amost everypossible issue has an associated youtube video on how to adjust/fix/repair/replace. Every single bike component is available at whatever quality level you wish to buy. Just takes a little research on forums and internet. As long as the frame is not cracked any other item can be fixed in minutes.

I would posit that perhaps you need a different bike shop? But really, a set of tools and a "I can fix this!" attitude may yield the most satisfying results.
I've actually taken it to several different shops. I don't work on my bike myself because I have a health condition. It is nearly impossible to work on the radwagon by oneself due to its size. Removing and replacing the rear wheel is a two-man job. I have seen several people try to do it by themselves and they get very very angry.

Lost
3 days ago

I am at 5000 miles and the Radwagon is shot. Can't go 100 mile without something going wrong. Not sure why my shiftier cable breaks all the time, tires have mystery flats, spokes break and bend..... I am out of money trying to keep up.
I don't carry heavy cargo, I don't jump curbs ever, I take it in for regular maintenance.

It is so difficult getting accurate measurements from Rad Power Bikes I never end up getting right gear the correct sizes.
My LBS says I need new everything.

I am currently collecting links to items that are known to fit the Radwagon. I am basically replacing everything.
If everyone could throw me a link to quality items that they can confirm fit the Radwagon... please help! Amazon links preferred.
I would like to make one massive order and have my LBS cobble it together.
I prefer colorful items blue, purple, orange, rainbow.
Need shifting system front and back, cassette, derailleurs front and back, pedals, crankset ..... what else?
need to keep it cheap but must be quality.... quality most.
ASAP! Need to get a price quote to my sugar mama!
Wow, that's insane!
On the whole, it sounds like "bikey" issues and not ebike issues? Anyone really into biking would do well to have a complete set of decent bike tools and a willingness to get down into it. Amost everypossible issue has an associated youtube video on how to adjust/fix/repair/replace. Every single bike component is available at whatever quality level you wish to buy. Just takes a little research on forums and internet. As long as the frame is not cracked any other item can be fixed in minutes.

I would posit that perhaps you need a different bike shop? But really, a set of tools and a "I can fix this!" attitude may yield the most satisfying results.

Barkme Wolf
4 days ago

I am at 5000 miles and the Radwagon is shot. Can't go 100 mile without something going wrong. Not sure why my shiftier cable breaks all the time, tires have mystery flats, spokes break and bend..... I am out of money trying to keep up.
I don't carry heavy cargo, I don't jump curbs ever, I take it in for regular maintenance.

It is so difficult getting accurate measurements from Rad Power Bikes I never end up getting right gear the correct sizes.
My LBS says I need new everything.

I am currently collecting links to items that are known to fit the Radwagon. I am basically replacing everything.
If everyone could throw me a link to quality items that they can confirm fit the Radwagon... please help! Amazon links preferred.
I would like to make one massive order and have my LBS cobble it together.
I prefer colorful items blue, purple, orange, rainbow.
Need shifting system front and back, cassette, derailleurs front and back, pedals, crankset ..... what else?
need to keep it cheap but must be quality.... quality most.
ASAP! Need to get a price quote to my sugar mama!

Barkme Wolf
4 days ago

I am at 5000 miles and the Radwagon is shot. Can't go 100 mile without something going wrong. Not sure why my shiftier cable breaks all the time, tires have mystery flats, spokes break and bend..... I am out of money trying to keep up.
I don't carry heavy cargo, I don't jump curbs ever, I take it in for regular maintenance.

It is so difficult getting accurate measurements from Rad Power Bikes I never end up getting right gear the correct sizes.
My LBS says I need new everything.

I am currently collecting links to items that are known to fit the Radwagon. I am basically replacing everything.
If everyone could throw me a link to quality items that they can confirm fit the Radwagon... please help! Amazon links preferred.
I would like to make one massive order and have my LBS cobble it together.
I prefer colorful items blue, purple, orange, rainbow.
Need shifting system front and back, cassette, derailleurs front and back, pedals, crankset ..... what else?
need to keep it cheap but must be quality.... quality most.
ASAP! Need to get a price quote to my sugar mama!

mams99
5 days ago

Hi there,
just a few comments. It seems like a longtail cargo bike could work well for you. Certainly the xtracycle with a bafang will work well with regard to the drive assist, but I wonder if the low deck (where your son would sit) would be problematic as he is so tall. Usually the low decks are nice because they lower the center of gravity helping with stability and because it is easier for young kids, but in your case it might be a problem with long legs.
Have you considered the Radwagon from Rad Power Bikes? It is very nicely priced and it is a long tail with the deck at a regular height. Depending on the maximum grade of the hills in your neighborhood, it could work very well for you. I have one and I use it to haul my two kids (3 and 4.5) to daycare and errands (anywhere from 1 to 10 miles). Let me know if you have any questions about it.

Antia

The height is my worry too. It has not been a gift to be a early growing (he's always been huge) high functioning autistic boy. People have expected him to act older than he is when really, he's a few years behind in all that physical ability development.

I looked at the Radwagon bike. Problem is the max load - that is also 350, right? For the price of new... I just don't know if that would work. But I have looked.

And my hill out of my neighborhood isn't HORRIBLY steep, just fairly long - like 3/4 of a mile. I was so discouraged when I was doing high impact step aerobics 3 times a week, strength training twice a week - being the woman in class who could lift the most, and then some other aerobic class 1-2 times a week - and I STILL had to walk the bike up the hill the last bit. I FINALLY ditched the 7 speed comfort bike and got a 21 speed road bike and could get out of the neighborhood - huffing and puffing, but then I got an injury, followed by another overuse injury and stopped riding/exercising and now I know NOTHING would allow me to get out of the neighborhood without electric assist. Plus... I'm all for fitness and such, but having some help on hills - especially with cargo would be wonderful.

Antia
5 days ago

Hi there,
just a few comments. It seems like a longtail cargo bike could work well for you. Certainly the xtracycle with a bafang will work well with regard to the drive assist, but I wonder if the low deck (where your son would sit) would be problematic as he is so tall. Usually the low decks are nice because they lower the center of gravity helping with stability and because it is easier for young kids, but in your case it might be a problem with long legs.
Have you considered the Radwagon from Rad Power Bikes? It is very nicely priced and it is a long tail with the deck at a regular height. Depending on the maximum grade of the hills in your neighborhood, it could work very well for you. I have one and I use it to haul my two kids (3 and 4.5) to daycare and errands (anywhere from 1 to 10 miles). Let me know if you have any questions about it.

Antia

Barkme Wolf
1 week ago

Ready for anything. Radwagon

1/1
Caleb Wolper
1 week ago

Hey finerbiner, nice setup with the Radwagon. I'm still tweaking mine. What tool bag, saddle and phone mount are you using in the photo?

Thx

Barkme Wolf
2 weeks ago

5000 miles on my Radwagon in one year. Worth it?
Yes, if you use it. I ride mine 40 miles a day to and from work.
Price $1,700
Essential Gear: Helmet, Lights, Rain Gear, Shoes, Bags (panniers).
Add $250
Tune up and true- (Unless you are proficient in bicycle maintenance you will need to have the tires trued and mechanics tuned within the first 100 miles).
Add $50
Since you are getting it tuned anyway, good time to throw on some tire liners. Went from 2 flats a month to no flats with Mr. Tuffy tire liners.
Add $20

Along the way you will need to have the bike tuned, tires trued, cables replaced.... I have not estimated the monthly costs.

Before I got the Radwagon I had not ridden a bike in 25 years. I am 47, a smoker and have a bad knee and back.
I went from taking the bus daily to riding the bike.
Last winter I rode the bus mostly because I still do not have proper lights for night riding (Add $150 for quality high lumen headlamp).
This has not stopped me from racking up 5000 miles on the Radwagon since I bought it last year.

I was spending $100 monthly on a bus pass which I no longer need.
So in the end I am saving money and improving my quality life.

An E-bike will not replace a car! These things are heavy and limited (considering battery capacity and recharge time).
I still need rides for grocery runs and date night. To be safe I assume a limit of 20-25 miles on a battery (although I get much more in lower assist levels).
I carry 2 batteries to get safely to work and charge them over the day (5 hours per battery).
I have to fully charge one and then just top off the other.

I just made 5000 mile review on the YouTube.

I have several other applicable videos including a hit and run.
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRHvSCmFZ4rRICyTEUOEK3w

windmill
2 weeks ago

The freewheel on my Radwagon was the tightest I've ever removed, the threads appeared to have no grease on them. A long cheater pipe made quick work of it.
A possible cheat is to use a bench vice to hold the tool, and use the wheel as the lever.

Use plenty of grease when reassembling, you'll thank yourself next time you remove it.

Barkme Wolf
2 weeks ago

Yup, they are all like that. My Radwagon is the same way. I don't think the "bolts" are for a water bottle. Maybe for a basket or something. You will have to figure out an alternative. I used zip ties for a while. Now I have some panniers with a mesh bottle pocket.

Barkme Wolf
2 weeks ago

My feelings about the experience after 5000 miles of riding an electric bike.

Barkme Wolf
2 weeks ago

5000 miles and still going.

1/1
Barkme Wolf
2 weeks ago

You mean the guy riding against the flow of traffic on the wrong side of the street? I've seen worse.
Yes, that guy. He came right at me. Realized I was going to ride my Radwagon (75lb. Cargo Bike) right through him so he backed off.

Secret Number
1 month ago

This Bike is useless for UBER DRIVER and for other bike messenger jobs because it comes with a battery size of 48v by 11.6 ah, which equals to 556whr (48×11.6) . Moreover it doesn't have the type of pedal assist mode that prolongs the battery. A work delivery bike must have a minimum if 1200 whr battery and a battery saving type of pedal assist mode in order for you to do deliveries all day. In manahtanb they sell those types of Chinese electric bikes for $1500.

jerome grzelak
1 month ago

Life is so hard u have to push 2 buttons

Friar Talk
1 month ago

I love the reviews of my favorite bikes but WHY is it always these ultra-femmy guys doing the reviews? I am tired of effeminate men, stop taking vaccines and watching tv, you are all being made into jellyfish and jellyfish won't survive what it coming. Straighten up.

nbookie
2 months ago

break is over so I can't watch the whole video. can I ride on motor only? no pedaling?

Nikko A.
2 months ago

which one is better? the one from HPC or Radpower?

Andrew Mullen
3 months ago

I don't think I can resist much longer...just have to convince my wife to let me get one. Maybe I'll just buy her a rad rover 1st!

Eugene Hanc
4 months ago

How Obtrusive is the wiring? Looks very loose and hanging.

Daryl Parsons
4 months ago

I like your reviews but I sure wish you would quit waving your hand in front of the camera.

zbikenut
6 months ago

Great video on this bike. 27.2 suspension seat posts are very available and cheap on ebay.

Mary McGuirk
6 months ago

many years ago, i owned a package delivery service, and really appreciate your BEST PRACTICES and TIPS... Ours was auto, not bike, but there were similar things to remember to avoid major disasters. Great Review...Could you add some emphasis points your review to have some OVERLAYS to make bullet points of your ideas. Just an idea for increasing value of your future reviews...I used movie maker successfully, so it can't be too hard to add titles to make something great even better.

DocCanFixIt
7 months ago

Nice! I Think I Found My Next Bike!

djkenny
7 months ago

So cheap for what it is! I just paid over $1500 for a new Surly Big Dummy, last year's model. I imagine the quality of components is a little lower to compensate for adding electric.

Bob Linton
8 months ago

I wish it could carry the load of an extra adult.

Michael Taylor
8 months ago

You Can!

Sovereign Knight
9 months ago

This is great and all but what is the range if used without pedal assist? As with all electric stuff range tends to be really poor vs gas counterparts.

Peter Q
10 months ago

Whats better this or the Juiced u500?

Darren Million
10 months ago

What a joke I have a 2 Stroke gas bike and I get way more mileage on just a 3/4 gallon tank of gas and it does 50+ MPH LOL. and it did not cost me $1500+ more like $300 HAHAHAHA

djkenny
7 months ago

There is nothing legally saying an electric bike is not street legal. They are just like any other bike. A gas powered bike is a grey area. Your bike "could" handle carrying 2-3 kids with a $550 Xtracycle freeloader kit, absolutely. It would make it into a long tail style MTB. We know the pollution levels due ot it being simple knowledge of a 2 Stroke. If it even got 4-5 times better gas mileage than a Hummer (and it might) that does not make up for the fumes emitted. It is 10 folds higher. Just what you get for a $300 gas powered engine. They are also much louder than electric. I am glad it works for you, though.

Darren Million
7 months ago

Well that goes for your E Bike too you dumb ass kid

Some Body
7 months ago

None of them are street legal you dumb fuck

Darren Million
7 months ago

+djkenny I would like to know something how do you get my bike can't carry big things? How do you get that it Pollutes more than a Hummer.? How do you know it won't carry kids? How do you know its loud? How does any of you know it's not street legal? YOU DON'T

Darren Million
7 months ago

+djkenny Really? you all are just mad HAHAHAHAHA thats fucking funnny.

Marc Dupont
11 months ago

Just got mine yesterday. Thank you so much for your reviews. you were instrumental in my final choice. keep up the good work

Alex Paulsen
12 months ago

Drop by my shop here in New Zealand and I'll find a bike or two you can review :P

alaskanhybrid
12 months ago

This looks cool. Its almost like a BMX with a rack to carry stuff and a hub mounted electric motor.

Co Mo
1 year ago

great review..thank you for posting...just began researching electric cargo bikes for my company and personal use and the reviews from electric bike review has been so very helpful...will absolutely make my research and decision easier...thank you all so much

Co Mo
2 months ago

actually, I have not as some of my requirements are changing..hoping to buy one in June...

Piercerson
2 months ago

Did you eventually buy an electric cargo bike? I'm currently searching.

ElectricBikeReview.com
1 year ago

Awesome! So glad it helped, hope you enjoy whatever bike you end up choosing :D