Rubbee Drive 2.0 Review

Rubbee Drive 2 0 Electric Bike Kit Review 1
Rubbe Ebike Kit Slick Tires
Rubbe Ebike Kit Charge And Signal Port Connector
Rubbe Ebike Kit Led Backlight Strip
Rubbe Ebike Kit Cadence Sensor Plate
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Rear Led Lights
Rubbe Ebike Kit Side View With Roller
Rubbe Ebike Kit Underside View
Rubbee Drive 2 0 6 Mm Mounting Bracket
Rubbee Drive 2 0 12 Magnet Cadence Sensor Ring
Rubbee Drive 2 0 250 Watt Motor
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Battery Charger
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Bottom
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Ebike Kit Up Position
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Kit
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Leather Carry Strap
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Left Side View
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Off Of The Bike
Rubbee Drive 2 0 On The Stand
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Optional Permanent Cadence Sensor
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Optional Sensor Front
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Power Cord Connector Point
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Power On Button
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Power Wheel Engaged
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Quick Connect Cadence Sensor
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Rubber Drive Wheel
Rubbee Drive 2 0
Rubbee Drive Stock Back
Rubbee Drive Stock Box
Rubbee Drive Stock Contact Patch
Rubbee Drive Stock Fixie
Rubbee Drive Stock Front
Rubbee Drive Stock Locked
Rubbee Drive Stock Mounted Back
Rubbee Drive Stock Right
Rubbee Drive Stock Side
Rubbee Drive Stock Top
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Electric Bike Kit Review 1
Rubbe Ebike Kit Slick Tires
Rubbe Ebike Kit Charge And Signal Port Connector
Rubbe Ebike Kit Led Backlight Strip
Rubbe Ebike Kit Cadence Sensor Plate
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Rear Led Lights
Rubbe Ebike Kit Side View With Roller
Rubbe Ebike Kit Underside View
Rubbee Drive 2 0 6 Mm Mounting Bracket
Rubbee Drive 2 0 12 Magnet Cadence Sensor Ring
Rubbee Drive 2 0 250 Watt Motor
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Battery Charger
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Bottom
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Ebike Kit Up Position
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Kit
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Leather Carry Strap
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Left Side View
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Off Of The Bike
Rubbee Drive 2 0 On The Stand
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Optional Permanent Cadence Sensor
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Optional Sensor Front
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Power Cord Connector Point
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Power On Button
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Power Wheel Engaged
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Quick Connect Cadence Sensor
Rubbee Drive 2 0 Rubber Drive Wheel
Rubbee Drive 2 0
Rubbee Drive Stock Back
Rubbee Drive Stock Box
Rubbee Drive Stock Contact Patch
Rubbee Drive Stock Fixie
Rubbee Drive Stock Front
Rubbee Drive Stock Locked
Rubbee Drive Stock Mounted Back
Rubbee Drive Stock Right
Rubbee Drive Stock Side
Rubbee Drive Stock Top

Summary

  • A portable, all-in-one electric drive system designed to work with most traditional bicycles, folding and full suspension included!
  • Clean professional design, quick and easy to install or remove, sturdy leather handle for transporting, solid two year warranty, responsive customer support
  • Creates drag that slows you down and makes noise even when powered off, limited power and speed create an underwhelming experience, the locking pin that suspends the unit is vulnerable to breaking

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Rubbee

Model:

Drive 2.0

Price:

$990 USD

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Cruising

Electric Bike Class:

Pedal Assist (Class 1)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States, Europe, Worldwide

Model Year:

2015

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

16 lbs (7.25 kg)

Battery Weight:

6.5 lbs (2.94 kg)

Motor Weight:

1.5 lbs (0.68 kg)

Frame Material:

Aircraft-Grade Anodized Aluminum Alloy

Frame Colors:

White with Blue Accents (Powder Coated)

Wheel Sizes:

16 in (40.64cm)20 in (50.8cm)24 in (60.96cm)26 in (66.04cm)27.5 in (69.85cm)28 in (71.12cm)29 in (73.66cm)

Accessories:

Integrated LED Lights, Genuine Leather Handle, Sound Signals for Status Notifications, Battery Status LED

Other:

Dimensions: 160 mm x 120 mm x 410 mm, Seat Tube Mount Compatible with 22 mm to 35 mm Diameter and Requires 80 mm Vertical Space, Works With Traditional, Full Suspension and Folding Frames and Tires from 20 mm to 60 mm Wide

Electronic Details

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Gearless Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Motor Peak Output:

560 watts

Battery Voltage:

14.4 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

20 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

288 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium Iron Phosphate (LiFePO4)

Charge Time:

3 hours

Estimated Min Range:

15 miles (24 km)

Estimated Max Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist (12 Magnet Pedelec Sensor, Integrated Speed Sensor)

Top Speed:

15.5 mph (25 kph)

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Written Review

The Rubbee is an affordable electric drive system designed to clamp onto the back of nearly any regular “human powered” bicycle and convert it into an efficient “pedal assisted” ebike that will climb easier and go further. I love the aesthetics on this thing, a lot of attention was paid to the paint job, routed logo, integrated LED backlight, twist-click power connector, beeping alert system and easy-install pedalec sensor. Unfortunately, compared to most of the purpose built and converted electric bikes I’ve reviewed (that rely on hub motors or mid-drive systems) it feels under powered. I’ve tested other ebikes that were limited to ~15 mph (designed to satisfy a European and global market) but this one felt slower and less zippy. There’s also no display panel showing your distance, charge level or speed so the Rubbee feels a bit detached. One thing is for certain, running out of batteries far from home would be a big bummer. The entire kit (drive system, wires and pedal sensor) weigh just under 16 pounds (7.3 kg) which isn’t too bad but the rubber friction drive slows you down if it isn’t powered on as demonstrated in the video. While it is possible to “disengage” the Rubbee and coast more efficiently, you may risk breaking the locking pin that holds it up. This actually happened during our tests while walking the bike off of a curb and from then on the unit was permanently engaged. I’m told that the pin is actually designed to break off clean (as it did for me) so that it can be replaced vs. being bent and jamming in the “up” position. This is a difficult review to do because the Rubbee team has been very responsive and professional, their two year warranty is excellent and the product seems neat… it just didn’t perform that well during my tests.

The motor in the Rubbee is a 250 watt gearless canister design that’s mounted inside the rubber friction wheel at the end of the unit. It peaks at 560 watts according to the company and benefits from a huge mechanical advantage, being positioned at the perimeter of the wheel instead of the center like traditional hub motors. Motor speed is translated to torque and power and it works alright but there is some noticeable whirring (even if the unit is off). Depending on what tires you use, there’s a noticeable buzzing as tire studs pass the rubber traction point. Depending on your weight and the terrain, the Rubbee will shut itself off to avoid overheating which is a neat feature in terms of self preservation. The downside is that you may be left to climb on your own… with the extra weight… and the drag of the motor system which will likely still be engaged with the rear wheel. You could always swivel the unit up and disengage but in tern risk braking the pin off as we did. I feel like this is one big area where the unit could definitely be improved. If I didn’t have to worry about the pin breaking I might be able to leave the unit up more often and that would reduce range anxiety. One possible downside is that in the up position, dropping a curb could still stress my seat post. On this topic… I would not recommend using this kit with any type of carbon fiber seat post as you could crack the post.

Powering the Rubbee Drive 2.0 is a Lithium Iron Phosphate battery pack offering 14.4 volts of power and 20 amp hours of capacity. The overall watt hours are decent at ~288 but you’re getting less power with this battery design than a traditional 36 volt 10 amp hour pack found on most other ebikes I review (in Europe the standard is more like 24 volts with 10 amp hours). Lower voltage may not be an issue here because of the motor design. Rubbee estimates that their system will get upwards of 20 miles per charge and this seems right to me given the assist-only design. There’s no throttle mode here, you have to pedal to keep it going. Since they used a cadence sensor here however, I found that you don’t have to push especially hard (after the bike is moving) to get the motor to activate and continue on. Still, even when it is going, it just doesn’t feel that satisfying. LiFePO4 batteries are known for being durable and long lasting, they make up the majority of the weight on the Rubbee at ~6.5 lbs and since the unit is super easy to clamp on or take off you can easily store them inside (in a cool dry place ideally) to extend their life and charge them up after each ride. I’m not sure how easy the cells would be to replace or if there’s a program for doing that but after 1,500+ charge cycles the unit may be pretty well worn. I noticed that rubber dust began accumulating around the back and under side of the unit after less than 10 miles and I’m not sure if that was from the friction roller or the tires?

Mounting and operating the Rubbee is easy and intuitive. The coolest parts are the slim, light weight 1.3 lb charger unit (that could easily be carried along to work or a friend’s house), the integrated LED light at the back and the unique twist-click power plugs. You can charge the battery completely in ~3.5 hours and once it’s ready you pick the entire thing up by the leather handle and carefully mount it to your seat post. You will need 80 mm of vertical space on the tube (so petite people who have their seat very low to reach the pedals may find that the system disrupts their ergonomics). The clamp is all metal, there’s no rubber liner or shims to protect from scratching the tubing but I do not have evidence that this would happen, I’m merely comparing it to beam racks I’ve had in the past which do. Maybe given the weight and forces exerted by the unit having metal on metal is more ideal? The clam will fit any seat post with diameters from 22 mm to 35 mm which is great. Once it’s on, you press a little power button that lights up blue and then you’re ready to go! As your pedal cranks move, a plastic disc with 12 magnets passes an electronic sensor and signals for the Rubbee to kick in. There are no modes or levels of power to choose from, this thing is basically working or it’s turned off. But we’ve skipped a big important piece here and that’s installation…

Installing the Rubbee 2.0 pedelec sensor system was fairly easy and did not require special tools thanks to the included half-disc setup. Basically, there’s a circular plastic disc that can be pulled apart along the center and then clicked back together around the crank axle of your bike. there’s a nice metal c-ring that keeps the two pieces together once it’s mounted and then all you have to do is align the electronic sensor to the magnetic dots by sticking it to the seat tube or chain stay tube. I think the picture below demonstrates it pretty well. Once the magnetic disc is on and the sensor probe has been secured you can zip tie wires along the downtube to clean up the aesthetic. At the other end of the sensor probe cable you’ve got that nice twist-connector which goes into the Rubbee. The company had actually sent me two different sensors to experiment with and the snap-on one was way easier and even more responsive than the more permanent version because it only had 10 magnets. This second system was also a huge pain to install as we had to take the cranks off and use special tools to remove the bottom bracket before installing correctly. In the video you may notice an extra plug hanging out in some of the shots and that was from this second sensor which we installed on the right side of the bottom bracket.

So after installing the Rubbee on a Giant Revel hardtail mountain bike (with 26″ wheels) and then swapping out the standard knobby tires for some smoother Schwalbe Fat Franks (to see how it would reduce noise and improve performance) I just wasn’t that impressed. The thing looks awesome and I love the idea of a completely removable, self contained drive unit but the results were lacking. I’ve actually tried other older electric powered friction drive units that rely on the same concept as the Rubbee and had a much better time. Even if it wasn’t able to hit 20 mph which is the standard in the US if they could make it zippier, make that rear wheel freewheel instead of causing drag and fix the vulnerable pin system that broke for us I would like it much more. I’m told that the unit rides more smoothly and drag is reduced after a while because the bearings in the motor loosen up. This is definitely a niche product and there are solid purpose built ebikes out there for ~$1,500 or you can experiment with other devices to convert your existing bike. I like the idea of using this with a folding bike, a full suspension mountain bike or anything in between but just because it could be used this way doesn’t mean I’d choose to do so after having experienced what it’s capable of. If you’re interested in this unit and live in America, check out Greenpath Electric Bikes in New York City which is one of their distributors.

Pros:

  • The leather carry strap on top of the unit is handsome and feels sturdy, makes transporting the kit much easier
  • It works on all sorts of bicycles including wheel sizes from 16″ up to 29″ and can even be used on full suspension setups because it has a spring built in to maintain contact with the rear wheel
  • The unit looks beautiful, the paint job was done with powder coating for durability and the LEDs all match well, even the packaging it comes in is sleek and well designed
  • Installing the Rubbee is surprisingly easy and fast, it could be added or removed from a bike without a lot of screwing around
  • The battery charger is light weight and fairly small, it has a nice connection system that twists and clicks which feels strong
  • The company is very professional and responsive to inquiries (at least the ones I sent) and they offer a solid two year warranty
  • The new version is said to be even more powerful and responsive than the unit I tried so it should be more enjoyable to ride
  • I’m told that with use, the drag from the motor bearings reduces and that the pin is actually designed to break off to avoid having it get bent and jamming instead, Rubbee offers replacement pins for ~$19

Cons:

  • Cannot be used as a storage rack, do not load items or bags on top of the unit or try to hang them off of the side
  • The lever and internal pin that secures the unit in the “up” or “disengaged” position broke when we walked the bike off of a curb and now the unit is permanently down in the “drive” position
  • No heads up display showing how fast or far you’ve traveled, there is a battery level indicator but it’s on the unit and not very convenient to read
  • While coasting, the Rubbee creates drag so if you run out of batteries it will feel heavy and make riding more difficult, you could disengage the unit but if you go off a curb it could break like our test unit did
  • The Rubbee just didn’t feel very satisfying, it doesn’t offer a whole lot of power and isn’t capable of going very fast by American standards
  • On bicycles with studded tires the Rubbee made extra noise because it connects directly to the tire
  • There’s no throttle on demand option, in order to activate the unit you need to pedal and it isn’t super responsive at times
  • Because there are no brake lever inhibitors and it uses a cadence sensor, the unit sometimes powers-on a bit longer than you might like

Resources:

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Boyd Peterson
2 years ago

I was interested in the Rubbee electric assist motor, but after reading all the comments from people that have purchased this item it looks like one to stay away from. Too many people tried to return them, faulty switches, stuck power switches etc. I decided to forget this item. Too bad, it looked like a great idea………oh well.

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Yeah, the finish is very professional and I see the vision but it just didn’t work that well… I was surprised and amazed how well the older Go-Ped GoBike worked (and it was made in 2006). There’s a new friction drive system that was being crowdfunded called the add-e. I’m hoping to check that out at some point :)

Reply
Nirmala
2 years ago

Here is another one that just was launched on Indiegogo. I just ordered the smallest version to try on the front wheel of my Magnum Ui5 for some more oomph on hills. I look forward to trying out an AWD ebike! It would be great if you could get a hold of one to review.

Reply
Court Rye
2 years ago

Nice! I really like the concept and got to meet the founder of ShareRoller last year in New York. I shot a review of his first version here. Sounds like the new one is smaller, lighter and quieter! Hope you enjoy yours, can’t wait to hear more and maybe review the latest version too :D

Reply
Matt Pintar
1 year ago

Where can I see a Rubbee Drive . I live in New Jersey.

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

I bet you could reach out through their official website and meetup near NYC. That’s where I met the founder for this review :)

Reply
michael rouse
1 year ago

in the chair of an international NGO and we want to test this type for the poor if anyone can reach-out to us to do trials we have head offices in UK and would love to develop our own low cost version in collaboration if we have some team players and tech advise

Reply
Court Rye
1 year ago

Hi Michael! I can’t speak on behalf of the Rubbee company but you can reach them via their website here http://www.rubbee.co.uk/contact and if nobody responds just email me using the contact form on EBR and I’ll try to make an introduction. Sounds like a very cool project!

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indianajo
19 mins ago

I can go 4.5 hours into a 25 mph wind pedalling myself, at 6 mph. I have an old fashioned cushioned wide seat, not one of those splinters the bike shops stock exclusively. I buy seats at Salvation Army. Fighting that much wind wears me out, but I gotta go to/from my summer camp when city services and appointments allow me.
So electrically driven, at 15 mph, I could easily make 72 miles. I bought a 15 AH 48 v battery, because I have a couple of fall parties and concerts I'd like to attend that are 35-40 miles away. I'm not counting on finding a charger at the destination; I'm sure one is not available at the one I attended in October (by rental car).
As an added bonus, electrical drive could fight the wind for me, getting me there on my normal commute in a normal 3.5 hr. I don't intend to use it on nice days. 3.5 hour exercise twice a week has been good for my cardiovascular system. I'm age 67.
So far my endurance greatly exceeds that of the motor/controller I bought, which lasted about 80 miles. I pedalled it to destination from two failures

Roland Leisenring
6 hours ago

A 250 watt hub is minimal assistance for a lightweight two wheeler. That trike is heavy. Slight boost would be noticed on level ground but there wouldn't be much energy on inclines and zip on hills, especially with a load of stuff in the basket.

If you need a trike, get one and put a stronger mid-drive kit on it. https://tinyurl.com/yd2bjn9q

The forum host has info on the drives https://electricbikereview.com/?s=8fun+mid+drive

Mark Peralta
11 hours ago

Thank you for this post. . . I thought I was missing something. When the Turbo S went on "Clearance", I grabbed it. It was next to the new Specialized mid-drive model. I asked the salesman (who didn't know much about electric bikes), hey, isn't this cheaper one faster and farther range? He said test drive them and see. Needless to say I have a "new" discontinued Turbo S. Awesome bike so far; not as good as my Stromer. . . . But for less than half the price, great bike. I ride a 7% 2 mile hill to work. I have a top-of-the-line Haibike (speed pedalec), the Stromer and the Turbo S leave the Haibike in the dust, at a standstill start. If I hadn't lost my Garmin a few weeks ago, I would have posted some screen shots.

Oh, and I'm not trying to start a feud, either.
Man, I would feel like in e-bike heaven with those babies!

Gary R Peacock
20 hours ago

Thanks for the info. I just came from High Peaks Cyclery in Lake Placid where I looked at the Giant Quick E+. It looks pretty nice but did not test drive it because we just got several inches of snow and the roads are super messy. Does anyone have experience with this model? It is billed as a commuter bike but the folks there said it would be good for Adk hills. Thoughts? I feel pretty good about Giant, in general, because both Plattsburgh Lake Placid have good service depts.

hurricane56
21 hours ago

Hey all, so quick check in after commuting home with this beast of a bike. I just finished a 17 mile ride with the HF and the power available is borderline insane. The one thing I noted is the power assist levels even in the ECO mode are good enough to keep me going around 24-26 mph at a decent cadence, maybe 80rpms with not too much effort. My point of comparison is with my other bike, 2016 Haibike Trekking S. I don't think this bike is going to replace the Haibike, but it'll give me another platform to use if I'm tired or just want something different. I'd compare the personalities of the HF to a high performance v8 pickup truck, vs the Haibike which is much more like buttery smooth straight six.

Battery life with the 21ah is incredible. I rode a total of 17 miles this evening and used about 5ah of capacity. My route is mostly flat with about 200 ft elevation gain.

There are a couple of subtle characteristics that set apart each bike. Obviously, the fit/finish and geometry of the Haibike is something to be admired. I feel that many people that bash "expensive factory bikes" tend overlook this. The Bosch mid-drive is seamless and very organic. The HF has it's strengths as well, and that is raw power at speed. There were a few times where I wanted to go slow in city traffic, and you can start to feel the bike wanting to really get up and go. Since I was riding with other ebike buddies most of the way back, I left the bike in ECO most of the time.

Overall, I'm happy with the performance thus far and hope that this bike will be a reliable platform for 2000+ miles of riding each year. The bike will need some additional tuning and add-ons to make this a daily commute beast:

1. Installation of rear rack - I ran a backpack today, but panniers are so much better for a longer ride.
2. Installation of bar end mirror.
3. Tuning of the suspension fork - The threads on the schrader valve are either not fully to spec or somewhat coarse. I needed to use a wrench to tighten my shock pump to the valve.
4. Installation of tire tube sealant - Once again this bike has no service disconnect near the motor assembly. There is enough slack on the cable after cutting the zip ties to remove the wheel, but doing a tube change in the field would be cumbersome with one person.

Oh yeah, top speed today was easily 35mph. I think I could sustain that for maybe 3-4 miles at most. Some might argue that having such a fast bike is dangerous. It is in the wrong hands, but now that I know I can go that speed, I feel it makes me safer when I can keep up with traffic taking a lane or on streets without protected bike lanes.

Leon Washington
22 hours ago

I wanted to add some very relevant information that no one seems to ever mention when comparing mid-drives and hub motors.

Mid-drive do tend to be excellent climbing systems because they benefit from the drive ratio of the front to rear sprockets at slow speeds where the torque of the motor can actually be increased to the rear wheel. The problem is that at high speeds that advantage becomes a disadvantage. If you say running at 20mph on a 44T front and 11T rear sprocket only 1/4th the axle torque of the mid-drive is delivered to the rear wheel because of the 4 to 1 reduction to achieve the speed at a reasonable cadence. In my opinion this is the equivalent of inefficiency - decreases the drive system efficiency because an 80nM mid drive will only provide 20nM of torque to the rear axle at that speed.

Hub drives (at least the gear-less more simply ones) do run at lower RPMs which is a less efficient dymanic state for a brushless motor but the torque is delivered directly to the rear axle. So if you are riding at 20mph, a rear hub motor only needs to be providing 20nM to equal the "effective" power of the mid-drive at this speed. The higher the speed the more efficient a rear hub motor becomes so I would venture to say that if you spend a significant % of your riding time over speeds of say 15mph a hub drive may be more efficient and provide more power to the rear wheel.

I would venture to say this is why some of the premium speed pedelecs still utilize hub drive motors.

If you think you will spend the bulk of your riding time below say 15mph and on trails, no doubt get a mid-drive but if you want a fast urbam mobility bike I would give hub drives serious consideration.

I have both a mid drive Haibike and a rear hub Polaris and the Polaris has better fast performance and the Haibike with the Yamaha mid-drive is awesome up to about 15mph. I think the Bosch mid-drives with the smaller front chain ring that spins at 2.5X cadence do provide better high speed assist than the Yamaha but at the cost of some low speed torque to the rear wheel.

This post was really helpful, and from my experience, I whole heatedly agree. I ride the back roads to work with my speed pedalec, mid-drive mountain bike. My DD hubs just get me from point A to Point B on paved surfaces really fast. Thankfully I have a loud horn.

Leon Washington
22 hours ago

Wondering why a company like Specialized would eliminate the rear hub drive and go with the mid - drive. The Specialized Turbo S looks like a pretty nice ride.
Thank you for this post. . . I thought I was missing something. When the Turbo S went on "Clearance", I grabbed it. It was next to the new Specialized mid-drive model. I asked the salesman (who didn't know much about electric bikes), hey, isn't this cheaper one faster and farther range? He said test drive them and see. Needless to say I have a "new" discontinued Turbo S. Awesome bike so far; not as good as my Stromer. . . . But for less than half the price, great bike. I ride a 7% 2 mile hill to work. I have a top-of-the-line Haibike (speed pedalec), the Stromer and the Turbo S leave the Haibike in the dust, at a standstill start. If I hadn't lost my Garmin a few weeks ago, I would have posted some screen shots.

Oh, and I'm not trying to start a feud, either.

Durukan Devrim
1 day ago

It might be psychological. When I first got my bike it felt like the most powerful thing on earth now I'm like meh it could do better... You could test drive a similar spec bike at the dealer and see if it feels any different.

NOBLNG
1 day ago

I received my Yukon 750 Limited last week. It has all of the upgrades that owners have been asking for. First impressions are WOW this thing is great!
Well I got a chance to ride along with my buddy this weekend. We went twice around a 7km long twisty single track trail through the bush at a local provincial park. I've got to say this bike is NOT designed for this type of riding! There is a bit of lag to get going and a LOT of lag before the motor cuts out after I stop pedaling. I needed to keep cutting the power constantly via the brakes to avoid hitting the trees or careening off the path. The motor is not geared low enough to maintain a slow-controllable pace on a super tight trail. My buddy is a more experienced rider and has a mid-drive and seemed to make out better. That said, I love the bike on the street and it will be just fine on more open trails. I did not buy it with the intention of doing tight trails or winter riding so I am looking forward to better weather so I can really get some use out of it.
Greg.

BikeMike045
1 day ago

Is all that noise characteristic to hub drive bikes ?
I've got a bike lock bouncing around, the camera case made a clicking noise against the spokes once or twice, tires make noise on the road, and the camera is mounted directly to the frame right beside the motor, so every vibration is amplified. Brake noise is also due to proximity. It is nowhere near that loud while riding. In fact my moped friend and neighbor was sitting on his front porch looking at his phone... I buzzed by twice at about 25 before he noticed me at all!

TForan
1 day ago

Made a short video. If you hear a clicking at 1:05 it's because the edge of my GoPro camera case leaned into the spokes. Oops.

Is all that noise characteristic to hub drive bikes ?

Eglon
1 day ago

Excuse all the junk and tools but here are a few observations:

1. Wire bead fat bike tires are crazy hard to take off. Just replaced the Kenda tires with Origin8 Captiv-8er. Installed tire liner, but will also deploy slime inside the tube.

2. There is no service disconnect for the motor, the wiring harness goes all the way to the controller. There is a multi-pin connector and a few soldered wired under heat shrink near the head tube. It won’t be impossible to fix a flat in the field, but it will be more challenging than a mid drive.
I noticed the lack of service disconnect as well and luckily by cutting the zip-ties there was plenty of slack even though it was in the bike stand. I was curious about why you choose the Captiv-8er versus the Supercell 4 inch tires.

Dewey
1 day ago

For folks seeking a step-through donor pedal bicycle frame to convert to an ebike with a DIY motor kit, the Reddit City Bikes spreadsheet has a column indicating where a step-through frame is available together with price, type of drivetrain, and web link:
https://www.reddit.com/r/citybike/comments/45zbr3/the_rcitybike_spreadsheet_updated_for_spring_2016/

Common features of ebikes used in urban bikeshare systems such as the Smoovengo E-Bike (Paris), Social Bicycles JUMP (Washington, DC), Bewegen Pedelec (Baltimore), and BCycle Dash+ (designed by Trek, coming in 2018), are a step-through frame, 26" wheels, 3 or 7 speed IGH, Class 1 pedelec, 250w front hub or 350w mid-drive motor, and rollerbrakes. Dock based systems recharge off the bikeshare dock vs dockless systems like JUMP incorporate a GPS locator chip and require you lock up the ebike with a provided U-lock and a maintenance guy either swaps out the battery or recharges it at a hub collection point every 2-3 days.

JayVee
2 days ago

Jayve in USA Haibike do not have speed pedelec treking yamaha engine 500w,speed pedelec is all BOSCH.

I'm talking about the frame. Apart from the bottom bracket with the drive mounts, it's the same geometry.

Mark Peralta
14 mins ago

I came across the internet about "ebike efficiency" from endless sphere
https://endless-sphere.com/w/index.php/EBike_Efficiency
and I thought it is worth sharing. The beauty of ebikes is there is a second source of motive power and that is your pedal power. It talks about the very basic principle about ebike motors. Here , it relates to a hub motor but the principle is still the same for the smaller mid drives. The road speed on the chart is just changed to cadence on mid drives. First, the power (watts) that comes out from the battery does not completely translates to actual watts to the wheels. There is a certain speed at which the conversion to mechanical power (motor efficiency) is highest.

In this example, the motor efficiency is highest at speeds somewhere between 25-31 mph. The lower the speed, the less efficient is the motor.

Those watt meters on some ebike displays do not always represent the watts to the wheels but these are the wattage that came out from the battery. And if you are on the wrong speed, most of those watts are wasted as heat. Or if you are in the wrong cadence in the case of mid drives.

To minimize energy waste at lower speed, a controller is used to limit the max current.

In the old days, simple resistors were used to control the current but these are very inefficient and obsolete and are now replaced by pulse width modulation controllers (PWM) with the use of metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET). The electrical current is then controlled to different levels. Example of this simple controller with different current settings at different assist levels is from a chart from Bafang mid drive (cadence is used at the x axis instead of road speed). The orange curve represents 100% (current decay is another user adjustable parameter in the Bafang controller)

https://electricbike-blog.com/2015/06/26/a-hackers-guide-to-programming-the-bbs02/

However, it is also important to know the power demand of an ebike at different speeds brought about by many factors and most especially the air resistance (aerodynamic drag), in order to further minimize power wastage when it is not needed and only apply power to when it is really needed.

You don't really need a lot of power at low speed but a simple controller's output is opposite (Cheap Chinese controllers). No wonder the cheap ebikes and ebike kits cannot reliably provide good battery mileage since you thought you are saving battery by going slower but you actually wasted a lot of power there. Most of the time, I notice that simple controllers feel "punchy" and tend to lurch ahead from a dead stop (great for showing off to friends) but once the ebike is already moving and you needed more assist, sometimes the power isn't there anymore, when you needed it the most.

Enter the Smart Controllers from the big players where more brain capacity is added to the controller's program in order to determine and match power requirement with the power output of the motor. And added measures are incorporated to cut the assist if the motor speed is at the inefficient range. This is made possible with the use of torque sensors and sophisticated program algorithms. An example of this is the "dynamic assist" from Juicedbikes.

http://juicedbikes.com.au/bikes/2017-crosscurrent/

I cannot find the controller charts of other big players but that is understandable (trade secret). It only goes to show that it's not only the motor efficiency that is important but how sophisticated the controllers are made. Not all controllers are created equal.

On mid drives, the gear reduction ratio is also set up so that the motor is most efficient at a cadence rate preferred by most cyclists (normal cadence range) .

https://www.electricbike.com/bosch-cannondale/

This principle in actual application made it possible for a small motor (mid drive) to achieve a very very impressive efficiency of 100 miles in 1 charge of the 500wh battery or 5 wh/mile!
https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/range-100-miles-giant-road-e.14617/#post-121767

This highest mileage potential is demonstrated by the small mid drive, but at a slower average speed. The mid drives also has an advantage for the ability to climb very steep hills, as long as the gear ratio in the drive train is appropriate, but at the expense of even much slower, snail paced, speed (sometimes it feels like being pulled up by a winch!).

However, hub drives are not far behind. Especially with increasing sophistication of the controllers and more efficient motor designs like the Maxon.
http://partir-en-vtt.com/fsb2/index.php?p=search&mode=author&id=52

https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/hub-vs-mid-drive-how-can-i-compare.14635/page-5

Hub drives are also more appropriate for high speed commuting, such as riding regularly at higher average speeds (above 23 mph) since the bicycle drive train at that higher crank output will wear out prematurely in less than a couple thousand miles. Or for transporting heavy loads such as the delivery ebikes.

There is still a bright future for efficient hub drives since, aside from the above mentioned strengths, hub drives are also very user friendly, preserve the life of the drive train (high durability), and is superior in stop and go city streets.

1/1
Joe
2 days ago

Rear rack

New more comfortable seat

iphone holder

Pinhead security nuts

I replaced the 8fun 500w geared motor for a NEW Direct drive motor 1000w !!! Bikes gets to 30mph easily now!!!

Nice work.
What flavor motor?
Happy holidays!

Dan Edwards
2 days ago

Just a heads up on prodecotech service. I live in gulf and was hit by hurricane Harvey a few months back. A friend grabbed my bike when the storm surge left my house in 4 ft of water. I was loving the fact my bike was saved because my car and truck was flooded, both useless. Only problem was my neighbor got the bike but left the charger. I called prodecotech to order a new charger and they said since I didn't register the bike they won't sell me a charger. I told them I wasn't wanting a charger under warranty, just needed to buy one at whatever price they wanted so I can have transportation around town while trying to get house and life fixed from devastating storm. They said they won't sell me one at any price since it wasn't registered. I then bought one on eBay that wasn't correct, went to Best buy where I got the bike and the only way they would sell me a charger was if I bought another $1500 bike. I ended up getting a computer geek friend to make one for me, no thanks to prodecotech. When I did get it running about 2 weeks after the storm I hit a curb with back rim going about 15 mph and it put a flat spot on rim. I called prodecotech about a new rim and they said they could MAYBE get me another rim in 8-12 weeks, but it could be as much as 6 months. I liked the bike a lot until this incident occurred and now I hate the sight of it. Try pedaling that heavy ass bike a couple miles with a couple bags of groceries. It was brutal. I cussed prodecotech everyday for a month and will never, ever buy anything from them again. I do love ebikes, I spent 80-100 on diesel a week, now I spend 20-30. Drive to store and back did cost me $5, now it's 5¢. Loving that, so does mother nature im sure
Wow that's crappy! Have you checked with a bike shop about getting a wheel and have them rebuild/spokes? As far as the charger, seems you got one going.

Trace martini
2 days ago

No ebike is perfect, this is a thread dedicated to sharing known issues or problems with electric bikes from Prodeco Tech as well as any help and solutions you know of. Sometimes that means a DIY fix and other times it can mean a recall, software update or part replacement by a dealer.

Please be respectful and constructive with feedback, this is not a space for hate speech. In many cases, representatives from the company will see feedback and use it to improve their product. In the end, the goal is to enjoy riding and help each other go further and be safer.
No ebike is perfect, this is a thread dedicated to sharing known issues or problems with electric bikes from Prodeco Tech as well as any help and solutions you know of. Sometimes that means a DIY fix and other times it can mean a recall, software update or part replacement by a dealer.

Please be respectful and constructive with feedback, this is not a space for hate speech. In many cases, representatives from the company will see feedback and use it to improve their product. In the end, the goal is to enjoy riding and help each other go further and be safer.
Just a heads up on prodecotech service. I live in gulf and was hit by hurricane Harvey a few months back. A friend grabbed my bike when the storm surge left my house in 4 ft of water. I was loving the fact my bike was saved because my car and truck was flooded, both useless. Only problem was my neighbor got the bike but left the charger. I called prodecotech to order a new charger and they said since I didn't register the bike they won't sell me a charger. I told them I wasn't wanting a charger under warranty, just needed to buy one at whatever price they wanted so I can have transportation around town while trying to get house and life fixed from devastating storm. They said they won't sell me one at any price since it wasn't registered. I then bought one on eBay that wasn't correct, went to Best buy where I got the bike and the only way they would sell me a charger was if I bought another $1500 bike. I ended up getting a computer geek friend to make one for me, no thanks to prodecotech. When I did get it running about 2 weeks after the storm I hit a curb with back rim going about 15 mph and it put a flat spot on rim. I called prodecotech about a new rim and they said they could MAYBE get me another rim in 8-12 weeks, but it could be as much as 6 months. I liked the bike a lot until this incident occurred and now I hate the sight of it. Try pedaling that heavy ass bike a couple miles with a couple bags of groceries. It was brutal. I cussed prodecotech everyday for a month and will never, ever buy anything from them again. I do love ebikes, I spent 80-100 on diesel a week, now I spend 20-30. Drive to store and back did cost me $5, now it's 5¢. Loving that, so does mother nature im sure

Scooter
2 days ago

Thanks, I will replace the tires when it starts to wear, perhaps then I can get that speed up and break the 25 mph barrier. I like the bike a lot, fun rides and also to the store for food. I live in an Urban/Suburban Community now and it is perfect. Well it is cold now but I bundled up and not too bad. Learning to use the pedal feature and be a little more flexible on the juice to get longer drive time. I'm a bit on the short leg side and it's kind of like getting up on a horse for me but it is just the learning curve. I ordered a mirror, that will make me much happier. Looks like only the left side for a normal type mirror. I would like a bar-end mirror on the right. I have read the standard bike mirror does not fit? Is that true? Were would I find one and what size do I look for to slide into the end of the Handle Bar?

Thanks

Woodenshoe
2 days ago

A simple aluminum clip is all that is needed to keep the first gen curry axle in place. My curry has over 1200+ miles and axle has not slipped since. (seen others with way more miles, upto 5000+)
Good points by Goosewiththefur about more bosch mechanics out there, true! it is the most wide spread power unit and they are boringly reliable. The new curry has redisigned the dropout so it should be ok on the newer bikes.
With that said, I own a TranzX drive curry and I love it. I have many bikes and the curry is most often my go to bike for random rides. A few things to note on the tranzX drive. 1. TrnzX is mostly cadence sensing which is nice when you are hauling big loads like 150lbs of kids or one 180lbs nephew shooting his next blockbuster youtube video ;). 2. Speed cut off is a little higher and not as sudden as on the bosch unit. 3. TranzX drive is very smooth with power at 0, pedals quiet and more freely than bosch ( if you are in a area that you are riding alot of paved trail this is nice because you end up riding maybe 25-33% with no assist even with a load.) 4. the idler wheel on the bosch is irritating. I have ridden so many bosch bikes with this and it detracts from the silent ride with power off. Both versions of the Spicy Curry are the best cargos on the market. They are strong, lite (62lbs), low center of gravity, and ride awesome. I will post pictures of that bracket. I have made many of the brackets for my spicy curry friends.

SHoe

JayVee
3 days ago

Something from the other side of the big pond: Flyer Upstreet 5

This is a Swiss bike, not available in the US. But it's interesting because it represents Flyer and Panasonic's answer for how to build an e-bike with an IGH that's able to climb steep hills without resorting to a 1000 Watt drive. The Upstreet 5 can optionally be configured with Panasonic's new dual gear drive, which automatically switches into a lower gear if your RPMs decrease and the torque increases. You can also manually switch the drive's gear if you don't like automatic shifting. It's rather pricey but comes with a 5 year factory warranty on the drive. You can build to order and either choose an Alfine 8 or your favourite variety of N380.

1/1
Scooter
3 days ago

First time here, so like dig it man and greetings dude and dudetts. I purchased a RadRover kind of on impulse on Cyber Monday. I love this thing. I am a Motorcycle Rider for some 45 years and presently own three. I might very well give up ONE. This is such a fun and handy rig. Took the Rover to the store, rode all over, main streets and back streets. I am getting the hang as one does drive differently on an ebike than a Motorcycle, like anything there is a learning curve. It is so much fun to break all the rules, cut across the street, hop a curb and go across the park. I know there are (probably) rules, even laws but I will remain ignorant if I can (get away with it). I am not a good example for children either. I saw how to over-ride the "Speed" Limiter and reset the the thing. I have seen 23 mph on the Speedo. That is a nice clip really. My only complaint is that the Rad Company should have called this a CLOSE OUT SALE ! It does not feel good to buy a new, rather expensive toy and then with less than 25 miles after riding ONE day find there is a New Improved 2018 to be sold for the same PRICE ??? I would have waited, buying a bike in winter anyway I did not expect a ton of use so waiting till after New Years would have made little difference. It just would have been the right thing for this Company to do, clearly they knew they had an all new line. I do understand business and by not telling the average Joe they maximized profits but this is my 2 Cents worth of complaints. Perhaps they will toss us a bone, free fender kit or how about a spare battery at COST as $500 seems a little steep. So howdy one and all, I know little or nothing about ebikes except they are a GAS! Well no, I guess they are NOT ........

So, like I will plant you now and dig you later ................

Rooster
3 days ago

Font triangle is the same as the CCS.
https://shop.juicedbikes.com/pages/crosscurrent-frame-geometry
Hi Tora, what up? Let me know if you have a 20 amp controller that will plug and play on my ocean current, I don't care if it doesn't fit in the frame, I will make it work. I would appreciate it. Thanks
Excuse all the junk and tools but here are a few observations:

1. Wire bead fat bike tires are crazy hard to take off. Just replaced the Kenda tires with Origin8 Captiv-8er. Installed tire liner, but will also deploy slime inside the tube.

2. There is no service disconnect for the motor, the wiring harness goes all the way to the controller. There is a multi-pin connector and a few soldered wired under heat shrink near the head tube. It won’t be impossible to fix a flat in the field, but it will be more challenging than a mid drive.
Man you have that seat way up there but them tires look good, they look like my speedsters I have on my ocean current but mine are 2.80x26, nice ride, low resistance.

Roger K
2 weeks ago

Had hopes but thanks for the impartial statements. Yrs. ago had a French bike with small gas engine with a friction wheel contact on the front wheel. It was quiet, and efficient. A nickels worth of gas ⛽️ and you were on your way w/o a pedal assist.

Richard Norris
3 weeks ago

Why buy anything electric!!???? It craps out in the rain.now it's in the garbage because of one little puddle.

Suhail Brahimi
4 weeks ago

you weight 135? are you serious? do you not eat?!?!?

linuxmq
1 month ago

How does it respond under wet road condition? Same traction or is it slipping on the wheel?

Bent Water
2 months ago

Rubber and REAL Leather? Where do I sign? The updated version has hamsters in the rear wheel. It still has the big car battery white box but that's for the food, water and a snake incase the hamsters get lazy.

Engelbert Eichhorn
4 months ago

gähhhn...

william donato
4 months ago

Alguém do Brasil? ?

Hakan B.
4 months ago

then, why u r clycing? :S

G Henrickson
4 months ago

My Rubbee uses LiFePO4 batteries and a replacement battery pack is completely unavailable. I am building a new pack as we "speak". Smooth tires are really the only way to go. Top speed is barely 13 mph. Its fun to play with yet not up to what a eBike should be these days.

マイクラウド
5 months ago

日本でもこういう物が当たり前にあるといいんだけどね

Matt Walls
6 months ago

looks like shit

LEON B
7 months ago

in rain, useless.

G Henrickson
4 months ago

Why do you say this? You own one and find it useless in the rain? Mine works fine in the rain.

William Garrett
8 months ago

you need a long spring to hold the friction wheel to the bicycle tire

jim
8 months ago

friction drive like this has been around awhile. it destroys the back tire with one full season of riding and can't be used in the rain at all. without a solid locking connection between the back of the motor and the dropouts there's also no usable torque at all which is prob why every demo video ive seen so far has the guys pedaling and never fully relying on the motor.

Vin Chung
2 days ago

I replace my rear tire every 3,000-5,000 miles on my friction drive. 4.2 HP (gas powered) And it has way more power than this weak rubbee system.

G Henrickson
4 months ago

jim: Um...One full season of riding SHOULD wear out a bike tire and if not, you are not riding very much so I am unsure what your point might be. Plus it has no throttle so...you must pedal. It IS underpowered (12v and 12 amps or so) and overpriced yet you do not mention this about your Rubbee. I would have to assume you have not ridden one?

Rick Everton
12 months ago

Great, now crank that thing up to go home and cut those fingernails my friend.

2refloG
2 months ago

a guy looking at another guy's nail AND commenting? Suspect

Don Gyde
1 year ago

how much dose this Rubbee 2.0 cost $$. All most no one sess .can you tell me,and where can i get one..

Madeline del Valle
1 year ago

about a yr ago it was almost 1200 us. I know in New York, Brooklyn there is a store that will receive it 4 you so that your shipping is less.

Felix Gonzales
1 year ago

this looks really cool I was close to buying the pedigo ridge rider which i still want but I cant afford it right now. but this is really cool that I can just pit it one my current mountain bike for a little help uphills I think thats brilliant for commuting! and the fact that it just pops off when you dont want it is even cooler. because most electric bikes even the pedigo are to heavy for regular pedaling 55lbs. so this keeps your integrity of your regular mountain bike. this is very interesting.

G Henrickson
4 months ago

I have a Rubbee and it is no Pedego. I am just happy I got mine cheap because the battery pack was dead. Get a real eBike unless you are just playing around as am I.

Stop All Abortions.
1 year ago

A small adult bike ?

smilncynic
1 year ago

"Rubby" or "Rue-by"?

gentlegiant6585
4 months ago

smilncynic I watched it on another site and they called it "Rue-by".

TheKaukas
2 years ago

This product is from Lithuania and I am from there and I never seen anyone using this product, so it should ring some bells.