GenZe 200 Series Review

Genze 200 Series Electric Bike Review
Genze 200 Series Profile Right
Genze 200 Series 350 Watt Hub Motor
Genze 200 Series Chainring Kickstand
Genze 200 Series Aluminum Handelbars
Genze 200 Series Shimano Tourney Cassette
Genze 200 Series 160 Mm Front Shimano Disc Brake
Genze 200 Series Profile Left
Genze 200 Series Electric Bike Review
Genze 200 Series Profile Right
Genze 200 Series 350 Watt Hub Motor
Genze 200 Series Chainring Kickstand
Genze 200 Series Aluminum Handelbars
Genze 200 Series Shimano Tourney Cassette
Genze 200 Series 160 Mm Front Shimano Disc Brake
Genze 200 Series Profile Left

Summary

  • A relatively comfortable electric bike that feels well suited for shorter treks through the city thanks to its Selle Royale Free Way gel saddle, Ergon ergonomic grips, and overall frame geometry
  • The 350-watt geared hub motor is surprisingly zippy and able to drive the e201 to its 20 mph top speed relatively quickly, it's compact and lightweight - balancing out the mid-frame battery
  • Torque sensing pedal assist and throttle only options expand the roles the e201 can play, giving riders the option to use it as a traditional electric bike or more like a moped or scooter
  • Integrated GenZe app provides tons of great information and functionality like built-in navigation, but the bike also has some components found on entry-level electric bikes

Search EBR

Video Review

Trusted Advertisers

Introduction

Make:

GenZe

Model:

200 Series

Price:

$1,899

Body Position:

Forward, Upright

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States, Canada, Mexico

Model Year:

2018

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

49.9 lbs (22.63 kg)

Battery Weight:

2.1 lbs (0.95 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

16 in (40.64 cm)18 in (45.72 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Large Frame Measurments: 18" Seat Tube, 23" Reach, 28.5" Stand Over Height, 26" Width, 69.5" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step, Step-Thru

Frame Colors:

Matte Black, Matte Grey

Frame Fork Details:

Rigid Steel, 100 mm Hub Spacing, 9 mm Quick Release Skewer

Frame Rear Details:

135 mm Hub Spacing, 11 mm Threaded Axle with Nuts

Attachment Points:

Fender Bosses, Rear Rack Bosses, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

8 Speed 1x8 Shimano Altus Derailleur, Shimano Hyperglide HG 12-32T Cassette

Shifter Details:

Shimano Microshift Trigger Shifter on Right

Cranks:

Aluminum Alloy, 165 mm Length, 48T Chainring, Plastic Chain Guard

Pedals:

FP Aluminum Alloy Platform with Reflectors, Black

Headset:

Threadless, Internal Cups, 1-1/8" Straight

Stem:

100 mm Length, Two 10 mm Spacers, One 20 mm Spacer

Handlebar:

Mid-Rise, Aluminum Alloy, 660 mm Width

Brake Details:

Shimano Mechanical Disc with 180 mm Rear Rotor and 160 mm Front Rotor, Four-Finger Levers with Rubberized Edge and Bell on Left and Motor Inhibitors

Grips:

Ergon Ergonomic, Rubber, Black with Grey Accents

Saddle:

Selle Royale Free Way Gel, Black

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

30.8 mm

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy, Double Wall, 36 Hole

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 13 Gauge, Black with Nipples

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Big Apple, 26" x 2" (50-559)

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)

Tire Details:

35 to 70 PSI, 2.5 to 5 BAR

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Optional OnGuard BullDog LS U-Lock with Mounting Bracket: 4.5" x 11" ($39.95), Planet Bike Beamer 3 Headlight ($24.99)

Other:

Locking Removable Downtube-Integrated Battery Pack, 0.5 lb 2 Amp Charger, Double-Sided Kickstand

Electronic Details

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

350 watts

Battery Brand:

Samsung 18650 SDI

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

9.6 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

345.6 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-Ion

Charge Time:

3.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

15 miles (24 km)

Estimated Max Range:

35 miles (56 km)

Display Type:

Downtube Integrated, Fixed, Backlit, Color LCD

Readouts:

Battery Indicator (6 Bars), Trip Meter, Odometer, Current Speed, Pedal Assist Level (0-5), Bluetooth Icon

Display Accessories:

Independent Control Pad on Left (Buttons: On/Off, Set, +, -), USB Type A Port on Base of Button Pad, Throttle on Right

Drive Mode:

Torque Sensing Pedal Assist, Twist Throttle

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

Trusted Advertisers



Written Review

GenZe has been making electric bikes for a while, having established themselves with their 100 series several years ago – in fact, Court actually covered both the e101 and e102 all the way back in 2014. Now, GenZe has a new lineup – the 200 series – with some improvements over their earlier iterations. The e201 and e202 have more powerful motors, larger capacity batteries, a sleeker design and improved warranties. The e201 and e202 come in either 16-inch or 18-inch frame sizes with two color schemes: white with red accents or black with blue accents. The e201, which is the model I tested, is a high-step frame, while the e202 is a step-thru. I like that GenZe has a variety of frame sizes and types as opposed to a standard “one-size-fits-all” frame. I believe this allows for a wider variety of riders to find the perfect setup for them. In my opinion, the GenZe e201 is a striking bike with a unique frame design and the Ergon ergonomic grips coupled with the Selle Royale Free Way saddle and overall geometry make for a comfortable ride that feels something like a hybrid of a cruiser and a road bike. Priced at $1,899, the e201 and e202 aren’t exactly entry-level price point electric bikes, and while it seems like there are some compromises when it comes to the components, overall there are still a lot of positive aspects to these models and the smartphone app really sets it apart. I particularly like the fully integrated and removable battery that all but disappears into the frame, making these electric bikes pretty stealthy – you really have to pay attention to notice it’s electric because the motor is compact as well. The battery is surprisingly light at just 2.1 pounds, which means lugging it around the city while the e201 is parked at a bike rack wouldn’t be nearly as much of a chore as some of the heavier batteries that way upwards of six pounds. A quick turn of a key unlocks the battery and with a slight tug on the built in handle it slides out of the frame, ready to be charged on the go. I love that the battery has a handle built in too, so you won’t drop it as easily. GenZe estimates the max range of the 200 series is about 40 miles, but given the battery has 345.6 watt hours, I’d venture a guess and say the range will probably be a bit less than that, especially if you’re a larger rider like me (200 lbs) and are using the throttle and power mode a lot.

Weighing in at 49 pounds, the GenZe e201 isn’t the lightest electric bike in the world but the 350-watt geared hub motor in the rear and the integrated battery in the middle of the frame, it felt like it was well balanced. There are two different operating modes for the e201 – “Normal” and “Power” – and the power mode provides a decent amount of, well, power. Even at 350 watts the e201 felt pretty zippy, even when only using the throttle. The motor can bring this bike up to 20 mph with the throttle or with pedal assist, and even though I weigh 200 pounds I found I was able to easily reach top speed. The e201 also has a torque sensor as opposed to a cadence sensor – one of the areas where I feel GenZe opted for an upgraded component. The torque sensor felt relatively responsive and the power came on quite quickly once I applied pressure to the pedals, and perhaps more importantly power cut off just as fast when I let off the gas. I always appreciate electric bikes with quick power cut offs as having the motor continue to provide power once pedaling has stopped can make traveling at low speeds a bit tricky, and sometimes even dangerous. Imagine trying to weave in-between cars or pedestrians on a busy street at slow speeds and having the motor cranking out full power when you don’t want it to… not that I’d advise anyone do that of course. :) Thankfully, that’s not an issue with the GenZe bikes. Additionally, the 200 series have motor inhibitors, so anytime the brakes are depressed the motor instantly shuts off, even if the rider is still pedaling or twisting the throttle. The Shimano Tourney derailleur offers 8 gears to cycle through, another slightly upgraded feature.

Braking power for the e201 was ample, though the mechanical disc brakes did require some extra pressure compared to hydraulic disc brakes. I think one of the upsides of having mechanical disc brakes is the ease of maintenance and adjustment. Generally speaking, they’re easier to fine tune than hydraulic disc brakes for the end user. Interestingly, the e201 has two different sized rotors for the front and rear disc brakes. The front has a 160 mm rotor while the rear has a 180 mm disc rotor. Given that the majority of stopping power comes from the front wheel (as your body weight shifts forward), I feel like it would make more sense for this to be reversed, with the larger rotor in the front and the smaller one in the rear. Still, I was able to bring the bike to a full stop pretty easily. During my brake testing I also put the motor inhibitors to work by trying to pedal while braking and also using the throttle while braking. In both instances the motor inhibitors worked as intended and power to the motor shut off as soon as I put pressure on the brake levers. I should probably note the brake levers aren’t adjustable in terms of reach, which could make grasping them difficult for those with extra large or small hands, or those wearing gloves. Maybe not, but just something to keep in mind.

One of the areas the e201 really shines is the integrated LCD control center and its corresponding app. The control center on the bike itself probably has enough information to satisfy most riders – a 6-bar battery level indicator, current speed, tripometer, odometer and pedal assist level – but the app has an incredible amount of additional information. And because the main display is integrated into the top-tube, you have plenty of room on the handlebar to mount your phone! On the smartphone app homescreen, you can see battery level in precise percentages, as well as a range estimation based on the current pedal assist setting and the ambient temperature. On the “Trips” tab there’s a built-in navigational tool where riders can input a destination and then get turn-by-turn directions. Very sweet. The app can diagnose the bike if there’s a problem, tracks all activity and displays it in graph form and also provides an overall synopsis of the bike. I really dig the app if you can’t tell. That being said, the display’s location on the top of the downtube makes viewing stats while riding somewhat difficult. I had to tilt my head down quite a bit in order to read it, obscuring obscuring my view ahead, and while I was in a safe area this could be dangerous in busier locations. The display is also non-removable, which means it’s going to be constantly exposed to the elements and possibly scratched at racks.

The GenZe e201 feels like it would be a great electric bike for shorter trips around the city. There’s rear rack bosses so riders can throw on a rack and stow their gear, and also fender bosses to attach fenders to help keep riders dry and clean. The Selle Royalle Free Way saddle, Ergon ergonomic grips, wide pressurized 2-inch wide tires and overall frame geometry make for a relatively comfortable ride. But since there’s no suspension, longer treks could prove to somewhat uncomfortable (I definitely felt this when riding through some grass off-road). The e201 feels like a responsive electric bike that’s enjoyable to ride and I want to thank GenZe for partnering with me on this review.

Pros:

  • Motor inhibitors instantly shut off power when the brakes are activated, ensuring riders can safely come to a stop without fighting against the motor
  • Selle Royale Free Way saddle and Ergon ergonomic grips make for a relatively comfortable ride experience, even without suspension, the overall geometry of the e201 adds to this comfort in my opinion, the mid-rise handlebars and stem spacers keep you upright
  • Small hub motor and fully-integrated battery make for a stealthy electric bike that can fly under the radar, you really have to look closely to realize it’s actually electric, though the motor does produce some whirring at the higher levels of power
  • Schwalbe Big Apple tires are highly pressurized and responsive, making the bike feel nimble, they also have a double layer of nylon fabric for increased protection against punctures and a reflective sidewall for increased visibility in low-light conditions
  • Torque sensing pedal assist is responsive and more fluid (matching the power you apply when pedaling, not just measuring an on/off that you are pedaling or not)
  • Having a twist throttle means the e201 can be used like a traditional electric bike by using the pedals or more like a scooter or moped by using just the throttle, expanding the roles the e201 can play
  • Double-sided kickstand keeps the e201 securely in place when deployed, which is especially important if riders are using a rear rack (which you have to buy separately, make sure it’s disc brake compatible like this)
  • Front and rear mechanical disc brakes offer adequate stopping power and will stay cleaner than most rim brakes… even though this is more of an urban style bicycle, they make it easier to take the wheels off the bike too
  • Built-in display offers a good amount of information, but the GenZe app provides tons of extra functionality like navigation, a more accurate battery indicator, and a lot of overall stats
  • The battery is lightweight and easy to carry around, and even has a built in handle so you’re less likely to drop and damage it by mistake, batteries tend to be one of the most expensive parts of ebikes (store it in a cool, dry location for best results)
  • 2-year comprehensive warranty means GenZe will take care of any issues should they arise, this is a small unit of a much larger company that has been around and feels reliable
  • Available in two frame sizes and two styles (high-step and low-step) so you can optimize for stiffness and performance or approachability, great if you have a sensitive knee or hip
  • Great pedals, they are large and stiff with plenty of traction, I also like that they squeezed bottle cage bosses onto the downtube!
  • Most of the wires and cables are routed through the frame, this thing is purpose built to look good and reduce snags if you’re lifting it or hanging it on the back of a car rack or on some busses
  • You can switch from Normal to Power mode to increase the feeling of zip and achieve higher speeds more quickly… or go with Normal to help the battery last longer and take you further, it’s a neat little extra
  • The battery pack is super light which makes it easier to toss into your backpack and charge off the bike, I also like how integrated it is into the frame, it looks really nice and streamlined
  • The crank arms, chainring guard, motor, rims, and spokes are all black and blend together nicely, most of the time you get silver spokes or different colored pedals… but even they are black here

Cons:

  • The front disc brake rotor is smaller than the rear, and since most stopping power comes the front wheel it seems like that should be the other way around
  • No integrated lights means riders who want illumination for night riding must buy and attach their own aftermarket lights
  • No suspension, and the 30.8 mm seat post diameter is not super common, which could make finding an aftermarket seat post suspension difficult
  • Brake levers aren’t adjustable so riders with extra large or extra small hands, or those wearing gloves, may find it difficult to grasp the levers… but at least the mechanical brakes are going to be easier to adjust for most owners than hydraulic
  • The double-sided kickstand does provide stability, but when folded up still hangs down pretty low and could get caught on debris while riding
  • At 9.6 amp hours, the battery capacity is a little lower than some other electric bikes, which means the range will also likely be a little less than electric bikes with larger batteries
  • With a price of $1,899, the 200 series aren’t overly affordable, and the bikes also have a few components that are found on most entry-level bikes, like mechanical disc brakes vs. hydraulic, Shimano Tourney derailleur, no-name hub motor
  • The tube-integrated display looks neat and keeps the handlebars clutter-free but it requires you to look further down to get to the readouts vs. something up higher and more forward where you’re already looking as you ride, the good news is, you now have plenty of room on the bars to mount your phone with something like this

Resources:

Trusted Advertisers

More GenZe Reviews

GenZe Recreational e102 Review

  • MSRP: $1,499
  • MODEL YEAR: 2014, 2015

A good balance of affordable options (weaker motor, entry level parts and one color) with a thoughtful custom design (mid-mounted battery, multiple frame sizes, integrated wires). Large display panel is easy to read but not removable, independent button pad is convenient…...

GenZe Sport e101 Review

  • MSRP: $1,499
  • MODEL YEAR: 2014, 2015

A compromise between affordability and design with a purpose built frame that integrates wires and the battery pack - spreading weight across the bike for improved handling and balance. Large display panel is easy to read but not removable, independent button pad is easy…...

Mike
3 weeks ago

That’s a very nice way of putting it – “aren’t overly affordable.” Very true, and in fact their price point at $1899 is a very crowded price point, and the competition at that price point is delivering far more value. Usually you can find much more stylish ebikes at that price point, that also have integrated front and rear lights, larger battery capacity, front shocks, and 500 watt motors. Also, their choice of torque sensing is likely to be a very costly one for them, as ebikes that have had torque sensing in this price range, generally have many warranty issues, and failures with that device. It’s not worth the trade-off of some modest difference in ‘feel’ during assist, for something that ends up causing the user headaches, return of defective stuff, or replacement of a usually hard to deal with mechanically item. In my opinion, at this price point, buyers should expect no less than:

  • 48 volt, 10 ah to 13 AH Samsung or Panasonic batteries, integrated on the frame or center mount just behind the seat post, such as on a Blix
  • 10 speeds, and preferably a SRAM derailleur, or something better than Altus
  • 500 watt, 48 V motor
  • Integrated front and rear tail lights
  • Adjustable stem
  • Rear rack
  • 50 mile range
  • LCD type display
  • halfway decent front suspension
  • Metal pedals, that are wider than average
  • Mechanical disc brakes
  • 2″ or wider name brand tires (Kenda or Schwalbe)
  • 13G spokes
  • USB port on the battery
  • Kickstand mounted away from the crank
  • Comfortable seat
  • 20 amp controller with waterproof connections
  • comfortable grips
  • Local support via a dealer network (not on-line where you have to do your own trouble-shooting and repairs -which is where a 2 year or 4 warranty even is senseless)

Many of These e-bike OEM’s are really not getting their price points right, which is in part why sales are so much lower here than other countries. (a few like Juiced or Rad are getting the price points closer to what they need to be)…. Americans are going to demand more value and lower price points, because they don’t use these ebikes for primary commuting as much as is done in other countries. Bike use in general is still largely recreational here, so justifying prices above $2,500 or $3,000, results in a very low percentage of the population wishing to ebike, no matter how exciting they may be to ride. Thus, we end up having too many brands of ‘me too’ ebikes, all competing for a very very very tiny niche market with prices mostly between $3,000 and $5,000, and with too many brands, each brand has a very weak dealer network, and not enough volume each to justify investment into a better trained and more knowledgeable network. The few like Genze who do price ebikes below $2,000, aren’t establishing decent dealer networks, and/or are providing margins too small for dealers to survive. Selling ebikes through places like Costco, or Dick’s, won’t cut it either. The sales declines in regular bike business continue to be steep, year over year, with notables like Accell getting their teeth kicked in and completely re-structuring, (many like them so not just picking on them). Now is the time for the major brands to step up and offer really high quality ebikes at affordable price points below $2,000. That is, if we want to see ebikes become more mainstream.

Reply
Court Rye
3 weeks ago

Well said Mike, I enjoyed your thorough suggestions and pricing discussion. I have been doing my best to cover the space and present data here so people can compare products back to back and then discuss them (as well as in the forums) and comments like yours go a long way toward that. I do agree that Juiced and Rad Power Bikes have made a splash and are tapping into a good balance of quality and affordability. Do you own an ebike? Have you been thinking about getting one or replacing yours? I’d love to hear which models you are really excited for :)

Reply

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Manu
3 days ago

In general, it is cleaning the terminal on the battery and the screen.

In europe haibike fulfills the guarantees, in fact publishes defective models picks them up and changes them for a new one within the same range price of the current year.

Different is when you make a modification on your own, for example change a cassette of 32 teeth by 50 teeth, it is clear that this does not fall under the warranty.

People think it's just changing a cassette and lengthening chain, but you have to put a new derailleur longer ... example deviator XT GS and change to XT GSG, this is out of warranty and check the full speed x10 or x 11 speed ......the serial number....

KMC x10e 10 speed
kmc x11e 11 speed

I in a new pedelec would spend all the components of series before proposing changes to be in warranty

https://www.haibike.com/en-US/US/service/recall

Krishna
1 week ago

Am I seeing 3 Milwaukee batteries in series at the back rack? M28 28-volts lithiun ion?

The battery is 18volt x 3 Milwaukee 9.0 ah (162wh)? battery.

Mark Peralta
1 week ago

I was able to hit 31mph on Easy Motion Eco 2015.

I weight in about 145 lbs with battery setup posted below. I ran the system for about 2 miles. Please see pictures for proof and setup. Hope this helps someone.

Please be careful 31mph is very dangerous and on the common roads you will be breaking the speed limit. Be responsible and safe.

(this bike)

Am I seeing 3 Milwaukee batteries in series at the back rack? M28 28-volts lithiun ion?

bfly
1 week ago

I'm happy with my Cube Stereo 160 Hybrid. It is based on the Stereo 160 bike that they race in the World Enduro Series.

JRA
1 week ago

I have recently put together a TS with a 52v controller which bumps it up to 780w peak (52v x 15A). It went together just fine with a little fiddling around but it was my first time doing one. The next would be way faster. Shouldn't take more than 3 hrs. max for an install.

Not problem with the display other than I didn't like the bracket. So I broke it and figured out another way to hold it on there. Was able to access the few things you can do like mph/km, top speed, and a few other things that didn't seem like I needed. Still has a voltmeter battery gauge which on a good day are worthless and this one because of the non stock 52v controller is even more so. Why don't they put ah output on there? Only takes a shunt to do so....

The torque sensing system works just fine for my needs which is primarily as a mtb. Yes there is a throttle, but it is really only useful for standing starts as a way to get going a bit to start pedaling letting the PAS take over, "walking" the bike uphill and maybe for blipping around a switch back. That's the only times I have felt the need for it but I am glad it is there for that alone.

Does hang down a bit but other wise is less obtrusive to the eye than the Bafang series motors. It is pretty tough seeming but I wouldn't want to bash it too hard on a rock.

Overall I am very pleased with how this system works. I still favor a hub motor with no PAS for primarily road use that requires a higher cadence. But there is no doubt that these little mid drives will climb hills when a lower cadence is in use.

Adds 15lb btw with a 52v 10.5ah battery, which now is shared between my primary road bike and this one. Just had to get another cradle.

1/1
bob armani
1 week ago

Yes! I was pretty active in the St Louis MO region. Used to race Husqvarna's, '68 360 8-speed, '70 400 Cross (Remember the movie On Any Sunday?), then a '73 250 CR. While those were my race bikes, I was a Mechanic at Surdyke Yamaha and had a TY250 to play around with Trials riding. Also had the whole AT/DT/RT Yamaha Enduro series from back in the day. I still ride off road on bikes, but not gnarly stuff, current ride is a BMW R1200GS for off-pavement stuff, and its too heavy for single track, mostly fireroad stuff, dirt roads, etc.

Sounds like you were/are really a hardcore cyclist on every level. We were only weekend warriors buying bikes from the Tradin Times and doing minor rebuilds just so we could beat on something. BTW-That is a real beauty in your BMW pic. Thanks for sharing...

drcollie
1 week ago

Wow you were a motocross guy in the 70s that is impressive. Me and my buddies use to ride on weekends on dirt trails in the 1980s/90s. Anything from Yamaha

Yes! I was pretty active in the St Louis MO region. Used to race Husqvarna's, '68 360 8-speed, '70 400 Cross (Remember the movie On Any Sunday?), then a '73 250 CR. While those were my race bikes, I was a Mechanic at Surdyke Yamaha and had a TY250 to play around with Trials riding. Also had the whole AT/DT/RT Yamaha Enduro series from back in the day. I still ride off road on bikes, but not gnarly stuff, current ride is a BMW R1200GS for off-pavement stuff, and its too heavy for single track, mostly fireroad stuff, dirt roads, etc.

1/1
bob armani
2 weeks ago

Hi Bob,
Glad to hear you enjoyed the expo,it was quite a ways for me to go but well worth it.I really like the conduit,kind of like a xm700 but with a shimano motor instead
of the bosch.I made it a lot better ride wise with the mono-shock fork I had put on.All and all a great ride for what I paid for it.
I have never ridden anything with a hub mounted motor,(outside of the show)how does this compare to a mid mount motor for all around riding?
Would love to get something else to compliment my conduit but I think I'm going to hold off for about a year or so because they
are coming out with so much new and high tech models I don't want to jump in too soon.But I have to admit that Juiced hyper-fat
1000 watt motor has my attention!!Look this up if you get a chance,there's a couple of great you-tubes on this one.One more thing,
is that your KTM in your avatar pic?I'm asking because I also ride motorcycles and wanted to know if you did too.Take care.
Ron

Hi Ron- The Juiced hyper-fat is insane clocked at over 35mph by Tora on his website. Thanks for the heads up! Right now that is a great choice for the $$, however with tech changing so rapidly, perhaps it is better to wait. Love the bike though. I also thought the Surface 604 Boar Fat is a a good buy also and very cool looking.
Your hub drive vs mid drive question: I found the hub drives felt a bit more get and go power than some of the mid-drives, however, when I tested the Trek SuperCommuter8 with Bosch, my feeling changed based on the way they tuned the motor on that bike compared to the BMW mid-drive which was not as peppy. For all around, riding (mostly pavement), I like a hub driven motor. If your chain breaks, you can keep riding using the throttle. ;)
I also liked the Trek Powerfly series they had at the expo, but a little pricey. Seems like trek knows how to tune their motors well paired to the bike to get peak performance IMHO. I was a little disappointed not to see Haibike at the expo. The organizers said they would be there, but then pulled out of the Chicago location. I would have liked to try their line of bikes as well. Maybe next year. Haha! Yeah, I do not own the KTM, just test rode the Freeride electric. A real thrill indeed. KTM also makes some great ebikes, but are taking forever to get over to the US. Downloaded the European catalog and they have some real beauties. HNY! Bob

Mike's E-Bikes
2 weeks ago

great article for DIY !

Seriously, I have done enough kit conversions now, and sold more than my fair share of regular ebikes, to be thoroughly convinced that doing a kit conversion on your existing regular bike is most times the way to go. If you don't feel up to doing it yourself, then have a shop do it for you, and you'll still come out money way ahead. Besides that, you can pick and choose the battery capacity you want with the motor size you want, along with where you wish to mount the battery, etc. You can get beautiful color displays like the one from APT (TFT 850C), which offers the option of up to 9 levels of assist, AND, you can put a far more efficient sine wave controller on your ebike, getting the most out of the motor, and extending battery range. It's easy to increase the amperage rating on the controller, so you don't burn that out, and you can mount the controller in an area where its easy to service or replace if needed, and keep it cooler than the ones on factory ebikes which are typically in areas where they will get hot, fail sooner, and be harder to service. Also, your replacement costs for any given component will be a LOT cheaper than having to buy from the ebike OEM. You can go the route of rear hub motor, front hub motor, both hubs powered by motor, or mid drive motor. If you have a higher end bike already, you are miles ahead, and dollars ahead, because you have quality components. You're extending the use of your existing bike, and not sending it to the garbage heap or Goodwill or wherever, thus keep resource use to a minimum and being a good steward for the planet. (you already are a good one, if you are using a regular bike anyway for commuting vs a car). You can easily get and many times EXceed the performance of Haibikes, Pedego's, Stromers, Easy Motions, and do so for less than a third the cost of those bikes.

If you are in the Chicago area, I offer FREE DIY seminars that you can sign up for, on how to do it yourself, and can show how and where to source top quality components. (http://www.mikese-bikes.com/schedule-appointment). I'll also let people use tools there at my shop, if they don't have the right ones for a particular task, as long as they bring the bike in. I've done trikes, fat tire bikes, and mountain bikes, in addition to regular bikes. If you are into very low step throughs, for easy mounting, I recommend the Biria Easy Boarding series, which also comes now in larger 2.3" balloon style tires. They are excellent for conversions because they already have very sizable throughways for the wiring to be mostly hidden within the frame tubes. Super easy to wire up, and very clean looking. You can also keep your rims if you love them, and typically have a local bike shop 'wheel build' and re-spoke in a hub motor for less than $75. Great for fat tire bikes, especially Salsa's which have some awesome (very strong) Surly fat tire rims.

Rooster
2 weeks ago

wow, I can't believe all the verbal diarrhea against Juiced CS especially from some who don't even own their product. I have the HyperFat with a 1000 watt motor...yes, a 1000 watt motor. I don't see Magnum, Trek, Rad or anyone else offering a 1000 watt motor or the performance of the HyperFat. Look what the other companies have to offer when it comes to watts, battery size, components, and PRICE. I understand having a Founder series bike I may have a few issues but so far Juiced has answered the telephone every time I called and has gotten back to me promptly with each email. CS has been great, solving any and all issues. For the select few Juiced haters...move on, we're tired of your crying and you know who you are.
I think I have owned my juiced product a bit longer than you have and definitely long enough to know it's nothing to write home about unless you want me to lie about it and tell you it's a wonderful product and I recommend it but I don't. Tora knows it's not up to par but I think his solution is to blow it off and move on. Unfortunately I can guarantee you it will never endure it's warranty as I now smell the controller burning when I ride it so it won't be long now but I don't expect much cs as I am not as much of a brown noser as some others on here and you know who you are.

Dapperham
2 weeks ago

wow, I can't believe all the verbal diarrhea against Juiced CS especially from some who don't even own their product. I have the HyperFat with a 1000 watt motor...yes, a 1000 watt motor. I don't see Magnum, Trek, Rad or anyone else offering a 1000 watt motor or the performance of the HyperFat. Look what the other companies have to offer when it comes to watts, battery size, components, and PRICE. I understand having a Founder series bike I may have a few issues but so far Juiced has answered the telephone every time I called and has gotten back to me promptly with each email. CS has been great, solving any and all issues. For the select few Juiced haters...move on, we're tired of your crying and you know who you are.

Chris M
2 weeks ago

wow, I can't believe all the verbal diarrhea against Juiced CS especially from some who don't even own their product. I have the HyperFat with a 1000 watt motor...yes, a 1000 watt motor. I don't see Magnum, Trek, Rad or anyone else offering a 1000 watt motor or the performance of the HyperFat. Look what the other companies have to offer when it comes to watts, battery size, components, and PRICE. I understand having a Founder series bike I may have a few issues but so far Juiced has answered the telephone every time I called and has gotten back to me promptly with each email. CS has been great, solving any and all issues. For the select few Juiced haters...move on, we're tired of your crying and you know who you are.

john peck
3 weeks ago

Reid Welch commented:
Edison said to reporters (am quoting from imperfect memory), "Nothing worthwhile works the very first time, all by itself, just to please you. You've got to make the damned thing work."

At the Juiced Bikes updates page,

HyperFat 1000 Production Update: Try Harder

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2017 AT 2:56AM

All of the HF1000 Founders Series frames got remade. We were not happy with the frame performance and just scrapped the entire batch of frames and started over. The new frames are much stronger and more capable of standing up to the powerful 1,000 Watt motor. We lab tested the frame with 33% more load and 4x more load cycles than what is necessary for production and it easily passed....
Show more

REPLY
Sounds like most of my builds,Reid. :)I wish someone with an HF would make a video of a mountain trail with one.

Mark Peralta
3 weeks ago

I think the Giant uses a slightly more advanced drive which doesn't resist the efforts of the rider as much as the regular PW series. That's the biggest problem I have with the PW. I can actually ride further with a 400Wh battery and a Bosch drive than a 500Wh battery and a Yamaha drive. The ECO and Tour modes provided by Bosch seem a lot easier on the knees than the assist levels provided by Yamaha. The Bosch drive provides assistance even in the higher cadence ranges, whereas the Yamaha tends to slowly cut off after 95 RPM. With the PW it's very difficult for me to tell how much I'm exerting myself during a ride, and the next day my knees usually ache if I've ridden in ECO mode a lot.

I think I can try to explain that by what available information we have in the EBR forum. The Yamaha drive is a highly optimized motor within a specified cadence range (50-80 RPM). I think the gear reduction is too low in a way that above 80 RPM the motor is already spinning beyond it's efficient range. A soon as the torque goes down (70 rpm, broad gray zone at the upper chart), the power will plateau briefly before it starts to also dip down (80 rpm, yellowgreen curve at the lower chart). And you will feel it on your legs that you are on your own without the motor assist. Your optimum cadence here is 60-80 rpm (easiest at 70 rpm).

This is even more apparent at the lower assist level since both toque (yellow curve ) and power also further goes down respectively. At the lowest assist level (yellow green lower curve), maybe your effective assisted cadence range will be 40-60 rpm.

Considering that this motor is rpm sensitive, it is very important to have a cadence meter so you will not be pushing too hard but rather share the effort with your motor.

One disadvantage of not being able to easily attain higher rpm is the difficulty to gather speed and momentum before the upshift.

Below is a simulation of the motor at full assist level (red and blue curves) and lowest assist level (faded red and blue curves). Ignore the vertical dashed lines, the black load curves, and green efficiency curves for a moment.
Multiply the RPM by a factor of 0.2 to correspond to the cadence at the x axis.

http://www.ebikes.ca/tools/simulator.html?bopen=true&motor=MCUTE36V_328&cont=cust_15_18_0.03_A&batt=B3614_PF&autothrot=false&throt=100&axis=rpm&cont_b=cust_15_18_0.03_A&motor_b=MCUTE36V_328&batt_b=B3614_PF&add=false&blue=Lbs&throt_b=21&k=1.29&k_b=1.29

Notice that even at the lowest assist level there is still full torque at the start up. Yamaha calls this as the "Zero Cadence" feature.

1/1
JayVee
3 weeks ago

I have a friend that just purchased the Giant Road-E+ Yamaha powered eBike and he said he rode in the lowest assist level for 30 miles and at the end of the ride his Yamaha computer said he had 78% left. That would translate to 136 miles which is about what you indicated.

I think the Giant uses a slightly more advanced drive which doesn't resist the efforts of the rider as much as the regular PW series. That's the biggest problem I have with the PW. I can actually ride further with a 400Wh battery and a Bosch drive than a 500Wh battery and a Yamaha drive. The ECO and Tour modes provided by Bosch seem a lot easier on the knees than the assist levels provided by Yamaha. The Bosch drive provides assistance even in the higher cadence ranges, whereas the Yamaha tends to slowly cut off after 95 RPM. With the PW it's very difficult for me to tell how much I'm exerting myself during a ride, and the next day my knees usually ache if I've ridden in ECO mode a lot.

Sergey Kirienko
4 weeks ago

thats usefull information thanks.

i would add that you have to connect the "Thin Red wire" in series with ignition switch to battery + red Thick wire to make everything work.
i had trouble with this untill i realize it my self :)

KidWok
1 month ago

Got my ST1 LE 19 months ago and have put on 6k miles so far. Last year was the wettest year on record in Seattle for quite some time. It was pretty obvious that the fenders wouldn't be long enough so I added mud flaps, as I have many times before on road and commuter bikes. I quickly discovered that speed pedelacs kicked up the water fast enough that the water stream atomized on contact with the mud flap. Over the last year, I've revised my mud flap design multiple times and now have one I'm really happy with. Here's how they evolved:

Version 1: Used the long side of an orange Tide laundry bottle and attached it to black plastic fender plug with two M4 bolts and lock nuts. As noted, high speed water spray atomized on contact, enveloping feet and drive train in a fine mist that flushed the lube out of the chain after any short amount of time on wet pavement.

Version 2: First tried folding the flap so that water impacted at an angle, which didn't noticeably help. Then drilled some holes to add a series of vertical strings (chalk line) along the inside of the flap. The idea was for the strings to wick the water down, which helped a little. This assembly started getting heavy and version two ultimately disappeared when the black plastic fender plug fell off mid-ride.

Version 3: Stromer sent me another plug. The plug has a small hole in it, presumably for water to not collect in the fender cavity. I drilled a 1/8th inch hole just above that on the inside of the aluminum fender so that I can run a small zip tie to make sure the plug is firmly attached (picture attached...you can barely see the pink zip tie covered in road crud). This time I also wanted to lengthen the flap so I used an old water bottle (LDPE) and the long section of another detergent bottle zip tied together, mostly because the orange looks good with the blue on the LE. This worked fairly successfully for some time, but the wind eventually blew back the flap so that it was flying almost horizontally. That actually was fine because it was enough to protect the drive train and I had started commuting in Hunter Chelsea rain boots. However, the LDPE bottle was repeatedly creased where it attached to the plug and eventually broke off mid-ride. The plug stayed put thanks to the zip tie.

Version 4: Now I'm using two halves of the water bottle (LDPE) for the top, connected to both inside and outside of fender plug. This creates a very rigid top half that keeps the lower flap in line with the fender. Played with various materials and have found that HDPE from a gallon vinegar bottle is light, durable, and flexible enough to be scraped and knocked around. Middle section of vinegar bottle where label is attached yields two flaps, but at this time I'm still only running a front flap because I don't care about spraying behind on my commute. In addition to vertical lines, I've now added a pair of zip ties horizontally in the middle of the lower HDPE section, which holds the curvature of the flap and elevates the lines off the plastic. This dramatically reduces the amount of mist at high speed as it seems the gap between the lines and the plastic create a pocket for the disrupted/decelerated spray to mix with any remaining mist and exit downward. Version 4 pic attached.

Version 5: Needed a flap for the rear due to towing my son around on a trail-a-bike, so I took another LDPE bottle and the other half of the HDPE to make another flap. Once more, the flap is attached to the fender plug with two M4 bolts and the plug is zip tied on to the fender body. Having realized that a large gap between the strings and the plastic lower flap greatly reduces mist, I decided to run the strings horizontally with holes drilled along the side edges, instead of vertically as before. This serves to both hold the flap in a eye pleasing parabolic curve and maximized the de-misting pocket. Am now running version 4 on front and version 5 on rear. Version 4, with its vertical endpoints at the bottom of the flap has always collected a bunch of leaves, dead worms, etc. Version 5 clearly stays cleaner and does a better job eliminating mist. I ran out of vinegar again today, so the front flap has now been updated as well (pictures attached).

This has been a fun design challenge and I hope it helps other speed pedelac owners get the most out of their bikes year-round.

Tai

1/4
harryS
1 month ago

Sorry, I am very new to this ebike thing. Is it possible to run an ebike (say a bbso2 mid drive) off a 36v battery with only 2.6ah? We are moving to europe but I would like to build the bike before we go since it needs to be adapted to carry a dog too..

FYI. While cleaning out my garage and swapping the lawnmower for the snowblower, I decided to do some science. No, a 750W BBS02 kit from Lunacycle will not run on 36V. Even fully charged at 42 volts. the Ryobi isn't enough, It might be possible to use the progamming cable and a PC to set the motor up for 36V, but I don't have the cable, electing not to mess with that stuff.

However, I do have a 12volt, 9 cell lithium battery that I added in series to the Ryobi. I took it around for a half mile. The combo was able to push out 20A peak current. I didn't think the Ryobi could do that. With the regular battery, the motor will draw 25A, SInce the Ryobi was never intended to push those current levels, you'll have a short range ride and eventually ruin the battery.

1/3
indianajo
1 month ago

What do you do, weld nickel tabs on the batteries, then weld the tabs together? Saw nickel tabs on e-bay. Don't you have to have argon or CO2 to make the welds good? I've got a Hobart 250 mig welder, I need to build a 200 ms pulse switch/transistor to make it a spot welder.
I've got a 15 AH 48v scooter battery I got a refund on because the last stack (of 11) connected shook loose in the eleventh mile. 6 volts instantly, 0 with a load. Supposedly Sanyo 18650 cells, we'll see. I disassembled down to the protection board, no obvious prolems with solder joints there. I have the heat shrink tube 800 mm to re-enclose it already.
I got the replacement 15 AH 48 v battery from a sun-ebike.com warehouser (LA) on e-bay. Lasted 60 miles already. With two 58 v batteries in series, I might be able to power my sawz-all and cut up trees and limbs 1000' from the electrical cord. Been using a 10 gauge 700' extension cord but it won't reach the boundaries of my summer camp. Radio Flyer power wagon, anybody?

Gnexus01
1 month ago

Has anyone heard of these guys : www.lifepo4.in

From the looks of the APP Series LiFePO4 Pack, it seems to have a single port for discharge and charging.. Never seen that before, nor have I heard of a battery that has GPS and Bluetooth either...

whamp
1 month ago

Just another data point.

I ordered April 11th and saw that my shopify order was updated with a tracking number November 30th for Delivery 12/1 (I just live a couple hours north of them). I also had the 12T motor and the Grin Cycle Satiator Charger. They also rebuilt mine (thanks guys) from a size M to an XL after I reached out and asked if the frame size change was allowed for Founder's Series orders.

Since then UPS has really blown it with constantly changing delivery date information. First i was told 1:45 to 5:45 Friday 12/1, then at 10pm when they never arrived with no status update I rechecked online and they said it was delayed until 12/4. I Called to confirm and UPS said yep, definitely going to be delivered 12/4 and no I couldn't just stop by the UPS warehouse and pick it up myself until 12/5 at the earliest. 12/4 comes and goes with no updates and no driver again. Now they say it'll be delivered today 12/5. I'm skeptical they even have the package at this point but we'll see. To be clear, this is no fault of Juiced. Just the typical terribleness of UPS. Can't wait for Amazon to eat their lunch.

Juiced should definitely demand their money back for shipping that was paid to UPS, especially after hearing about all the damage on other packages.

Update: didn't come 12/5 went to the distribution facility today 12/6 because they said they had it here but now that I'm here they're saying they don't know what the people on the phone are talking about because it's not here.

Lovely

harryS
1 month ago

You had a 24 V controller. You had 24 volts. You're OK. It doesn't matter if you had 100 24 V batteries in parallel or the two 12V batteries in series. You're not overloading the controller. It determines what it needs in current and if operating correctly, there's no problem.

If it were me, I'd make sure the throttle is working OK and that it didn't malfunction,

Does the motor still run uncontrolled when you power up the old controller? Does it shut off when you squeeze a brakelever. If you hooked them up, your brake levers have switches that shut off the moto.

If it does start up on its own, does disconnecting the throttle shut off the motor? If it does, you can suspect your throttle, and do further tests. If not, your controller blew up. Replace it.

Prabhu Kameswaran
1 month ago

https://robu.in/product/motor-controller-for-my1016-350w/

This is the controller that I have used. It says a under voltage protection of 20V and current limit feature of 33A.

But I doubt these features.

I am using a throttle to adjust the speed of the motor.

https://www.amazon.in/Amaron-7AH-Sealed-Battery-Maintenance/dp/B00YAZO6T2?tag=googinhydr18418-21

I am using two of the batteries mentioned above and I connect them in series to form 24 v. Do I need some voltage/current regulation circuit before i feed the controller with amps from those batteries. Please help me to sort out before i fry another controller.

rich c
1 month ago

Successfully converted? What capacity is the controller? If 10 amps, you may have fried it with those batteries in series. Are you using a throttle? PAS?

roko 2147
3 weeks ago

Do a review on the folding Rainbow Rusty electric bike please.

Gary Bryan
3 weeks ago

Nice review, thank you.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 weeks ago

Thanks Gary! Glad you enjoyed it :)

roko 2147
3 weeks ago

This guy's awesome!

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 weeks ago

Thanks for the positive feedback Roko, I'm working with Brent so we can cover more bikes and provide the best resource possible with EBR, I'm sure he appreciates your encouragement :)

Martin Schmidt
3 weeks ago

Why exactly? Because He is on amphetamines? Please speak faster. Its Not annoying. :D

marcel trovarello
3 weeks ago

I would rather have Court doing these reviews. He’s more specific and doesn’t repeat the same things over and over. Court has a neutral look at bikes also. Court keep your channel for yourself. 😜

marcel trovarello
3 weeks ago

ElectricBikeReview.com great to hear Court. Keep up the fantastic work.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 weeks ago

Thanks for the feedback Marcel, it has been challenging to let go and get Brent's help, I tried to weigh the option of missing some reviews vs. having Brent help but maybe present differently or have some misses in the process... he's growing and I will still be doing the vast majority of reviews here ;)

Martin Schmidt
3 weeks ago

marcel trovarello Yeah. Court is better. This Dude is like on speed . Super annoying.

Steve Petttyjohn
3 weeks ago

Compared to the lower priced Rad Power RadCity, this bike is not a very good value at all.
I've noticed that the somewhat lower spec GenZe 100 series are a "road show" item at Costco for $1299

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 weeks ago

Interesting... Thanks for sharing this Steve! I have seen ebikes and other random electric mobility things at Best Buy in the past, cool that Costco is getting in on it too

Ian Mangham
3 weeks ago

Another fugly bike,great review

Steve Donovan
3 weeks ago

It's foolish to expect you would have done it like Court. I enjoyed your review, hope to see you again.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 weeks ago

Thanks for your positive support Steve! Brent is working hard and getting better all the time. I'll still be posting the majority of reviews but together we can explore more products and I think he brings a unique perspective and feel thankful to have his help here :D

Honky Tonk
3 weeks ago

I don't want Court's channel to turn into a corporate channel.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 weeks ago

Thanks Honky! I am committed to not selling out the channel... I actually removed all brand ads from ElectricBikeReview.com recently to be even more neutral. Brent is learning, there's room for improvement, but by having him help out from time to time we are able to cover ebikes that I would otherwise miss and I feel like it's a way to serve the community, even if he still has room for improvement :)

Ian Mangham
3 weeks ago

Honky Tonk Well if you say so then that's it 😄

D Danilo
3 weeks ago

The bottle-cage bosses went unnoticed by BOTH of our beloved reviewers! (I just saw an opportunity and jumped on it!)

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 weeks ago

You win!!! Thanks for sharing :D

b b
3 weeks ago

Weird frame like the flash.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 weeks ago

Kind of funky yeah?!

willjammski
3 weeks ago

this bike is underwhelming for the price considering the competition.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 weeks ago

It's great to have competition to keep these prices low and offer some choice... I like that GenZe has a couple of sizes in addition to the step-thru

Ian Mangham
3 weeks ago

willjammski It sure is fugly

willjammski
3 weeks ago

this guy is a good reviewer.

Seb K
3 weeks ago

ElectricBikeReview.com - Oh of course I don't want to put Brent down or anything . I just prefer the way you do it .

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 weeks ago

Thanks for your positive encouragement! I think Brent does a good job too and am happy to have him working to cover more ebikes here with me :)

Seb K
3 weeks ago

Not as good as Court though .

Mark Elford
3 weeks ago

Liking the frame, looks to have a bit longer wheelbase.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 weeks ago

Right! I wasn't sure why they made the frame as they did, like... it looks different, but does it perform better or offer something unique or was it just a style choice?

Adog828
3 weeks ago

Great review but court does it better though

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 weeks ago

Thanks for the support! I feel very fortunate to have Brent's help with reviews from time to time, I think he's doing a good job (especially since this is new to him and I have been doing it for five years) but we are always working to get better ;)

Ddr Hazy
3 weeks ago

$1.9k for this bike is too much. Battery and motor are underpowered for that price. Perhaps this company is manufacturing that frame themselves but upon looking at their website it just says that it's assembled in Michigan.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 weeks ago

I'm with you... the big stand-out for me is their app and unique frame design which could be a plus or minus depending on your tastes

Martin Schmidt
3 weeks ago

Overpriced.

DiGiTaLGrAvEDiGGA
3 weeks ago

I agree the battery needs to be 400W @ least

Isaiah Yhomas
3 weeks ago

Do they have a 48v 500w hydraulic breaks genZe?

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 weeks ago

Hi Phil! As you make a stop, body weight and frame weight sort of shifts forward because of momentum and the front brake ends up doing more work. This is why many electric mountain bikes use larger 180 mm or even 203 mm front rotors. You don't want to overdo it and flip the bike by jamming the front brake... but having a larger disc up front gives you more leverage and allows the rotor to cool more easily

Phil Hogan
3 weeks ago

Good review! Doesn't most of the braking power go to the rear wheel?

Ian Mangham
3 weeks ago

Awesome review Bro, Awesome

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 weeks ago

Thanks for the support Ian! It's neat to see how GenZe is expanding and growing their offering since a few years ago