Electric Bike Outfitters EBO Cruiser Kit Review

Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Cruiser Kit Review
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Cruiser Kit
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Cruiser 350 Watt Internally Geared Hub
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Cruiser Rear Battery Rack Samsung Cells
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Cruiser Kt Lcd Display With Throttle
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Cruiser Kit Intalled
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Cruiser Kit Review
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Cruiser Kit
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Cruiser 350 Watt Internally Geared Hub
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Cruiser Rear Battery Rack Samsung Cells
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Cruiser Kt Lcd Display With Throttle
Electric Bike Outfitters Ebo Cruiser Kit Intalled

Summary

  • A feature rich, reasonably priced, electric bike kit with trigger throttle and cadence sensing pedal assist drive modes
  • The battery pack mounts into a sturdy universal rear-rack that can support ~55 lbs and includes pannier blockers
  • You get to choose from a wide range of wheel sizes, front or rear mounted motor setup and add a cassette of gears from 1 to 6, 7, 8 or 9 but that costs $25 to $50 extra, you can choose from silver or black for motor casing color
  • Installing the cadence sensor for this kit can be more tedious and it only offers five magnets vs. 12 on some other kits I've tested, the battery pack, tail light and main display have to be powered on separately which can be easier to forget when you stop riding

Search EBR

Video Review

Trusted Advertisers

Introduction

Make:

Electric Bike Outfitters

Model:

EBO Cruiser Kit

Price:

$925

Suggested Use:

Cruising, Urban, Commuting

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

30 Day Return, 1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

20152016

Bicycle Details

Battery Weight:

7 lbs (3.17 kg)

Motor Weight:

6 lbs (2.72 kg)

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses

Gearing Details:

9 Single Speed or Shimano 6 or 7 Speed Cassettes or SunRace 8 and 9 Speed Cassettes

Brake Details:

Mechanical 5 Brand Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy

Spokes:

13 Gauge Stainless Steel, 36 Spoke

Wheel Sizes:

16 in (40.64cm)20 in (50.8cm)24 in (60.96cm)26 in (66.04cm)27.5 in (69.85cm)28 in (71.12cm)

Accessories:

Rear Carry Rack with Pannier Blockers (25 kg Weight Limit), EBO Quick Connect Anti-Water Wiring, Integrated Backlite (LINEO by Spanninga) Optional Twist Throttle

Other:

Rear Motors Cost $25 to $50 Extra, Dropout Widths Front: 100 mm, Rear 120 mm or 135 mm, Brake Clamp Diameter 22.2 mm, 17 Amp Controller

Electronic Details

Motor Type:

Front-Mounted Geared Hub, Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

350 watts

Battery Brand:

Samsung

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11.6 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

417.6 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

15 miles (24 km)

Estimated Max Range:

40 miles (64 km)

Display Type:

Fixed Monochrome Backlit LCD by KT

Readouts:

Battery Level (4 Bars), Assist Level (0-5), Speedometer, Clock, Odometer, Wattage, Temperature, Average Speed, Max Speed

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad

Drive Mode:

Trigger Throttle, Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

Trusted Advertisers



Written Review

The Cruiser Kit from Electric Bike Outfitters is unique in that it offers a rear-rack style battery pack vs. one that mounts mid-frame on the downtube. This rack style battery used to be more common in the ebike kit space but has become less popular in recent years due to balance and handling limitations. Basically… they are rear heavy and position weight higher up which can be less stable when parked and more dangerous if tipped. I personally tend to prefer the lower center of gravity that mid-mounted batteries offer but recognize that for some applications, like step-thru frames, the benefits of easily mounting the bike and comfortably standing over the bike when stopped become more important. And so, for this demo we were using the ~$500 Crosby model from Pure City Cycles which looks beautiful and perfectly illustrates the strengths and weaknesses of the EBO Cruiser Kit. The Crosby comes stock with its own silver rack which was replaced here by the handsome and sturdy black battery-mount rack that is included with the EBO Cruiser conversion kit. This bike also had fenders, a comfortable saddle and swept back handlebars for that upright relaxed cruiser feel which all remained in tact. Basically, the e-bike kit itself is plug and play… you can choose a front or rear mounted wheel with motor pre-installed and it’s designed to work with traditional brakes or disc brakes. There’s definitely some screwing around and effort that goes into getting everything setup correctly (especially the cadence sensor) but it looks great and rides well once complete. My biggest complaint about this particular build was actually the kickstand that comes with the Crosby… it barely held the bike up once the heavy battery pack was mounted to the rear rack and I think I’d replace that immediately if this was my own bike, Amazon has several adjustable kickstands on offer.

There are lots of choices when it comes to this electric bike kit and the first major one is wheel size. It’s an easy choice though because your bike will probably only accommodate one size! The Crosby I was testing with here had 26″ wheels so that’s the size used for the review. Electric Bike Outfitters offers 16″, 20″, 24″, 26″, 27.5″ and 700c or ~28″ which is common on city bikes. If you aren’t sure what size wheel you need, look at both sides of the tires on your bike and try to find a measurement… You might see some air pressure ratings like 30 to 50 PSI and likely the size such as 700x35c. If you’re ordering the bike online or through a shop just read the details in the description or call Electric Bike Outfitters for help, their website is pretty nice and easy to use. So the next choice is whether you want a front or rear mounted motor. For those who might want to swap between their traditional unmotorized wheels I recommend a front motor because it’s much easier to install and take off. For those who plan to ride more and want the best traction and steering I recommend he rear motor but it can end up costing $25 to $50 more if you add sprockets to work with your gearing system. The Pure City Crosby I was testing with had an 8 speed setup stock so the kit also had to have 8 gears to work properly. Note that you can choose from a single speed design and 6, 7, 8 or 9 speeds. The final question to ask yourself is whether you want silver or black. The spokes are always silver so that hub tends to blend in more but the rim has a black accent on it so both end up looking alright in the end. I found that the front motor operated more quietly… both offer the same power rating of 350 watts nominal and are internally geared which allows them to feel peppier when starting and climbing but also tends to wear more quickly than a gearless direct drive motor. The motors whir a bit (especially at low speeds and under heavy load) but are warrantied for a year. I’d estimate that the motor on its own weighs about six pounds.

Powering this kit is a beautiful slide-in rack mounted battery with premium Samsung Lithium-ion cells. The batter and rack are colored black to match each other and the pack feels well protected when locked into the controller box surrounded by the rack. The tubing on the rack is a bit oversized but may still work with clip-on panniers and you get pannier blockers on both sides of the rack to keep bags and cargo from snagging in the wheel. My favorite part about the whole setup is the integrated LINEO LED light by Spanninga. It feels really polished and has a built-in reflector… but unfortunately you have to turn it on and off separately from the battery and the main display. It’s actually not a huge deal because this allows you to operate the light when the kit is completely shut off (perhaps you’ve almost completely discharged your battery but still want to ride safe). All things considered, the battery, rack and light all work very well and offer an above-average capacity of 36 Volts, 11.6 Amp hours for a total of 417.6 Watt hours which should go 17+ miles per charge on throttle power alone for a 170 lb rider on flat paved terrain. You can extend your range by pedaling along and using the lower settings in pedal assist.

Pedal assist is a great option to have on any electric bike in my opinion because it incentivizes pedaling allowing you to get more exercise, stretch your legs, focus your hands on steering and let your fingers relax (vs. pressing a trigger throttle or twist throttle). The great news for the EBO Cruiser is that it offers both assist and Throttle mode so you can choose how to ride and even override with the throttle at any time. I use this strategy a lot… riding in level two or three in pedal assist then stepping it up with the throttle to pass a fellow rider, get up to speed quickly from a stop sign or climb a short hill. Once my objective is complete I release the throttle and go back to pedaling. One complaint about the EBO Cruiser kit (and most of the Electric Bike Outfitters systems) is that there is no throttle-only mode. You have to be in PAS 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 to use the throttle. But at least you can use full power with the throttle, it doesn’t matter which PAS mode you’re in. Another question mark I had while riding was how well the limited five sensor cadence disc was performing. I was impressed to be honest, I see a lot of 12 magnet sensors these days so five had me worried. Apparently EBO plans to upgrade their sensors in the future but the five magnet setup really wasn’t all that bad. The real challenge is getting it on when installing the kit. You have to take your crank arm completely off which can be a two person job and require special tools… this might be worth paying a local shop to help with but that adds to the overall price of the kit.

The final consideration here is operation and the kit is pretty standard… You do have to power the battery and display on separately, there’s a toggle switch at the rear of the pack and a power button on the remote pad usually mounted near your left grip. Lots of ebikes and kits function this way but I’m always forgetting to turn the battery off after each ride so hopefully you’ll remember on your own ebike ;) Once powered up the display shows battery charge level, speed, assist level, odometer, time, temperature and a few more readouts. It’s a lot to take in but the screen is easy to read in light or dark because it’s backlit (just hold the up arrow for a few seconds). The brake levers included with this kit are wired into the system so anytime you pull, they will cut power to the motor and that’s important for pedal assist mode. To me, this kit is a winner because it’s flexible and relatively affordable. You get literally everything you need to convert most bicycles to electric for under $1,000 and you get a one year warranty to boot. These days you can get some entry level electric bikes starting at ~$1,500 and the wires will all be integrated and you won’t have to do much work compared to a kit… but those tend to be lower quality bikes with limited sizing options. On the flip side, many purpose built quality cruisers like those from Pedego cost $2k to $3,500. There’s room for improvement refining this kit by swapping the cadence sensor for one with more sensors that’s easier to install and integrating the battery, light and display with fewer on/off buttons but for the price it’s a good setup.

Pros:

  • Color coded wires are easy to setup, the motor cable has a quick disconnect point that makes servicing the wheel (front or rear) much easier
  • You get brake levers with integrated motor inhibitors here which could come in handy if you upgrade to pedal assist (much more affordable to do when you buy the bike vs. later since it uses a different controller)
  • I like trigger throttle because it allows you to use your existing grips and twist shifter but you can upgrade to a twist throttle if you prefer
  • Available in a huge assortment of wheel sizes including 16″, 20″, 24″, 26″, 27.5″ (650B) and ~28″ (700c) so you can convert folding bikes, kids bikes, road bikes, mountain bikes etc. and they all cost the same
  • This kit offers more Amps for increased starting and climbing power vs. the entry level EBO Commuter, that model is 14 Amps and this one is 17
  • The mechanical brake levers are compatible with traditional designs as well as disc brakes and the motor has a mounting pattern for use with a disc brake rotor
  • You can override pedal assist with the throttle at any time but there is no throttle-only mode so you’ll need to be in 1-5 to use it
  • The rack-mounted battery pack comes with a built in Spanninga LED light that looks great and works whether the bike is powered on or not

Cons:

  • The pedal assist cadence sensor requires more effort to install and the units I saw only had a five sensor disc which isn’t as responsive as the 10 and 12 magnet designs
  • You have to power the battery pack on as well as the display unit to get the bike going… this adds a bit of time to each ride but also makes it easier to forget to turn the battery pack off when you park – same thing with the rear light, it is activated with a separate rubber switch at the rear but this isn’t so bad if you just want the light on and aren’t using the battery to power the bike
  • The cadence sensor only offers a five magnet disc vs. 10 or 12 on some newer hardware I’ve seen from other companies, it sounds like Electric Bike Outfitters might upgrade this in the future and frankly, it worked alright during my tests

Resources:

Trusted Advertisers

More Electric Bike Outfitters Reviews

Electric Bike Outfitters EBO Mountaineer Kit Review

  • MSRP: $1,180
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015, 2016

A high power, high speed electric bike kit capable of 30 mph top speeds, can be operated with pedal assist, trigger throttle or optional twist throttle. Heavier but sturdy 750 watt gearless hub motor, can be mounted in the front or…...

Electric Bike Outfitters EBO Front Range Kit Review

  • MSRP: $1,083
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015, 2016

A powerful gearless hub motor kit capable of being installed as a front or rear wheel, sturdy and relatively quiet. Gearless motors tend to be heavier and this one is ~12 lbs and does not…...

Electric Bike Outfitters EBO Phantom Kit Review

  • MSRP: $925
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015, 2016

An affordable electric bike kit with everything you need to get going: motor, battery, throttle, pedal assist. Custom designed casing is narrower than many other 350 watt motors and fits in 100…...

Electric Bike Outfitters EBO Commuter Kit Review

  • MSRP: $704
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015, 2016

An affordable, all-inclusive electric bike kit available in many wheel sizes (front or rear) with a nice one year warranty. You get a standard 350 watt internally geared motor, 36 volt Lithium-ion battery pack and…...


Be the First to Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

emco5
1 week ago

The Electric Shopping Cruiser Any opinions?

A 250 watt hub is minimal assistance for a lightweight two wheeler. That trike is heavy. Slight boost would be noticed on level ground but there wouldn't be much energy on inclines and zip on hills, especially with a load of stuff in the basket.

If you need a trike, get one and put a stronger mid-drive kit on it. https://tinyurl.com/yd2bjn9q

The forum host has info on the drives https://electricbikereview.com/?s=8fun+mid+drive

Roland Leisenring
1 week ago

The Electric Shopping Cruiser Any opinions?

Roland Leisenring
1 week ago

Any reviews on The Electric Shopping Cruiser ($2,500)

Ed P
1 week ago

I've been pedaling a non-electric, crank -forward Fuji for years, but age is catching up with me. The geometry that allows me to place my feet firmly on the ground when needed is even more important to me now in my early eighties. I need an electric version. What category do these bikes fall in? EBR doesn't seem to make it clear. Is it "cruiser" or "comfort" or something else?
And which electric bikes have this geometry? The only one I've found is the Electra Townie Go, which is actually higher adjusted for me than it should be - not really a "flat foot" in my opinion, and has fatter tires than I like for pedaling. Are there other electric bikes out there with the crank-forward geometry?
Any help will be much appreciated. Thanks.
I, too, have loved my non-electric, crank-forward, step-thru bike (RANS Fusion) for the past 10 years here in somewhat hilly Washington, DC; 10 months ago I brought it to the flat, Delaware shore and finally decided on a a step-thru e-bike (Kalkhoff Include 8) for use here and have been very pleased.

Baron
2 weeks ago

I've been pedaling a non-electric, crank -forward Fuji for years, but age is catching up with me. The geometry that allows me to place my feet firmly on the ground when needed is even more important to me now in my early eighties. I need an electric version. What category do these bikes fall in? EBR doesn't seem to make it clear. Is it "cruiser" or "comfort" or something else?
And which electric bikes have this geometry? The only one I've found is the Electra Townie Go, which is actually higher adjusted for me than it should be - not really a "flat foot" in my opinion, and has fatter tires than I like for pedaling. Are there other electric bikes out there with the crank-forward geometry?
Any help will be much appreciated. Thanks.
I am 72 and absolutely love my townie go

vincent
2 weeks ago

what kind of riding do you plan to do?

dont think you would go wrong with a radmini or voltbike mariner- i dont have any experience with the sondors fold but it may be a good option too

i am 5'6" and have a rad rover
the rover is on the big side, it is doable but i have another smaller frame off brand bike similar to the rover and it is easier for me to "handle" overall

also have a radmini in my ebike stable and have to say for riding 25-35 miles think i prefer the rover, the bigger tires and the front shock just seem to give a better ride overall

one thing that is an issue for me on the rover is my favorite bike seat is a big cruiser type seat, that pushes me forward and make the taller top bar more of an issue, when i ride it with a smaller footprint seat the top tube/bike fits me better ...

hope some of this helps

John from Connecticut
2 weeks ago

Seems like Trek's answer to Turbo Levo como...
But, I like the specialized's design better. Bigger tires on this would be nice.

e-boy , I think you nailed it when you wrote......

"At max speed of 20mph and max torque of 40Nm , I think it's meant as a neighborhood/city cruiser ,
bike path , recreational type of bike ; in other words , an eBike version of the push bike Verve . I think it retails for US$2300 or 0.24 Bitcoin . :) . "

I agree. I don't think Trek had anything at this price point with a Bosch Drive System, perhaps this is their way of being a little more aggressive in the US market place.

John from CT

TntE3+
3 weeks ago

I recently got my second Bulls bike and wanted to give you my comparison between the RS 3 and the evo45.
Both came with bottom line Nobby nics and both bikes the tires failed in first 50 miles. Tried to go tubliss right away on 45 and the tires will not seal well and rear had to put the tube back in only to have side wall fail on first test run.
The pike fork on 45 is a much nicer more stable feel in stock form over the Yari on the RS 3. The brakes on the 45 are much larger and are solid on any decent, the brake levers on 45 are monsters and belong on a motorcycle.
As far as form and feel the bikes are quite similar, exept the RS3 climbs better even with 100 less watts power and has better battery life.
On the flats the 28mph assist is quite fun.
I suffered from stability and fork dive horribly on both bikes and ended up converting both to 160mm travel up front and added a token on both.
The rear shock on the 3 is slightly stiffer valved and has better rebound valving and i find myself running it primarily with rebound adjust closed to 3 Click from closed.
On the 45 the rear shock is absolutely pathetic, you have to run it in peddle mode all the time to get any real dampening force at all. If you try to sprint out of the saddle the bike wallows like a true DH bike without a pedal mode in suspension.
The 45 on a flat ground ride running between level 2-3 the battery went 33 miles and had one bar left.
On RS 3 on same ride it had 3+Or over 50% bars on battery left but also averaged slower speed
45 i averaged 24.8mph, RS3 average 17.9mph.
Both mine loose assist 2mph bellow the advertised max speed ratings.
RS3 shits down 18mph
45 at 26mph.
Rider review vs magazine reviews.
Every test i have read has rated these bikes fairly poorly in a few catagorys.
Climb and DH.
After hundreds of miles testing on single track, chunky, hiro dirt, loose, leaf covered, fast, pro level Gnarly, cruiser pace to 28 STRAVA DH KOM’s I have come to this conclusion.
The RS3 27.5+is hands down best bang for the buck. Few key misses on factory setup lead to failed reviews.
Grid or good snake skin tires, 160mm front, 1 add token, bigger brakes,dropper seat, 35mm stem and it’s a true enduro bike that can run with top of the line enduro bikes and feel as comfy as your couch in hands of a novice rider.

Evo45, add the additional cost of the bike and the bang for the buck deminishes. The inability to climb better with 100 additional watts, shorter battery life, 27.5 tires and the lower bottom bracket leads to increased pedal strikes, the light valving in rear shock and steep head jangle make for nervous bike that really isn’t enduro capable and this bike belongs on fire roads and entry level to novice level riding.
If the 45 was 1,000 less the RS3 27.5+ i wouldn’t feel it was an equal bang for the buck.
Maybe they build a 29er out of it and address its major short sides and it will improve its bang for buck.
Stay tuned i have a 29er front end I’m gonna put on in next few weeks see how that affects the review.

e-boy
3 weeks ago

AFAIK , this model has not been officially released yet ; it's not on Trek.com .
It uses Bosch's new entry level Active drive , which I read is light , quiet , and pedals unpowered like a regular bicycle .
https://www.bosch-ebike.com/us-en/products/active-line/?setLanguage=3
At max speed of 20mph and max torque of 40Nm , I think it's meant as a neighborhood/city cruiser , bike path , recreational type of bike ; in other words , an eBike version of the push bike Verve .
I think it retails for US$2300 or 0.24 Bitcoin . :) .
If it fits and is comfortable , you can't go wrong with Trek and Bosch .

What did you like about it ?
What are you looking for in an ebike ?
Where are you located ?

rich c
3 weeks ago

This summer I started riding my full suspension mtb along the Hennepin Canal. It's like 75 miles of basically a straight line and little elevation change. We also have a crushed rock rail trail that goes about 30 miles in a similar fashion. I'm thinking a Fat-Tad from Electric Trikes on slicks would be the perfect nature cruiser for those rides. Heads up and a relaxed position for the miles. The canal ride is so enjoyable with birds and water views the entire distance, I think the heads-up ride would let me enjoy the view better. Any opinions about the recumbent trike?

mrgold35
4 weeks ago

My wife hates trail riding while I love it. The Radrover's big advantage is when it gets sandy and the fat tires can float on top instead of digging in (you will need the throttle with really deep sand). I had to add the larger Cloud-9 cruiser seat and Suntour NCX SP-12 suspension seatpost to my Rad for the trails. The updated seat combo also came in handy for my work commutes smoothing out the ride at 18-22 mph where I can remain seated 95% of time compared to always having to lift up over every bump.

Mrlinesides
4 weeks ago

My first post - I'm waiting for my first E Bike - a M2S R750 All Terrain. I was looking for a entry fat electric bike I can cruise around on - beach paths, around town, for pleasure and fun. I did some extensive comparisons and research and chose between 3 final candidates - Volt Yokon, Rad Rover and M2S All Terrain. All three were comparable in price, all were pretty close in output, weight, and shared some components some minor variations. I rode the Pedego, and it was nice, but could not justify more than twice the cost for basically the same bike. All look to be great bikes for the $, and at certain points I had decided on the Volt, then Rad and ended up with the M2S. Hopefully beginning of December I can park my cruiser for good...

Mike's E-Bikes
4 weeks ago

PS. Also, here is a link to a number of crank forward bicycles.... https://www.electricbike.com/12-crank-forward-bikes/
Most of these can make great candidates for conversion kits. Fuji also makes the Barnebey 7 (updated version here http://www.fujibikes.com/usa/bikes/cruiser-comfort/comfort/barnebey/barnebey-7) which is a very good candidate for conversion, just like the Firmstrong is, and KHS makes the Smoothie, another popular candidate for using e-bike kit conversions.
Good luck in your hunt.

Mike's E-Bikes
4 weeks ago

I've been pedaling a non-electric, crank -forward Fuji for years, but age is catching up with me. The geometry that allows me to place my feet firmly on the ground when needed is even more important to me now in my early eighties. I need an electric version. What category do these bikes fall in? EBR doesn't seem to make it clear. Is it "cruiser" or "comfort" or something else?
And which electric bikes have this geometry? The only one I've found is the Electra Townie Go, which is actually higher adjusted for me than it should be - not really a "flat foot" in my opinion, and has fatter tires than I like for pedaling. Are there other electric bikes out there with the crank-forward geometry?
Any help will be much appreciated. Thanks.
There are several brands with the crank forward geometry, often also referred to as 'flat foot' or 'touch down' geometry, which allows you to put your feet down flat while sitting.

The most prominent as mentioned is the Electra Townie, but there are a few others worth considering:

Tuesday cycles is known for their version of 'crank-forward' regular bikes, or what they call TDG for Touch down geometry, which they do also in an e-bike version:
http://www.tuesdaycycles.com/bikes/cruisers/august/august-live-mens

Fuji has also gotten back into the e-bike business, and will be coming out with a number of e-bike models in 2018.

Right now they do offer a crank forward or what they call pedal forward ebike too...
http://www.fujibikes.com/usa/bikes/cruiser-comfort/beach-cruiser/sanibel

http://www.fujibikes.com/usa/bikes/cruiser-comfort/beach-cruiser/sanibel/sanibel
Priced reasonably at $1399.

Fuji is owned by the same company that also owns Tuesday Cycles, Kestrel Bikes, SEBikes, Breezer Bikes, Oval Concepts, and Phat Cycles. Advanced Sports is the parent company of all of these. or ASI.

For Pedal Forward designs, consider Firmstrong bikes, and put conversion kits on them for clients.
Firmstrong CA520 with a Magnum 500 Watt motor, and 13 AH battery. Has nice wide tires, very comfortable seat, and pedal forward geometry.

PaulGee
1 month ago

I also test rode the Como 2.0 at the Philly Bike Expo. Court's review is spot on. I was impressed with the looks, build quality, comfort, and handling of this bike. The seat and upright position were very comfortable. The tuning of the Brose motor IMO is perfect for this cruiser-style bike. It had plenty of zip and the bike (L size) was noticeably lighter than the similar step-thru (L size) commuter-style Vado bike (most likely because it lacks the front suspension fork). It would make a great recreational bike for paved roads and hard packed bike paths. I liked the ride and handling on the Como better than the Vado but both are very nice bikes.

rich c
1 month ago

What a fun ride! Bent back handlebars, upright riding position, and a cushy seat. What a fun cruiser! On that section of the trail, there is an elevated bridge. So hitting the 19mph limit was an annoyance because it felt like it was hunting around a little. But for my city cruising speed of 15-16, quite nice. Going to have to give this one some more thought. Too bad the 3.0 only comes in black, love the platinum/black paint.

Rooster
1 month ago

The American Flyer E Wave S looks like it uses the same frames, batteries, and motor as the Juiced OceanCurrent but costs $100 more sold through CA or AZ dealers who sell similar styled pedal bicycle cruiser frames. The specs don't mention a torque sensor, only a cadence sensor, but it has the same 104 pulse rate and three bolts above the rear drive side drop-out where the sensor is located so probably is in fact the same.
Can't remember where I saw it but I have seen the same bike for 900 and something dollars brand new. Same exact bike as the ocean current under a different brand. Something stinks about that.

Dewey
1 month ago

The American Flyer E Wave S looks like it uses the same frames, batteries, and motor as the Juiced OceanCurrent but costs $100 more sold through CA or AZ dealers who sell similar styled pedal bicycle cruiser frames. The specs don't mention a torque sensor, only a cadence sensor, but it has the same 104 pulse rate and three bolts above the rear drive side drop-out where the sensor is located so probably is in fact the same.

Kysos
1 month ago

I've been pedaling a non-electric, crank -forward Fuji for years, but age is catching up with me. The geometry that allows me to place my feet firmly on the ground when needed is even more important to me now in my early eighties. I need an electric version. What category do these bikes fall in? EBR doesn't seem to make it clear. Is it "cruiser" or "comfort" or something else?
And which electric bikes have this geometry? The only one I've found is the Electra Townie Go, which is actually higher adjusted for me than it should be - not really a "flat foot" in my opinion, and has fatter tires than I like for pedaling. Are there other electric bikes out there with the crank-forward geometry?
Any help will be much appreciated. Thanks.

I know that Magnum has a Cruiser that is crank forward, it looks pretty nice.

https://electricbikereview.com/magnum/cruiser/#/

Keith Lee

indianajo
1 month ago

Sorry about the cancer. Enjoy yourself while you heal or plan.
Body size, leg legnth, back length, arm length, weight matter. Proposed posture matters, forward for efficiency, straight up for comfort. There are bike frame sizing programs on line, use one to pick a frame size, and rise. Some frames come only in one size, that size may not fit you. Top speed matters, length of trips between charges, roughness of pavement or softness of beach sand determine your desired wheel and tire size. Maximum grade matters, mine is 15%, pretty radical. I draw 750 W on the display up those if I start too slow, but 400 W if I hit 15% at >5 mph. Type of mount on the motorhome matters. There are ramp up devices, there are cable lifts from the ladder, there is lift it yourself. Choose now.
For example, I'm 67, needed a e-ride home 30 miles from summer camp if injured (no phone, no car). Plus occasional festival rides of 80 miles round trip without charge. I'm miniature, with short legs, so I was able to take a ninety's kid's 10 speed cruiser and convert it with a powr wheel for $600 (for the 80 mile range battery). 26"x1.9" tires are fine on our roads. Bigger people have to pony up for a bigger frame which will not be at the charity resale shop. Higher speeds than my typical 10 mph indicate suspension built into the frame. My frame is rigid. Snow or sand indicates big tires, 3 or 4". Ultra smooth pavement allows tiny wheels, 16"x 1.5". I wanted pedal assist plus throttle only, since if injured (pulled muscle or tendon) I don't want to pedal. On festival excursions, I can extend range by pedalling. Whatever NYC/California are requiring don't matter to me. If I break a leg the police tell me my $8/mo cell phone will call an ambulance, otherwise Verison service is $70 a month. Park riding in CA or MA or other "civilized" states may dictate no throttle. Stealth batteries and no visible motor may cut number of encounters with park rangers.
Nuvinci 380 is reported to have trouble with higher power motors, it was designed in the leg powered era. Some oil leaks reported under maintenance. I like the idea of 380; the detent shifting of Shimano 7 speed derailleur has given me a big cyst above my thumb tendon. I tried Sturmey-Archer S80 IGH, it has a reliability problem with the shifter cable mount. But the twist grip SA shifter is making my cyst go down. Nivinci is twist grip shifting.
Have fun shopping.

Neil Shadle
1 month ago

I've been pedaling a non-electric, crank -forward Fuji for years, but age is catching up with me. The geometry that allows me to place my feet firmly on the ground when needed is even more important to me now in my early eighties. I need an electric version. What category do these bikes fall in? EBR doesn't seem to make it clear. Is it "cruiser" or "comfort" or something else?
And which electric bikes have this geometry? The only one I've found is the Electra Townie Go, which is actually higher adjusted for me than it should be - not really a "flat foot" in my opinion, and has fatter tires than I like for pedaling. Are there other electric bikes out there with the crank-forward geometry?
Any help will be much appreciated. Thanks.

Mark Peralta
1 month ago

Looks like a great choice! Wondering how the fit is? I see Piaggio is offering only two sizes in the Active line, M, L > 50, 55 cm. Wondering how the fit is for you? I usually ride a 60cm so it looks like the Piggios would be too small for me.
Get the active line with the MTB handle bars having longer reach (not the cruiser bars of the comfort line). That can accommodate taller riders.

Rooster
1 month ago

Yes he can of course, actually the OceanCurrent can easily take a front electric hub driven motor; maybe another five hundred watt motor in the front to give oneself two wheel drive for a combined total 1,000 watts of electric hub driven e-biking; one could even re-use the front brake inhibitors, disc brake rotors, disc brake calipers and front brake levers; though one could definitely probably use a second additional 12.8ah lithium ion battery pack mounted to an additional front rack; well if one really had the "need for speed"; with that said it is definitely not impossible but highly doable and would definitely make ones Juiced Bikes OceanCurrent; now as a result it would be the first officially certified one kilowatt electric motor pedalac infused "beach cruiser" styled Juiced Bikes "1Kw e-bike" floating along on its massive classic looking 2.35" big balloon Schwalbe "Fat Frank" beach cruiser whitewall tires; violating all known laws of cycling propulsion physics naturally of course as it flies by like a speed demon!
Yes but this ocean current already has vee tire co. Speedster 2.80x26 fat tires and looks the roll

daniel58
1 month ago

Other than the problems I have had with trying to upgrade I must say that I am quite happy with my ocean current. Very good design just would like a little more power but I guess one can't have everything, or can he?

Yes he can of course, actually the OceanCurrent can easily take a front electric hub driven motor; maybe another five hundred watt motor in the front to give oneself two wheel drive for a combined total 1,000 watts of electric hub driven e-biking; one could even re-use the front brake inhibitors, disc brake rotors, disc brake calipers and front brake levers; though one could definitely probably use a second additional 12.8ah lithium ion battery pack mounted to an additional front rack; well if one really had the "need for speed"; with that said it is definitely not impossible but highly doable and would definitely make ones Juiced Bikes OceanCurrent; now as a result it would be the first officially certified one kilowatt electric motor pedalac infused "beach cruiser" styled Juiced Bikes "1Kw e-bike" floating along on its massive classic looking 2.35" big balloon Schwalbe "Fat Frank" beach cruiser whitewall tires; violating all known laws of cycling propulsion physics naturally of course as it flies by like a speed demon!

Steve Petttyjohn
2 years ago

I have the Burly model from EBO which is similar but has the "dolphin" battery pack mounted on the down tube. I have it on my lugged frame '85 Trek All Mountain (before they started calling them Mtb). I absolutely love this kit and how it gave new life to an old friend. The quality of the EBO kits are great and Jason was readily available to answer any questions. On fairly flat ground I've done 45 miles on 1 or 2 assist levels and still had a bar left of juice. Couldn't be more satisfied.

NFS HOT PURSUIT VIDEOS
2 years ago

It wil be intereting how this bikes stacks up against the new Electra Townie GO. Both have 8 speeds and are cruiser bikes. Cost per mile over 3 years comparison.

UNKOWN123G
2 years ago

can you do a bike collection?

George Vandalay
2 years ago

Hey whats the best ebike for someone who wants a lifetime warranty? Thanks.

Robert Tabor
2 years ago

If you are doing a review on a motor or a bike it would be nice to know what it can handle. So testing it on a flat and maybe posting the weight of the bike and then telling us a top speed would be good information.

Jay Gurung
2 years ago

Hey Mr. Court when is new BH EasyMotion EasyGo Race review coming? Please review that bike as soon as possible. Seems like a really good bike for city(NYC) commute. Thanks in advance.

Flo Mo
2 years ago

I'm Elya from Fort William in Scotland. 23 years old. I currently live in Germany. I like your videos. What is your first name? And I have one more question: Can I distribute your videos in my channel? Only if you allow it. I would support you. :) I would make a channel only for your videos with german descriptions.

vothry
2 years ago

Your show inspired me to go big, trading in my car and commuting 33 miles daily with the Trek XM700+. Thanks again man. Check me out on Instagram @thecyclingtherapist

Flo Mo
2 years ago

I like it. It's puristic and cheep. It works pretty well. Nice look. Greetings from Germany.