2014 Specialized Turbo S Review

Specialized Turbo S Electric Bike Review
2014 Specialized Turbo
2014 Specialized Turbo Sram X0 10 Speed
2014 Specialized Turbo Downtube Battery Pack
2014 Specialized Turbo Ergo Grips Display Panel
2014 Specialized Turbo Display Panel Joystick
2014 Specialized Turbo Rear Led Light
2014 Specialized Turbo Super Nova Headlight
2014 Specialized Turbo Thru Axle
2014 Specialized Turbo Gearless Direct Drive Motor
Specialized Turbo S Geometry Chart
Specialized Turbo S Electric Bike Review
2014 Specialized Turbo
2014 Specialized Turbo Sram X0 10 Speed
2014 Specialized Turbo Downtube Battery Pack
2014 Specialized Turbo Ergo Grips Display Panel
2014 Specialized Turbo Display Panel Joystick
2014 Specialized Turbo Rear Led Light
2014 Specialized Turbo Super Nova Headlight
2014 Specialized Turbo Thru Axle
2014 Specialized Turbo Gearless Direct Drive Motor
Specialized Turbo S Geometry Chart

Summary

  • One of the fastest, quietest and sturdiest road-style electric bikes around, extremely refined
  • Solid 15mm thru-axles, tapered head tube and alloy frame for efficient power transfer and high speed riding
  • Beautifully integrated battery pack, computer display system and LED lighting kit
  • Not the most forgiving ebike (no suspension), easier to tamper with system if battery is left on frame

Video Review

Trusted Advertisers

Introduction

Make:

Specialized

Model:

Turbo S

Price:

$6,000 USD

Body Position:

Forward Aggressive

Suggested Use:

Road, Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedelec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

Lifetime Frame, 2 Year Motor and Battery

Availability:

United States, Australia

Model Year:

20142015

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

50 lbs (22.67 kg) (Varying by Frame Size)

Battery Weight:

8 lbs (3.62 kg)

Frame Material:

Aluminum Alloy, Smooth Welding, Internally Routed Cables

Frame Sizes:

16.53 in (41.98 cm)18.11 in (45.99 cm)19.68 in (49.98 cm)21.25 in (53.97 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Small 16.53 (Top Tube Horizontal 577 mm, Head Tube Length 179 mm, Seat Tube Center to Top 420 mm, Chain Stay 455 mm, Wheelbase 1060 mm), Medium 18.11 (Top Tube Horizontal 595 mm, Head Tube Length 189 mm, Seat Tube Center to Top 460 mm, Chain Stay 455 mm, Wheelbase 1078 mm), Large 19.68 (Top Tube Horizontal 610 mm, Head Tube Length 204 mm, Seat Tube Center to Top 500 mm, Chain Stay 455 mm, Wheelbase 1093 mm), Extra Large 21.25 (Top Tube Horizontal 635 mm, Head Tube Length 230 mm, Seat Tube Center to Top 540 mm, Chain Stay 455 mm, Wheelbase 1119 mm)

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Red with Black Accents, Black

Frame Fork Details:

Custom Turbo Alloy, Tapered Steerer, Q15 Axle Dropout, Fender Eyelets, Low Rider Mounts

Frame Rear Details:

15 mm Thru Axle

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

10 Speed 1x10 SRAM XO Long Cage Derailleur 48/36

Shifter Details:

SRAM SL700, Flatbar Trigger on Right Bar

Cranks:

FSA Gossamer, BB30 with Alloy Guard, 110 mm

Pedals:

Specialized Bennies, 6061 Alloy Body, Sealed Cartridge, 4.5 mm Removable Pins

Headset:

1-1/ 8" Campy Style Upper Cartridge Bearing, 1-1/ 2" Lower Integrated

Stem:

Crank Brothers Cobalt 2, Alloy

Handlebar:

Specialized Flat Top, Double Butted Alloy, 12-Degree Backsweep, 31.8 mm

Brake Details:

Formula R1 Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Rotors

Grips:

Specialized Body Geometry XCT, Lock-On

Saddle:

Body Geometry Turbo, Hollow Cr-Mo Rails, Integrated LED Light

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Diameter:

30.9with2.5mmOffset(TwoBolt) mm

Rims:

Alloy Double-Wall with Eyelets, 36h

Tire Brand:

Specialized Electrak Armadillo, 60TPI, Wire Bead, 700 x 45c

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

Armadillo Puncture Protection

Tube Details:

Presta Valve

Accessories:

Aluminum Bash Guard on Front Ring, Scisoring Double Leg Kickstand, Integrated Supernova E3 LED headlight, Optional City Kit with Fenders and Rack, Bell on Left Bar, Rear View Mirror for Left Bar

Other:

Removable Battery Pack Locks to Frame, Magnetic EnergyBus Charging Port, LED Power Level Indicator on Battery Pack, KMC X10 Chain with Reusable Missing Link, FSA MegaExo Outer-Style Bottom Bracket, Regenerative Braking

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Go SwissDrive

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Gearless Direct Drive Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Motor Peak Output:

750 watts

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

14 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

504 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium Manganese Oxide (LMO), High C-Rating

Charge Time:

3 hours

Estimated Min Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Estimated Max Range:

40 miles (64 km)

Display Type:

Backlit LCD on Right Bar

Readouts:

Assist Level (3 Modes), Battery Status, Lights on/off, Speed, Time, Distance

Display Accessories:

Joystick on Display Panel Acts as Throttle to ~11 mph

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle

Top Speed:

28 mph (45 kph)(~11 in Throttle Mode)

Trusted Advertisers



Written Review

Specialized took its time to craft and refine the first Turbo and in 2014 introduced the Turbo S which has a larger battery pack, smaller more integrated display / input system and a new color… black. It’s a stiffer electric bike that foregoes suspension in favor of power transfer and speed. The motor is silent but powerful and the battery pack is so well disguised in the downtube that it almost disappears. It even has water bottle cage mounting points built right into the pack! While I prefer the support of full suspension and knobby tires (especially at 28+ mile per hour) the addition of a Thudbuster, Body Float or Suntour NCX SP12 make for an excellent ride here. The Turbo feels solid and its Electrak tires offer more give than a traditionall narrow 700c road tire would.

The motor on the Specialized Turbo offers 250 watts nominal with ~700 peak for excellent acceleration and climbing. It’s gearless, relying on large magnets inside to generate force, and this makes it very quiet and durable. There aren’t any gears inside rubbing to create noise or wear out over time. It’s also very responsive, relying on torque and speed sensing pedal assist. The motor is mounted to the rear drop outs in a direct drive configuration with a sturdy 15mm thru-axle. This keeps the wheel straight at higher speeds which is great because I had no problem reaching 30 miles per hour when riding. The original Turbo was one of the first electric bicycles to top 20 miles per hour in pedal assist mode and continues to focus on speed and performance here. The motor itself is made by Go SwissDrive and retails for ~$1,100 on its own (still having to be laced into a wheel) so considering quality components, battery and display in use here it’s a solid deal.

The battery pack on the Turbo S uses energy dense Lithium-ion cells that will last for 1,000+ charge cycles if cared for. While the original Turbo offered 36 volts of power and only 9 amp hours of capacity the 2014 model offers 14 amp hours for increased range. This also adds some weight to the bike but it’s all kept low and center with the downtube battery design. This thing is beautiful (hardly noticeable on the black design) and doesn’t rattle when riding. On the side there’s an LED scale that can be activated for a quick power reading (kind of like on a Mac laptop). The on/off button for the entire bike is right at the top of the pack and also looks like a computer switch. I love that the battery pack includes bosses for mounting a water bottle cage (something I wish other ebikes did) but I wish there was some way to disable the bike when not in use (like with a key or something) because as-is anybody can turn the bike on and mess with the display.

The display has undergone improvements for 2014 as well and now resides on the right portion of the handlebars instead of the center. Before there was a break out panel with rubberized + and – buttons but now it’s all combined with the display and actually built into the right brake lever. The design is sleek, adding to the “stealth” factor of the bike and since it’s made of aluminum alloy to match the brake levers it feels really solid. The downside here is that it’s not removable and if you adjust the angle of the display you also end up adjusting the angle of the brake lever. Given the simplicity of the modes on this bike (ranging from regen to zero to eco and turbo) it’s not something you need to stare at very often when riding. Instead of rubberized buttons the new input system uses a transparent rubberized joystick. Up and down let you change assist levels and if you hold up it doubles as a throttle which propels the bike up to ~11 miles per hour even from rest. The display and joystick light up for easy night use and activate the headlight and tail light when pressed in. By pushing left or right you can see distance and battery readouts. Again, it’s just so simple and easy to reach without looking down and it works very well with the trigger shifters (also on the right grip).

While the latest iteration of the Turbo isn’t perfect I don’t mind the little issues. This thing is solid, fast and fun to ride. I feel like I must be fooling everyone when I pass by at high speed because it’s just so quiet and the battery is so well hidden. The bottle cage is perfect and there’s tons of room between the top tube, seat tube and downtube for mounting this thing on car racks and stuff. As much as I complain about bumpy roads and the jerkiness of electric bikes at high speed it’s almost worth the extra abrasion here because the speed and power transfer are so satisfying. It’s an electric road bike… and on smooth roads it’s fantastic. The acceleration and torque of the rear hub motor is nice vs. mid-drive systems that sort of change depending on the gear you’re in and the addition of braze ons for adding fenders and racks make this a versatile ride. One big downside to the motor design here is that the rear wheel doesn’t freewheel and spins less efficiently when the bike is off due to cogging (the magnets inside repel the stater and slow it down, see video review). This enables regeneration but could ruin a ride if you run out of juice prematurely. Thankfully, the larger 14ah pack helps a lot here by extending the range.

Pros:

  • One of the quietest, smoothest and fastest electric bikes I’ve tested (based on the motor, stiff frame and tires)
  • New LCD display panel with joystick is easy to adjust when riding, doesn’t stand out visually and appears to be very rugged
  • Integrated LED tail lights stay out of the way, Supernova E3 headlight is bright and sturdy
  • New Lithium-ion battery pack is five amp hours larger than the old version for extended range
  • There are bottle cage mounts built right into the battery pack so you don’t have to skip on water
  • This bike is super stealth because the battery is so well integrated, motor is super quiet and display is so small
  • Battery pack can be charged on or of the bike for convenient fill-ups at the office, charger is fast and silent
  • Electrak tires are a bit larger than standard road tires for more air and cushion when riding
  • Plenty of braze ons (front and rear) for adding fenders or racks so you can stay dry or carry more gear
  • Regenerative braking with right brake lever and regen mode for coasting down hills (even works in zero mode)
  • Solid two year warranty for the motor and battery system, lifetime frame warranty

Cons:

  • Handle bars are fairly wide and mirror on left bar sticks out when going through doors (doesn’t swivel easily)
  • Stiffer frame improves power transfer but makes for a rough ride, suggest seat post suspension or padded riding shorts
  • Since the LCD computer display is integrated into the brake lever they cannot be adjusted independently (for improved viewing angle or brake position)
  • Throttle mode cuts out at ~11 miles per hour (better than no throttle but less than 20mph legal limit)
  • This ebike is more expensive than comparable designs but features a high quality finish and warranty
  • Since the new tail light is integrated right into the saddle, if you swap seats you lose your light and if you’re wearing a long shirt or jacket it might cover the lights
  • If the battery is left on the frame anybody can turn the display on (display is not removable) and mess with the bike
  • More cogging than geared motor designs and even some gearless given the large magnets inside (doesn’t freewheel as efficiently)

Resources:

More Specialized Reviews

Specialized Turbo Vado 5.0 Review

  • MSRP: $5,150
  • MODEL YEAR: 2020

A high-speed, feature-complete, urban electric bike with unique tubular fenders that have flexible extensions and water routing system to keep your legs, back and face dry, integrated lights and a tight modern rack. Available in 6 sizes including high-step and mid-step frame styles with gender-specific saddle and grips,…...

Specialized Turbo Como 5.0 Review

  • MSRP: $4,150
  • MODEL YEAR: 2020

A great top of the line model for Specialized, starts at $4,150 and has relaxed cruiser riding position, hydraulic brakes, front rack, a smooth mid-drive motor, 28mph top speed, and a lot of great little features. Features a custom Brose S ALU mid-drive motor that was tuned just for Specialized, high…...

Specialized Turbo Como 4.0 Review

  • MSRP: $3,350
  • MODEL YEAR: 2020

A great mid point for Specialized, starts at $3,350 and has relaxed cruiser riding position, hydraulic brakes, a smooth mid-drive motor, 28mph top speed, and a lot of great little features. Features a custom Brose T mid-drive motor that was tuned just for Specialized, 36v 14ah…...

Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert Review

  • MSRP: $7,550
  • MODEL YEAR: 2019

A purpose built, strong and sturdy, full suspension, all mountain with some enduro, agile and balanced with it’s 50/50 weight distribution, smooth and powerful mid-drive electric mountain bike. This is an extremely sturdy and overbuilt setup, thanks to points of interest like this…...

Specialized Turbo Vado 4.0 Review

  • MSRP: $3,550
  • MODEL YEAR: 2020

A high-speed, feature-complete, urban electric bike with unique tubular fenders that have flexible extensions and water routing system to keep your legs, back and face dry, integrated lights and a tight modern rack. Available in 6 sizes including high-step and mid-step frame styles with gender-specific saddle and grips,…...

Specialized Turbo Como 3.0 Review

  • MSRP: $2,950
  • MODEL YEAR: 2020

A great entry point for Specialized, starts at $2,949 and has relaxed cruiser riding position, hydraulic brakes, a smooth mid-drive motor, and a lot of great little features. Features a custom Brose CB mid-drive motor that was tuned just for Specialized, 36v 12.8ah…...

Specialized Turbo Levo Expert Review

  • MSRP: $8,250
  • MODEL YEAR: 2019

A lighter, stiffer, even more powerful second generation Turbo Levo platform, custom side-arm rear suspension design improves cable routing, tubeless ready rims and tires, unique hidden SWAT multi-tool under stem cap. 29er wheel size with narrower 2.6" tires reduce friction and improve steering precision, new battery…...

Specialized Turbo Levo Comp Fat Review

  • MSRP: $5,000
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A hardtail, fat tire electric bike with high-volume 4.6" tires, four frame size choices, and an extensive network of dealers in the United States. Sturdy thru-axles provide stiffness and strength, the RockShox Bluto air fork provides comfort with lots…...

Specialized Turbo Como 2.0 Low-Entry 650b Review

  • MSRP: $2,600
  • MODEL YEAR: 2018

A comfortable, stable, quiet, and efficient electric bike made in two frame sizes and colors, well-suited to neighborhood riding and cruising. Relatively lightweight at ~48 lbs, in part because it comes without lights or fenders, you…...

Specialized Turbo Vado 6.0 Review

  • MSRP: $4,800
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A high-speed, feature-complete, urban electric bike with unique tubular fenders that have flexible extensions and water routing system to keep your legs, back and face dry, integrated lights and a tight modern rack. Available in four sizes including high-step and mid-step frame styles with gender-specific saddle and grips,…...

2017 Specialized Turbo Vado 5.0 Review

  • MSRP: $4,600
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A high-speed urban electric bike with premium tubular fenders, minimalist rack with integrated light, 600 Lumen headlight, reflective stickers on fenders and rims. Available in four frame sizes but only one style (high-step), rigid alloy fork and thru-axles…...

Specialized Turbo Vado 3.0 Review

  • MSRP: $3,200
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A feature-complete urban electric bike with premium tubular-alloy fenders, integrated rack and lights, rims and tires as well as a suspension fork with 50 mm travel. Available in four frame sizes and two styles (high-step or mid-step), rigid thru-axles improve handling,…...

Specialized Turbo Levo FSR Expert 6Fattie Review

  • MSRP: $7,500
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016, 2017

One of the stealthiest electric mountain bikes around with integrated battery and motor technology from Brose, available to demo and buy from a wide network of shops. Responsive and zippy without producing a lot of noise, you don't get shift detection here…...

Specialized Turbo Levo Hardtail Comp 6Fattie Review

  • MSRP: $4,000
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016, 2017

The lowest priced Turbo Levo eMountain bike model from Specialized, it's a hardtail with 10 gears, an air fork and the Brose drive system. You get a slightly smaller battery capacity here but the same beautiful integration into the…...

Specialized Turbo Levo FSR Comp 6Fattie Review

  • MSRP: $5,500
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A full suspension electric mountain bike with 650b plus "six fatty" tires for improved traction, handling and comfort. Seamlessly integrated Brose motor and downtube battery pack, completely purpose built frame available in two…...

Specialized Turbo S Review

  • MSRP: $7,000
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

An extremely fast, quiet and stiff electric bike with premium drivetrain and brake components and sleek integrated lights, available in four frame sizes for improved fit. Beautifully integrated battery pack, it matches the frame perfectly and even features a bottle cage…...

Specialized S-Works Turbo Levo FSR 6Fattie Review

  • MSRP: $9,000
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

The highest level full suspension e-mountain bike from Specialized, purpose built frame incorporates battery and motor seamlessly. Premium suspension from RockShox Pike RCT3 and Fox Float with Autosag, 11 speed SRAM XX1…...

Specialized Turbo Review

  • MSRP: $3,800
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015

Completely purpose built with integrated lights, in-frame cabling and downtube mounted battery pack that blends in. Available in four frame sizes for improved fit, optional city kit with fenders and rear…...

Specialized Turbo X Review

  • MSRP: $4,000
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015, 2016

Stealth appearance with integrated battery pack and near-silent motor helps it blend in like a "normal bike". Excellent weight distribution, responsive hydraulic disc brakes, integrated LED lights, rack and fender mounts, nice…...

2013 Specialized Turbo Review

  • MSRP: $5,900
  • MODEL YEAR: 2013

One of the fastest and priciest electric bikes around, Top speed 45kph (27.96mph) at $5,900 USD. Clean aesthetic with internally routed cables, integrated lithium ion battery pack and built in LED…...


Comments (30) YouTube Comments

James McClellan
5 years ago

What do you need nobby tires for? Off road? Because that’s all they are meant for. Less grip on the street. Less grip when it’s wet. At 28mph the last thing you want is a nobby tire. Road tourers do well in excess of 50 mph on much smaller tires riding on skinny slicks.

  Reply
Early adopter
5 years ago

I think the review captures the pro and cons accurately. I like the bike a lot and have ridden it around 1000 miles. In that time I’ve had to replace the control unit twice. To me, it’s the major flaw. Otherwise the bike is really great. Battery life is good if commute is not more than 30 miles total. I also like being able to haul heavy pack with me with impunity. It is exercize, which is nice, and it’s more fun than my motorcycles!

  Reply
Early adopter
5 years ago

They replace the display unit which is attached to the brake assembly with 2 screws. Takes 5 minutes. I believe this could be an issue with the bike, but it’s guaranteed for life I think and they will sort it out before long. No big deal.

  Reply
Early Adopter
4 years ago

Here is my 9 month update: replaced control unitr three times, battery once, I have a loaner back wheel because the motor on mine stopped working. All this in less than 3000 miles!!! I have an old Ferrari that is more dependable than the Specialized Turbo. My last update wasn’t posted, and I think it is fair for people to know that this bike was not built and designed with reliability in mind. I’m giving it back.

  Reply
Court
4 years ago

Hi Peter, I manually approve all comments so I have approved your first comment now, sorry it took a while… I’m not trying to sensor anyone :)

Court
5 years ago

Thanks for the great testimonial! Sorry to hear about the display panel issues… Did they have to replace the entire right brake lever along with the display or do you have one of the 2013 Turbo’s with the center mounted unit? What was the issue you had?

  Reply
AG
5 years ago

Specialized Turbo S Availability: I went by the largest specialized dealer in my town (Houston) and they have not seen nor were aware of the Turbo S. I tested the 2013 model – nice but missing the a few of the features such as the side control, upgraded seat, rearview mirror. Thoughts on the Turbo S model availability? Will it be hitting more markets soon? Thank you for any information.

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Great question AG… I tried the one in this review at a friends house. I’m not sure where he ordered it but you can ask him in the forums here. His name is Brambor :)

  Reply
Michael Hedrick
5 years ago

Can you make all bike reviews on that trail and with that kind of detail?! Love it! Also, without recking is there a way you could tell us what gear you are in, especially when showing Hill climb and top speed?

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Hey Michael, thanks for the suggestions and feedback. I don’t remember which gears I was in (I try to change them frequently during ride tests to listen for mashing and get a feel for how shifting works). This location was at a private residence in Maine near Portland. The bike belonged to my friend and I was just visiting so there may never be another review shot there unfortunately. Often times I have to work with the landscape (and time frame) available given the bike. I travel all across the US to get these reviews but I’m working to improve their quality and provide better demonstrations :)

  Reply
Rob Guthrie
5 years ago

Hi Court,

Test-rode the Turbo S last week at my local dealer — really fun, quiet ride! From YouTube, I learned that for 2015, Specialized will be introducing a Turbo X model, presumably a hard-tail, with front shocks and tread tires: http://youtu.be/ppZqlEZOe4s

Hoping they’ll include a thud buster on the seat post, and increase the battery capacity to expand the range a bit, like they did with the 2014 edition.

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

That’s awesome! Thanks for the heads up Rob. I’m excited about the new Specialized Turbo bikes and intrigued by their naming convention… Reminds me of Tesla with their Model S, upcoming Model X and I heard they wanted to do a Model E but Ford was claiming a copyright on that name (for their old Model E car). Anyway, the idea was to have three models that spell S, E, X… clever ;) I agree that a suspension seat post or maybe even their coblgoblr post would be nice on the Turbo X. I’ll keep an eye out for it at Interbike!

  Reply
Rick Zehr
5 years ago

Good review. I’ve got about 400 miles on mine (with Thudbuster ST), and it is a delight. Solid, stable, and the motor is perfectly modulated with the torque sensor. Well, at least it is until something comes loose in the electronics under the battery at the bottom bracket, leading to a JERK when you start from a stop. This has required adjustment at the shop twice so far. I have also had the display/controller fail. First it started dropping into Regen mode when climbing steep hills, and then the joystick became loose and failed entirely (replaced under warrantee). So it’s a really nice bike, but I’d have to knock my opinion down to a 3 of 5, based on these issues.

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Thanks for the critical input here Rick! Sorry to hear that a few of the parts have failed on your bike. Hopefully future versions will have a stronger joystick interface, I’ve heard a couple people mention that this can become unresponsive with wear over time.

  Reply
Spyridon
5 years ago

I purchased the Specialized Turbo but had many problems and the dealer was not able to provide much help. Here is the log of me explaining problems and trying to get help from them.

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Thanks for sharing your experience Spyridon, so sorry to hear that there were issues with your bike… It appears that you’re located in Europe or perhaps somewhere outside of the US? Do you mind sharing where, it sounds like it was hard to get support there :(

  Reply
Spyridon
5 years ago

Hi and thanks for the hospitality. I am located in Greece. The European headquarters located in Holland. A friend in Germany’s Specialized inform me there is a big supply of parts for Turbo. Everything like batteries, motors, and everything you can imagine. The Greek distributor also is for Cyprus and Malta. I checked all the emails between Holland’s and Greek’s, and believe it or not there is a mess from Holland. They can’t give a solution.

As already check the U.S. specialized don’t even answer to my problem. A company like specialized the first thing has to do after a lot of days is to replace the bike. Also as anyone who check the history they will knew the technician for Turbo he is not anymore in Specialized. The first time they told me that I won’t believe it, but then I check it with my connection and is 100% truth. I shared my so far experience with this site because people have to know what is happened, and also for the purchase for the bike your review helped me to decide a lot.

To give 6000 for a bike is for people who need something special and give them some new experience like nothing so far, and the turbo the first 29 days it was great. Of course I also have a great road bike for my training. Now the only thing I want is my money back. I can’t have a bike with no tech support and every time something wrong I have nightmares. This is the reputation of Specialized. Thank you again and keep going with great reviews.

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Yeah, that’s just such a bummer. I’m so sorry the bike didn’t work out for you and I hope that things will be resolved. My goal is to help people find great bikes and it is sad when they have a bad experience because it impacts the entire space. Thanks Spyridon for sharing here.

  Reply
early adopter
5 years ago

I’ve had the 2014 Specialized Turbo S for 8 months. The controller unit on the handlebar has been replaced 3 times!!!!! Electric bikes can’t be that complicated, but Specialized seems unable to get it right. Buy one if the shop is walking distance to where you live.

  Reply
Overspeed
5 years ago

I’ve had my turbo s for two months and not a single problem so far. Love the bike, using it to commute to work, 20 mile round trip, uses between 50-60% of the battery in Turbo mode. Its gotten me active.. worth every penny.

  Reply
Court
5 years ago

Wow, that’s awesome! Pretty great range there, especially in Turbo mode. Thanks for the testimonial and data… Feel free to share your height and weight here to help other similar sized riders if you feel comfortable doing so :)

  Reply
Overspeed
5 years ago

Short and 220 lb’s – looking to get back to 160lb’s – should make a difference to acceleration and range :)

  Reply
Early adopter
4 years ago

New update: first 8 months, 3 control units. Month 9, new battery. Month 11: dead motor. Total miles: 2800. The bike is fun when it works. Quality control is non-existent. specialized should take it back. I’ll see what they end up doing.

  Reply
Spyridon
4 years ago

Update. 1200 km so far. They replaced the controller on my Turbo S 2014 because it stops backlit, and was unreadable at night. I was wait for replacement three months. The new battery so far works great. At the controller once I saw M ERR message. They still don’t replace the wheels as out of the box they damaged. The lights sometimes they refused to ON or OFF from the controller and only from the button on the front light. Of course is fun and pleasure to ride it. At 29th of April I have a curt against Greek distributor. As said in my previous message they don’t give a bother about a customer.

  Reply
Court
4 years ago

Thanks for your feedback Spyridon, I’m sorry that the purchase has had some rough moments and I hope they continue to smooth out. It’s great to hear that you enjoy riding the bike when it does work :)

  Reply
Rick
4 years ago

The comments from “early adopter” are troubling in the apparent conclusion of enjoying thousands of miles with only occasional five minute, except for motor replacement, service swapout issues before ‘giving’ it back.

First bike miles are not the same as car ones, anymore then scooter or cycle odometer readings book out depreciation wise comparably. Government auctions routinely give away police traffic Harlie’s for pennies on the dollar often after only a few thousand miles.

The reviewer’s name is ignored by the ultimate attitude of no quality control. The manufacturer is not about the reliability of the dashboard. If there was a safety issue it would be different. Strategic failure engineering is awesomely important but there is silence on that.

For those of us who want the talent on knowledge real bike builders build to have minds open to incorporating modern materials and systems being a relatively early adopter, if we are to become the main presence on roads, as we must, we all now are, still, then we must be tolerant to unintentional however apparently avoidable issues like those mentioned.

The Chevy volt just shed a few hundred pounds. Yet we carp about delta’s of fractional dozen between models.

I believe any bike company that does not support the weak legged is soon to not be mainstream. For commuting being able to procure something that weighs less then us and is not the work of idiots or zealots but rather is a tool, of non-sociopathic design, even in cities, remains a challenge that this company pursues as a pioneer, a true hero, and one I have no difficulty forgiving for costing dollars a mile in the worst case to use it’s flagship model.

Judging it by mean time between failures anecdotally is like wanting gigs of foreign continent roaming for free on your watch. Just swap it out every few hundred miles for a new one and your reliability concerns are addressed largely. This is what the automakers do for years with there ‘innovations’ like seat-belts etc. before being forced to bring them to actual market.

Perhaps there is a lesson here about how not to stand behind one’s product- do not make it to easy or free to get repairs. Do not encourage someone who would not pay for the work to remain a customer, at the first sign of there unrealistic expectations pay what you need to to look fair to get the product back, and put it into someones hands who understands the risks being mutually taken better.

  Reply
Ty
4 years ago

Any idea when the 2016 model Turbo S will be available? And do you know the confirmed upgrades? Very much considering purchasing one of these but due to the price, I might as well wait for the 2016’s. Thanks

  Reply
Court
4 years ago

Hi Ty! No clue… I haven’t heard anything about it, just the new Turbo Mountain eBike that was launched in Europe (looks like we might see that model early next year).

  Reply
lfogelquist
3 years ago

Hi Court… I just wanted to thank you for the GREAT review of the 2014-2015 Turbo S. I learned a lot of valuable information about this bike. For instance, why, when it’s in no assist mode is it harder to pedal? Mystery solved! So far I’ve put almost 500 miles on the bike without any significant issues. I’m totally in love with it. And it’s all but replaced my car. So I guess that’s it… just wanted to express my gratitude… and also thanks so much for the great work that you’re doing. I really believe that eBikes are the wave of the future and your site has become the ‘go to’ site for my questions.

  Reply
Court
3 years ago

Awesome! Glad the details here have helped you to master your bike, sounds like you’re really enjoying it :D

  Reply

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.