Magnum Peak 29 Review

Magnum Peak 29 Electric Bike Review
Magnum Peak 29
Magnum Peak 29 Altus Acera 24 Speed Drivetrain High Amp Controller
Magnum Peak 29 Shimano Acera 8 Speed Cassette
Magnum Peak 29 Das Kit C7 Lcd Ergonomic Grips
Magnum Peak 29 Sr Suntour Xcm 30 Suspension Fork
Magnum Peak 29 Tektro Auriga 180 Mm Hydraulic Disc Brakes
Magnum Peak 29 Rear Derailleur Guard
Magnum Peak 29 Schwalbe Smart Sam 29 2 25 Off Road Tires
Magnum Peak 29 Regular 2 Amp Ebike Battery Charger
Magnum Peak 29 Electric Bike Review
Magnum Peak 29
Magnum Peak 29 Altus Acera 24 Speed Drivetrain High Amp Controller
Magnum Peak 29 Shimano Acera 8 Speed Cassette
Magnum Peak 29 Das Kit C7 Lcd Ergonomic Grips
Magnum Peak 29 Sr Suntour Xcm 30 Suspension Fork
Magnum Peak 29 Tektro Auriga 180 Mm Hydraulic Disc Brakes
Magnum Peak 29 Rear Derailleur Guard
Magnum Peak 29 Schwalbe Smart Sam 29 2 25 Off Road Tires
Magnum Peak 29 Regular 2 Amp Ebike Battery Charger


  • A powerful, relatively affordable, hardtail cross country style electric bike that's capable of 28 mph pedal assist and 20 mph trigger throttle operation, offers 24 gears vs. 10 or 11 on most competing products
  • This particular model (with 29" wheels) is available in one large frame size and color, but Magnum also sells a 27.5" wheel version Peak which has a slightly smaller frame... so, two sizes?!
  • High-capacity 48 volt battery helps to extend range or simply match the range of other bikes while allowing you to ride faster, the battery has a USB port for charging accessories
  • Kickstand placement puts it in the way of the left crank arm, display is not removable, the spring suspension fork adds a bit of weight but the head tube is tapered for easy upgrades, solid hydraulic disc brakes with cutoff switches

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Video Review

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Body Position:


Suggested Use:

Urban, Trail, Mountain

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedalec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes


1 Year Comprehensive


United States, Canada

Model Year:


Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

57.5 lbs (26.08 kg)

Battery Weight:

9.1 lbs (4.12 kg)

Motor Weight:

10.1 lbs (4.58 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

20.75 in (52.7 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

20.75" Seat Tube, 22.5" Reach, 30" Stand Over Height, 27.5" Width, 73.75" Length

Frame Types:


Frame Colors:

Satin Black with Blue Accents

Frame Fork Details:

SR Suntour XCM 30 Spring Suspension, 100 mm Travel, Hydraulic Compression Adjust with Lockout, Preload Adjust, 100 mm Hub Width, 9 mm Skewer with Quick Release

Frame Rear Details:

142 mm Hub Length, 11 mm Axle with Nuts

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

24 Speed 3x8 Shimano Altus Front Deraulleur, Shimano Acera Rear Derailleur, 11-32 Tooth Cassetee

Shifter Details:

Shimano Triggers on Left and Right Bar


Shimano 170 mm Length Crank Arms, 28-33-42 Tooth Chainrings, Square Tapered Bottom Bracket


Wellgo Aluminum Alloy Platform, Black


Neco, Tapered 1-1/8" to 1-1/2", Sealed Cartridge


Promax, 110 mm Length, Aluminum Alloy, Two 10 mm Spacers, One 5 mm Spacer, 31.8 mm Clamp Diameter


Promax Flat, Aluminum Alloy, 690 mm Length

Brake Details:

Tektro Auriga Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Rotors, Tektro Levers with Motor Inhibitors and Adjustable Reach


Velo Ergonomic Rubber with Lockers


Magnum Branded Velo, Black

Seat Post:

Promax, Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

30.9 mm


Double Walled, Aluminum Alloy, 25 mm Width, 36 Hole, Black


Stainless Steel, 13 Gauge, Adjustable Nipples, Silver

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Smart Sam, 29" x 2.25" (57-622)

Wheel Sizes:

29 in (73.66cm)

Tire Details:

26-54 PSI, 1.8 to 3.7 BAR, Performance, Reflective Labels

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve


Single Side Adjustable Length Kickstand, Integrated 5 Volt USB Charging Port, Steel Derailleur Guard, Optional Metal Carry Rack ($49)


Locking Removable Downtube Mounted Battery Pack, 1.5 lb 2 Amp Battery Charger, 9 Mosfet 18 Amp Current Controller

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:


Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Motor Peak Output:

700 watts

Motor Torque:

90 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung, DLG, Panasonic

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

13 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

624 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium Nickel Cobalt Manganese (Li-NCM)

Charge Time:

6.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Estimated Max Range:

60 miles (97 km)

Display Type:

Das-Kit C7, Fixed, Backlit, Monochrome LCD


Power Output Indicator (6 Ticks), Assist Level (0-6), Speed, Odometer, Timer, Trip 1, Trip 2, BMS Voltage, Battery Level (6 Bars)

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad (Power, Set, +, -), (Press Power Button for Display Backligt, Hold Minus Button for Walk Mode)

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle

Top Speed:

28 mph (45 kph) (20 MPH Throttle, Adjustable)

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Written Review

Magnum has built a reputation around affordability and power. Their ebikes tend to offer both pedal assist and throttle operation, which can be handy if you need help getting started or simply don’t want to pedal at all times. With the Peak and Peak 29, you get a cross country style hardtail mountain bike with a large but well-placed battery pack, a 24 speed drivetrain, and a zippy rear-mounted geared hub motor that won’t interfere with shifting. The 29er model focused on in this specific review provides larger wheels that elevate the frame, improve comfort with increased air volume, and provide more rolling momentum. The frame itself is slightly larger than the original Peak I reviewed a while back, so I almost think of this as the “Large Peak” for taller riders, but it’s more nuanced than that. This model will be slightly less nimble but provides a lower attack angle and can cruise more efficiently at high speed. One of the things I really appreciate about this bike is that it could serve as both a trail bike or urban platform, you can even purchase a rear rack from Magnum for use with a trunk bag or pannier bags. Recent versions of this bike have been upgraded to 180 mm hydraulic disc brakes on both the front and rear wheels (whereas older versions had 160 mm in the rear) and the top tube now has bottle cage bosses! Which, might not be that useful. You see, as much as I complain about how electric bikes sometimes skip bottle cage mounting points, I can see why they would do so on a bike like this, because any accessory you mount to the top of the top tube is going to raise the stand over height and possibly hit your crotch. A water bottle would be near horizontal and might drip out as you ride, a folding lock might get kicked or brush against your inner thighs when pedaling… I would probably just remove the included bolts and keep the top tube smooth and low because I just barely fit on this bike with my ~30″ inseam and stand over height is about 30″ as measured during the review.

Driving the bike in assist and throttle mode is a torquey planetary geared hub motor that weighs about 10 lbs. It’s rated from 500 to 700 watts and can produce 90 Newton meters of torque, but that doesn’t mean it can climb from standstill. I tested this on an inclined section of dirt trail in the video review above and could hear the motor struggling to start. Once you have a bit of speed, the motor works fine, so consider pedaling a bit to help out at first. As mentioned earlier, this hub motor does not interfere with shifting or chain action on the 24-speed drivetrain. That’s great because it will allow you to shift more smoothly than a mid-drive motor and keep the two derailleurs in better shape long term. I’m a bit mixed on having two derailleurs because it increases weight and complexity, shifter cables stretch over time and that means visits to the shop or more hands-on work for you. The three chainrings up front are completely exposed and could get grease on pants so I suggest riding with shorts… but what about that urban use case? The front derailleur acts as a guide and provides a bit of protection, but I sometimes roll up my pant leg or use reflective velcro pant keepers when riding to avoid snags etc. Having two derailleurs also means having to use two shifter mechanisms up front and the cockpit is already pretty cluttered due to the addition of a display, trigger throttle, button control pad, and brakes with motor inhibitors. I love that the motor inhibitors are in place, in addition to the larger 180 mm rotors, because the cadence sensors are good here, but not quite as fast or fluid as advanced multi-sensors on the more expensive mid-drive systems now being produced. Again, I actually felt that the new sealed cadence sensor was very responsive and you can see that in the video as well.

powering the bike, beautiful backlit display panel, and integrated USB Type A port is a 48 volt 13 Amp hour battery pack. You can charge this thing on or off the bike and the included charger is very standard, offering 2 Amp output. This is a bit of a gripe for me because with such a large battery, and the potential for draining it faster by riding quick or relying purely on the throttle, it would be nice to have a 4 Amp charger. I could see myself buying this bike to ride to work during the week and then taking it on light trails when the weekend rolls around… and the removability of the battery pack means that I could charge the pack from my desk at work, make the bike lighter when loading it onto my car rack, and also reduce chemistry fatigue by storing it in a cool dry place vs. out in freezing temperatures or extreme heat. It’s a battery design that works well because the pack sits low and center on the frame, improving balance, and it blends in beautifully with the satin black frame. The pack clicks in from a 45-degree angle from the left side vs. going straight down, and this makes it easier to mount without scratching the frame. One thing that was missing however, was a slap guard on the right chain stay, but you can use clear masking tape or get a cheap slap guard online or from your local shop if you want. At the top left side of the battery is a standard female USB A port for charging portable electronics, such as your phone, which could be handy for GPS directions. I believe the port is active whether you have the battery mounted to the bike or not, so it could be like a backup power source. When mounted to the frame, this battery pack felt solid, but did rattle just a bit and I have heard some owners talk about using a bit of electrical tape to tighten the fit, just don’t overdo it because you wouldn’t want to see it fall off when riding! The locking core felt solid and there’s a little handle on the left side to grasp when removing.

And so, I mentioned that the cockpit on this bike can be a little crowded and messy because of the second set of shifters, brake lever motor inhibitors, and throttle… but it works well enough. The button pad (which allows you to arrow up through 0 to 6 levels of assist) is easy to reach and allows you to go “around” from six to zero vs. clicking down six times. One complaint, that may not be relevant to all customers, is that the trigger throttle on the right side can be difficult to reach depending on where you mount it. I had to reach across the shifter housing and brake attachment to press the throttle paddle and it compromised my grip a bit which is not idea when riding off-road. Considering that this is either a Class 3 speed pedelec or Class 2 throttle activated ebike by default, it’s probably not going to be allowed on many mountain bike trails in some states. You can probably use it on off-highway vehicle (OHV) trails and private property, and you might also be able to turn down the top assisted speed to 20 mph and remove the throttle to use it as a Class 1 electric bicycle, but by default it’s a bit unconventional. Many people love the power and freedom of this setup, but if you had a crash that damaged property or hurt someone and the bike was seen as more of an unregistered vehicle in court, that could be a bummer. The display panel on this bike is large and easy to read, it can be swiveled a bit to reduce glare (which is nice because it’s very shiny all the way across) but it cannot be removed. This could lead to more damage from weather exposure or other bikes at a public rack, but the display does feel sturdy. It shows your battery level, assist level, and trip stats like trip distance, odometer, and even a timer.

There’s a lot to say about this bike and a few additional points worth sharing here are that the spokes are thicker at 13 gauge vs. 14 gauge on most other products I test and review (lower gauge numbers mean it is thicker). Magnum has upgraded the headset with a sealed cartridge design that won’t squeak or rust as easily and I want to reiterate that the tapered head tube can accommodate more advanced suspension models, such as air forks that will weigh less and provide more adjustability. The stock fork provides lockout and rebound adjust but uses springs and a narrow 9 mm skewer like you’d find on a city bike. Most of the higher end true off-road e-bikes now come with 15 mm thru-axles on their forks to provide more stiffness and strength… and I think that would be nice to have on this bike because it weighs more and can go faster. The ergonomic grips are more of an urban choice because lots of mountain bikers wear gloves and don’t want an overly thick grip… but at least these grips are locking and won’t spin under pressure. The cables on the bike aren’t as hidden or internally routed as some other products I have been reviewing and even the motor controller stands out visually, but Magnum reps told me that the choice had to do with providing more Amps and keeping the system cool. The bike does have walk mode, simply hold the minus key, and that’s handy for climbing hills by foot or walking the bike in a crowded environment or if you get a flat. At ~57.5 lbs, it’s on the heavier side for an ebike without fenders, lights, or a rear rack stock and this is due to the larger battery and wheels. You can tap the power button to turn on display backlighting when riding in dark or dim conditions. I have heard that Magnum may have a narrower “slim” throttle design that could bring it closer to the right grip (maybe mounting between the grip and the brake and shifter clamps) but I cannot say for sure… and it’s worth paying special attention when mounting or dismounting the bike because if it is turned on, the throttle will be hot and could send the bike forward unexpectedly. The throttle will override all levels of assist and zero, which give you great control, but also requires great responsibility right ;) Big thanks to the Magnum team for inviting me to their headquarters in Utah and partnering with me on this post. Magnum has been expanding their network of dealers in the USA and that makes this and other models easier to test ride and get serviced.


  • The Peak offers throttle-only mode, allows you to override assist with the throttle up to 20 mph and can hit 28 mph in pedal assist… it’s one of the most open control systems I have reviewed, giving you full control over how to ride
  • Higher volume tires improve comfort and increase the contact patch for better handling off-road, ergonomic grips feel nice and reduce wrist fatigue regardless of terrain
  • You get 24 gear combinations here which is unique in the world of value priced electric mountain bikes, this also means more potential maintenance and weight, but when you need to climb or hit and comfortably maintain the 28 mph top assisted speed I feel that it can be worth it
  • Name brand Schwalbe tires and mid-level SR Suntour suspension fork with lockout and preload adjustment improve ride quality and won’t take damage as easily as super cheap options
  • I like that they ship the bike with a derailleur guard to protect the main derailleur and that they used Acera here vs. Altus (which is used for the front derailleur and is lower specced), this guard also protects the power cable that connects into the hub motor on the right side of the rear dropout
  • While the Peak only comes in one frame size and color, I feel that the design is great because the top tube angles for lowered standover height, the head tube is tapered for improved strength (and optional fork upgrades) and the black color helps wires and the battery blend in, for those who want a slightly lower and smaller frame, consider the original Magnum Peak which uses 27.5″ wheel size vs. 29″ here
  • The battery has a charging port on the lower left side vs. on top which is much easier to get to (of course it can also be charged off the bike if you want) and I like that there is a female USB port near the top (on the left side of the pack) so you could power your phone or lights, consider a right angle adapter for charging while riding to keep the wire out of the way when you pedal, I believe the USB port can also be used to charge stuff when the battery is not mounted to the bike
  • Magnum sells a rear rack if you want to carry a trunk bag or panniers but this new Peak frame also has bottle cage bosses added to the top tube, they do increase the stand over height and might position your bottle near horizontal, but could also be used for a folding lock or mini-pump accessory
  • Hydraulic disc brakes with motor inhibitors in both levers keep you in control of the bike and are especially important for high-speed operation, you get a larger 180 mm rotor up front for improved braking power and the brake levers offer adjustable reach for people with different hand sizes
  • Even though it’s not removable, I like how compact the display is and appreciate that you can swivel it to reduce glare, there are lots of options built in, the button pad used to operate it is mounted close to the left grip where it’s very easy to reach and use on the fly, overall the cockpit didn’t feel super crowded even with the extra wires and two trigger shifter units vs. just one on most other electric bikes that have 10 or 11 speeds vs. 24 here
  • Minor pluses: I love that the saddle and pedals are upgraded, less reason to have to replace them for improved comfort and traction respectively, they worked great for me even in the snow when my feet were wet and the trail was bumpy
  • Quick release front wheel and removable battery reduces weight significantly (by over 10 pounds) making the bike easier to toss into the trunk of a car or lift onto a storage hook in a garage
  • Magnum has a specially designed trigger throttle that is super slim so it doesn’t crowd the brake or shifter mounts and can be easier to reach, the cadence sensor is also slimmer, smaller and better protected by a plastic shell
  • The battery capacity is quite impressive, you get 48 volts and 13 amp hours which I would call way above average and the cells are premium brands (LG, Samsung or Panasonic) with a one-year warranty
  • In my opinion, the price point of this bike is amazing, it really feels like a good value at $2k given all of the options and dealer network they’ve built (over 75 shops in the US carrying it at the time of this post)
  • The bike ships with a rigid 30.9 mm seat post which works fine and is a little thicker for added strength… this is one are you could potentially upgrade with a seat post suspension like Thudbuster or Body Float, you might just need a shim in some cases for the perfect fit


  • Surprisingly, I didn’t see a slap guard on the right chain stay, this means you’ll get chips in the paint over time and possibly some wear on the chain itself, consider adding one yourself aftermarket like these
  • I’m accustomed to seeing internally routed cables, integrated batteries and compact motors as with the Peak here but the controller box stood out as being large and potentially vulnerable… I asked about it (positioned in front of the bottom bracket) and was told it had to be overbuilt to dissipate heat due to the higher amp output and it’s made from Aluminum alloy to be sturdy
  • Due to the hub motor design, there isn’t a quick release at the rear which means you’ll need extra tools for flat-fixing on the go, the power cable also protrudes a bit and could get snagged or bent easier than if it was fully tucked in
  • Because the throttle is always active, I suggest being extra careful when mounting and dismounting the bike… or even loading it onto a car rack, I would turn it off to be safe, perhaps future versions of the Magnum Peak can power up to assist level zero and make that a non-throttle mode for safety
  • The kickstand is large, adjustable and sturdy but I wish it was mounted slightly back so the left crank arm wouldn’t collide, the demo bike had some nicks already, this is also a concern with the charging port as the pedal could snag it or bend the plug
  • The cockpit handlebar area of this e-bike is kind of cluttered because of the two shifters, brake lines, and motor inhibitors as well as the display, control pad, and trigger throttle
  • While I think they did a good job keeping the weight of the bike reasonable considering the larger battery pack and motor, this is about four pounds heavier than most other hardtail electric mountain bikes I have been testing
  • One area for possible improvement would be a thru-axle on the fork for added stiffness and sturdiness given the off-road nature and higher speed capability of the bike, as it stands you get a regular 9 mm quick release skewer and a spring shock vs. air which would be more adjustable and reduce weight
  • Many of the wires are run along the base of the top tube verses being internally routed, this combined with the angled nature of the top tube could make hanging style racks difficult to work with (snagging cables or just not fitting without first removing the battery pack)
  • If you’re commuting, especially at high speed, add some reflective stickers or lights because the matte black frame and lack of integrated lights combined with higher speed riding could make you vulnerable and I can imagine a lot of people will use this in urban environments even though it’s trail capable
  • The charger is compact and light weight at ~1.5 lbs but it’s not super fast with just 2 Amps output and that could mean longer waits given the larger capacity of the battery on the Magnum Peak


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Jay Ford
4 months ago

The review for this eBike is very detailed and accurate; however, the Magnum pedal assist controller goes from level 6 down to level 0 and then rolls back around to level 6. It is very easy to accidentally click one time too many and when you thought your assist is off, you get thrown forward with full assist.

4 months ago

Thanks for the feedback Jay, it may be a preference thing… clicking buttons while riding can also be a distraction and cause instability, just like going from zero to six accidentally can be startling. Thanks for highlighting this point, ride safe :)

4 months ago

Great review Court. One question about specs. It says 90 Nm torque. But I’ve checked Das-kit website and their motors provide only 38 Nm, how can it be that much different?

4 months ago

Hi Tim, thanks for sharing that detail. I wrote what the folks at Magnum told me… and perhaps they were wrong or just adding some marketing spin on it. My gut tells me that 38 Newton meters is more accurate based on what other companies report and what mid-drives are rated (in the 70 Nm range).

Tim Clark
3 months ago

Excellent review Court! So much so that after looking at all the bikes $1.3K to $2K that you reviewed, I settled with the Magnum Peak 29 and could not be happier! Everything you mentioned is right on! I am 6’2″ with all my height in my legs so the extra size that this bike gave over the the standard 19″ that most electric bikes go with was dramatic and so much more comfortable! Another big point that I have found with Magnum is the ability to deal with a local dealer AND directly with the manufacturer.

Now that I am a full convert to electric bikes, I am starting to look at bike racks for the car. Thought about doing a comprehensive bike rack review? Keep up the great work as while I am sold on this Magnum Peak, I still enjoy watching/reading your reviews!

3 months ago

Hi Tim! I’m so happy to hear that you’re loving the Magnum Peak! Thanks for posting your kind words and support here, I do my best and try to be thorough but also share enthusiasm when companies like Magnum have done a great job. I hope it continues to be a source of fun and health for you. And yeah! I have done a couple of bike rack reviews but mostly stay focused on ebikes… Here’s the one I own, and here’s another unique one that can carry more bikes and different types of frames. I hope this helps!

(UPDATE! I just got confirmation from Ty at Rad Power Bikes that no, the maximum weight that the bike can carry does NOT include the weight of the bike itself, so my thoughts above are correct… you can load up to 275 lbs onto the bike)


Post a Comment

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2 days ago

Have you checked out Magnum bikes? My magnum bike is 500W and it's plenty (non-fat tire kind). I am a 6'2" 250lb guy and I can get around just fine with 500W. Why do you need 750W?

You need fenders? lights? rack?

5 days ago

I just bought a new Magnum Metro and have a helmet and under-seat G Keni light/alarm and a Kryptonite New York lock to start out. What other accessories do folks recommend? I don't think mine has a bell, so need that for passing pedestrians, what about bags that will go on this rear rack for the Metro? I'd like some kind of handlebar mount to hold my phone for GPS or whatever. Is there anything to carry a small dog safely?

Any ideas/recommendations on common/useful accessories or farkles (as we call them in the motorcycle world, maybe the same here) welcome. Thanks!

5 days ago

I got the 27.5 not sure about the height guess around 30" or so. Tires performing pretty well so far and I ride it on pretty rough roads on occasion. This is the first super heavy bike I've ridden and it takes some getting used to - can't make turns as sharply as I can on my non electric. Overall pretty happy with it, feels sturdy and gets up to 25 with little effort.

5 days ago

I'm looking at the Magnum Peak now too. Waiting to hear back on shipping charge to Honolulu. Their Shipping Calculator doesn't seem to update the price for any zip code. Did you go with the 27.5 or 29" wheels and what's the standover height? How do the stock Schwalbe Smart Sam tires perform on the road?

5 days ago

What's the standover height with the 29" wheels? I couldn't find any measurements on the Magnum site.

Kurt in CT
6 days ago

Magnum peak

Mike's E-Bikes
6 days ago

The Ui6 is the same frame, components, tires, brakes, as the Ui5, but it comes with a 500 watt motor (instead of the Ui5's 350 watt), and a 48 Volt, 13 AH Samsung battery. It also has a newer display from Magnum. It's priced (MSRP $1799) at only $100 more than the previous Ui5, so its a pretty good value. The motor has a peak output of 700 watts.

Vs, The Metro is a different ebike , priced at $1999. It has the same wattage motor, but its Das-Kit versus Bafang, and the ebike is capable of a higher speed at 28 mph (assist only). (versus 22 mph for Ui6). The display is different too, a bit nicer and larger. It'll have a slightly higher grade derailleur (Shimano Altus), and better trigger shifter. And hydraulic brakes vs mechanical brakes on Ui6. Also has a better quality suspension fork than the Ui6. Lastly, they are including a suspension seat post. Functional but won't be the higher quality of a Thud Buster or Body Float.

Mike's E-Bikes
6 days ago

I would go with the Magnum Ui5. You should be able to find it on sale for around $1500. (msrp$1699) It has everything you want, and they've been around longer than any of the folks you mention. For that short of a trip, you don't need anything more. Has a rack, lighting, integrated battery, tires slightly over 2" wide. If you advise where you are located, can suggest a shop. Otherwise I'd sell you one if you were close to Chicago. (p.s. they are transitioning to the Ui6, which has a 500,48v watt motor, but otherwise everything else is staying the same, which is great and since the Ui5 is a proven and high selling model.) Stay away from Addmotor, and the others. You aren't getting value with those where you need it, in terms of reliability, and paying extra for stuff on the others you don't need. I could show you the differences in person, which are obvious when you physically see the bikes. Hard to do that over the internet. Ui5 is also a very comfortable ride.

Jim Mass
7 days ago

Yes you are both correct. Yesterday we took a trip to Newport Beach and rented 3 RAD's - City step-thru, Rover, and the folding model with the geared motor. The "City step-thru" does 90% of what the Magnum "cruiser" does and its $400 less expensive. We rode for two hours and received a $50 cash back on our $75 rental bill for 2 units). My friend got $50 cash back on his rental. My new favorite so far - RAD City Step-thru.

1 week ago

Any updates on this topic? I watched the video and it was a bit disheartening and affecting my decision to buy an ebike since I live in NJ and I've had a motorcycle stolen before by someone just putting it in the back of a truck, locked wheels/frame and all. I don't want to carry a heavy assortment of locks to lock down the wheels, frame, seat, etc every time I have to run to the grocery store or something. Considering a Magnum Metro if there's any brand-specific options. The smart locks with a motion sensing alarm and app notification sounded good though, have any good ones come to fruition yet?

Kurt in CT
1 week ago

I just bought a Magnum bike a week or so ago off a local bike shop. No discount for me. (though i didnt press as hard as i probably could have..)

1 week ago

Before I pull the trigger, does anyone know if Magnum has any discount coupons or sales? I see a place on the online order form to enter a coupon code (doesn't mean there is one, but just in case...). The local bike shop said they're having a Trek sale end of march/beginning of April, not sure if that's just them or Trek doing that. So I wondered if Magnum is doing something similar to kick off spring, or if there's a coupon code or veterans discount, etc.

2 months ago

to bad that in israel The engine is limited to 250W
we have the same bike just with engine 250w
that cost 2.5 k

james eagle
4 months ago

Hey court, didn't you review this bike already at the beginning of the year?

4 months ago

Wheres the link to the website?

Armando Aleman
4 months ago


Left Foot Brake
4 months ago

I was with you 'till you said you had a Prius...
4 months ago

Check this out:

Mike B
4 months ago

Double front rings are only excessive if you Never ride the bike unpowered. If you do, you will quickly find that MOST mtb's would be better with 20g than 10. I think the trend will go the other way as end users realize they don't have enough gearing to get home comfortably if the battery is dead or other problem.
4 months ago

That's a good point Mike, I see how the extra gears can be relevant

Scott TheOzoneGuy
4 months ago

Where is this trail head?
4 months ago

Somewhere very near Salt Lake City? I'm not sure, they took me to a random spot

Eddie Espinal
4 months ago

Thanks a bunch court I'm in the Brooklyn area I'm going to look at your locator available on the website
4 months ago

Cool, I hope that helps, it should let you search by brand now but let me know if it has issues :)

Eddie Espinal
4 months ago

Court can I get this bike at propel Brooklyn ?
4 months ago

Hi Eddie! No, Propel seems to only carry Bosch powered electric bikes these days. Magnum has a pretty widespread network of dealers however, so you might be able to find someone else nearby or buy directly from the company and have it shipped. I suggest contacting them and asking, they will refer you to the closest dealer and really seem to support their dealers well:

Juan Bruna
4 months ago

Is it available in the uk
4 months ago

Hi Juan, I'm not sure? might be something worth asking I do believe they sell in Israel and similar designs may be available in parts of Europe under different names.

Edgar Cuevas
4 months ago

good review. feel like upgrading ebikes with all the new ones coming out.
4 months ago

Thanks Edgar! Yeah, there are some very cool electric bikes on the horizon. I have over 40 new videos to process and post in the coming month or so, keep an eye out :)

Joey Love
4 months ago

I could watch this all night. Oh wait I do! This is a great bike for the price.

4 months ago

Comparing motors? Im watching for it now! Cant wait.
4 months ago

Ha! I've got a bunch of fun guide type videos in the works soon, like comparing motors and stuff, should be fun ;)

4 months ago

Nice to have all those gears to pedal a hub motor bike if the battery goes dead.
4 months ago

Now that's a great point... especially since the Magnum Peak 29 weighs about 57.5 lbs ;)

Mr Jhonny
4 months ago

15th like

Mr Jhonny
4 months ago


4 months ago

Aim for first next time...
4 months ago

Not bad :P

J Flores
4 months ago

Great review, thank you!
4 months ago

Happy to help, glad you enjoyed it :D