Magnum Cruiser Review

Magnum Cruiser Electric Bike Review
Magnum Cruiser
Magnum Cruiser Das Kit 500 Watt Internally Geared Hub Motor
Magnum Cruiser Large 48 Volt 13 Ah Downtube Ebike Battery
Magnum Cruiser Padded Stitched Grips
Magnum Cruiser Rst Neon Tnl Spring Suspension Fork With Led Headlight
Magnum Cruiser Tektro Auriga Hydraulic Disc Brakes 180 160
Magnum Cruiser 18 Amp Controller Chainring With Minimalist Guard
Magnum Cruiser 8 Speed Shimano Acera With Derailleur Guard
Magnum Cruiser 2 Amp Portable Electric Bike Charger
Magnum Cruiser Electric Bike Review
Magnum Cruiser
Magnum Cruiser Das Kit 500 Watt Internally Geared Hub Motor
Magnum Cruiser Large 48 Volt 13 Ah Downtube Ebike Battery
Magnum Cruiser Padded Stitched Grips
Magnum Cruiser Rst Neon Tnl Spring Suspension Fork With Led Headlight
Magnum Cruiser Tektro Auriga Hydraulic Disc Brakes 180 160
Magnum Cruiser 18 Amp Controller Chainring With Minimalist Guard
Magnum Cruiser 8 Speed Shimano Acera With Derailleur Guard
Magnum Cruiser 2 Amp Portable Electric Bike Charger

Summary

  • A handsome, cruiser style electric bike with neatly integrated cables, strong alloy fenders, a clean plastic chain cover, and uniquely designed rear cargo rack, everything matches
  • Emphasis on comfort for the rider with soft Big Ben balloon tires, an extra-wide saddle with rubber bumpers, high adjustable-angle handlebar, padded grips, and suspension fork
  • Powerful 500 watt geared motor, 48 volt Lithium-ion battery, and 18 Amp controller can support larger riders and power up hills more easily, 28 mph pedal assist and 20 mph throttle on demand
  • Heavier build at nearly 60 lbs in part due to the large battery capacity, only one frame size and color choice for now, independent lights and reflective tires improve safety

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Magnum

Model:

Cruiser

Price:

$2,099

Body Position:

Upright, Upright Relaxed

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Cruising

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2), Speed Pedalec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States, Canada, New Zealand, Israel

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

59.2 lbs (26.85 kg)

Battery Weight:

9.2 lbs (4.17 kg)

Motor Weight:

10.1 lbs (4.58 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

19.5 in (49.53 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

19.5" Seat Tube, 25.25" Reach, 27.5" Stand Over Height, 26.75" Width, 76" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Satin Black with Bronze Accents

Frame Fork Details:

RST Neon-TNL Spring Suspension, 75 mm Travel, Compression Clicker with Lockout, Preload Adjust, 100 mm Hub Length, 9 mm Skewer with Quick Release

Frame Rear Details:

142 mm Hub Length, 11 mm Axle with Nuts

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

8 Speed 1x8 Shimano Acera Derailleur, 11-32T Cassette

Shifter Details:

Shimano RevoShift Grip Shifter on Right

Cranks:

Prowheel Ounce, Forged Alloy, 170 mm Length, Square Taper Bottom Bracket, 48 Tooth Chainring with Alloy Guard

Pedals:

Wellgo Aluminum Alloy Platform, Black

Headset:

Neco Tapered 1-1/8" to 1-1/2" Threadless Internal Cups

Stem:

Promax Quill Style, Tool-Free Adjustable Angle, 100 mm Length, 25.4 Clamp Diameter

Handlebar:

High-Rise, Aluminum Alloy, 670 mm Length

Brake Details:

Tektro Auriga Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Front Rotor and 160 mm Rear Rotor, Dual-Piston Calipers, Three-Finger Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Grips:

Imitation Leather, Ergonomic, Stitched

Saddle:

Selle Royal Cruiser Comfort, Rubber Bumpers, Imitation Leather

Seat Post:

Promax, Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

300 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

30.4 mm

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy, Double Walled, 25 mm Width, 36 Hole

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 13 Gauge, Silver with Adjustable Nipples

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Balloon Big Ben, 26" x 2.15" (55-559)

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)

Tire Details:

30 to 55 PSI, 2.0 to 4.0 BAR, Reflective Sidewall Stripes, K-Guard 3 Puncture Protection

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Flick Bell, Custom Rear Rack with Pannier Blockers and Triple Bungee (25 kg / 55 lb Max Weight), Black Aluminum Alloy 70 mm Wide Fenders with Mud Flaps, Minimalist Plastic Chain Cover, Independent Spanninga Swing Headlight (3 AAA Batteries, Twist Lens to Open), Independent Spanninga Solo Back Light (2 AAA Batteries), Sticker Slap Guard, Center-Mount Single Side Adjustable Length Kickstand, Steel Derailleur Guard

Other:

Locking Removable Downtube Mounted Battery Pack, 9 Mosfet 18 Amp Current Controller, 1.5 lb 2 Amp Charger, Sine Wave Controller

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Das-Kit

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Motor Peak Output:

700 watts

Motor Torque:

90 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung, DLG, Panasonic

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

13 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

624 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium Nickel Cobalt Manganese (Li-NCM)

Charge Time:

6.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Estimated Max Range:

60 miles (97 km)

Display Type:

Das-Kit C7, Fixed, Backlit, Monochrome LCD

Readouts:

Power Output Indicator (6 Ticks), Assist Level (0-6), Speed, Odometer, Timer, Trip 1, Trip 2, BMS Voltage, Battery Level (6 Bars)

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad (Power, Set, +, -), (Press Power Button for Display Backligt, Hold Minus Button for Walk Mode)

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle

Top Speed:

28 mph (45 kph) (20 MPH Throttle, Adjustable)

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Written Review

In recent years, Magnum has expanded their line of electric bikes for sale in the US, and the Cruiser is one of the newest models. It builds on the 28 mph top speed, pedal assist + throttle operated, extra-large battery concept that the Metro and Peak models also use, but really emphasizes comfort and style. With a bottom bracket that is pushed forward and smaller 26″ diameter wheels, you can more easily mount, stand over, and stabilize this bike at stops. When it comes time for pedaling, you still get decent leg extension because the cranks are positioned forward. And upper body position is extremely adjustable here, you can angle the high-rise bars forward or back to suite your arm length and the adjustable angle stem can raise or lower the base position. When you combine puffy padded grips with an enlarged comfort saddle, fatter 2.15″ balloon tires, and an adjustable suspension fork, you end up with a very satisfying ride. This is one of the few cruiser style electric bikes that’s priced within reach for a large audience, and still comes with fenders, lights, and a custom mid-frame battery pack. In my opinion, it really does offer a great value… even if you decided to remove the fenders and rear rack to emphasize style and shed a few pounds. Weighing in at nearly 60 lbs, I was surprised to discover that the Cruiser model is not heavier than the similarly specced Metro. The Metro just looks lighter to me because it’s a commuter frame with skinnier tires. The features overlap quite a bit, though the Cruiser has a 180/160 mm disc brake setup vs. 180 mm for both on the Metro, and the Metro also has an integrated headlight vs. independent lights on the Cruiser. I think the big decision between the two should be based on body position and ride style. If you care about active pedaling on a narrower saddle and more forward aerodynamic position, get the Metro. Otherwise, the Cruiser is just as capable. Note that the Cruiser frame is only available in this swooping high-step design and you can only get it in black with bronze accents at the time of this review.

Driving this ebike is a very capable Das-Kit internally geared hub motor rated from 500 watts nominal to 700 watts peak. The motor controller offers 9 Mosfets and puts out up to 18 Amps for smooth, quiet, and powerful operation. Notice how large the controller unit is, and how it’s mounted outside of the frame (there near the bottom of the downtube). It’s insulated against water, just like the motor, display panel, button pad, and battery, but gets more direct airflow here. I also believe that they positioned it as they did, so that the battery could slide down lower for improved frame balance. Everything works together and while the aesthetics are slightly altered, the controller box is mostly hidden by the chainring and I feel that it is mostly out of the way of water and debris because of the large alloy front fender. As with all internally geared hub motors I have reviewed, this one does produce some electronic whirring noises. It does not interfere with pedaling, so you can shift easily and smoothly regardless of power delivery, and it works best if the bike has a little bit of speed going. I was able to climb some steep sidewalk sections in a garden area near the capitol building in Salt Lake City and had no issue once the bike got going a few miles per hour. I only weigh 135 lbs, but got the impression that this bike would be capable of handling heavier riders and gear on the rack. The rack is rated to 55 lbs. Perhaps the best part of this setup is that the motor can be activated anytime the bike is powered on by simply pressing the trigger throttle near the left grip. It’s wonderful to have such control at your fingertips and not have to pedal… but this will drain the battery quickly, and if you’re starting from standstill on a steep incline it may struggle. The throttle offers full power if you depress the trigger throttle all the way but maxes out at 20 mph. If you want to hit the maximum speed of 28 mph, you will have to arrow up into the highest level of assist and pedal along. That said, you do not have to push while pedaling because this bike relies on a cadence sensor to measure crank movement, not crank torque. For those who are interested in lower speed operation, Magnum or your local dealer can set a different top speed. Coming back to the throttle for a moment, take care to always turn the bike off when dismounting or moving it because the throttle is always active and could easily get bumped. This could lead to the bike getting out of hand and crashing.

Supporting that powerful motor is an equally powerful high-capacity Lithium ion battery pack. It offers 48 volts and 13 Amp hours for a total of 624 watt hours (over half a kilowatt hour!) that should take you anywhere from 25 or 30 miles up to 60+ miles per charge. The range is fairly wide and imprecise because speed, rider weight, and terrain greatly influence operation. If you always use the first one or two levels of assist and rarely juice the throttle, it will go much further than if you sit back and zip around like a scooter. The battery pack fits neatly into the downtube and clicks in from the left side. You can charge it on or off the bike with the included 2 Amp charger, but be careful with the plug interface because the charger wire ends up in the path of the left crank arm and could get snagged or bent if you turn the pedals accidentally or move the bike when it’s plugged in. I also noticed that the little rubber cover that seals the charging port on the battery can be difficult to press in. Near the top right side of the battery is a second port which has a standard sized USB female plug for charging portable electronics. You could use this while riding the bike to keep your phone charged (perhaps if you’re using it for GPS navigation) or when the pack is off the bike, as a backup source of energy. The rubber cover for the USB port fits much easier and I appreciate that this plug is out of the way of the cranks and your legs when pedaling. So, you can also take the battery completely off the bike for storing or charging inside, which is convenient if you work in an office and have to park the bike outside. Lithium-ion batteries tend to be very durable but it’s best to avoid extreme heat or cold to really make them last for the 1,000+ rated full cycles. Note that this battery pack weighs about nine pounds, and would be worth taking off if you have to lift the bike or transport it on a car rack. The front wheel can also be removed with a simple quick release mechanism and the seat post is the same way. You will need some tools to get the rear wheel off, but there’s a simple disconnect port on the motor power cable to make it easier.

Operating the Magnum Cruiser is simple and clear. Once the battery has been charged and mounted, you press the rubberized power button on the pad situated near the left grip. The Das-Kit LCD display panel blinks to life, and you can tap the power button once more to turn on backlighting. Unfortunately, this display does not activate the headlight or tail light. They are both independent, relying on AAA batteries and separate on/off switches. This is a grip for me because the battery is so large and easily rechargeable. It takes extra time and memory to switch the lights on and off when parking, but at least you get the lights, and I appreciate the reflective tire casings as well. Since this is a black colored bike, it’s important to have some front and side reflection and lights if you plan to ride in early morning or late evening conditions where automobiles might miss you. Note also, since the headlight is mounted to the moving portion of the suspension fork, it may create a less consistent beam and even get jolted out of place over time. During my test rides, I took the Cruiser down some steps and across a few very bump sections of sidewalk, and I could hear the kickstand bouncing up and down. But the fenders and light seemed solid. It was easy for me to look down and get a sense for speed, battery capacity, and assist level because the display panel is so large and centrally mounted. I do wish that the display was removable, for reduced wear at bike racks, but it’s better protected than most because of the taller handlebars. The button pad allows you to arrow up or down for more or less power and speed with assist… but remember, the throttle is always hot and offers up to full power depending on how far you push it. This is a more advanced and “full control” setup than a lot of other electric bikes and as a regular, possibly more confident rider, I love it. You can hold the down arrow to activate walk mode for climbing steep sections or just taking a break. It’s useful if the bike is loaded with gear or when you’re walking through tall grass or other soft terrain.

There’s a lot to say about this electric bike because it’s packed with features. The fenders are correctly sized for the large balloon tires and the plastic chain cover kept my pants clear of the chain. There’s also an alloy bash guard that would protect the chainring from curb strikes and other tall obstacles… but that’s a bit overkill for more of a neighborhood/urban styled ebike. I think the chainring guard looks nice, but wouldn’t mind having a full chain guide (a second plate on the inside) to keep the chain from bouncing off track. I never dropped the chain during my test ride, and did appreciate the plastic sticker style slap guard to protect the black paint on the right chainstay. Even the kickstand has been optimized here, though not completely 100%. It is positioned far back enough on the left side to stay mostly clear of the left crank arm when walking the bike backward or servicing the chain, as long as the pedal is not in the flat position when it passes. This stand is adjustable for length and supports the bike well, even in soft grass. Magnum continues to do a great job with their purpose built, value oriented electric bikes. To some people, $2 might not sound affordable, but you get the proper assembly and year long support that dealers can offer with this product. Little extras like the derailleur guard keep your gears and the motor cable in good shape if the bike tips or is parked next to other bicycles in a rack, and the internally routed cables look nice and stay protected. Stopping is a big deal, especially because this bike is heavier and capable of high-speeds, so the hydraulic disc brakes with motor inhibitors are a win, and the little bits (like the custom rack with pannier blockers and bungee cord) all add up to something really special. I’d like to thank Magnum for partnering with me on this review and bringing their Metro model for side-by-side comparison. I feel like they have a good model here, balancing value against performance and service, and enjoyed this ebike very much.

Pros:

  • Considering that Magnum sells their electric bikes predominantly through independent electric bike shops and offers a comprehensive one year warranty, I feel like their price points offer a lot of value, this thing has a powerful motor, larger than average battery pack, and lots of great comfort and utility accessories like fenders, lights, upgraded saddle, and suspension fork with lockout
  • The whole bike is setup to be heavy duty with a thicker than average seat post, thicker gauge spokes and full 36 hole rims vs. 32 hole, and a reinforced diamond type frame
  • It isn’t as loud or “buzzy” as some hub motor powered electric bikes because they use a pure sine wave controller to deliver power and have an upgraded controller to handle the extra power and dissipate heat better
  • The fenders are extra wide to fully protect you from mud and water, since the tires are 2.15″ diameter, and I love the thin plastic chain cover that protects your pants from getting dirty or snagged on the chain
  • Magnum custom designed this frame for comfort and a lowered body position, notice how the seat tube bends forward to connect with the bottom bracket (where the crank arms attach) this allows you to get more full leg extension while lowering the saddle for easier mounting and balancing at stops
  • A tool-free adjustable angle stem and taller handlebar combine to make steering relaxed and upright, you don’t have to hunch forward and get a sore back and neck when riding… but this isn’t as sporty or aerodynamic as a road bike
  • The rack can be removed if you want, but I thought it looked cool and offered a lot of utility (even just using the included triple-bungee cord), the fenders are also removable
  • I love that this e-bike comes stock with powerful hydraulic disc brakes, they are easier to actuate than mechanical brakes and offer adjustable-reach levers, the levers also have motor inhibitors built in to cut motor power when stopping
  • I love the pedal choice here, they are large and stiff for people with bigger feet, the nubs aren’t especially sharp so you get good traction but maybe not as scraped up if you do slip off
  • Decent Shimano Acera drivetrain with eight speeds, you get a clean and intuitive grip shifter and at the derailleur there’s a steel guard to keep the motor cable and shifter mechanism in good shape if the bike tips, the eight speeds is just enough for the Class 3 speed version and more than enough for the standard Class 2 setup limited to 20 mph
  • The front wheel and seat tube collar offer quick release so you can make the bike smaller and lighter or do service or fitting more easily, the battery is also removable to reduce weight or charge and store separately
  • Since the lockout clicker on the fork is progressive, you can raise compression for a mixed suspension feel and decreased dive when stopping, this would be good for heavier riders or those carrying a lot of cargo
  • This is a minor pro, but I appreciate how compact and sealed off the cadence sensor is, many ebikes use a larger more exposed magnet design that can get bumped out of place
  • For people who enjoy portable electronics and want to keep them charged on the go, the battery pack has a 5 Volt USB charging port built into the right side, consider getting a cheap right angle USB adapter to keep the cables from getting bumped while pedaling
  • I really like the display, button pad, and throttle setup on this electric bicycle, they look good, seem very durable, and are reachable without too much hand effort

Cons:

  • The controller box is larger than normal, you can see it mounted at the lower portion of the downtube, near the bottom bracket, aesthetically it stands out a bit but the utility of improved cooling and a lowered battery position is worth it in my opinion
  • I wish the lights were powered by the main battery pack instead of independent AAA batteries, this means you will have to occasionally change the cells and spend more time powering them on and off before and after rides, at least the rear light is tucked into the rack so it won’t get blocked by a bag or panniers… but the headlight sits on the fork brace and may bounce around as the sliders travel up and down
  • I like that chainring has an Aluminum alloy bash guard to protect the chainring teeth but didn’t see a second plate to create a full guide (and prevent chain drops), I did not experience chain drops when riding however so this is a minor consideration
  • The battery charging port and kickstand are in the path of the left crank arm, so be careful not to bump them if you back the bike up (as the crank arms will automatically backtrack) or if you trip over the charger cable, to be fair, the kickstand is just barely clear if the pedal is not sticking out
  • They didn’t have room for a water bottle mount on the frame, so consider adding a trunk bag with integrated bottle holster like this, I like that this particular bag is also reflective for added visibility
  • The battery charger is compact and lightweight, but very average in terms of speed… and the Magnum Cruiser has a big battery, so it can take longer to fill, some e-bikes are now offering 3 or even 4 Amp chargers vs. just 2 Amp here

Resources:

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Jay Ford
3 weeks ago

This eBike is very fun and is built strong; however, the Magnum pedal assist controller goes from level 6 down to level 0 and then rolls back around to level 6. It is very easy to accidentally click one time too many and when you thought your assist is off, you get thrown forward with full assist.

Reply
Court Rye
3 weeks ago

Thanks for the feedback Jay, it may be a preference thing… clicking buttons while riding can also be a distraction and cause instability, just like going from zero to six accidentally can be startling. Thanks for highlighting this point, ride safe :)

Reply

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emco5
1 week ago

The Electric Shopping Cruiser Any opinions?

A 250 watt hub is minimal assistance for a lightweight two wheeler. That trike is heavy. Slight boost would be noticed on level ground but there wouldn't be much energy on inclines and zip on hills, especially with a load of stuff in the basket.

If you need a trike, get one and put a stronger mid-drive kit on it. https://tinyurl.com/yd2bjn9q

The forum host has info on the drives https://electricbikereview.com/?s=8fun+mid+drive

Roland Leisenring
1 week ago

The Electric Shopping Cruiser Any opinions?

Roland Leisenring
1 week ago

Any reviews on The Electric Shopping Cruiser ($2,500)

Ed P
1 week ago

I've been pedaling a non-electric, crank -forward Fuji for years, but age is catching up with me. The geometry that allows me to place my feet firmly on the ground when needed is even more important to me now in my early eighties. I need an electric version. What category do these bikes fall in? EBR doesn't seem to make it clear. Is it "cruiser" or "comfort" or something else?
And which electric bikes have this geometry? The only one I've found is the Electra Townie Go, which is actually higher adjusted for me than it should be - not really a "flat foot" in my opinion, and has fatter tires than I like for pedaling. Are there other electric bikes out there with the crank-forward geometry?
Any help will be much appreciated. Thanks.
I, too, have loved my non-electric, crank-forward, step-thru bike (RANS Fusion) for the past 10 years here in somewhat hilly Washington, DC; 10 months ago I brought it to the flat, Delaware shore and finally decided on a a step-thru e-bike (Kalkhoff Include 8) for use here and have been very pleased.

Baron
2 weeks ago

I've been pedaling a non-electric, crank -forward Fuji for years, but age is catching up with me. The geometry that allows me to place my feet firmly on the ground when needed is even more important to me now in my early eighties. I need an electric version. What category do these bikes fall in? EBR doesn't seem to make it clear. Is it "cruiser" or "comfort" or something else?
And which electric bikes have this geometry? The only one I've found is the Electra Townie Go, which is actually higher adjusted for me than it should be - not really a "flat foot" in my opinion, and has fatter tires than I like for pedaling. Are there other electric bikes out there with the crank-forward geometry?
Any help will be much appreciated. Thanks.
I am 72 and absolutely love my townie go

vincent
2 weeks ago

what kind of riding do you plan to do?

dont think you would go wrong with a radmini or voltbike mariner- i dont have any experience with the sondors fold but it may be a good option too

i am 5'6" and have a rad rover
the rover is on the big side, it is doable but i have another smaller frame off brand bike similar to the rover and it is easier for me to "handle" overall

also have a radmini in my ebike stable and have to say for riding 25-35 miles think i prefer the rover, the bigger tires and the front shock just seem to give a better ride overall

one thing that is an issue for me on the rover is my favorite bike seat is a big cruiser type seat, that pushes me forward and make the taller top bar more of an issue, when i ride it with a smaller footprint seat the top tube/bike fits me better ...

hope some of this helps

John from Connecticut
2 weeks ago

Seems like Trek's answer to Turbo Levo como...
But, I like the specialized's design better. Bigger tires on this would be nice.

e-boy , I think you nailed it when you wrote......

"At max speed of 20mph and max torque of 40Nm , I think it's meant as a neighborhood/city cruiser ,
bike path , recreational type of bike ; in other words , an eBike version of the push bike Verve . I think it retails for US$2300 or 0.24 Bitcoin . :) . "

I agree. I don't think Trek had anything at this price point with a Bosch Drive System, perhaps this is their way of being a little more aggressive in the US market place.

John from CT

TntE3+
3 weeks ago

I recently got my second Bulls bike and wanted to give you my comparison between the RS 3 and the evo45.
Both came with bottom line Nobby nics and both bikes the tires failed in first 50 miles. Tried to go tubliss right away on 45 and the tires will not seal well and rear had to put the tube back in only to have side wall fail on first test run.
The pike fork on 45 is a much nicer more stable feel in stock form over the Yari on the RS 3. The brakes on the 45 are much larger and are solid on any decent, the brake levers on 45 are monsters and belong on a motorcycle.
As far as form and feel the bikes are quite similar, exept the RS3 climbs better even with 100 less watts power and has better battery life.
On the flats the 28mph assist is quite fun.
I suffered from stability and fork dive horribly on both bikes and ended up converting both to 160mm travel up front and added a token on both.
The rear shock on the 3 is slightly stiffer valved and has better rebound valving and i find myself running it primarily with rebound adjust closed to 3 Click from closed.
On the 45 the rear shock is absolutely pathetic, you have to run it in peddle mode all the time to get any real dampening force at all. If you try to sprint out of the saddle the bike wallows like a true DH bike without a pedal mode in suspension.
The 45 on a flat ground ride running between level 2-3 the battery went 33 miles and had one bar left.
On RS 3 on same ride it had 3+Or over 50% bars on battery left but also averaged slower speed
45 i averaged 24.8mph, RS3 average 17.9mph.
Both mine loose assist 2mph bellow the advertised max speed ratings.
RS3 shits down 18mph
45 at 26mph.
Rider review vs magazine reviews.
Every test i have read has rated these bikes fairly poorly in a few catagorys.
Climb and DH.
After hundreds of miles testing on single track, chunky, hiro dirt, loose, leaf covered, fast, pro level Gnarly, cruiser pace to 28 STRAVA DH KOM’s I have come to this conclusion.
The RS3 27.5+is hands down best bang for the buck. Few key misses on factory setup lead to failed reviews.
Grid or good snake skin tires, 160mm front, 1 add token, bigger brakes,dropper seat, 35mm stem and it’s a true enduro bike that can run with top of the line enduro bikes and feel as comfy as your couch in hands of a novice rider.

Evo45, add the additional cost of the bike and the bang for the buck deminishes. The inability to climb better with 100 additional watts, shorter battery life, 27.5 tires and the lower bottom bracket leads to increased pedal strikes, the light valving in rear shock and steep head jangle make for nervous bike that really isn’t enduro capable and this bike belongs on fire roads and entry level to novice level riding.
If the 45 was 1,000 less the RS3 27.5+ i wouldn’t feel it was an equal bang for the buck.
Maybe they build a 29er out of it and address its major short sides and it will improve its bang for buck.
Stay tuned i have a 29er front end I’m gonna put on in next few weeks see how that affects the review.

e-boy
3 weeks ago

AFAIK , this model has not been officially released yet ; it's not on Trek.com .
It uses Bosch's new entry level Active drive , which I read is light , quiet , and pedals unpowered like a regular bicycle .
https://www.bosch-ebike.com/us-en/products/active-line/?setLanguage=3
At max speed of 20mph and max torque of 40Nm , I think it's meant as a neighborhood/city cruiser , bike path , recreational type of bike ; in other words , an eBike version of the push bike Verve .
I think it retails for US$2300 or 0.24 Bitcoin . :) .
If it fits and is comfortable , you can't go wrong with Trek and Bosch .

What did you like about it ?
What are you looking for in an ebike ?
Where are you located ?

rich c
3 weeks ago

This summer I started riding my full suspension mtb along the Hennepin Canal. It's like 75 miles of basically a straight line and little elevation change. We also have a crushed rock rail trail that goes about 30 miles in a similar fashion. I'm thinking a Fat-Tad from Electric Trikes on slicks would be the perfect nature cruiser for those rides. Heads up and a relaxed position for the miles. The canal ride is so enjoyable with birds and water views the entire distance, I think the heads-up ride would let me enjoy the view better. Any opinions about the recumbent trike?

mrgold35
4 weeks ago

My wife hates trail riding while I love it. The Radrover's big advantage is when it gets sandy and the fat tires can float on top instead of digging in (you will need the throttle with really deep sand). I had to add the larger Cloud-9 cruiser seat and Suntour NCX SP-12 suspension seatpost to my Rad for the trails. The updated seat combo also came in handy for my work commutes smoothing out the ride at 18-22 mph where I can remain seated 95% of time compared to always having to lift up over every bump.

Mrlinesides
4 weeks ago

My first post - I'm waiting for my first E Bike - a M2S R750 All Terrain. I was looking for a entry fat electric bike I can cruise around on - beach paths, around town, for pleasure and fun. I did some extensive comparisons and research and chose between 3 final candidates - Volt Yokon, Rad Rover and M2S All Terrain. All three were comparable in price, all were pretty close in output, weight, and shared some components some minor variations. I rode the Pedego, and it was nice, but could not justify more than twice the cost for basically the same bike. All look to be great bikes for the $, and at certain points I had decided on the Volt, then Rad and ended up with the M2S. Hopefully beginning of December I can park my cruiser for good...

Mike's E-Bikes
4 weeks ago

PS. Also, here is a link to a number of crank forward bicycles.... https://www.electricbike.com/12-crank-forward-bikes/
Most of these can make great candidates for conversion kits. Fuji also makes the Barnebey 7 (updated version here http://www.fujibikes.com/usa/bikes/cruiser-comfort/comfort/barnebey/barnebey-7) which is a very good candidate for conversion, just like the Firmstrong is, and KHS makes the Smoothie, another popular candidate for using e-bike kit conversions.
Good luck in your hunt.

Mike's E-Bikes
4 weeks ago

I've been pedaling a non-electric, crank -forward Fuji for years, but age is catching up with me. The geometry that allows me to place my feet firmly on the ground when needed is even more important to me now in my early eighties. I need an electric version. What category do these bikes fall in? EBR doesn't seem to make it clear. Is it "cruiser" or "comfort" or something else?
And which electric bikes have this geometry? The only one I've found is the Electra Townie Go, which is actually higher adjusted for me than it should be - not really a "flat foot" in my opinion, and has fatter tires than I like for pedaling. Are there other electric bikes out there with the crank-forward geometry?
Any help will be much appreciated. Thanks.
There are several brands with the crank forward geometry, often also referred to as 'flat foot' or 'touch down' geometry, which allows you to put your feet down flat while sitting.

The most prominent as mentioned is the Electra Townie, but there are a few others worth considering:

Tuesday cycles is known for their version of 'crank-forward' regular bikes, or what they call TDG for Touch down geometry, which they do also in an e-bike version:
http://www.tuesdaycycles.com/bikes/cruisers/august/august-live-mens

Fuji has also gotten back into the e-bike business, and will be coming out with a number of e-bike models in 2018.

Right now they do offer a crank forward or what they call pedal forward ebike too...
http://www.fujibikes.com/usa/bikes/cruiser-comfort/beach-cruiser/sanibel

http://www.fujibikes.com/usa/bikes/cruiser-comfort/beach-cruiser/sanibel/sanibel
Priced reasonably at $1399.

Fuji is owned by the same company that also owns Tuesday Cycles, Kestrel Bikes, SEBikes, Breezer Bikes, Oval Concepts, and Phat Cycles. Advanced Sports is the parent company of all of these. or ASI.

For Pedal Forward designs, consider Firmstrong bikes, and put conversion kits on them for clients.
Firmstrong CA520 with a Magnum 500 Watt motor, and 13 AH battery. Has nice wide tires, very comfortable seat, and pedal forward geometry.

PaulGee
4 weeks ago

I also test rode the Como 2.0 at the Philly Bike Expo. Court's review is spot on. I was impressed with the looks, build quality, comfort, and handling of this bike. The seat and upright position were very comfortable. The tuning of the Brose motor IMO is perfect for this cruiser-style bike. It had plenty of zip and the bike (L size) was noticeably lighter than the similar step-thru (L size) commuter-style Vado bike (most likely because it lacks the front suspension fork). It would make a great recreational bike for paved roads and hard packed bike paths. I liked the ride and handling on the Como better than the Vado but both are very nice bikes.

rich c
1 month ago

What a fun ride! Bent back handlebars, upright riding position, and a cushy seat. What a fun cruiser! On that section of the trail, there is an elevated bridge. So hitting the 19mph limit was an annoyance because it felt like it was hunting around a little. But for my city cruising speed of 15-16, quite nice. Going to have to give this one some more thought. Too bad the 3.0 only comes in black, love the platinum/black paint.

Rooster
1 month ago

The American Flyer E Wave S looks like it uses the same frames, batteries, and motor as the Juiced OceanCurrent but costs $100 more sold through CA or AZ dealers who sell similar styled pedal bicycle cruiser frames. The specs don't mention a torque sensor, only a cadence sensor, but it has the same 104 pulse rate and three bolts above the rear drive side drop-out where the sensor is located so probably is in fact the same.
Can't remember where I saw it but I have seen the same bike for 900 and something dollars brand new. Same exact bike as the ocean current under a different brand. Something stinks about that.

Dewey
1 month ago

The American Flyer E Wave S looks like it uses the same frames, batteries, and motor as the Juiced OceanCurrent but costs $100 more sold through CA or AZ dealers who sell similar styled pedal bicycle cruiser frames. The specs don't mention a torque sensor, only a cadence sensor, but it has the same 104 pulse rate and three bolts above the rear drive side drop-out where the sensor is located so probably is in fact the same.

Kysos
1 month ago

I've been pedaling a non-electric, crank -forward Fuji for years, but age is catching up with me. The geometry that allows me to place my feet firmly on the ground when needed is even more important to me now in my early eighties. I need an electric version. What category do these bikes fall in? EBR doesn't seem to make it clear. Is it "cruiser" or "comfort" or something else?
And which electric bikes have this geometry? The only one I've found is the Electra Townie Go, which is actually higher adjusted for me than it should be - not really a "flat foot" in my opinion, and has fatter tires than I like for pedaling. Are there other electric bikes out there with the crank-forward geometry?
Any help will be much appreciated. Thanks.

I know that Magnum has a Cruiser that is crank forward, it looks pretty nice.

https://electricbikereview.com/magnum/cruiser/#/

Keith Lee

indianajo
1 month ago

Sorry about the cancer. Enjoy yourself while you heal or plan.
Body size, leg legnth, back length, arm length, weight matter. Proposed posture matters, forward for efficiency, straight up for comfort. There are bike frame sizing programs on line, use one to pick a frame size, and rise. Some frames come only in one size, that size may not fit you. Top speed matters, length of trips between charges, roughness of pavement or softness of beach sand determine your desired wheel and tire size. Maximum grade matters, mine is 15%, pretty radical. I draw 750 W on the display up those if I start too slow, but 400 W if I hit 15% at >5 mph. Type of mount on the motorhome matters. There are ramp up devices, there are cable lifts from the ladder, there is lift it yourself. Choose now.
For example, I'm 67, needed a e-ride home 30 miles from summer camp if injured (no phone, no car). Plus occasional festival rides of 80 miles round trip without charge. I'm miniature, with short legs, so I was able to take a ninety's kid's 10 speed cruiser and convert it with a powr wheel for $600 (for the 80 mile range battery). 26"x1.9" tires are fine on our roads. Bigger people have to pony up for a bigger frame which will not be at the charity resale shop. Higher speeds than my typical 10 mph indicate suspension built into the frame. My frame is rigid. Snow or sand indicates big tires, 3 or 4". Ultra smooth pavement allows tiny wheels, 16"x 1.5". I wanted pedal assist plus throttle only, since if injured (pulled muscle or tendon) I don't want to pedal. On festival excursions, I can extend range by pedalling. Whatever NYC/California are requiring don't matter to me. If I break a leg the police tell me my $8/mo cell phone will call an ambulance, otherwise Verison service is $70 a month. Park riding in CA or MA or other "civilized" states may dictate no throttle. Stealth batteries and no visible motor may cut number of encounters with park rangers.
Nuvinci 380 is reported to have trouble with higher power motors, it was designed in the leg powered era. Some oil leaks reported under maintenance. I like the idea of 380; the detent shifting of Shimano 7 speed derailleur has given me a big cyst above my thumb tendon. I tried Sturmey-Archer S80 IGH, it has a reliability problem with the shifter cable mount. But the twist grip SA shifter is making my cyst go down. Nivinci is twist grip shifting.
Have fun shopping.

Neil Shadle
1 month ago

I've been pedaling a non-electric, crank -forward Fuji for years, but age is catching up with me. The geometry that allows me to place my feet firmly on the ground when needed is even more important to me now in my early eighties. I need an electric version. What category do these bikes fall in? EBR doesn't seem to make it clear. Is it "cruiser" or "comfort" or something else?
And which electric bikes have this geometry? The only one I've found is the Electra Townie Go, which is actually higher adjusted for me than it should be - not really a "flat foot" in my opinion, and has fatter tires than I like for pedaling. Are there other electric bikes out there with the crank-forward geometry?
Any help will be much appreciated. Thanks.

Mark Peralta
1 month ago

Looks like a great choice! Wondering how the fit is? I see Piaggio is offering only two sizes in the Active line, M, L > 50, 55 cm. Wondering how the fit is for you? I usually ride a 60cm so it looks like the Piggios would be too small for me.
Get the active line with the MTB handle bars having longer reach (not the cruiser bars of the comfort line). That can accommodate taller riders.

Rooster
1 month ago

Yes he can of course, actually the OceanCurrent can easily take a front electric hub driven motor; maybe another five hundred watt motor in the front to give oneself two wheel drive for a combined total 1,000 watts of electric hub driven e-biking; one could even re-use the front brake inhibitors, disc brake rotors, disc brake calipers and front brake levers; though one could definitely probably use a second additional 12.8ah lithium ion battery pack mounted to an additional front rack; well if one really had the "need for speed"; with that said it is definitely not impossible but highly doable and would definitely make ones Juiced Bikes OceanCurrent; now as a result it would be the first officially certified one kilowatt electric motor pedalac infused "beach cruiser" styled Juiced Bikes "1Kw e-bike" floating along on its massive classic looking 2.35" big balloon Schwalbe "Fat Frank" beach cruiser whitewall tires; violating all known laws of cycling propulsion physics naturally of course as it flies by like a speed demon!
Yes but this ocean current already has vee tire co. Speedster 2.80x26 fat tires and looks the roll

daniel58
1 month ago

Other than the problems I have had with trying to upgrade I must say that I am quite happy with my ocean current. Very good design just would like a little more power but I guess one can't have everything, or can he?

Yes he can of course, actually the OceanCurrent can easily take a front electric hub driven motor; maybe another five hundred watt motor in the front to give oneself two wheel drive for a combined total 1,000 watts of electric hub driven e-biking; one could even re-use the front brake inhibitors, disc brake rotors, disc brake calipers and front brake levers; though one could definitely probably use a second additional 12.8ah lithium ion battery pack mounted to an additional front rack; well if one really had the "need for speed"; with that said it is definitely not impossible but highly doable and would definitely make ones Juiced Bikes OceanCurrent; now as a result it would be the first officially certified one kilowatt electric motor pedalac infused "beach cruiser" styled Juiced Bikes "1Kw e-bike" floating along on its massive classic looking 2.35" big balloon Schwalbe "Fat Frank" beach cruiser whitewall tires; violating all known laws of cycling propulsion physics naturally of course as it flies by like a speed demon!

bFlattheOriginal
2 days ago

This bike is much improved over its predecessor, the CD5, and $400 less, so kudos to Magnum for going in the right direction. The only problem is, the few Magnum dealers in my city are on the other side of town, so the dealer argument is out the window unless one closer to me decides to carry the brand.

Hawsrule Begin
3 months ago

Good to see less expensive bikes being reviewed. Would be great to get your reviews on cheaper bikes, for instance the ones you get on eBay from China.

Chris Collier
3 months ago

So many steep city hills around the capitol

luis fernando
3 months ago

Nice review could you tell me how miles does it tim before go empty thamks

Plumetheum
3 months ago

Eh? Not as much of a ripoff as other ebikes (Looking at you Faraday with the 3000$ 250 watt bike....) But still a ripoff. You get 500 watts of power for 2100$ And maybe 25 miles of range if you're economical.. While I built a 1600 watt bike with 45 miles of range.(60V 24.5 ah battery) Its lighter, and like a thousand bucks less. Don't waste your money on brand name ebikes people! Build your own kick ass DIY bike.

Andrew Hunter
4 months ago

Ups hope you didn't scratch it

john white
4 months ago

Another great video review ! All explained very well.

Mike Banzhoff
4 months ago

So many bikes reviewed, so many choices. Do you compare bikes on your website? E bikes seem great those of us in our 60's. Looking for something for trails and County roads and maybe less than $2k, with some level of support from the manufacturer. Fenders could be keep us old folks dry. Realistic? 750 watts important?

Dooneegomaface Ifinnaspring
3 months ago

You should be able to get a fully featured and powerful bike with your budget, no worries there. You'll be kicking you some ass. Pull the trigger on it and enjoy this Autumn!

Mike Banzhoff
4 months ago

Dooneegomaface Ifinnaspring Thanks for the information, want to find out as much as I can before making a purchase.

Dooneegomaface Ifinnaspring
4 months ago

You need a 500 watt motor and 48 volt 10+ah battery to a have pleasant e-bike to ride. I'm an active rider and I wouldn't want any less power.

Alex NC
4 months ago

It's cool that these smaller companies are allowing different speed settings. The new Juiced bike has all kinds of advanced settings where the user can set the speed of the bike at home. I wish Trek and Haibike would allow that

Andri Egilsson
4 months ago

I wish you'd start doing shorter videos. Sub 5 minute videos.

Smurdle450
4 weeks ago

The whole idea i think is so he can get all the details in. I like the in-depth.

Jessa Phillips
4 months ago

2 questions... first is the other bike using the same setup as far as having 20 mph throttle mode and 28 mph pedal assist mode? the other question is did they tell you the range on throttle only mode vs pedal assist?

Dooneegomaface Ifinnaspring
3 months ago

No cyclist would ever use the throttle. The pedal assist is absolute domination of your roads. Especially for 20+mph bikes like this bad boy. If you want throttle than get you a gas scooter.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 months ago

Hi Jessa! Yes, they both operate the same way and I have a full review on the Metro here: https://electricbikereview.com/magnum/metro-step-thru/ it's the step-thru version but I showed the Metro+ high-step in this video, they use the same drive system. As for range, I estimate between 25 and 60 miles, maybe even 30 to 60 miles because the pack is quite large... but it really depends on how you use it and what the terrain is like. I usually make a rough estimate by dividing the battery watt hours by 20 like 624/20=31.2 miles as a rough start. Mid-drive vs. hub motor, throttle vs. assist, even the tire type and bike weight all come into play

Phil Eyers
4 months ago

That will have the hidden menu based Max speed and Max pedal assist speed overrides.

Smurdle450
4 weeks ago

To enter the programming menu you can hit plus/minus at the same time, where you can dial up/down the top speeds.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 months ago

Cool, do you know how that works?

dmnguyen15
4 months ago

Man, I hope they bring the Shimano 8-speed and the Daskit C7 to the Premium Folder. Ugh, Interbike seems so close and so far away!!

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 months ago

Yeah, I think it makes a lot of sense to share systems... I'm excited for Interbike as well, have a lot to post before then, a couple more from Magnum actually

Torian Allen
4 months ago

Man, you look like you're having so much fun. This does look like a really good bike though. Honestly man, I've already decided on my bike, it was the Specialized you did a while back. I just watch you now for the pure entertainment. Your videos are great.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 months ago

I've been thinking about that... most of my footage is shot with a steadycam so people don't get sick, it allows me to walk around and film, but in order to livestream I'd need an internet connection, like a phone, and the reception concerns me, and being able to use a portable camera with limited battery life etc. I'm not sure it's worth it without compromising the footage? I haven't done it before, do you have nay advice on how to make this work?

James Mason
4 months ago

ElectricBikeReview.com you should try to live stream at inter bike

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 months ago

Ha! Thanks Torian, I'm glad the videos are entertaining. Got a whole bunch more on the way, this last trip was packed with bikes in SF, Vancouver, Seattle, and Salt Lake City... and then LA at the open house. Trying to make some progress on it all before Interbike ;)

CLOTHED IN SHADOWS.
4 months ago

Do most of the ebike companies featured in your videos have foreign motors or American motors ? .

"CLOTHED IN SHADOWS"👤

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 months ago

I'm not sure if any of them have American made motors? I think a lot of it comes from China and Taiwan but some frames are from Vietnam (possibly Haibike)

Daniel S.
4 months ago

Awesome entry shot man. Nice video again.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 months ago

Thanks, it's a beautiful location. I had never been to the Utah Capitol Building before :)

Blair Frost
4 months ago

Yo Cort you doing anything with ur electric ride review channel vs electric bike review?

Blair Frost
4 months ago

ElectricBikeReview.com yes definitely if it means boosting up your ride channel

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 months ago

Hi Blair! Funny you should ask, I connected with a guy named Brent last yesterday and he may be doing some videos for that. I'm overloaded with ebikes and he already has a channel comparing scooters and skateboards, what do you think? Should I open it up and let him make some posts?

Mr Jhonny
4 months ago

8th like

Mr Jhonny
4 months ago

ElectricBikeReview.com Not a problem!!! I have a subscriber and liked your videos since 2015!!!!

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 months ago

Nice, thanks for the like!

Chauncey Smith
4 months ago

Looks like its a fun ride. I have to put it on the shopping list.

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 months ago

Haha! I'm guessing your list has grown pretty big in recent years Chauncey ;)

Funny TV
4 months ago

What a cool bike!

ElectricBikeReview.com
4 months ago

Yeah, I like the way this one looks, the body position is great too