Magnum Metro+ Review

Magnum Metro Plus Electric Bike Review
Magnum Metro Plus
Magnum Metro Plus 500 Watt Planetary Geared Ebike Hub Motor
Magnum Metro Plus 48 Volt 13 Amp Hour Battery
Magnum Metro Plus Ergonomic Grips Das Kit Display Panel
Magnum Metro Plus Sr Suntour Nex Spring Suspension Fork
Magnum Metro Plus Tektro Auriga Hydraulic Disc Brakes 180 Mm
Magnum Metro Plus Custom Aluminum Rear Rack With Bungee Straps
Magnum Metro Plus 8 Speed Shimano Acera
Magnum Metro Plus External 18 Amp Motor Controller And Kickstand
Magnum Metro Plus 2 Amp Ebike Charger
Magnum Metro Plus Electric Bike Review
Magnum Metro Plus
Magnum Metro Plus 500 Watt Planetary Geared Ebike Hub Motor
Magnum Metro Plus 48 Volt 13 Amp Hour Battery
Magnum Metro Plus Ergonomic Grips Das Kit Display Panel
Magnum Metro Plus Sr Suntour Nex Spring Suspension Fork
Magnum Metro Plus Tektro Auriga Hydraulic Disc Brakes 180 Mm
Magnum Metro Plus Custom Aluminum Rear Rack With Bungee Straps
Magnum Metro Plus 8 Speed Shimano Acera
Magnum Metro Plus External 18 Amp Motor Controller And Kickstand
Magnum Metro Plus 2 Amp Ebike Charger

Summary

  • A sturdy high-step commuter style electric bike offering up to 28 mph pedal assist and 20 mph throttle on demand, uses the same 500 watt motor and 48 volt battery as Magnum's Peak mountain bike
  • Mid-level eight speed drivetrain with Shimano Acera derailleur, metal guard protects the derailleur and motor cable in the back and an alloy chainring protector keeps your pants clean along with sturdy alloy fenders
  • An integrated headlight and stand-alone rear light keep you visible but have to be activated independently, large reflective tires from Schwalbe are e-bike specific, providing increased air volume for comfort and a puncture protection layer
  • Tool-free adjustable angle stem, ergonomic grips, basic spring suspension fork and suspension seat post make the ride more comfortable, large hydraulic disc brakes with adjustable levers are powerful and easy to use which is important given the heavier 59 lb curb weight

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Magnum

Model:

Metro+

Price:

$1,999

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Urban, Commuting

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2), Speed Pedalec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States, Canada, New Zealand, Israel

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

59.2 lbs (26.85 kg)

Battery Weight:

9.2 lbs (4.17 kg)

Motor Weight:

10.1 lbs (4.58 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

19 in (48.26 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

19" Seat Tube, 22.75" Reach, 29" Stand Over Height, 24.25" Width, 73" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Satin Black with Blue Accents, Satin White with Blue Accents

Frame Fork Details:

SR Suntour NEX Spring Suspension, 63 mm Travel, Preload Adjust (Under the Plastic Caps), 100 mm Hub Length, 9 mm Skewer with Quick Release

Frame Rear Details:

142 mm Hub Length, 11 mm Axle with Nuts

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses

Gearing Details:

8 Speed 1x8 Shimano Acera Derailleur, 11-32T Cassette

Shifter Details:

Shimano Triggers on Right

Cranks:

Prowheel Ounce, Forged Alloy, 170 mm Length, Square Taper Bottom Bracket, 48 Tooth Chainring with Alloy Guard

Pedals:

Wellgo Aluminum Alloy Platform, Black

Headset:

Neco Tapered 1-1/8" to 1-1/2" Threadless Internal Cups

Stem:

Promax Tool-Free Adjustable Angle, 100 mm Length, 25.4 Clamp Diameter

Handlebar:

Low-Rise, Aluminum Alloy, 610 mm Length

Brake Details:

Tektro Auriga Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Rotors, Dual-Piston Calipers, Three-Finger Levers with Motor Inhibitors

Grips:

Imitation Leather, Ergonomic, Stitched

Saddle:

Selle Royal Royalgel, Imitation Leather

Seat Post:

Promax Suspension (40 mm Travel), Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

340 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy, Double Walled, 36 Hole

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 13 Gauge, Silver with Adjustable Nipples

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Marathon, 700 x 38c, (28" x 1.5"), (40-622)

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

50 to 85 PSI, 3.5 to 6.0 BAR, E-Bike Ready 50, Reflective Sidewall Stripes, Performance Line GreenGuard

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Flick Bell, Custom Rear Rack with Pannier Blockers and Triple Bungee (25 kg 55 lb Max Weight), Black Aluminum Alloy Fenders with Mud Flaps, Integrated Spanninga Kendo+ Headlight, Independent Spanninga Solo Back Light (2 AAA Batteries), Sticker Slap Guard, Center-Mount Single Side Adjustable Length Kickstand, Steel Derailleur Guard

Other:

Locking Removable Downtube Mounted Battery Pack, 9 Mosfet 18 Amp Current Controller, 1.5 lb 2 Amp Charger, Sine Wave Controller

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Das-Kit

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts

Motor Peak Output:

700 watts

Motor Torque:

90 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung, DLG, Panasonic

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

13 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

624 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium Nickel Cobalt Manganese (Li-NCM)

Charge Time:

6.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Estimated Max Range:

60 miles (97 km)

Display Type:

Das-Kit C7, Fixed, Backlit, Monochrome LCD

Readouts:

Power Output Indicator (6 Ticks), Assist Level (0-6), Speed, Odometer, Timer, Trip 1, Trip 2, BMS Voltage, Battery Level (6 Bars)

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad (Power, Set, +, -), (Press Power Button for Display Backligt, Hold Minus Button for Walk Mode)

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Trigger Throttle

Top Speed:

28 mph (45 kph) (20 MPH Throttle, Adjustable)

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Written Review

The Magnum Metro Plus electric bike is a high powered city commuter, complete with aluminum alloy fenders, LED lights, and a compact rear rack. If you have been the full range of Magnum products, it’s essentially a souped up high-step version of the Magnum Ui5 and comes with 180 mm hydraulic disc brakes vs. mechanical, a 500 watt nominal motor vs. 350 watt, a 48 volt battery vs. 36 volt and a nicer drivetrain (gears, derailleur, and shifter). For a price that’s $300 more here, you get a boost in power and performance but overall range might end up being similar because the zippy motor draws more energy, and it’s also a heavier bike by ~7.5 lbs at ~59 lbs total. If you need the power for climbing, hauling extra weight, or just like the feel of going fast (this is a Class 3 speed pedelec, capable of ~28 mph assisted speeds after all) then this would be the best choice. In some ways, $300 doesn’t seem like that much money to spend beyond the Ui5, but it is almost 18% more (compare the Ui5 priced at $1,699 vs. the Metro Step-Thru and Metro+ models priced at $1,999). It’s fun to compare these e-bikes side by side, but now I’m going to focus in on what the Metro+ offers and how it runs. This is a versatile product that could be used for neighborhood riding, grocery getting, or city commuting. The high-step frame is large and sturdy, only available in one size, but has a sloping top tube to slightly lower stand-over height. Much of the added weight is positioned low and center on the frame vs. towards the back like other electric bikes with rack mounted battery packs. the cargo rack here is completely open for a trunk bag or panniers and even comes with a triple-bungee strap! One consideration however, is that the rack is closer to the seat post and might position a trunk bag directly below the saddle verses further back and out of the way. You get Aluminum fenders that don’t rattle a whole lot and the rubber mud flaps at the ends provide more coverage without getting bent or scratched as easily. It’s feature rich, but not all of the features and accessories are perfect. The rear light, for example, is not wired in to the battery pack. Both lights must be activated by hand vs. using the display panel and it’s easy to forget to turn them off (you literally have to turn them off, even the front one). However, because they appear to be basic single-LED lights without super bright beams, they probably won’t draw as much power and this gripe doesn’t amount to much more than inconvenience. Another gripe is the kickstand position, which is directly below the bottom bracket where it can collide with the left crank arm if you back the bike up without stowing it first. It’s something that bugs me on a lot of ebikes but again, isn’t much more than an annoyance… and at least this stand offers some adjustability in length. I like the comfort upgrades including a fairly basic suspension fork and seat post suspension, the Selle Royal gel saddle feels nice. The matching ergonomic grips, while hard, are thicker and nicer to hold than some skinny rubber ones if you have larger hands (which I’m assuming because this is the larger of the two Metro models). Saddle height is adjustable and the mid-rise handlebar can be positioned up or out to suit your reach and body position preference (relaxed or aggressive). If you’re on the fence about having to lift your leg way up and over this high-step model or are more average height, the Metro step-thru uses smaller 26″ wheels vs. 28″ here which further lowers the frame but raises the attack angle and might not be as efficient when rolling (though it does weigh about one pound less). In most ways, the two models are very similar and I believe that both come in either black or white and look gorgeous. The black paint hides the motor, battery box, and black wires better but won’t be as visible at night. For me, this product is priced at the point point where you could opt to spend another $500 and get a mid-drive, but many of them do not have trigger throttles or high-speed 28 mph operation. Magnum has done an excellent job outfitting, styling, and pricing this bike in my opinion and they have a growing network of dealers around the US, Israel, New Zealand, and Canada. I appreciate the dealer relationship a lot because it means the bike will be setup and tuned properly, serviced (under the 1 year Magnum warranty), and you can grab some accessories with the money you might save… but for those who live in remote places or simply prefer delivery, they do sell through their official site.

Driving the Metro Plus is a 500 watt nominal, 750 watt peak, internally geared hub motor from Das-Kit. This is a semi-new brand to me verses the 8Fun motor on the Ui5. It’s the same company that makes the display panel, which works very well here, and in practice I felt the motor performed well too. It produces a familiar electronic whir at high levels of power but the control unit on the bike puts out up to 18 amps using a pure sine wave vs. square signal which means it’s smoother and zippier. This is what I was told at least, along with a peak torque rating of 90 Newton meters which feels misleading compared to most other hub motors that are rated around 40 Nm. It did climb well for me and I was able to start easily from standstill in grass, but I only weigh ~135 lbs. You can definitely stall the hub motor out if you completely stop the bike and try to start on a medium steep incline. Hub motors are at their best when they have a bit of momentum going because they can’t leverage and benefit from your cassette the way mid-motors can… however, they don’t complicate the drivetrain and cause wear the way that many mid-drives do. In practice, I enjoyed the smooth acceleration and general feeling of power and control that this electric bike offered. The trigger throttle (placed on the left side of the handlebar due to a more basic shifter with a window on the right) was useful for accelerating after a stop sign or traffic signal. It all worked as expected but was definitely smoother and more refined than some of the cheaper products out there. I love that the throttle can be pressed very gently for slower speeds too, and that it overrides assist and is basically always active. On that note, be careful when mounting and dismounting the bike, always turn it off so you don’t bump the throttle accidentally. When not using the variable speed throttle, you rely on a high definition cadence sensor that listens for crank arm movement and sends an on/off signal with the allotted power that you choose. There are six levels of assist with a zero level if you don’t want any pedal response, and again, all levels can be overridden with full power by the throttle. It’s my ideal setup as a more advanced rider. For me, it’s nice to have a throttle to get going and then a cadence sensor (or advanced multi-sensor) to stay going vs. torque only because I don’t enjoy pushing hard all of the time. Cadence sensors are more like on/off switches and they send as much or as little power as you select vs. listening to how you are actually pedaling. Before moving on… one thing worth noting is that the rear axle is connected to the bike with nuts vs. the front which uses a quick release skewer. This is because the power cable running to the hub motor goes in through the axle and there’s more force at the rear so the axle is thicker (ll mm vs. 9 mm up front). If for some reason you end up with a flat rear tire, there’s more effort required to get the wheel off and change the tube. Thankfully, the tires on this bike have puncture protection lining, just make sure you keep them inflated between the recommended 50 to 85 PSI so you don’t get a “snake bite” on the inner tube from the rim bitting into the rubber when going over bumps and curbs.

Charging the bike is fairly easy, you can fill the battery pack on or off the frame, and it locks onto the downtube with a secure key. I like that the locking core springs automatically to “locked” so you don’t have to guess and will always know it’s protected. Magnum seems to use a similar charger for all of their electric bikes and it puts out 2 Amps which is average… and maybe a little slow considering the capacity of this battery. The pack weighs 9.2 lbs (4.17 kg) all on it’s own and I would highly recommend taking it off of the bike before you try to lift or transport it. Expect upwards of six hours for a full charge if you empty the pack, the first half will fill much faster than the second because the cells will need to balance out. The battery is well protected when mounted to the frame but the charging port is a bit exposed to letting the charger cable snag on the left crank arm. Try to avoid this because if the charger gets tripped over or the crank arm bends the plug port it could damage the battery pack. Towards the top right section of the battery is a 5 Volt USB port which you can use to fill portable electronic devices while riding. It’s positioned mostly out of the way but I would still consider a right angle adapter from Amazon like this if you plan to use it frequently, and then maybe zip tie your wires to stay out of the way while leaving enough slack at the stem for turning (so it doesn’t pull the cable out). That controller, by the way, is exposed at the base of the downtube and I was told that it puts out more Amps and might overheat if contained inside the tubing like most other electric bikes. I think it looks okay, but is slight more exposed to water and bumps. I haven’t heard any complaints from customers in the forums and believe that for a city bike, it’s probably a non-issue (most ebikes do fine in rain and wet conditions as long as you aren’t submerging them and this bike probably isn’t going to encounter the rough conditions of mountain bike trails).

Once the battery has been filled and you’re ready for some electric riding, just hold the power button on the little control pad near the left grip. It activates the display and you get several readouts including assist level, current speed, and battery capacity. Pressing power one time will activate backlighting on the LCD display and holding the down arrow constantly will activate walk mode (which can be handy if you need to to ascend a ramp, make your way through a walk-only space, or even climb stairs). The display can show different menus if you press the set button, and depending on your preferences for speed or the geography you live in, Magnum dealers can lower the top speed to 20 mph or less by using a password. I like the size and position of the display, you can even angle it forward and back to reduce reflection glare, but it is not removable. For those who plan on commuting, it might be worth strapping your helmet over the display to keep people from noticing or scratching it, and also protecting it from the sun, while parked at racks. And now back to the gripes about the lights not being activated by the display. Every time you want to use them, you basically have to get off of the bike and press a rubber button to get them on. This isn’t super fun, the headlight can be bumped out of position easily, may bounce up and down as you ride because it’s mounted to the arch vs. suspended above the fork, and the backlight has to have its triple-A batteries replaced every once in a while as they will eventually run down vs. being rechargeable like the main battery. Overall, I would still call this display panel and accompanying button pad above average, I love that it can be angled to reduce glare and feel that it looks beautiful and is well sealed against water… but to clean the bike it is recommended to use a damp cloth vs. spraying it. Don’t ever submerge the bike components or spray them hard. Also, consider storing the battery pack away from extreme heat and cold to protect the cells.

In my view Magnum offers a lot of value with this product and the price is very reasonable for the hardware and service on offer, you get a slap guard to protect the nice paint from the chain, a larger tapered head tube for strength (and they tend to allow for nicer forks to be swapped in if you ever wanted to upgrade), and those hydraulic disc brakes with adjustable reach levers are very nice. That’s a big deal for hand fatigue and for stopping a heavier, faster electric bike. Even though the suspension fork doesn’t lock out, there is some preload adjust if you take the plastic caps off and click both of the adjusters evenly. I picture heavier riders on this bike and would love a lockout to prevent dive when stopping and bob when pedaling, so the suspension fork wold be nicer if it had lockout. I love the Wellgo platform pedals used here because they are larger and sturdier feeling than many cage style pedals and plastic pedals, but I do wish that in addition to the chainring protector, there was a second plate on the inside of the chainring to create a guide which would reduce chain drops. I did not have an issue with chain drops on this review but the chain was off before I hopped on the bike and I’m not sure why, maybe it bounced off during transport? I have dropped chains before, especially on bumpy terrain and when riding faster. It can be annoying and dirty to correct, but it’s just part of the cycling experience sometimes. At least the Alloy chainring protector that you do get, will keep your pant or dress clear of the greasy chain. It’s nice to have help setting the bike up and then tuning it as the shifter cables stretch over time, and this is where the dealer network comes in. The 8-Speed Shimano Acera drivetrain is solid (several steps up from entry level) and I appreciate the more refined trigger shifters here vs. a large oversized thumb shifter on the Ui5 and other cheaper products. For commuting purposes, I would get a trunk bag and maybe some panniers to carry my work supplies, note that both wheels are spoked with thicker 13 gauge spokes and have 36 holes vs. 32 on the rims for added strength. Another interesting feature is that if you press the plus or minus buttons on the display continuously, they cycle all the way around, so you can go from zero to six in just one click. It was neat to see a couple of different models back to back for this review, especially since they share similar drive systems. I’d like to thank Magnum for partnering with me on this post and hanging out for the shoot. Cory helped explain how the suspension could be adjusted, which was new to me. As always, I welcome your feedback and comments, you can also connect directly with other owners and potential customers in the Magnum electric bike forums here.

Pros:

  • The hub motor used on the Metro+ is the same one that Magnum chose for its Peak electric mountain bikes! It offers a lot of torque and zip for climbing that makes this urban ebike feel more powerful than many others in the space
  • Great overall aesthetic, the black frame blends perfectly with the black motor, battery box, fork, stem, handlebar, cranks, pedals etc. and allows the cables and wires to disappear a bit, I like the matching faux leather grips and saddle too
  • Comfort is an important consideration when riding electric bikes because they tend to take you further and keep you at higher overall speeds, so I love that the Metro+ has a suspension fork, suspension seat post, tool-free adjustable angle stem, gel saddle, and ergonomic grips!
  • The drivetrain on this electric bike is well protected, notice the aluminum alloy bash guard on the chainring (which will help keep your pants clean and snag-free) and the derailleur guard at the back (which protects the derailleur and motor power cable), I feel that a full chain guide would have prevented chain drops… but overall this is pretty good
  • Safety is a very important issue to me, especially on a black bicycle that is designed for urban use, so I love that you get a headlight and back light as well as reflective tires and a bell with the Metro+
  • The battery pack and front wheel are easy to take off, which could help reduce weight for transport and make maintenance easier, unfortunately the display panel is not removable and could take more weather wear and scratching at the bike rack
  • Long aluminum alloy fenders with mud flaps will keep you relatively dry and clean, I appreciate the larger alloy pedals here which will reduce slipping and allow for better contact and power transfer
  • Two drive modes to work with here, you can pedal along with cadence sensing pedal assist that doesn’t require force to activate or take a rest and use the trigger throttle which overrides any level of assist for instant power, it’s a good setup for people who need help starting or want to focus on balance and ride around more like a scooter
  • This frame is bit taller, longer, and stiffer than the regular Magnum Metro which offers a step-thru geometry, it’s nice that the high-step Metro+ still offers an angled top tube to reduce stand-over height, the high-step diamond design is going to be more rigid (reducing frame flex with a fully loaded rack)
  • Wider range of gears with an 8-speed cassette and upgraded Shimano Acera derailleur, it’s going to provide more comfortable pedaling options than a 7-speed and hold up better between tuneups
  • I feel that the pricepoint on this electric bicycle is very good considering the powerful motor, high capacity 48 volt battery and large 180 mm hydraulic disc brakes with adjustable-reach levers and motor inhibitors
  • The cadence sensor on this e-bike is very compact and well protected, it seems more sealed than the older discs with visible magnetic dots and might hold up better in dusty, wet, or muddy conditions
  • This bike can be setup as a Class 3 speed pedelec with maximum assisted speeds of close to 28 miles per hour! That’s a nice option for people who commute and want to save time, the throttle always tops out around 20 mph and I believe that pedal assist can also be lowered to 20 mph if you want
  • The 700c (28-inch) wheel size is more efficient, provides rolling momentum and a lower attack angle, and allows for increased air volume, the Schwalbe Marathon tires are e-bike specific and provide better puncture protection than generic tires
  • The battery has a standard USB Type A port near the top right corner which can power your phone or other portable electronics on or off the bike, if you use this while riding, be careful with any wires that are plugged in so they don’t get caught and bent, consider a right angle USB adapter like this

Cons:

  • The kickstand they chose works well enough, and offers adjustable length, but is positioned at the bottom bracket vs. further back on the left chain stay, this can result in the left crank arm colliding if you back the bike up and just annoying, a rear mounted kickstand would have also offered more support for a loaded rack
  • This isn’t a huge complaint, but I noticed the motor controller isn’t built into the frame or battery as seamlessly here as it is on most other electric bikes, Magnum told me that this helps it stay cool and the metal casing did seem tough, at least it’s protected by the front fender and you get a pure sine wave conversion for smoother and quieter motor operation
  • I love that the bike comes with lights, but only the headlight is integrated (running off of the rechargeable bike battery), the rear light requires two AAA batteries and is easier to forget – which could leave you dark from behind or wear the battery down if you forget to turn it off, the headlight is also positioned on the bridge of the suspension fork which travels up and down and could cause it to bounce around and create a less consistent beam in some situations
  • I mostly like the rear rack design, which has pannier blockers, uses standard gauge tubing that will work with most clip-on bags, and comes with the triple-bungee strap, but it does sit nearly directly below the saddle which could get in the way of a trunk bag… some alternative racks are positioned further back to make space for the saddle
  • It appears that there was not enough room to squeeze in bottle cage bosses on this electric bike, that means you will need to wear a hydration pack, get a cup holder handlebar mount, or use a trunk bag with a bottle holster
  • Minor gripe, the rubber cap that covers the charge port on the lower left side of the battery pack can sometimes be difficult to seat, this port is also very close to the left crank arm and your wire or the connector could get snagged and bent if you are charging the battery when mounted to the bike and accidentally bump the pedals… it’s sort of like the kickstand issue, it’s just a little bit more vulnerable here

Resources:

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P E
1 week ago

Hi Court, I have this bike and I have maxed out the settings to achieve the highest speed while pedaling. The best I could do was 24 mph. Then again, I weigh 226 lbs, and that could be a factor. So I am curious which speed you were able to achieve with this bike? Real-world speed do not always match the advertised speed.

Reply
Court Rye
1 week ago

Hmm, that’s great feedback P E. I’m sorry that you haven’t been able to hit roughly 28 mph with the bike. Maybe it does have to do with weight or wind resistance if you’re a bigger person. I am relatively small and weigh ~135 lbs but I believe the companies test and rate bikes with a ~170 lb rider on perfectly flat paved streets with no wind. Have you asked Magnum? I believe I was able to get up to 27ish during tests with this and other models from them that use the same motor and battery pack. Thanks for your input! Maybe others will chime in too or you could engage more in the Magnum ebike forums.

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Reid
18 mins ago

Why I prefer drop bars on my road bikes. Naturally narrow and plenty of room for all the accessories I need. Plus more available hand positions for variety
So true. But, alas, I must ride upright and cannot ever be a road biker again. For many people a drop bar, even rotated upward, might be a great thing. It was to minimize the width, for squeezing by things, that I made my bar so short. I like the looks, too. It fits the bike. And like on a road bike, it certainly feels great to stand on the pedals when your grip is about shoulder width.

Another thing I am going to do, is a transplant of my existing Cygolite Metro 850 (it is brighter than the supplied headlight and has an effective, wide-beaming lenticular diffusor) to the fork top. I will hardwire its capsule to the CCS headlight power wire.

Afterthought: I have just enough room for all that I want on my handlebars. I don't want anything else on the bar. It is about as clean looking as it can be. We all please ourselves, that's what we are here for. To be happy with our respective choices. I really like your expertise, JRA.

Larger pedals, with replaceable pins and better bearings:

1/1
Mark Peralta
1 week ago

Mark,
I appreciate your responses. Its nice to get some real world info from people with ebike experience and understanding.
It seems that you are right on as far as doing a DD build as being the preferred route to go for high speed long distance commuting. I have been trying to educate myself in this area. A few questions if you don't mind.
The Grin site clearly states the 9C motors are of ??? build quality on the external housing creating some potential install issues, shims etc. Price point is only about $75 less than the MXUS motor. I would opt for the MXUS but I'd like to know if you have any insight?
Second the motors have options for standard or "fast" wiring. The site states the fast wiring is prefered on smaller wheels. However when putting them into the motor simulator, it shows higher speeds with with fast motor and lower temps. Obviously power usage is tied most closely to speed either way. I assume I will lose out on low speed torque with the fast wiring, which I am fine with as I am used to accelerating from a stop through the gears anyway. Am I missing something important here, or would I be better off with the "fast" wiring?
The grin site also refers to EM3EV for other battery options. That site clearly has lower pricing on the batteries, and also gives me an option of a 52V triangle pack with ~19 amp Hr rating. I have already read enough to be very wary of cheap batteries on the internet. Wondering what you know about the EM3EV batteries?
Thanks.
Also Magnum bikes has a shop here in Utah, I plan on trying to do a test ride on the Metro+ as soon as possible. I had decided on the Juiced over it, mainly for the bigger battery at the same price point. 13.5 vs 17.4 amp Hr. Otherwise they seem like very similar bikes.
You're right, MXUS is the better motor. If you intend to use it on roads only (not off-roads), then I would choose high speed wind combined with large wheel (700c) and put thick rubbers (2 inches or more). Battery in the triangle 52v 19ah would be ideal in your case. EM3EV is a reputable company.
--https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LZ3NGgx-Sgg
If you decide for Magnum, you may need to carry a spare battery. If you decide crosscurrent, it's wiser to choose the bigger battery right from the start (48V 21Ah).
Good luck.

By the way, statorade is heaven sent for all direct drive motors, it's a life saver on long uphills and it is dirt cheap, you should invest on it too.

Chris Hammond
1 week ago

Mark,
I appreciate your responses. Its nice to get some real world info from people with ebike experience and understanding.
It seems that you are right on as far as doing a DD build as being the preferred route to go for high speed long distance commuting. I have been trying to educate myself in this area. A few questions if you don't mind.
The Grin site clearly states the 9C motors are of ??? build quality on the external housing creating some potential install issues, shims etc. Price point is only about $75 less than the MXUS motor. I would opt for the MXUS but I'd like to know if you have any insight?
Second the motors have options for standard or "fast" wiring. The site states the fast wiring is prefered on smaller wheels. However when putting them into the motor simulator, it shows higher speeds with with fast motor and lower temps. Obviously power usage is tied most closely to speed either way. I assume I will lose out on low speed torque with the fast wiring, which I am fine with as I am used to accelerating from a stop through the gears anyway. Am I missing something important here, or would I be better off with the "fast" wiring?
The grin site also refers to EM3EV for other battery options. That site clearly has lower pricing on the batteries, and also gives me an option of a 52V triangle pack with ~19 amp Hr rating. I have already read enough to be very wary of cheap batteries on the internet. Wondering what you know about the EM3EV batteries?
Thanks.
Also Magnum bikes has a shop here in Utah, I plan on trying to do a test ride on the Metro+ as soon as possible. I had decided on the Juiced over it, mainly for the bigger battery at the same price point. 13.5 vs 17.4 amp Hr. Otherwise they seem like very similar bikes.

Mark Peralta
2 weeks ago

Mark, thanks for the info.
A few questions.
Does a direct drive hub offer enough benefits over a geared hub to overcome the weight penalty?
I had looked at the motor simulator page last night, and put in info on the Juiced bike. The graph looked remarkably similar to the one you showed. I probably should play with that page a bit.
Do you notice any significant ride-ability issues with having a very heavy rear wheel/ rotating mass?
I know you get regen capability with DD, but does this really help with battery life on a ride? I spend nearly all my time pedaling anyway.
Thanks for the info on the Grin systems. I had seen them mentioned over the last few weeks, but I hadn't looked at them at all. (Just what I needed, another viable option to mull over.o_O)
The DD's main advantage is durability if you intend to ride tens of thousands of miles since there are no gears to wear out inside (no maintenance needed). I don't feel the weight increase of the DD when riding since I mainly ride on the paved bike trails but I feel it when lifting to my car rack (additional 3 -5 pounds), esp with the rear biased weight distribution. For my kind of riding I don't see the weight penalty of my DD over my mid drive and I don't feel the "heavy rotating mass" at the back. The regen only extends range to maybe 3% (mine doesn't have regen) but the more tangible benefit of the regen is the braking part which significantly extends the life of your brake pads.

Here is another resource information on building ebikes with various power categories.
https://www.electricbike.com/12-kit-power-levels-360w-to-8000w/

ADDENDUM:

You might also be interested on this $2k fully assembled speed pedelec with warranty.

https://electricbikereview.com/magnum/metro-plus/

mhs7386
2 weeks ago

HELP: Would appreciate thoughts on buying my first e-bike. It MUST be from a local shop as I like to support local businesses, prefer to deal with a human in person, and I’m not handy.
So, from those carried locally what are your thoughts on the Electra Townie Go!, Magnum Peak and Mangum +, and the iZip E3 Dash.
Thanks!

For the most bang for the buck, I went for a Magnum Metro+. The Juiced Bike is very similar but I went for Magnum only because it's an older (?) more established company than Juiced.
Also, when I was doing research, I try to keep in mind on what I have to add to the bike after, such as a rear bike rac, derailleur guard and fenders. Magnum had all that included, whereas other bikes that I looked at similar price range were extra.

BernieS
3 weeks ago

On their gear page Giant is showing a new rack for the Quick E+. It's not available yet but is coming.

The Giant Rack-It Metro E Rear Rack (for the Quick E+) is now showing as available through dealers in the Giant web site. I've asked my LBS to order me one (along with the required fender bracket). We'll see how long it takes to come in.

Dan Hutchinson
1 month ago

I also emailed magnum,
the response I got was:
"Thanks for contacting Magnum. I'm sorry to hear about your rubber cap breaking off but we don't carry any replacement caps. It isn't a terribly important port to keep covered. At the very most you might get some dust build up that you would need to blow out."
I also have this problem with my new Metro+. I don't like the idea of having to blow dust out of the port. I am thinking of finding an alternative plastic plug that fits. Or what about getting another electrical connector and using it as the cover. The battery is too expensive to leave an open port.

Dan Hutchinson
1 month ago

First ride on my new Metro+ today! I chose the Metro over the CCS mainly because I didn't want to wait. Turns out that the weather here in Michigan has been unusually nice and in the next week or so I plan a lot of riding.
Just 10 miles on the inaugural ride but this bike is awesome. I like the upright position and the ride was smooth and the bike responsive. Still a lot to learn!
Any other riders in Southeast Michigan?

ChasA
2 months ago

I'm having a problem with the battery plug-in rubber cap. It broke off easily during the 1st week and its nearly
impossible to fit it in. Sometimes 15 minutes to get it to seal. Is there a replacement or a fix? Don't want to ride
without that spot sealed. Don't want to keep using tape. Have the metro+.
I also emailed magnum,
the response I got was:
"Thanks for contacting Magnum. I'm sorry to hear about your rubber cap breaking off but we don't carry any replacement caps. It isn't a terribly important port to keep covered. At the very most you might get some dust build up that you would need to blow out."

ChasA
2 months ago

I'm having a problem with the battery plug-in rubber cap. It broke off easily during the 1st week and its nearly
impossible to fit it in. Sometimes 15 minutes to get it to seal. Is there a replacement or a fix? Don't want to ride
without that spot sealed. Don't want to keep using tape. Have the metro+.

Mark Peralta
2 months ago

Edit 1:
Male, late 20s.
150lbs, 5 ft, 8.5.
Located in US, east coast.
Health: average.
Injury: None
Pre-existing condition: very mild back pain. so, upright position is how I currently ride.

Edit 2:
At this point I am thinking a combination of some type of pedal assistance (lots of traffic stops) and throttle would be useful for hills and keeping up with traffic when needed.
Does that limit my choices?

With lots of traffic stops and the intended use all year round, you would need a hub drive for drama-free frequent accelerations (unless you have a mid drive with expensive nuvinci). A hub drive would also protect your drive train from premature wear brought about by the motor power, thus, preserving the life of your drive train.

Between direct hub drive and geared hub drive, the geared hub is smaller and lighter but has gears to wear out and is a bit noisier. Direct drive can run tens of thousand of miles with no wear and tear parts to replace, very silent, but it is a little heavier (however, you will barely notice the weight penalty for your intended commuter ride).

Aside from the previous recommendations (Bionx, stromer,..), another example of direct hub drive that I would look at is the Radcity (you can program to inc the speed limit from factory 20 mph to 25 mph).

https://electricbikereview.com/rad-power-bikes/radcity/

Another example of geared hub drive that I would look at is the Magnum metro plus.

https://www.magnumbikes.com/product/magnum-metro-plus/

daniel58
2 months ago

I almost bought the Metro +. It has a lot to offer and I think since this summer they have upgrade their battery to a 13 amp hour probably to compete with the CCS.

Ultimately I didn't go with Magnum because I couldn't find a local dealer that had the bike in stock thus being a special order. And I heard mixed experiences from dealers about their customer service in the LA area.

I happened across a local dealer in SoCal (Electric Bike Center in Fullerton) that had one of the first the CCS bikes in stock, in their store and I got it because it rode so nice and the specs are hard to beat. Not many bikes at this price point have a torque\cadence sensor.... Metro was close. Yes Metro + had better stock tires but for me it was about what I could test ride.

Not knocking anyone's experiences with Juiced... I went in with full knowledge of their customer support, but honestly I haven't had any issues. My CCS came without a light, which they shipped (from China which was slow to get here)... and I bought the specialty wrench which took a long time to get because it came from China. I have talked to them once on the phone and 2 times on the chat app through the website without issue.

But honestly how widespread is the motor burn out and spoke issues? Yes I feel bad for the forum member that it happened to and it did take waaaay to long to resolve....(not giving Juiced a pass)... but really how high is the failure rate?

Again I hope they get their act together with stock and customer service....as noted on the forums. (for my own selfish future needs)

I love this bike (CCS)... for me its a solid platform, I enjoy riding it and its fast. But a first run product is going to have hickups..especially from a small company... in this Kickstarter world you need to expect some of that....if you don't then spend $3+ on a Trek.

In a different situation if a Metro+ was on the showroom floor vs a CCS, I probably would have purchased that....

Hopefully you can vent your frustration and then enjoy riding your Metro+

best of luck riding

Andy

Andy

I have considered many potential E-Bike brands and typical E-Bike consumer pitfalls in the process of doing ones usual due diligence homework prior to purchasing an actual E-Bike; I am also not in any rush by any stretch of the creative imagination; and I usually take a very very long time in considering all the pro's and con's prior to making any kind of potential actual E-Bike purchase as much ultimately has to be considered overall; now Magnum like many other potential E-Bike offerings also offer very compelling alternatives indeed to consider; they do have a rather extensive network of bicycle dealers that are willing to not only sell but are actually also willing to do all of the potential servicing, maintaining and even the inevitable potential e-bike repair services on ones e-bike in particular during the actual product warranty period timeframe; so this is a very important primary consideration indeed in of itself; I am also not afraid to consider other excellent E-Bike brands such as RadBikes with their very competitive RadCity, RadRover, even their RadWagon($1c599) competitive E-Bike market offering starting at only $1,499; is just another choice and possibility for potential consideration especially at its rather attractive cost competitive price point for the value and performance dollar given; their are also many other choices to potentially choose from at under $2k in particular; which may even include building ones own custom E-Bike from Luna Cycle(excellent provider of E-Bike Conversion kits) also as well;

Electric Bike Center out of Fullerton, CA is definitely one of the better electric bike shops with actual extensive experience servicing and potentially troubleshooting e-bike service issue(s), along with any other related associated e-bike maintenance and/or repair issues; my main primary issue with Juiced Bikes is their lack of totally committed primary support of their chosen bike dealers whether it be in California and/or nationwide(will naturally be worse support); Juiced Bikes has a major massive ongoing verbal and written communications failure problem with both their dealers and also their paying customers that is seriously affecting the ability to deliver normal expected proper quality customer servicing that a typical paying e-bike customer should expect to get without question, expectation or even having to ask or beg in the first place; after all they have just paid the stated perceived value of the offered asking price in "total and in full"; in order so that they can actually receive and fully expect to get the full expected measure of ones actual expected total E-Bike support that is due to them even on a post purchase basis; not this alternative half baked, half thought thru and/or half measure support for any future potential customer service support issues Juiced Bikes has become so well known and famous for instead;

now if this is Juiced Bikes great marketing idea of complete and totally committed E-Bike customer support; then they will likely only have further ongoing negative customer service support issues and/or concerns going forward that will only get more complex and ultimately cause the existing relationships that they have with their bike dealers(outside California) to de-evolve and ultimately further deteriorate to the point of not being able to effectively deliver an acceptable level of paying Juiced Bikes customer service post purchase support; as an very graphic illustration how "on earth" can one actually expect a local Juiced Bikes bike dealer to actually pull spare parts off of completely working multiple Juiced Bikes store display "for demonstration purposes only" models is yet again another effective highly illustrative objective demonstration of a purely insane, illogical and also irrational in nature highly ineffective business model practices(if one ever existed at all) if ones is to actually take Juiced Bikes as a serious E-Bike company that is actually going to compete with the other major E-Bike competitive companies(HaiBike/Bulls) and also for any potential Juiced Bikes E-Bike customer to actually take seriously prior to actually purchasing a Juiced Bikes E-Bikes;

now since I have not heard of any Juiced Bikes officially taking on any new actual customer service support initiatives to actual support ongoing potential paying Juiced Bikes customers from Tora Harris himself; I will assume that it's business as usual at Juiced Bikes HQ and that their will not be anything further done for their potential paying Juiced Bikes customers with potential future customer servicing issue(s) and/or concerns in case they actually run into any potential customer service issues during the actual twelve month product warranty period time frame; I could see Juiced Bikes also taking particular advantage of a potential paying Juiced Bikes customer who at ten months into the actual Juiced Bikes product warranty might be delayed "on purpose" to a future point in time where they are actually beyond the actual initial twelve month product warranty period time frame; and also when does the actual Juiced Bikes twelve month product warranty begin exactly; from the date one places one original order; or when one actually receives and accepts ones actual Juiced Bikes product from the asian Chinese factory at ones physical address; now it's literally quite true that if it's not actually in physical writing; then Juiced Bikes might literally make up the rules as Juiced Bikes sees or even deems fit to profit handsomely from; which really does not surprise me at all at this point if it did so;

now most potential Juiced Bikes customers may in fact not ride their E-Bike for many miles other than for the occasional recreational outings with family but what if the potential Juiced Bikes customers actually uses it for actual every day E-Bike travel commuting and actual every day recreational enjoyment bicycle tour riding which does in fact start to add on and stack up substantial miles quite rapidly(where will their investment in Juiced Bikes E-Bike end up-take a wild guess); will Juiced Bikes be able to actually deliver 20,000 miles for example in a typical four years like a typical Evelo fully equipped Orion Series E-Bike(four year warranty with 20,000 miles full unquestioned product warranty coverage) for example and what can one fully expect from ones local bike dealer in terms of actual Juiced Bikes E-Bike support to hopefully resolve any potential future inevitable Juiced Bikes aggravating customer service support issues that they may experience in the first four years of potential E-Bike ownership; my confidence is not high at all based from the written testimony feedback that I have seen so far based on the objective evidence I have seen thus far in navigating the various E-Bike forums that I have intercepted and continue to collect and analyze data on; now for the time being I have put Juiced Bikes "on hold-due to lack of Juiced Bikes from taking on definitive corrective action in so far as with their current unsatisfactory customer service practices" indefinitely until they actually get their current sadly lacking "customer services" act hopefully together sooner rather than later; its rather unsurprising just how "apathetic" and "uncaring" they actually turns out to be when Juiced Bikes actually is; once it has conveniently intercepted your money and somehow mysteriously vanished on the written promised basic excellent customer service support front; which is basically an irrational logical insult to the potential paying Juiced Bikes customer who has been dis-serviced and thrown directly under the bus; which is fine so long as its not me who personally gets thrown under the bus(naturally of course..my preference).

michael mitchell
2 months ago

Thanks FredE, I actually followed up and looked into Magnum E-Bikes for a potential E-Bike future purchase consideration and they are actually well liked by E-Bike consumers for both the value they offer and the attractive up to date looks of its Magnum E-Bikes lineup and they also happen to have a very good working relationship with their bike shop dealers; now it turns out that even the bike technician's love their E-Bike's because they are really high quality requiring minimal initial set-up work to getting it to work perfectly for their potential customer's and also very minimal amount of ongoing maintenance and repair post purchase also as well; also their default included Magnum E-Bike battery is about ten percent higher in electrical capacity; and their Magnum E-Bike replacement and/or spare lithium ion batteries are also about seven percent less expensive also as well; another important consideration is their are actually not one but two local Magnum E-Bike bike shops within fifteen miles of where I live locally; the graphic user interface screen on the Magnum E-Bike is also as large as a GPS screen; the height and angle of the adjustable stem can be actually locked and unlocked with ease by using an integrated built in locking latch mechanism; the Magnum E-bike Metro Plus does come with hydraulic disk brakes, led headlight, led taillight, full fenders and a full size bike rack with included bungee cords all included; also any potential Juiced Bike paying customer can look forward to missing out on the below indicated Juiced Bikes absolutely horrific customer service experiences;

yes so no more Juiced Bikes "bait and switch" customer service tactic shenanigans, no more two or more weeks of not returning Juiced Bikes paying customers telephone calls, no more empty and useless Juiced Bikes customary promises being made to yet be fulfilled at some undetermined future date yet to be announced, no more useless usual customary Juiced Bikes excuses that we will have to see about ordering some more items from our asian chinese factory and warehouse for our next scheduled two month ocean shipping container shipment, no more daily e-mailing Juiced Bikes to get a response from them by the end of the week; no more usual customary excuses that we use the same unbranded spokes as the Giant Bikes manufacturer uses; no more bad intermittent electrical connections due to poor inprecise and inaccurate sloppy close tolerance CNC work in their snap in frame E-Bike battery modules; no more bad burnt out gear hub electric drive motors that require the Juiced Bikes customer to make a video recording of; no more legendary bad Juiced Bike customer service where they are famous and best known for first and foremost over promise and then unsurprisingly under deliver on those very same ineffective written promises made to their Juiced Bikes paying customers; no more instant messages sent and left messages often replied to days later where the first sentence automatically apparently also always includes a automatic curt but ineffective "sorry for the delay" as a matter and method of actually delivering supposed good customer service; no more less than informative, unhelpful and ineffective creative Juiced Bikes excuses "made up on the fly" and "empty/useless" written promises made to prevent the paying Juiced Bikes customer from officially lodging and potentially applying a "credit hold" written complaint with their credit card company to give them the actual leverage needed to get what they have already paid for;

now all of these things as indicated previously above "one can in fact" look forward to missing out on and also "avoiding at all costs"; by simply actually choosing Magnum E-Bikes where they seemingly actually unsurprisingly routinely stock Magnum E-Bike parts at their bike dealers to properly service and also to keep their Magnum E-Bike customer ultimately happy and actually contented even if its on a less important post purchase basis; now that actually sounds to me like a win for Magnum E-Bikes, a win for their Magnum E-Bike dealers and a win for their potential Magnum E-Bike paying customers; now the Magnum E-Bikes have a very beefy and stable attractive sporty look to them that can easily be mistaken for an E-Bike costing $3k or more while only costing $1.7K to 1.99K on average.

This seems like a troll posting an advertisement for Magnum. Are you getting paid by the word? Why is it so long? Allow me to state, that I've had zero Customer Service issues with Juiced (I got a CC Air that needed throttle replacement), but I had to file an Amazon A-Z claim against Magnum to get my money back. Soooooooo, people's experiences with these companies aren't always the same.

Andy_in_CA
2 months ago

I almost bought the Metro +. It has a lot to offer and I think since this summer they have upgrade their battery to a 13 amp hour probably to compete with the CCS.

Ultimately I didn't go with Magnum because I couldn't find a local dealer that had the bike in stock thus being a special order. And I heard mixed experiences from dealers about their customer service in the LA area.

I happened across a local dealer in SoCal (Electric Bike Center in Fullerton) that had one of the first the CCS bikes in stock, in their store and I got it because it rode so nice and the specs are hard to beat. Not many bikes at this price point have a torque\cadence sensor.... Metro was close. Yes Metro + had better stock tires but for me it was about what I could test ride.

Not knocking anyone's experiences with Juiced... I went in with full knowledge of their customer support, but honestly I haven't had any issues. My CCS came without a light, which they shipped (from China which was slow to get here)... and I bought the specialty wrench which took a long time to get because it came from China. I have talked to them once on the phone and 2 times on the chat app through the website without issue.

But honestly how widespread is the motor burn out and spoke issues? Yes I feel bad for the forum member that it happened to and it did take waaaay to long to resolve....(not giving Juiced a pass)... but really how high is the failure rate?

Again I hope they get their act together with stock and customer service....as noted on the forums. (for my own selfish future needs)

I love this bike (CCS)... for me its a solid platform, I enjoy riding it and its fast. But a first run product is going to have hickups..especially from a small company... in this Kickstarter world you need to expect some of that....if you don't then spend $3+ on a Trek.

In a different situation if a Metro+ was on the showroom floor vs a CCS, I probably would have purchased that....

Hopefully you can vent your frustration and then enjoy riding your Metro+

best of luck riding

Andy

Andy

daniel58
2 months ago

It took me 2 weeks of call after call just to get Juiced to answer a phone call. After hearing all the hurdles OP had to jump through just to get what he already paid for, a warranty replacement I will pass. A lesson for a start up. Great products are only one part of great company. You have to give great service as well. Magnum answers the phone, which is the basic 1st step of running a business. Answer the phone, call people back, be honest and transparent.

Magnum did that for me. I felt like the CCA was a better product but that does not matter much if they can't take or return call or are having supply chain issues over a year's time.

That is not a company it's a hobby.

Thanks FredE, I actually followed up and looked into Magnum E-Bikes for a potential E-Bike future purchase consideration and they are actually well liked by E-Bike consumers for both the value they offer and the attractive up to date looks of its Magnum E-Bikes lineup and they also happen to have a very good working relationship with their bike shop dealers; now it turns out that even the bike technician's love their E-Bike's because they are really high quality requiring minimal initial set-up work to getting it to work perfectly for their potential customer's and also very minimal amount of ongoing maintenance and repair post purchase also as well; also their default included Magnum E-Bike battery is about ten percent higher in electrical capacity; and their Magnum E-Bike replacement and/or spare lithium ion batteries are also about seven percent less expensive also as well; another important consideration is their are actually not one but two local Magnum E-Bike bike shops within fifteen miles of where I live locally; the graphic user interface screen on the Magnum E-Bike is also as large as a GPS screen; the height and angle of the adjustable stem can be actually locked and unlocked with ease by using an integrated built in locking latch mechanism; the Magnum E-bike Metro Plus does come with hydraulic disk brakes, led headlight, led taillight, full fenders and a full size bike rack with included bungee cords all included; also any potential Juiced Bike paying customer can look forward to missing out on the below indicated Juiced Bikes absolutely horrific customer service experiences;

yes so no more Juiced Bikes "bait and switch" customer service tactic shenanigans, no more two or more weeks of not returning Juiced Bikes paying customers telephone calls, no more empty and useless Juiced Bikes customary promises being made to yet be fulfilled at some undetermined future date yet to be announced, no more useless usual customary Juiced Bikes excuses that we will have to see about ordering some more items from our asian chinese factory and warehouse for our next scheduled two month ocean shipping container shipment, no more daily e-mailing Juiced Bikes to get a response from them by the end of the week; no more usual customary excuses that we use the same unbranded spokes as the Giant Bikes manufacturer uses; no more bad intermittent electrical connections due to poor inprecise and inaccurate sloppy close tolerance CNC work in their snap in frame E-Bike battery modules; no more bad burnt out gear hub electric drive motors that require the Juiced Bikes customer to make a video recording of; no more legendary bad Juiced Bike customer service where they are famous and best known for first and foremost over promise and then unsurprisingly under deliver on those very same ineffective written promises made to their Juiced Bikes paying customers; no more instant messages sent and left messages often replied to days later where the first sentence automatically apparently also always includes a automatic curt but ineffective "sorry for the delay" as a matter and method of actually delivering supposed good customer service; no more less than informative, unhelpful and ineffective creative Juiced Bikes excuses "made up on the fly" and "empty/useless" written promises made to prevent the paying Juiced Bikes customer from officially lodging and potentially applying a "credit hold" written complaint with their credit card company to give them the actual leverage needed to get what they have already paid for;

now all of these things as indicated previously above "one can in fact" look forward to missing out on and also "avoiding at all costs"; by simply actually choosing Magnum E-Bikes where they seemingly actually unsurprisingly routinely stock Magnum E-Bike parts at their bike dealers to properly service and also to keep their Magnum E-Bike customer ultimately happy and actually contented even if its on a less important post purchase basis; now that actually sounds to me like a win for Magnum E-Bikes, a win for their Magnum E-Bike dealers and a win for their potential Magnum E-Bike paying customers; now the Magnum E-Bikes have a very beefy and stable attractive sporty look to them that can easily be mistaken for an E-Bike costing $3k or more while only costing $1.7K to 1.99K on average.

iBikeDiane
2 months ago

It says limited quantities, but they let me buy 3, so I can tell you that 2 is not the limit ;) I think it will serve me well as a starter once the battery is right.

Here's a direct link Metro XT

iBikeDiane
2 months ago

[EDIT: This is a rockin' bike and a great value. Battery was ok!]

I ordered the Metro XT from ridegenesis.com last week and it arrived today. It's stated as being on sale for $599 as a pre-Black Friday deal. Unfortunately the battery is a dud. :(

The good news is they have a 30-day return policy and a 6-month warranty. Their customer service and shipping is in Secaucus, NJ, and they are friendly and helpful. Before it arrived, I bought 2 more as gifts, but I will check them out first. Their replacement battery is only $200, so it may not be a high-end battery. There were a couple of reviews that mentioned battery failures.

But the bike itself is very solid and rides well on its own. It is the perfect size for me and easy to manage at 35 lbs including the battery. Opens and closes easily, etc. I don't feel nervous that the handlebars or seat are going to suddenly collapse. Everything locks in tightly. I have to send the whole thing back for an exchange and I'm already attached to it!

However, I anticipate I will want something in the future that will allow for riding in damp conditions.

Ann M.
2 months ago

Glad you decided to get an ebike Diane; think you'll find it a fun way to feel better. Looking forward to hearing about your Metro XT once it arrives.

iBikeDiane
2 months ago

Hi all, I just bought my first electric! Recovering from major health issues and quite depleted. I wanted a foldable I could easily transport in my small car, maybe ride out for lunch from work, finally be able to ride our beautiful rail trails, nearby errands, getting around without car, etc.

Was aware of electric bikes, but didn't think I could afford one until I recently started researching. Things have really changed!

I'm petite, and went with the Metro XT from ridegenesis.com. With 30-day return and 6-month warranty, and an unbeatable price (plus free US shipping) for the impressive specs, I figured I couldn't go wrong! It looks like a standard frame that they are adapting for their own branding, but maybe some brand confusion with the Prodeco Genesis.

I'll post an update next week once received and tested...

Ann M.
2 months ago

@Sonoboy & @Eros Di Miele, Court is pretty flexible about e-scooters mixing with the ebikes on this site. It's the same Forum for both the ElectricRideReview & ElectricBikeReview.com sites. I've got several customers (well over 20 yrs old) who use electric skateboards as a way to commute to a bus or Metro Rail connection and then get around, especially in the really crowded downtown Austin TX area. The incredibly light weight and fairly powerful dual rear hub motors paired with a lithium power pack make for an impressive practical ride.

Drumulac
2 months ago

Mark - thanks for posting the trailway vids. Plans are in the works to extend this 43.7 connected Bronx-Westchester-Putnam route. My company, an engineering and land surveying firm, has been providing design services for a number of downstate NY trails, including the Hudson River Greenway on the west side of NYC that the guys rode in Court's video. We recently bid on a design/build project for Metro North Railroad which will consist of a 23 mile shared pedestrian bike trail connecting the Putnam Maybrook Trailway to the Dutchess Rail Trail. The Dutchess Rail Trail, Walkway over the Hudson, and the Hudson Valley Rail Trail will add another 18 miles of continuous paved ped/bike path and take you to the west side of the Hudson River past Poughkeepsie into Ulster County. This is all part of the Governor's initiative to build 350 miles of new trail running from the metro NYC area to Canada called the New York Empire State Trail. This would connect 750 miles of trail across and through the state by 2020. Let's hope that initiative continues to be funded through subsequent administrations. This is only going to happen if we all continue to be active advocates for alternative, healthier transportation routes.

BlondAngel
2 months ago

Hi,
While there is a youtube video on how to change the C7 display from mph to kph, it doesn't explain what all the words and numbers mean on the display. I mean, I know what PAS is but it has some icons and no explanation of what they mean. Is there an online manual for this? It has 'trip 1' and 'trip 2' but I would like to know the total number of miles -- any way to find out? How do I zero out trip 2? I was able to zero out trip 1 but not trip 2. Also the display shows 'BMS' and a number like 51.4. What does BMS mean in this context?

BlondAngel
2 months ago

So for a while I have been doing research and suffering from analysis paralysis and ebike overload. I finally bit the bullet and brought a Magnum Metro+.

BernieS
3 months ago

While I wait for the Giant Rack-It Metro E rear rack to be available, I installed a Topeak Beamrack (E-Type). I just barely had the required 2" of seat post free for the QR clamp. For a little added support I attached a piece of aluminum bar to the Topeak rack and Giant OEM rack (using one of the eyelets on the crossbar. I then added an Arkel Tailrider bag. I carry my Abus Mini U-lock and a cable in the bag. The Arkel bag is very stable on the Topeak rack. I attach a Cygolite taillight to the bag for a flashing red light in the rear. Eventually I'll include one or two panniers for grocery shopping. I'm inclined towards the Arkel Shopper or Brooks' Suffolk pannier. But with winter coming on I'm in no rush for this.

These additions are illustrated in the accompanying photos.

1/3
B G
1 day ago

Is there anyone that can answer a question about the led display. I can't store it inside, when I have really hot or really cold weather will it hurt the display?

howlingwolf125y
1 week ago

A lot to like about this bike.. A very nice more upright riding position. Comfortable ride is so important to me. Even thought it has suspension seat and front fork .. What's with the skinny tires??. I wish they would have put on fatter tires for a even more smoother ride. I would have liked for the bike to simply go a bit faster (Like 33 mph pedal assist and 28 mph throttle on demand) But still a nice 2K price on this bike.. I would be willing to pay a couple of hundred more if they would add the things I mentioned above. Oh, and I am 6'3" 175lbs - so I need a larger version.

brandonjpj1
2 weeks ago

Man court you post so many good reviews ! Seems like every day I have a new review to watch and I love it ! I jus purchased my first ebike and am awaiting its arrival (being shipped to me) and can’t wait !

Lynn Recker
2 weeks ago

Nice bike. Good view of the capital but seemed to be quite a bit of fog or maybe smog in the valley (or possibly the resolution of your camera?). The last time I was in the neighborhood of Pavilion Circle you could easily see the Oquirrh Mountains beyond.

Florida Scot
2 weeks ago

I really like this one, for me I need 25 MPH minimum which I have now to help out run dogs & get up into the wind on hot days in Florida, the geared hub motors I love & have 17k miles on mine & counting , the 48 V battery I want to try having a 36v, & the 29er rims look like they'll take Big Apple balloon tires { after removing the fenders which you dont need } which I ride with now, looks like it's built by the same plant that makes Pedego, decent quality not excellent but fast & gets the job done for little $. May pull the trigger on this one need a second for when my friends & family visit & well, like it  😀

trekkeruss
2 weeks ago

I don't mind a rear light not being wired-in. LED lights draw very little power anyway, so batteries last a long time. Plus, you don't have to worry about the thin and fragile wiring and connections that usually accompany wired-in lights.

F r e e l e e
2 weeks ago

2 amp charger is better than a 3 amp please read up.

F r e e l e e
2 weeks ago

Martin schit you should not comment on what you dont understand.

Martin Schmidt
2 weeks ago

Nope. Its Just slower charging. 4 a should be Standard. :)

Greg McMahon
2 weeks ago

There is a lot more to it. Ideally the battery and the charging system would be engineered to avoid snark as that will degrade performance worse than sugar.

David Kenefick
2 weeks ago

Looks like a good value for money ebike. Nice review.