Rad Power Bikes RadCity Review

Rad Power Bikes Radcity Electric Bike Review
Rad Power Bikes Radcity
Rad Power Bikes Radcity 750 Watt Gearless Hub Shengyi
Rad Power Bikes Radcity 48 Volt 11 6 Amp Hour Battery
Rad Power Bikes Radcity Backlit Lcd Display Low Rise Bars
Rad Power Bikes Radcity Tektro Levers With Inhibitors Bell Ergonomic Grips
Rad Power Bikes Radcity 7 Speed Shimano Acera
Rad Power Bikes Radcity 180 Mm Tektro Mechanical Disc Brakes
Rad Power Bikes Radcity Adjustable Kickstand
Rad Power Bikes Radcity Integrated Alloy Rack 60 Lb Max
Rad Power Bikes Radcity Independent Controller Box 22 Amps
Rad Power Bikes Radcity Sr Suntour Suspension Fork Lockout Rebound Led Light
Rad Power Bikes Radcity Electric Bike Review
Rad Power Bikes Radcity
Rad Power Bikes Radcity 750 Watt Gearless Hub Shengyi
Rad Power Bikes Radcity 48 Volt 11 6 Amp Hour Battery
Rad Power Bikes Radcity Backlit Lcd Display Low Rise Bars
Rad Power Bikes Radcity Tektro Levers With Inhibitors Bell Ergonomic Grips
Rad Power Bikes Radcity 7 Speed Shimano Acera
Rad Power Bikes Radcity 180 Mm Tektro Mechanical Disc Brakes
Rad Power Bikes Radcity Adjustable Kickstand
Rad Power Bikes Radcity Integrated Alloy Rack 60 Lb Max
Rad Power Bikes Radcity Independent Controller Box 22 Amps
Rad Power Bikes Radcity Sr Suntour Suspension Fork Lockout Rebound Led Light

Summary

  • A value priced but featured packed urban commuter style electric bike with everything from fenders, to LED lights, rear carry rack and regenerative braking
  • Solid driving and braking performance with a 750 watt gearless hub motor and 180 mm mechanical disc brakes... you get five levels of assist plus twist throttle that overrides with full power
  • Comfortable 2.3" all-terrain tires, basic suspension fork with lockout, ergonomic grips and an adjustable angle stem, the bike comes in two frame sizes for improved fit!
  • Gearless motors are durable and quiet but less zippy (especially from start) and tend to weigh more, the RadCity weighs ~60 lbs which is on the heavier side, rear light is not wired in

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

Rad Power Bikes

Model:

RadCity

Price:

$1,499 ($175 Flat Rate Shipping)

Body Position:

Upright, Upright Relaxed

Suggested Use:

Urban, Commuting

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive (Original Owner)

Availability:

United States, Canada

Model Year:

20162017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

60.5 lbs (27.44 kg)

Battery Weight:

7 lbs (3.17 kg)

Motor Weight:

9 lbs (4.08 kg)

Frame Material:

Aluminum

Frame Sizes:

16 in (40.64 cm)20 in (50.8 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

16" Frame: 16" Seat Tube, 30" Reach, 31.5" Stand Over Height, 70" Length, 20" Frame: 20" Seat Tube, 33.25" Reach, 32.5" Stand Over Height, 70" Length

Frame Types:

High-Step, Mid-Step

Frame Colors:

Gun Metal Gray

Frame Fork Details:

SR Suntour XCT Suspension with 100 mm Travel, Lockout, Rebound Adjust, 11 mm Quick Release Skewer

Frame Rear Details:

10 mm Axle with Bolts

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

7 Speed 1x7 Shimano Acera, 11-28T

Shifter Details:

Shiman SIS Index Shifter on Right

Cranks:

48T Chainring with Aluminum Bash Guard, Prowheel Crankset

Pedals:

Wellgo M111 Forged Aluminum Platform

Headset:

VP

Stem:

Zoom Adjustable Angle

Handlebar:

Zoom Low-Rise

Brake Details:

Tektro Aries Mechanical Disc with 180 mm Rotors, Tektro Levers with Motor Inhibitors, Rubberized Edge and Integrated Bell

Grips:

Velo Comfort, Ergonomic

Saddle:

Velo Comfort with Integrated Handle

Seat Post:

Promax, Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

330 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Double Walled Alloy, 30 Hole

Spokes:

12 Gauge, Stainless Steel with Nipples

Tire Brand:

Kenda K-Rad, 26" x 2.3"

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)

Tire Details:

Folding, Wire Bead, 60 TPI, 50 to 60 PSI

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Plastic Fenders with Mud Flaps, 200 Lumen Integrated LED Headlight (Micro by Spanninga), Stand Alone LED Tail Light, Integrated Rack with Pannier Supports (60 lb Capacity), Side Mounted Adjustable Kickstand Spanninga Micro Integrated LED Headlight, Blaze-Lite RL1800 Independent LED Back Light, Neoprene Slap Guard, Side Mounted Adjustable Kickstand, Two USB Charging Ports for Portable Electronics (On Battery and Display)

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack, KMC Z7 Rustbuster Chain, 275 lb Max Capacity, Hold Up and Down on Button Pad for Settings

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Shengyi

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Gearless Direct Drive Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

750 watts

Battery Brand:

Panasonic

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11.6 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

556.8 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium Nickel Cobalt Aluminum

Charge Time:

5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

20 miles (32 km)

Estimated Max Range:

40 miles (64 km)

Display Type:

King Meter SW-LCD, Fixed Backlit LCD

Readouts:

Battery Gauge (5 Bars), Assist Level (0-5) Speed, Avg. Speed, Top Speed, Odometer, Trip Odometer, Watts, Lights Indicator

Display Accessories:

Independent 3 Button Pad

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Twist Throttle (6 Magnet Pedelec Disc)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

Rad Power Bikes has become well known and appreciated over the past couple of years (since early 2015) when they first launched a fat tire bike followed by a cargo bike and then a miniature folding fat ebike. Having tested each of them, even in remote inhospitable environments, I’ve gotten to know the technology, the team and better understand the company as a whole. I’ve seen the bikes undergo incremental improvements, tested second generation models, and I’ve seen a bunch of testimonial videos online from actual customers who have ridden hundreds of miles. Recently I got to see and test out their latest model, the RadCity!

This bike is designed for comfort, utility and durability. Like the RadWagon, it uses a gearless direct drive motor that isn’t as immediately zippy or torquey feeling as the geared hub motors used on the fat tire bikes but runs smoother, quieter and offers regenerative braking. Now, regen braking is a mixed bag… it reduces wear on brake pads and helps to generate a touch of energy, perhaps offsetting the added weight of the motor design, but it’s not the sort of technology that you can use to charge the bike just by pedaling. At least, without exhausting yourself and spending significantly more energy pedaling than is recaptured by the system (it’s only about 10% efficient at recapture). Still, this motor performed well and was smoother than the original Shengyi hub I saw on the original RadWagon. There is some cogging drag as you coast because the motor does not freewheel and it plus the larger battery, integrated rear rack and basic suspension fork bump the weight of the bike up to ~60 lbs.

Rad Power Bikes is based in Seattle where it rains a lot and I asked the team how their RadCity has held up in the wet environment. I was told that they often leave the bikes outside, ride frequently in the rain and have experienced very few issues. Of course, if you can store your ebike out of the rain (especially heavy rain) that’s probably ideal. The RadCity comes with full length fenders that have mud flaps at the end and I did test them through a couple of puddles. The only downside of these and most fenders is that if you make a very sharp turn and continue pedaling the toe of your shoe may collide with the fender. The display panel, battery pack and controller box are sealed, like the hub motor, and were familiar to me. The display itself is backlit and when activated, switches on the headlight (I believe you hold the up arrow for a few seconds on the control pad). There’s a rear light as well but this one is independent, requiring separate batteries and separate activation. Turning the bike on is actually a two step process where you press a silver button on the battery and then hold the mode button on the independent button pad near the left grip. The battery is removable and can be charged on or off the frame but the display panel is not, you can however swivel it forward and back.

One thing I really love about Rad Power Bikes is that their frames are custom and they go the extra mile or two adding features and accessories. The RadCity has two USB charging ports with one at the base of the display panel where it’s easy to access when riding and another on the right side of the battery pack so you can use it like a portable energy bank. The other delighter for me was the bottle cage bosses added to the base of the downtube. Sure, it’s a bit of a reach to get a bottle or lock way down there but at least it’s an option! There are two sets of bosses near the head tube as well and those are meant for an add-on rack that Rad Power Bikes is still working on. In the mean time, I suppose you could adapt them to be used with bottle cages or use a cup holder clamp on the handlebars. The cockpit of the bike is a bit crowded because they went with a more basic SIS thumb shifter design vs. triggers but they keep the price down and actually work well with gloved hands. The brake levers are a big upgrade with rubberized edges and an integrated bell as well as the motor inhibitors that activate regen and kill the motor for safety. Rounding things out are a pair of ergonomic rubber grips that don’t lock but work fine for city riding. The whole handle bar is setup as a low-rise for improved comfort in terms of body position and is supported by an adjustable stem that can make the difference between a taller or shorter rider enjoying the fit. And also! This is the first Rad Power Bikes model to come in two frame styles and sizes. You’ve got the standard high-step diamond frame measuring ~20″ and the slightly lower step diamond measuring 16″ that my girlfriend was able to comfortably stand over (she’s ~5’2″). Both cost ~$1,500 and offer all of the same accessories, motor, battery etc.

So what about the ride itself? Well, I found it to be smooth, quiet and powerful enough to ascend moderate hills (though I only weigh ~135 lbs). You can pedal along with one of seven gears and five levels of assist and override full-power twist throttle! Not only that, you can activate or de-activate the throttle independently so you don’t accidentally bump it when loading or unloading. It’s the best combination of drive modes I can think of and the way I would design a bike of my own to be honest. So many times, assist limits the throttle power or the throttle is always active or you don’t get throttle-only mode… the RadCity offers all of this. Note that the six magnet assist sensor isn’t the worlds fastest but surprised and impressed me with its performance because the software is dialed in. Back to some of the details, I love the derailleur guard and upgraded Wellgo pedals, the standard-gauge rack rails for adding panniers and Yepp! child seat compatibility. It’s a well thought-out design that reflects all of the learning Rad Power Bikes has experienced over the past two years (and all of their custom work since 2007). I love that the rear axle is upgraded in terms of thickness, has a torque arm and has a new tucked-cable design to reduce bends and snagging. I love that they still ship nationally but also have a storefront in Seattle where you can go and see the bikes or take a test ride. This bike is exactly what I’d expect from the company plus a couple of nice surprises and I feel that it would be a great choice for individuals planning to ride around urban environments. Yes, it’s a little heavy and has a less refined look than some of the more expensive models but the price is right and the quality is there where it counts most… specifically with the Panasonic battery cells and that one year comprehensive warranty. Big thanks to Rad Power Bikes for partnering with me for this review.

Pros:

  • They managed to include a pair of bottle cage bosses! albeit along the bottom of the downtube which can be a bit tricky to reach… could work well for a folding lock or mini-pump if you aren’t using a trunk bag, the other bosses near the head tube are meant for an add-on rack but could still be adapted for a bottle cage or other accessories with some creative tinkering and a metal strip
  • Because Rad Power Bikes opted to use a gearless direct drive motor hear you get the benefit of regenerative braking, there is a bit of cogging drag and the motor weighs slightly more but these tend to be very durable and quiet compared to geared designs
  • The rear axle is thicker than normal for improved strength and handling (nice given the heavier motor design), there’s also a torque arm to distribute force and I love how the power cable is tucked down and kept out of the way vs. protruding directly from the end of the axle
  • Full length plastic fenders with mud flaps keep you dry and clean, I tested them through puddles in Seattle and was impressed, I also like that they blend in with the frame color (but be careful when turning or you can clip your toes on the fender since it sticks out a bit from the tire)
  • Good color choice, the dark grey is professional, hides dirt, blends in well with the black accessories, battery, motor and cables and works for guys or girls… I also like that they integrated most of the cables through the downtube to reduce snags
  • The battery capacity is quite large and they’ve used high quality Panasonic cells which are known to be reliable, safe and long lasting
  • Comfortable ride quality thanks to the larger tires, suspension fork, adjustable angle stem and ergonomic grips, they also used a low-rise bar to further dial in fit and comfort (forward for taller riders or up and back for shorter riders)
  • Two USB ports let you charge portable electronics while riding or at home using the battery pack as a power bank, I like that the first port (on the base of the display) stays out of the way when pedaling
  • Sturdy kickstand that’s mounted far back so it stays out of the way, I believe it also offers adjustable length so you can dial it in
  • The saddle felt a little firm to me but I like the integrated handle at the rear (for lifting and maneuvering the bike), the seat post is a standard sized 27.2 mm and could be swapped for a suspension post to improve comfort but usually ads at least a few inches of vertical height so keep that in mind depending on how tall you are
  • Seven speeds is enough for getting around town, I like that they went with a higher grade derailleur here (Acera vs. Altus or Tourney) that should last longer and keep the chain tighter, there’s also an extra-large first gear for climbing and starting
  • The parts are fairly modular meaning that replacing the battery pack, display or controller isn’t as expensive or difficult as on the super fancy ebikes and Rad Power Bikes has been around since ~2007 (re-branding in 2015), they offer a one year comprehensive warranty and seem to have an active support team

Cons:

  • The RadCity is heavier than some competing models because it has an oversized built-on rack, a spring and oil based suspension vs. air and the motor is gearless vs. geared, if you remove the battery pack (which weighs ~7 lbs) it’s easier to lift but the bike is still on the heavier side
  • I like that the front wheel offers quick release but the rear does not… that means changing flats and doing maintenance requires more time and tools
  • The controller box is not integrated with the battery pack or motor as with some other models and the battery is bolted onto the frame vs. being semi or fully inset so the aesthetic is a bit less polished but that’s part of what keeps the price down I suppose, may also improve maintenance ease
  • This isn’t a huge con but just be careful with the adjustable angle stem, make sure it’s tight and don’t go off large curbs without checking it occasionally or it could get loose
  • I love that the bike has LED lights for safety and appreciate that the front one is integrated (running off the main battery pack) but wish the rear was too, instead you have to open it occasionally to swap out the AA batteries and it may be easier to forget and leave on vs. the front one that shuts off when the bike is powered down
  • There’s a large Aluminum alloy bash guard on the chainring providing some protection and stability but it might be worth adding a second guard on the inside to create a proper guide given that this bike can be ridden with throttle only and the chain can bounce off a bit more easily at high speed with this sort of setup (at least in my experience, I did not lose the chain while testing the RadCity)
  • I want to complain that the cadence sensor only uses six magnets vs. 12 and that it’s not as responsive as it could be but my actual ride experience was good, I feel like they have optimized the response well enough and in the lower gears especially it works fine

Resources:

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Jordan Chandler
12 months ago

I find my chain comes off a lot on the Rad Rover…I’m not sure why their final production version went with no inner chair guard. I’ve also upgraded the front sprocket to a larger one so the existing guard doesn’t help.I’m going to sandwich the sprocket between two guards.

Otherwise I love the Rover and would love to ride this one.

Reply
Court Rye
12 months ago

Hey Jordan! Sounds like a good solution, I’ve dropped the chain on ebikes much more frequently than on traditional pedal powered bikes because I’ll be using the throttle and possibly in a high rear gear and that leaves the chain really slack and liable to bounce around (and off) more. Maybe with the RadCity mostly be used on roads that won’t happen as much? Hope you get the chance to try it someday, the bike is great, especially for the price :)

Reply
JP
12 months ago

Nice review of an exciting product. Which frame size did you ride? I’m 5′-9.5″ and their website recommends the 16″ frame for 5′-10″ and shorter. Did that match your experience?

Reply
Court Rye
12 months ago

Hey JP, I actually rode the 20″ large model and had a great time. The stand-over heights are very similar, just like ~1″ difference, and the weight is similar so the biggest thing seems to be reach. If you get the smaller frame it might position you upright vs. a bit forward… but if you want that aerodynamic aggressive ride position then the 20″ should work :D

Reply
George J
12 months ago

Great bike. I’ll definitely purchase one when you come out with the step thru version.

Reply
Court Rye
12 months ago

Good thoughts George… The stand over heights aren’t that much different on the two models they launched and I think it’s just part of their formula, using the same battery pack that attaches to the downtube vs. going with an integrated design, it keeps their products affordable and works well enough BUT yeah, a true step-thru would be nice, especially given the permanent rack :/

Reply
Ken Cooper
7 months ago

Caution re. stand-over height: It’s not about how tall you are, it’s about leg length (inseam). I’m over 6’2″ but the RadCity I bought is too tall (ouch). The pants I buy have an inseam length of 31″. I’d say if your inseam is less than 33″ you ought to opt for a shorter bike than the 20″ RadCity.

Reply
John Goodman
12 months ago

I have the power wagon for me and my little daughter and the EM 29er snow pro for myself. The wife and big daughter like to drive the power wagon around more than the 29er. I could buy two radcity bikes and they like how the rad bikes function more than the more expensive bike! Christmass will be a slam dunk this year!!

Reply
Court Rye
12 months ago

Ha! That’s wonderful, I have to admit… using the throttle, having assist, being able to choose from a few different styles of bikes but deal with one company and get the support at the prices they set is pretty great. I’m glad you’re all having a great time with ebikes and wish you a Merry Christmas John :D

Reply
Juan A Noval
12 months ago

Hello Court, I have a few quick question when comparing the RadCity vs. the Surface 604 Colt. The Colt is priced at $400 more than the RadCity but I wonder if the Colt, in your opinion is worth the extra money? When you look at both bikes, aesthetics and my personal views on design aside i.e. better integration of battery on Colt, more of a higher end look, etc. they seem to be pretty close. Does the Colt have better components to help justify the higher price? The RadCity comes very well equipped and as you state in your video review, the attention to detail is very good. I guess I’m trying to justify the extra cost of the Colt in my mind. I’d like to say that I like both bikes a lot, and would have no problem purchasing either one as they both fit the type of riding that I do. Thx again for the great videos. JN

Reply
Court Rye
12 months ago

Hey Juan! Great question here… yeah both bikes are well done. Surface 604 has two models, the Colt being their mid-step which definitely has a lower stand-over height than the RadCity (by about four inches according to my measurements). It’s also three pounds lighter because it uses a more compact geared hub motor vs. gearless and has a slightly smaller battery pack by about 60 watt hours. I was impressed with both bikes and remember the RadCity being super quiet. The regeneration capability of the RadCity is also cool but in my opinion only sort of balances out the power lost through cogging and added weight (while slowing break wear). Maybe it comes down to style or the price difference but I think both are solid options. I must say, the reflective chain guard, fully integrated light set and hydraulic disc brakes on the Colt are features that I value.

Reply
George J
7 months ago

I checked out the surface 604, great looking bikes and decent specs. But, I emailed the company three times to inquire about the motor–DD or geared? They never replied. Poor customer service in my eyes.

Reply
John Williams
5 months ago

I emailed them with some questions today and got a reply back in a couple of hours.

Michael Solana
10 months ago

Thanks Court! Once again, your review has informed me on a purchase. Seems like there is limited bloggining/vlogging on ebikes. Awesome job on covering all the specs and pros/cons. Best!

Reply
Court Rye
10 months ago

Happy to help Michael, it’s nice to know that my work makes a difference and I always get excited to hear when people decide on one bike vs. another, there are so many cool types available now and the RadCity is definitely a leader. Have fun out there!

Reply
Chuck Avery
7 months ago

Looks like a great bike, but for me, one change would seal the deal. I would love to see a 8-speed IGH instead of the derailleur. Any chance of that being a option in the future?

Reply
Court Rye
7 months ago

Hi Chuck! Maybe someone from the Rad Power Bikes team will chime in. I’m not sure if we’ll see internally geared hubs for a while given the extra weight and price increase. It seems like they are striving for that $1,500 mark… but maybe this is something you or a local shop could try to install yourself :)

Reply
Ken Cooper
7 months ago

I finally received my Radcity ebike. It’s beautiful .. but .. It’s too tall for me. I’m over 6’2″ and never imagined I’d run into a bike that’s too tall for me. But when I straddle the bar, I have to stand on my tippy toes in order to keep from damaging myself (I have a 31″ inseam). As long as I’m riding the bike it’s great, but whenever I have to stop I have to come down on my tiptoes. For me, it’s dangerous. Now I have no idea what the heck to do. I’ve had it for about 20 days and have ridden it .. not much .. but I’ve ridden it. Thus It appears I don’t qualify for a return. I live in an area where ebikes are a rarity so selling it would, at best, be difficult. I suppose I could find a welder who could maybe move that bar down for me – or maybe some low profile tires is the answer. Suggestions anyone?

Reply
Court Rye
7 months ago

Hey Ken THANK YOU so much for sharing your height, inseam and the situation with your RadCity. Did you get the 16″ or 20″ frame size? I do my best to share specs like standover height and yeah… it’s right at 31.5″ for the smaller of the two models. Bummer man, you can post it as a used bike on the forums here in the Rad Power Bikes section or reach out to the company for a possible exchange. I would not recommend welding it or doing anything that could impact the structural integrity. Best to sell at a deeper loss locally and maybe buy a different model with a discount from Rad? I hope these ideas help…

Reply
George J
7 months ago

I’m seriously thinking of purchasing the Radcity but not sure which size. I’m 5’10”. 16 inch or 20 inch? Any suggestions? Thanks.

Reply
Court Rye
7 months ago

Hi George! I’d probably go with the smaller frame size if you’re considering the stand over height. This other person, Ken Cooper, has been talking about how his inseam is ~31″ and he’s a bit nervous riding the bike due to how high the top tube is. I hope this helps you… There are lots of other great ebikes out there now at a good price, explore your options and visit a shop for test rides too if you can!

Reply
Ken Cooper
7 months ago

Here’s what I wish I had seen posted before I bought my 20″ RadCity .. This bike is for people who have long legs (at least a 32 1/2 inch inseam).

Reply
Court Rye
7 months ago

Thanks for the feedback Ken, sorry the frame is a little large for you. I did post the stand over height in the specs section of this review (something I try to measure manually for every ebike I review). I realize it’s easy to miss and maybe a term that not all people are familiar with. Appreciate your update here and hope you find a solution :/

Reply
George J
7 months ago

Ken. Radcity bikes are built for easy repair, ie electrical system can easily be removed and adapted to a non electric bike. Might make sense to find a frame that fits and move the motor, battery, controller etc to a frame that fits your build.

Reply
Andrew Mullen
6 months ago

Where are you located and how much do you want for it?

Reply
MarkP
7 months ago

Court, In talking with the Rad Power Bikes owners during the RADCIty review. Was there any discussion on he problem with bikes be damaged in shipment? Has RPB upgraded the container the RADCity is shipped in? Last summer I received two RadRovers and both were damaged. It seems like this would be a simple fix, just change the quality of the box and pack the bikes better. Something like the Sondors bikes are shipped in. I received two Sondors and neither had any damage at all. There is no comparison between RPB and Sondors shipping boxes. The RPB and Sondors shipments were both cross country to me.

I am considering on purchasing a RADCity, but do not want e hassle of having to repair a new bike due to shipment damage. Last summer when I was dealing with returning the first Rover (at my expense) and repairing the second replacement Rover with incorrect parts from RPB (a part from the 2015 Rover not the 2016 Rover which I had ordered) I am concerned I will go through the same hassle again with a RADCity.

When I questioned RPB on the quality of the shipping container they told me “we were working on it”. That was a year ago. Has the shipping damage problem been addressed? Has the quality of the shipping container improved?

Reply
Court Rye
7 months ago

Hi Mark! This isn’t an issue I have heard much about but I appreciate you bringing it to the forefront here. Sorry to hear about the money and time involved with damaged ebikes from Rad Power Bikes in the past… that’s no fun. What I can say is that the team at RPB seem to be stepping up their game in terms of products, opening an in-person shop and providing quick communication with customers. If you go for the RadCity and have a good or bad experience I welcome you to post about it here and in the forums. I HOPE they have improved things but I can’t do much beyond offer my own sympathy for the issues you’ve had :/

Reply
Anonymous
7 months ago

I am considering a Radcity v Addmotor Hithot H2. Almost identical price so which do you recommend? Michael

Reply
Court Rye
7 months ago

Howdy Michael, I haven’t tried the latest Addmotor Hithot H2 so it’s difficult to say. I feel that Rad Power Bikes does a good job with their support, they even have a shop now in Seattle. If I had to choose one I’d probably get the RadCity as long as the frame fits you. It’s a little taller and a couple of people recently commented that they didn’t feel super comfortable standing over it. Hope this helps! I put measurements in the stats above ;)

Reply
Rotom
6 months ago

The radcity (or possibly the wagon, but most likely the city) is highest on my list of potential bikes right now. I’m a bigger guy (250lbs) so I don’t want to go too low in price and have an underpowered bike, but I am also very limited in my budget. What other bikes would you recommend that I should look into? 1500-1600 is about as high as I’m willing to go, and would like to go less if I find something that fits my needs. Around 6 mile trips on flat land each way (12mi total). I want both throttle and pedal assist. The big negative for the radpower bikes for me is the twist throttle instead of a trigger, but this is by no means a deal breaker. Fenders are required so I dont get wet driving after it rains, but I don’t mind aftermarket ones if available.

Reply
Court Rye
6 months ago

Hi Rotom, how tall are you? I’ve read a few comments complaining that the RadCity is too high to stand over comfortably. It does come in multiple frame sizes which could help but this is worth considering in my opinion. I enjoy step-thru models more and more as I add racks and bags at the back and sometimes have to hop off suddenly. As a taller guy (or at least someone with longer legs) I didn’t have a problem here but I’m also nimble and lightweight at ~135 lbs. Check the Corratec LIFEBIKE out for an example of easier stand-over while still being sturdy for larger riders.

Reply
Rotom
6 months ago

Oh I can’t believe i forgot to put my height. I’m somewhere between 5’10 and 5’11 with an inseam of about 32. So unfortunately it looks like I’m right in between the sizes of the two, but this is something I already took into consideration. If I finalize my choice on the radcity i would be sure to confirm all of my measurements before picking a size. I’m young (22) so I dont have a problem with issues getting on/off a high step despite my weight, and I usually prefer high/mid steps. $1650 is a pretty hard budget cap as I am a student and only working part time. So, while I appreciate it, the bike you linked is definitely too far out for me at this stage of my life.

I’m also looking to keep it around 750w (probably 500w min) due to my current weight.

Reply
Court Rye
6 months ago

Cool, sounds like the RadCity will be a great fit! Keep in mind that even though these other mid-drive bikes are rated at 250 watts nominal, they peak above 500 and offer much more torque than hub motors. They are actually more powerful than a big heavy hub motor in practice even though they might not appear that way on paper. The downside for some people is that they don’t usually offer throttle mode. With your budget, I think the RadCity will be an excellent choice, glad you’re thinking about the stand over height and I’m excited for you. Hope it works out great and I welcome your feedback here or in the forums once you get it :D

Reply
Chris
5 months ago

Hi, First thanks for all the amazing reviews! I’m torn between the RadCity and E-Glide ST. I’m looking for a good value city commuter bike (18 miles round trip). I’m 5’10 and 220lbs. Which bike would you recommend? Is the E-glide worth the extra cash?

Reply
Court Rye
5 months ago

Hi Chris, the only complaint I’ve heard about the RadCity is that the standover height is high (even on the smaller frames). If you like the style and lighter weight of the E-Glide ST then go for it. I believe that Rad Power Bikes is larger than E-Glide but both companies seem to offer good customer service :)

Reply
Jon Knudson
2 months ago

Wonder when they plan on making a female version (step through)?? I would buy 2 if they did.

Reply
Court Rye
2 months ago

Hi Jon! I have no idea… but am sure we will see some updates with the 2018 line of Rad Power Bikes. It does make sense to have a low-step or even more of a mid-step for their city bike. They did have two versions but I felt that both were a bit on the tall side this year :)

Reply
Jon Knudson
2 months ago

Have you done a review on “Wave” e-bikes”? If so where can I find it? Thanks . . . Jon

Reply
Court Rye
2 months ago

Hi Jon, I almost had a chance when visiting Los Angeles a while back but missed out. I will keep an eye out for it and appreciate you asking here. Perhaps there are people in the EBR Forums who have tried it or can comment?

Reply
Jon Knudson
2 months ago

Hi Court, I see you did some reviews on the iGO Canadian Metro back a few years. Now they have the iGO “Explore’ which is a step through. The motor is now different and a few other things have been upgraded since you did review and price is lower. Have you kept track of the changes and have any comments ?

Reply
Court Rye
2 months ago

Hi Jon! Unfortunately, I have not been able to visit iGO since that last trip and have not seen any of their new products in person as I traveled to California, Washington, Vancouver, and Utah recently. I will keep an eye out for you, but so far it is not on my list. Maybe someone in the EBR Forums can comment or provide some conversation about the new Explore model :)

Reply
(S450)
4 weeks ago

Just one quick question: just how bad is the drag of the gearless motor? (like, how hard is it to pedal with NO motor assistance?) I am seriously considering this bike. It seems Rad… Couldn’t help it.

Reply
Court Rye
3 weeks ago

It’s not a deal killer, I think sometimes with so many choices out there, it’s easy to look at each and every detail and judge… but it works well enough and is going to be more durable than a geared design. So, there are trade-offs. It is not so noticeable when riding with the bike powered on, and especially when using assist, but if you turn the bike off it may feel just a bit like the tires are slightly low on air, just a bit of slowdown and drag there.

Reply

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mrgold35
16 hours ago

Excellent write-up on first impressions for new ebikers. Price was first on my list because my thinking was to work out the pros/cons and likes/dislikes before moving on to my 2nd ebike purchase a few years down the road (hopefully prices, range, and capabilities would also improve the next 2-3 yrs). I figured a few years with the Radrovers would give me an excellent starting point with a lot of ebike experience to draw from on my next e-ride.

I've had my two his/her Radrovers for over an year with +3500 miles between them. The RadCity wasn't available at time of purchase and I might have done one of each (RadCity for the wife). I had to make a few mods like 0-60 degree adjustable handlebar stem, better pedals, Cloud-9 cruiser seat, and Suntour suspension seatpost. I found the Rad bikes are like a "Swiss army knife" or "Gerber multi-tool" of ebikes. Not the best in any one area; but, very good to have if you encounter a lot of different situations.

The amount of debis you run over in the road when commuting is unbelievable! I've had issues with commuting flats with standard Kenda tires. It helped to use Mr. Tuffy liners and Stans tire sealant in the tubes. What really helped was Mr. Tuffy+Stans+Vee8 tires. I have yet to have a flat riding the exact same routes with the Vee8 tires +1200 miles compared to 5 "tire falling off the rim" flats with the Kenda. Upgrading the tires might save you from a flat or two.

I'm constantly tweaking the brakes and derailleur on my rovers and I have several problems related to the bike being beat up during shipping. The issues we will have at this price point; but, I've learned so much about bike maintenance that is extremely helpful.

I keep my rovers in the garage at home. I have to take my rover to the 2nd floor to store at work in a private room next to my office (I have the only key). I'm lucky to have an elevator near the main entrance that lets off next to my office area at 6am. I take my rover down the back fire escape stairs after work since the door lets out closer to my direction of travel (and I avoid running into +20 folks asking about my bike). I use to carry my bike down the stairs until I discovered it was waaaaay easier to walk it down the stairs riding both brakes. I also discovered (when the elevator was down), I can push the rover up stairs using the throttle. Much easier to apply the throttle is this application if you attached a thumb throttle.

Hopefully, the negative first impression will not be a lasting impression of the capabilities of the RadCity.

IWantABike
2 days ago

Hi all! I need some help with choosing my first ebike. A little bit of info on me - I'm 5'7" and 130lbs. I'm planning to use the bike around town, run errands, and ride on trails once in a while for fun with my family. I also have a 9 year old daughter who has special needs and doesn't walk. So I'd like to go biking with her pulling a trailer with my daughter in it (the trailer is 34lbs and my daughter is 90lbs). We live in a fairly flat area. I've been looking and seems like the RadCity, Juiced CrossCurrent S, and Surface 604 Rook might be good. Thoughts?

mid drive merv
2 days ago

Disclaimer: This is my first ever Ebike, so my expectations may be unreliable. If so, feel free to tell me off so I can make better purchase decisions in future.

After spending weeks researching on BBSHD conversions, I got lazy and picked this bike because it looked cool, EBR seemd to like it, and the specs looked great for the price.

Model: 16"

Use: Bought this bike for a sweatless daily travel of 18 miles to and from work. Route is pure tarmac road/trail, with the exception of this particular 100 yard stretch with tree roots cracking open the trail path. Slight up/down gradients no more than 6 degrees (calculated using my Runkeeper elevation chart) along the way making up about 5% of the trip.

Delivery:
Free shipping is great. Delivery was prompt and fast. However, the UPS people dumped the box on first floor. Had a fun time hauling the 70lb package up the stairs alone. The plastic handles on the cardboard box are not reliable, do not use them to pull. Mine gave way causing the box to cut up my knuckles. Wear gloves and pull on the plastic straps, get help if possible.

Assembly:
Followed the assembly video on the Rad website. It was really frustrating to assemble alone, mostly due to the weight of the frame causing it to constantly want to tip over and smack my face. The overly tightened disc brakes made installing the front wheel (the first time) really painful, and the rear wheel rotor kept squeaking.

The rear derailleur is okay. Not tuned out of the box so it can't go below gear 5. I don't use anything less than gear 5 so didn't bother indexing it. Both disc brakes are overly tightened, I highly recommend tuning them before first ride and get the rear wheel removal pain over with ASAP.

Bike Weight:
I severely underestimated what 60+lbs meant.

If you stay on any floor other than level one, you're going to have a fun time. I don't lift, but have sort of decent upper body and leg strength. This bike is very unwieldy to carry up and down the stairs. After a few times of experimenting and eventually injuring my wrist+elbows, I found the most efficient and least painful method to carry it.

Squat down to wrap the upper frame bar under your armpit with the saddle above your shoulders. Grip the lower frame bar directly beside the rear hub motor and lift it up with your legs, with your other hand holding on to the handle bar to prevent the heavy fork from giving you a bitch slap. This method gives you enough height clearance (I'm 5'5" 150lb so YMMV) to go upstairs without the front wheel bouncing off the steps, while relieving stress on your joints.

First ride impressions:
It was really awesome to ride. The heavy frame makes the bike really stable. The large rear rack welded to the frame made carrying all sorts of cargo really easy. The throttle was great and the cadence sensor was quick to respond. Again, this is my first ebike, so not sure how responsive candence sensors should be like. Motor was very quiet; all I hear is the rolling of the tire treads. Free toolkit was a nice touch.

Impressions after riding the first 10 miles:
Ride quality is generally smooth until you hit the bumps. Get a suspension seatpost if budget allows if you don't enjoy having your crotch violently punched by a 60lb frame.

The 20mph limit was extremely irritating. From what I learnt on YouTube, I thought a 20mph limit meant that the motor will only assist up to 20mph, and speeds beyond that require extra effort to pedal. It didn't really feel that way with this bike. At 20mph, the motor actively kicks with its regenerative braking to stop you from going faster. It activates unpredictably causing really unnatural feeling. The closest analogy I can give is driving a car while someone is randomly tapping your brakes. Or if you drive a Nissan Leaf, imagine randomly lifting off your foot from acceleration while driving on ECO.

That said, you are able to enter the metric-based settings mode to increase the speed limit from 32kph to 40kph (~25mph). That made the ride a lot more natural, with short bursts of ~23mph going down gradients, but averaged at 20mph on flats with minimal pedalling.

Impressions after 100 miles:
This may be an issue of bad luck. Rad recommends 50-60psi, so I kept both wheels at 55 psi. My front wheel got a puncture less than 50 miles into riding the bike. A week later at 100 miles, my rear wheel got a puncture on the way to work. The culprit was a tiny piece of rock not more than 2mm wide embedded into the tires. For comparison, my $300 hybrid bike hasn't had a puncture in 7 years, of which 1000+ miles were put on this exact same route.

The rear wheel is tightly bolted down. The EBR YouTube review glosses over this, but mark my words you'll want to throw the bike into the ravine when you get your first rear wheel flat if you didn't do prior preparations to the rear wheel (anti-seize, grease etc.). The spanner provided in the free tool kit is way too short to loosen the bolt, so you'll need to hammer it to make it work. For me, hammering didn't work as the free spanner was chipping before the bolt would budge. I just ordered a new spanner set with a larger spanner instead. The free screwdriver provided was undersized for the bolt washer plate, causing stripping to the screw. My rear wheel bolt dust cover also managed to slip off while riding, so that sucks.

During the rear wheel tube patching, I realized the Rad team installed the tube valve incorrectly. The Schrader valve was only threaded halfway through, so the rim hole had been slicing into the valve. Didn't want to risk another rear wheel removal, so used a new tube instead of a patch.

The Rad rep stated that consumables are not covered under their limited warranty, which I can totally understand. But it'd be nice to at least cover the first 100 miles in case of assembly errors on their part.

I intend to swap out the Kenda K905-007 tires for maybe Schwalbe tires to prevent more commute pain. In the meantime, also budgeting for a BBSHD to convert my hybrid before selling this bike, purely due to the bad taste in my mouth.

Radcity Prep Kit before hitting the road:
1. Your typical bicycle multitool.
2. A screwdriver that won't strip the washer screw. (+$5)
3. The free toolkit (after applying anti-seize/grease to the rear wheel bolts)
4. Patch kit, granted this is required for any bike. (+$5)
5. Wire cutter (to cut zip ties during rear wheel removal) (+$5)
6. At least 2 backup tubes, given the high failure rate I've experienced. (+$18)
7. Change the damn tires for decent puncture resistant ones. (+$100)
8. Tape down the rear wheel bolt dust covers, or just don't use them at all.

Who this bike is for:
1. Heavyweight and strong riders.
2. People who need a strong sturdy frame to carry heavy cargo.
3. People who already have a decent tool set in their house.
4. Riders who can store the bike on ground floor.
5. Riders who are less whiny than me.

Summary:
From my understanding $1500 is considered entry-level pricing for an ebike, but the price point still makes me sort of expect more from the product, considering the same price can get me an excellent 2017 Trek Emonda ALR5. At the very least, don't have the bike break down every 50 miles. What I got was a lot of buyer remorse and extra hidden costs that came with PITA bike maintenance. If you do intend to buy this bike, just budget a bit more to upgrade the parts, prep the bike before your ride, and you should have a better time than I had.

LeftyLoosey
2 days ago

Disclaimer: This is my first ever Ebike, so my expectations may be unreliable. If so, feel free to tell me off so I can make better purchase decisions in future.

After spending weeks researching on BBSHD conversions, I got lazy and picked this bike because it looked cool, EBR seemd to like it, and the specs looked great for the price.

Model: 16"

Use: Bought this bike for a sweatless daily travel of 18 miles to and from work. Route is pure tarmac road/trail, with the exception of this particular 100 yard stretch with tree roots cracking open the trail path. Slight up/down gradients no more than 6 degrees (calculated using my Runkeeper elevation chart) along the way making up about 5% of the trip.

Delivery:
Free shipping is great. Delivery was prompt and fast. However, the UPS people dumped the box on first floor. Had a fun time hauling the 70lb package up the stairs alone. The plastic handles on the cardboard box are not reliable, do not use them to pull. Mine gave way causing the box to cut up my knuckles. Wear gloves and pull on the plastic straps, get help if possible.

Assembly:
Followed the assembly video on the Rad website. It was really frustrating to assemble alone, mostly due to the weight of the frame causing it to constantly want to tip over and smack my face. The overly tightened disc brakes made installing the front wheel (the first time) really painful, and the rear wheel rotor kept squeaking.

The rear derailleur is okay. Not tuned out of the box so it can't go below gear 5. I don't use anything less than gear 5 so didn't bother indexing it. Both disc brakes are overly tightened, I highly recommend tuning them before first ride and get the rear wheel removal pain over with ASAP.

Bike Weight:
I severely underestimated what 60+lbs meant.

If you stay on any floor other than level one, you're going to have a fun time. I don't lift, but have sort of decent upper body and leg strength. This bike is very unwieldy to carry up and down the stairs. After a few times of experimenting and eventually injuring my wrist+elbows, I found the most efficient and least painful method to carry it.

Squat down to wrap the upper frame bar under your armpit with the saddle above your shoulders. Grip the lower frame bar directly beside the rear hub motor and lift it up with your legs, with your other hand holding on to the handle bar to prevent the heavy fork from giving you a bitch slap. This method gives you enough height clearance (I'm 5'5" 150lb so YMMV) to go upstairs without the front wheel bouncing off the steps, while relieving stress on your joints.

First ride impressions:
It was really awesome to ride. The heavy frame makes the bike really stable. The large rear rack welded to the frame made carrying all sorts of cargo really easy. The throttle was great and the cadence sensor was quick to respond. Again, this is my first ebike, so not sure how responsive candence sensors should be like. Motor was very quiet; all I hear is the rolling of the tire treads. Free toolkit was a nice touch.

Impressions after riding the first 10 miles:
Ride quality is generally smooth until you hit the bumps. Get a suspension seatpost if budget allows if you don't enjoy having your crotch violently punched by a 60lb frame.

The 20mph limit was extremely irritating. From what I learnt on YouTube, I thought a 20mph limit meant that the motor will only assist up to 20mph, and speeds beyond that require extra effort to pedal. It didn't really feel that way with this bike. At 20mph, the motor actively kicks with its regenerative braking to stop you from going faster. It activates unpredictably causing really unnatural feeling. The closest analogy I can give is driving a car while someone is randomly tapping your brakes. Or if you drive a Nissan Leaf, imagine randomly lifting off your foot from acceleration while driving on ECO.

That said, you are able to enter the metric-based settings mode to increase the speed limit from 32kph to 40kph (~25mph). That made the ride a lot more natural, with short bursts of ~23mph going down gradients, but averaged at 20mph on flats with minimal pedalling.

Impressions after 100 miles:
This may be an issue of bad luck. Rad recommends 50-60psi, so I kept both wheels at 55 psi. My front wheel got a puncture less than 50 miles into riding the bike. A week later at 100 miles, my rear wheel got a puncture on the way to work. The culprit was a tiny piece of rock not more than 2mm wide embedded into the tires. For comparison, my $300 hybrid bike hasn't had a puncture in 7 years, of which 1000+ miles were put on this exact same route.

The rear wheel is tightly bolted down. The EBR YouTube review glosses over this, but mark my words you'll want to throw the bike into the ravine when you get your first rear wheel flat if you didn't do prior preparations to the rear wheel (anti-seize, grease etc.). The spanner provided in the free tool kit is way too short to loosen the bolt, so you'll need to hammer it to make it work. For me, hammering didn't work as the free spanner was chipping before the bolt would budge. I just ordered a new spanner set with a larger spanner instead. The free screwdriver provided was undersized for the bolt washer plate, causing stripping to the screw. My rear wheel bolt dust cover also managed to slip off while riding, so that sucks.

During the rear wheel tube patching, I realized the Rad team installed the tube valve incorrectly. The Schrader valve was only threaded halfway through, so the rim hole had been slicing into the valve. Didn't want to risk another rear wheel removal, so used a new tube instead of a patch.

The Rad rep stated that consumables are not covered under their limited warranty, which I can totally understand. But it'd be nice to at least cover the first 100 miles in case of assembly errors on their part.

I intend to swap out the Kenda K905-007 tires for maybe Schwalbe tires to prevent more commute pain. In the meantime, also budgeting for a BBSHD to convert my hybrid before selling this bike, purely due to the bad taste in my mouth.

Radcity Prep Kit before hitting the road:
1. Your typical bicycle multitool.
2. A screwdriver that won't strip the washer screw. (+$5)
3. The free toolkit (after applying anti-seize/grease to the rear wheel bolts)
4. Patch kit, granted this is required for any bike. (+$5)
5. Wire cutter (to cut zip ties during rear wheel removal) (+$5)
6. At least 2 backup tubes, given the high failure rate I've experienced. (+$18)
7. Change the damn tires for decent puncture resistant ones. (+$100)
8. Tape down the rear wheel bolt dust covers, or just don't use them at all.

Who this bike is for:
1. Heavyweight and strong riders.
2. People who need a strong sturdy frame to carry heavy cargo.
3. People who already have a decent tool set in their house.
4. Riders who can store the bike on ground floor.
5. Riders who are less whiny than me.

Summary:
From my understanding $1500 is considered entry-level pricing for an ebike, but the price point still makes me sort of expect more from the product, considering the same price can get me an excellent 2017 Trek Emonda ALR5. At the very least, don't have the bike break down every 50 miles. What I got was a lot of buyer remorse and extra hidden costs that came with PITA bike maintenance. If you do intend to buy this bike, just budget a bit more to upgrade the parts, prep the bike before your ride, and you should have a better time than I had.

Briggs Anderson
1 week ago

I am curious if these electric bikes can tow a bike trailer like a Burley D'Light? Probably weighs 80#s with both my kids in it. I like that idea better than having the child seat on the back of the bike itself. Then I could easily attach/detach the trailer.

Briggs Anderson
1 week ago

So you got the RadCity? My wife is going to commute with the bike. Then we want to be able to haul our kids around with the bike as well. I was curious if you were ever able to tow around a child trailer with the RadCity?

Islandrog
2 weeks ago

The Radcity or Surface604 Rook or Colt should be considered. Check out the reviews by Court.

Mark23
2 months ago

Thanks for your suggestion - it looks like a nice bike, like many I've seen. But from the pics it looks like it lacks the swept-back handlebars we wanted. At one bike store we went to, they didn't seem to crazy about the idea of swapping out handlebars, so I don't know if that is an option. Thanks, Mark.

If you get some ebikes, I predict your biking frequency will go way up. I'm 64 and put on 2,000 miles last year, 1,700 so far this year. You can get lighter bikes, but will be short distance riding due to small battery packs. For your price bracket, I suggest the RadCity Commuter bike. It will give you racks to carry panniers and that let's you pack a lunch. I find that suspension forks, suspension seat post, and medium sized tires make for a very comfortable ride for my aging joints.

rich c
2 months ago

If you get some ebikes, I predict your biking frequency will go way up. I'm 64 and put on 2,000 miles last year, 1,700 so far this year. You can get lighter bikes, but will be short distance riding due to small battery packs. For your price bracket, I suggest the RadCity Commuter bike. It will give you racks to carry panniers and that let's you pack a lunch. I find that suspension forks, suspension seat post, and medium sized tires make for a very comfortable ride for my aging joints.

Redeemed
3 months ago

So, my wife and I ride our Rad's to work most days. Her mini slowly walks away from me, and I'm peddling hard in 6th gear on PAS 3., and she is running the mini in 4th gear on PAS 4.
Also when using just the throttle, the speedometer reads 19.3 - 19.5 on flat ground...never 20MPH. Is that normal?

post
3 months ago

Just received my RadCity bike today and the LCD screen will not turn on.

I am not sure where to begin to troubleshoot this problem. The immediately accessible connections all appear to be properly secure.

Steve2014
3 months ago

Yes, I purchased the larger frame. Although right at 6'0, either the medium or large frame will work perfectly well. It sorta comes down to personal preference. I almost wish I had gotten the medium frame instead, but that's only because my previous non-electric bike was more like the medium-sized Juiced frame, and that's what I was used to riding. The large frame felt a little too big for me at first, but now that I've put some miles on it I've become adjusted to it and like it.

As for the throttle, I've found that I hardly ever use it. Which actually surprised me. I had an electric bike in the past and used the throttle frequently, so I figured it would be the same with my Juiced bike. But I've found that the CrossCurrent Air with torque sensor has enough power such that I never really need to use the throttle. In the highest gear from a dead stop (and in Sport mode), once you start pedaling the power immediately kicks in...and quite strongly at that. I actually accelerate faster by peddling than I do with the throttle, which is a very different experience - in a good way - than with my previous bike. I'm not kidding...this bike really does have a surprising amount of power for only having a 350 watt motor. At least, compared to my old e-bike it does. Juiced uses batteries with a 3C discharge rate, and I've read that this higher discharge rate helps with the power.

Like you, I did a ton of research before choosing a bike. I wanted to keep it under $1,500 if possible. My choices finally came down to the GenZe Sport, RadCity or Juiced CrossCurrent Air. I was able to more quickly eliminate the GenZe bike because it only had a 36v battery and 250 watt motor (although they recently added a 350 watt option for an extra $100). The big attraction of the GenZe was that it mostly looked like a "normal" bike, and GenZe has its own dealership in my city. Ergo, it would have been a very easy purchase. But I determined the other two bikes simply had better overall specs for the money. The RadCity was my #2 choice, and I suspect I probably would have been happy with it too. But I chose the Juiced bike instead, primarily for these six reasons:

1. Speed was the most important factor to me, and the CrossCurrent Air is a legit 28mph bike (Class 3) while the RadCity is a 20mph (Class 2) bike;
2. I wanted a geared hub motor rather than a direct drive hub motor. My last bike was a direct drive, and it had NO torque whatsoever. (Although keep in mind, hub motors in general don't have a great deal of torque...geared or not.)
3. I wanted a torque sensor. While it's a subjective thing, I think torque sensors are superior to cadence sensors. I don't know of any other bike in this price range with a torque sensor.
4. I liked the Juiced design better. IMO, the Juiced bike looks more like a "normal" bike than the RadCity. Especially with its smaller, geared hub motor.
5. The Juiced bike was a couple hundred dollars less than the RadCity, and there is a Juiced Bikes dealer in my city (important if I ever need any warranty work.)
6. Juiced has a fantastic reputation. Although in fairness, I suspect Radbikes probably does too. I honestly don't know.

That said, the RadCity has some of its own advantages. For example, it comes with a better stock battery (11.6AH Panasonic). And I suspect the RadCity is a perfectly good bike in its own right. But after doing a comparison and deciding what factors were most important to me, I went with the Juiced CrossCurrent Air. And I'm glad I did!

OrangeWagon
3 months ago

Hey Monica,
Que chevere que te anímes por un bici eléctrica!

I think shipping would be your most limiting factor.
In terms of price and value, I think the RadCity would be your best bet, but not sure about the shipping part.

Yo tengo una RadWagon, y me gusta muchisimo para llevar a mi hija al colegio, e ir al super mercado. Pero es bien grande y pesada - quizas la RadCity sea una mucha mejor opción para ti.

Another option is to get a kit (easier to ship), and you convert a bike there... check out https://lunacycle.com/

Saludos!
Tona

Monica Piñeros
3 months ago

Hi everyone! In the next months a want to buy an ebike but I am absolutely lost about which one is the perfect match for me. Here are some info about my location, budget and needs:

- I live in Bogota, Colombia. I work as a real estate broker and I am tired of traffic and cars. Here traffic is caotic, so ive been moving in a mountain bike and its great. However, the city is not a plain at all, part of it is steep terrain so I need a ebike that helps me with that, without being so heavy.

- Budget: Between $1300 and $1700 USD

- Bodytype: Im short! But I like big wheels bikes. Not the small ones.

- Since I dont live in the US, its important to know how good customer service is, or if it has International support. If the bike damages, can i fix the problem easily?

Ive been reading and some options ive seen are: SHIMA A2B, MAGNUM UI5 and RadCity commuter bike from Rad Power. Any suggestion? Preference? Recomendation?

Or if you have other options please let me know! Thanks your your help.

WilliamT
3 months ago

I prefer the RadCity over the CrossCurrent for the following reasons
- its a better value when you include the adjustable stem, fenders, rack, generic dolphin battery.
- the wider tires are much easier to ride on trails with gravel and sand.

For hub bikes, I have 2 with a 350w geared hub, a RadWagon (same direct drive hub as the RadCity).

I would say the 350w geared hub on the CrossCurrent will climb better than the 750w direct drive hub.

On flat roads, the direct drive is going to run more efficiently and will definitely be quieter (almost completely silent) vs the constant sound from geared hub.

I'm not a big fan of the CrossCurrent proprietary battery. Sure you can always replacing the wiring but I don't need to do that with the RadCity. At $60/ah, those CrossCurrent batteries are expensive. The RadCity battery I can get on other sites like Dillenger and Luna where the cost is around $30/ah to $38/ah

emco5
3 months ago

The climb would be easier with a geared hub, and much easier with a mid-drive, but all will work you and probably be slower than you'd expect. The boost is still worth the price of admission, though. :) You are turning a 48 tooth chainring on the RadCity which is a bit tall for hills. If you could drop a few teeth to reduce your work load and spin a little faster you might be able to climb quicker.

Redeemed
3 months ago

I've had the RadCity for a week now and all riding has been on level ground...love it. I have a hill next to me that is a mile long at a 10% incline I've wanted to try and today was the day. I was hoping to zip up the hill at 20 MPH, but that didn't happen. More like 10 MPH in 2nd gear @ 3 assist level. It was more of a workout than I had expected. But I would have never made it up the hill with my Kona 21 speed without stopping numerous times...so I'm happy with that! So, what has been you experience going up step hills, I'd like to know?

shawn wolowicz
4 months ago

Hi folks, newb to the forum. I'm not a mechanic of any kind and I haven't worked on a bike in years, but I think my new RadCity may have come wither the wrong fork attached. The fork appears to be way to wide for the wheel provided. The very outside edges of the threaded part of the axle BARELY touches the dropouts. Barely. I'm guessing maybe fat tire fork is on the bike. Images attached.

I'd appreciate any thoughts on this. I've already emailed Rad Power, but imagine I won't hear anything before next week.

Thanks,
Shawn

1/2
mrgold35
4 months ago

Once you add up two Radrover ebikes, shipping, and any extra accessories, you will be under the $2000 per if you picked the Radrover. Rad Power Bikes also makes a folding Radmini with 4" fat tires if you need a smaller storage footprint or you need something with a lower stand over height. The Radcity has pretty much the same specs as the Rover; but, has 2.3" tires, fenders, two different frame sizes, rear rack along with front suspension. I like the 4" fat tires because they can travel between paved roads, sandy beaches, and every where else in-between very smoothly. I work commute at 20-23 mph for 13 miles roundtrip on paved roads and sometimes take a detour to ride the hard packed to sandy single track trails before or after work without missing a beat.

You can find the same mix of bikes with Volt, Teo, and some others around the same price range. I would get something within the 2"-4" tire range, 48v, 11 to 17 A/h battery, twist or hand throttle with Pedal assist, front suspension forks, cargo capacity (or mounts for racks/baskets), 500-750 watts, and 180mm brakes.

Pretty much all ebikes in this range are around +60 lbs if that is a consideration. That weight is too heavy for my wife to lift on our platform bike rack even with the 7 lbs battery removed.

I don't have a RV; but, I do travel with my Radrovers on my SUV (Grand Canyon, Sedona, eastern NM). I had no problems travelling with the Radrover once I prepped for the road (removed battery, seat post with seat, rack bag, wrapped LCD in saran wrap, etc...). I even have a weather proof travel cover that encases both bikes and the rack if we run into really bad weather or if I want to cover the bikes overnight on the back of the SUV.

Robert L. Murphy
4 months ago

I have a RadCity that as far as I can tell, has regenerative braking, charges the battery while costing and going down hills without pedaling. The problem is that there is no way to charge the battery while pedaling. I think that all I need to do is add a switch to the cadence sensor. With cadence sensor off, I could pedal on level ground (more exercise) and pedal down hills, charging the battery while doing so. The problem I have now is that on long trips, without a lot of down hill, the battery dies after 20 to 30 miles of pedaling and then as long as I keep pedaling, the battery never charges. On long trips, I'd love to keep the cadence sensor on anytime the battery is full and off the rest of the time except when climbing hills (even with gradual slops) or accelerating after a stop light (for example). Has anyone done this? I was thinking about using a really nice head light switch but would that have too much resistance for the weak signal generated by the magnets passing the sensor? Before I strip the sensor cable, are there just two wires in there? Is it a passive sensor? Or does power go to the sensor?
Never mind, boots up at level 1, just noticed can down arrow to level 0, which effectively accomplishes what I was attempting to accomplish.

Grant Brugger
4 months ago

I ordered my rear light from RAD Power Bikes. The same light as used on the RADCity will fit the RPB RAD Rover rack. Fits perfect. Uses regular double A batteries but that is OK with me. I called/emailed RAD Power Bikes to place the order.
How much was it?

MarkP
4 months ago

I ordered my rear light from RAD Power Bikes. The same light as used on the RADCity will fit the RPB RAD Rover rack. Fits perfect. Uses regular double A batteries but that is OK with me. I called/emailed RAD Power Bikes to place the order.

mrgold35
4 months ago

I have a Radrover hub drive bike at around 70 lbs fully loaded (accessories, rack, rack bag). It does have 2 mph walk feature; but, I've never tried to use it up inclines or stairs. I just use the throttle (converted from a twist to thumb throttle). I have tried the throttle up 2 flights of stairs and it work great because it only turns the rear wheel and you can modulate or hold between zero and full 750w of power with the thumb throttle I added.

Even at +70 lbs, the Radrover is very easy to walk down stair just by using both hand brakes (not ride down; but, walk beside it). When I work commute, I store my Radrover in my server room next to my office on the 2nd floor. Elevator up in the morning at 6am and down the fire escape stairs well out the back door at 3pm.

Rad Power Bikes does make the Radcity with the same programming and 750w rear hub motor (2 sizes, headlight, throttle and PAS levels 0-5, rear rack, front/rear fenders, front suspension forks included). The only difference is it has smaller 2.3" tires for city riding; but, it still comes in at +60 lbs like the larger Radrover (minus 7 lbs without battery). Even the small Radmini folding bike still comes in at +60 lbs.

JeffDG
4 months ago

Thanks everyone for your responses!!
Too bad that most of the Haibikes are limited at 20mph.
I do like the design of the RadCity, though I don't think I'd take that off road (edit: single track). The other day we went to Columbus OH and road some e-bikes...Haibike, Juiced, Raleigh... and fell in love with the center Drive system...and I only rode the Yamaha, which was fantastic. The Juiced CrossCurrent was nice enough, but just didn't feel very natural, rather dead on start; but did better at higher (~15mph) speeds. The mid-drive worked marvelous throughout the entire speed range. It's true...it really felt like it was "more me" riding.

Two I did fine that meet almost all my criteria, but are budget busters are the Bulls six50 E Street ---28mph, center Drive, 100mm shock...but $3800... yikes. The other is the Haibike Hardnine Street 4.5 which loses out because it's only a 20mph, 29er, and almost $4k. Hmm...if I'm stuck in this price range, I feel like I could get a center-drive commute and convert my Trek Marlin.

Vinícius Peluqui
2 days ago

when pedaling, does it feel like the pedals are loose, like when you are too fast for a gear?

Vinícius Peluqui
2 days ago

thanks!

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 days ago

It could probably feel that way if you're in a low gear but the throttle has taken you faster... but the RadCity has a seven speed drivetrain so I feel like it pretty well covers the 20 mph top assisted speed and feels good if you just switch gears :)

Julian Lohss
2 weeks ago

Only half way through the video though.

Julian Lohss
2 weeks ago

Does the motor drag on you pedaling if The battery dies? Seriously looking.

James Hargis
3 weeks ago

Thanks for the review. I purchased one of the 20" city bikes from their Ballard store. Its been an amazing ride so far. The throttle is great when you need it but the lower pedal assists are good enough to get you up to a decent speed. Using mostly pedal assist 1 and 2 I was able to ride 34 miles today on a single charge. The bike is a little on the heavy side but also feel very sturdy and well built. As a 275lb guy I still get plenty of power and have conquered some pretty steep hills in the Seattle area.

ElectricBikeReview.com
3 weeks ago

Wow, 34 miles with one charge is pretty good! Thanks for sharing your experience with this bike and also your weight so that people with a similar body type can get an idea for how it would work :)

Smurdle450
4 weeks ago

1 question: How bad is the drag of the gearless motor? like how hard/bad is it to pedal without battery power?

RadCity eBike Vlog
1 month ago

This video made me order a RadCity!! Had it for a week now and love the bike. Thanks for doing a review!

Hemp Viking
1 month ago

Fat Tire or Street Tire ... Im gona buy next week .... Im full time RVer what would you do?

Wm Napier
1 month ago

Could someone explain to me a little about the stand over height!!! Is it the height to the top of the frame bar in front of the seat. Asking because I am a little short legged and 31.5" on the 16" Frame seams a little high for me!!! (Maybe)

SIZING

The RadCity electric commuter bike comes in two frame sizes with recommended rider heights of:

16" Frame Size (31.5" stand over): 5'2" - 5'10"
20" Frame Size (32.5" stand over): 5'11" - 6'7"

Tom Irwin
1 month ago

I'm impressed with Rad.. fair pricing & solid prroducts ! Thanks guys/girls, VERY much appreciated.. Thank you Cort/EBR for your reviews, always a trusted source..

Hamid Shibata Bennett
1 month ago

I thought I heard a mention of the chain hopping off the gears on the Radcity in another one if your reviews. Is this still an issue?

Jon Neet
2 months ago

Can someone explain "regenerative braking"?

Jon Neet
2 months ago

We live on the big island of Hawaii near Hilo, in the Puna District. It is an area that gets loads of rain, yet has awesome sunny days. I have been caught in rains so hard here, you had to pull the car over and wait it out, as wipers, even at high speeds, would not let you see. Been caught in heavy rains on my SYM HD200 scooter a few times, and limped home.

I am considering an electric bike, mostly for runs to Pahoa and back (maybe 12 -16 miles round) and into the beaches in Hilo and back (more like 32-36 miles round). This bike, having fenders included, is a big attraction should I get caught in a rain.

Meno Passini
2 months ago

Does anyone one know of a better quality electric bike?

TheXboxTacoThing
1 month ago

Meno Passini they don't exist, these are the best

Stephen Davis
2 months ago

My wife and I recently purchased Radcity bikes and love them! One question; towards the end of the vid review you mention that you "tap" the brakes to engage the regen braking and the video shows power being put back into the battery although you are not applying the brakes. (no hands on either brake lever) IE it appears that you just give the brakes a light tap and the regen stays engaged until you apply power. I think something may have changed in the Radcity bikes that are being produced today. In order to engage regen on our bikes we have to "apply" the brakes. IE; we have to keep the brakes applied, vs. just tapping, to engage the regen. We find this to be a disadvantage on big hills where the brakes end up doing most of the braking work. Are we missing something? Thanks!

Gerald Scott
3 months ago

What is the approximate range of this bike with NO pedaling on a relatively flat road at about 10 mph with a 160 pound rider? I need a commuter bike to get to work and back, but I'm disabled and cannot pedal. I need at least a 10 mile range.

Marley J
1 month ago

I think its around 20 miles or so!!  Definitely more than ten miles.

ZacPerfect 1
3 months ago

I know this Bike is good for rugged terrain but would it be good for hunting(transportation)

PopcornShrimp
1 week ago

ZacPerfect 1 the radrover might be what your looking for. The engine isnt as quiet but it has more torque so itll be better on rougher terrain. It has no shocks but it has big fat wheels that should absorb most impacts

Mike Malloy
4 months ago

Looks like a nice bike that covers much of what I'm looking for. The one thing that concerns me is that the display is not removable. This concerns me when leaving the bike locked in a bike rack unattended. WIthout the display, the bike would be less a target and useless for potential thieves.

Andrew Mullen
4 months ago

I love it but find myself wanting to go faster than the 20mph limit. Is there any way to bypass this limit?

pie189
4 months ago

think that bike would work well in the snow?

VideoNOLA
5 months ago

For the entire minute from 24:00 and on, my ears tell me the motor never cut out, even when you stopped pedaling. Seems to contradict your assertion that they've "dialed in" the 6-magnet cadence design... or does it?