Rad Power Bikes RadMission 1 Review

Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Electric Bike Review
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 500 Watt Geared Hub Motor
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Removable 48 Volt 10 5 Amp Hour Battery Pack
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Swept Back Handlebar Ergonomic Grips
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Led Display Panel Closeup
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Spanninga Axendo 40 Headlight
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Kenda Kontact Tires With Reflective Stripes Puncture Resistant
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Tektro Aries 180mm Disc Brakes
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Velo Active Saddle
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 50 Tooth Chainring With Alloy Guide
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Steel Torque Arm Optional Kickstand
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Motor Controller 12 Fet Irfb 4110
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Bottom Bracket Closeup Internally Routed Wires
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Sealed Cadence Sensor 14 Pulse Bb
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Spanninga Solo Integrated Rear Light
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Ebike
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Led Charge Level Indicator 4 Bars
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Battery Slide Track Mount
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 New Battery Pack 504 Watt Hours
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Ebike Charger Tool Kit Instructions
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Ebike Charger 2 Amp
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Mobile Service Van
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Stock High Step Steel Blue
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Stock High Step Black
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Stock High Step Gray
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Stock Mid Step Red
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Stock Mid Step Black
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Stock Mid Step White
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Electric Bike Review
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 500 Watt Geared Hub Motor
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Removable 48 Volt 10 5 Amp Hour Battery Pack
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Swept Back Handlebar Ergonomic Grips
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Led Display Panel Closeup
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Spanninga Axendo 40 Headlight
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Kenda Kontact Tires With Reflective Stripes Puncture Resistant
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Tektro Aries 180mm Disc Brakes
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Velo Active Saddle
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 50 Tooth Chainring With Alloy Guide
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Steel Torque Arm Optional Kickstand
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Motor Controller 12 Fet Irfb 4110
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Bottom Bracket Closeup Internally Routed Wires
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Sealed Cadence Sensor 14 Pulse Bb
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Spanninga Solo Integrated Rear Light
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Ebike
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Led Charge Level Indicator 4 Bars
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Battery Slide Track Mount
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 New Battery Pack 504 Watt Hours
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Ebike Charger Tool Kit Instructions
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Ebike Charger 2 Amp
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Mobile Service Van
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Stock High Step Steel Blue
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Stock High Step Black
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Stock High Step Gray
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Stock Mid Step Red
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Stock Mid Step Black
Rad Power Bikes Radmission 1 Stock Mid Step White

Summary

  • The lightest, most affordable electric bike from Rad Power Bikes. Available in two frame sizes and styles including a sturdy high-step diamond and approachable mid-step mixte. Six color schemes let you personalize the bike and stand out, which is rare for cheaper electric bikes. Lots of attachment points for optional fenders, racks, baskets, bottles, and frame locks.
  • Surprisingly powerful geared hub motor offers 50nm of torque. Single speed drivetrain is quiet, durable, and simple to use. An aluminum alloy chainring guide and chain tensioner reduces the potential for drops. Kenda Kontact puncture resistant tires, steel torque arm, stainless steel hardware, rust resistant chain, DNP freewheel sprocket, and sealed bottom bracket make the bike durable.
  • Reflective tires and Spanninga integrated lights improve safety. The headlight offers 40 LUX and the rear light has solid, blinking, and bright mode when braking. Both brakes have motor inhibitors to cut power instantly when stopping. Sealed 14-pulse cadence sensor and variable speed twist throttle are intuitive and responsive.
  • At 47.8lbs, it's heavier than other single speed ebikes I've reviewed, but also offers a higher weight rating of 275lbs and has a stronger front basket mount. Geared high with 50 tooth chainring and 16 tooth rear cog, designed for slow steady pedaling... most comfortable when it's up near 20mph. New 504 watt hour battery pack is smaller than Rad's other batteries, but it's lighter and still offers 48 volts for efficient power delivery. The standard 672 watt hour packs do work with the RadMission!

Video Review

Introduction

Make:

Rad Power Bikes

Model:

RadMission 1

Price:

$999 ($1,399 Canadian Dollars, €1,099 Euros)

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States, Canada

Model Year:

2020

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

47.8 lbs (21.68 kg)

Battery Weight:

6.3 lbs (2.85 kg) (7.7lb Optional High Capacity Battery)

Motor Weight:

8.7 lbs (3.94 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

18 in (45.72 cm)20.25 in (51.43 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Mid-Step: 46cm Seat Tube, 57cm Reach, 63cm Stand Over Height, 80cm Minimum Saddle Height, 104mm Maximum Saddle Height, 68cm Width, 181cm Length, 112cm Wheelbase, High-Step: 52cm Seat Tube, 58cm Reach, 76cm Stand Over Height, 87cm Minimum Saddle Height, 109mm Maximum Saddle Height, 68cm Width, 181cm Length, 112cm Wheelbase

Frame Types:

Mid-Step, High-Step

Frame Colors:

Steel Blue with Red Accents, Black with Tan Accents, Gray with Black Accents, White with Gray Accents, Red with Blue Accents

Frame Fork Details:

Hi-Tensile Rigid Steel, 44mm Offset, 100mm Hub Spacing, 9mm Axle with Quick Release Skewer

Frame Rear Details:

135mm Hub Spacing, 12mm Threaded Slotted Axle with 1.25mm Thread Pitch, 18mm Nuts, Steel Torque Arm

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack, Front Rack, Fenders, Bottle Cage, Cafe Lock

Gearing Details:

1 Single Speed, 16 Tooth Cog LONG YIH DNP Freewheel LY-BB16T8VNF, Two-Cog Chain Tensioner

Cranks:

Forged Aluminum Alloy, 170mm Length, 50 Tooth Chainring with Aluminum Alloy Guide, Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) Square Tapered Spindle, Sealed Cartridge Bearings

Pedals:

Wellgo Composite Platform with Reflectors, CrMo Axle, Standard 9/16" x 20 TPI Threading, Black

Headset:

Semi-Integrated, 1-1/8" Straight

Stem:

Aluminum Alloy, 80mm Length, 7º Rise, Two 10mm Spacer, One 15mm Spacer, One 15mm Tapered Spacer, 31.8mm Clamp Diameter

Handlebar:

Aluminum Alloy, Swept Back, 660mm Width

Brake Details:

Tektro Aries Mechanical Disc with 180mm Rotors, Four-Finger Tektro Levers with Rubberized Edges and Bell on Left and Motor Inhibitors and Brake Light Activation

Grips:

Ergonomic, Rubber, Non-Locking

Saddle:

Velo Active

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy, Single Bolt Clamp

Seat Post Length:

390 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy, Double Wall, 32mm Outer Width, Machined Sidewalls, 36 Hole

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 12 Gauge, Black with Nipples

Tire Brand:

Kenda Kontact, 27.5" x 1.95" (48-584, 650x48b)

Wheel Sizes:

27.5 in (69.85cm)

Tire Details:

40 to 65 PSI, 2.8 to 4.5 BAR, Reflective Sidewall Stripe, 4-Ply, K-Shield Puncture Resistant Casing

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Spanninga Axendo 40 Integrated Headlight (Stem Mount, 40 LUX), Spanninga Solo Integrated Rear Light (One LED, Brake Light Activation), Optional Rear-Mount Adjustable Kickstand (Standard 18mm Wide Two-Bolt Mounting Point), Optional Fenders (60mm Width, Made from Glossy PVC with Stainless-Steel Brackets and Hardware, Rubber Mudflaps), Optional Rear Rack (Standard Gauge Pannier Hanger, Bungee Loops, Two Top Platform Bars, 18kg/40lb Max Weight), Optional Front Rack Basket (Sturdy 4-Bolt Steer Tube Mounted, Wooden Panel, 10kg/22lb Max Weight), Optional Small Pannier, Optional SR Suntour NCX Seat Post Suspension, Optional GUB PRO-3 Phone Mount, Optional Small Basket Bag, Optional Small Insulated Delivery Bag, Optional ABUS Bordo 6100/90 Folding Lock

Other:

Locking Removable Downtube Mounted Battery Pack, 1.0lb 2 Amp Charger, Fully Potted 11 Amp Motor Controller Rated at 500 Continuous Watts, Stainless Steel Torque Arm, 275lb Maximum Weight Rating

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Vision, RadMission Specific

Motor Type:

Rear-Mounted Geared Hub
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

500 watts (250 Watt Nominal in Europe)

Motor Torque:

50 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

DLG RAD-S1303Y, Samsung 18650 35E 3500mAh Cells 13S3P

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

10.5 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

504 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium NMC (LiNiMnCoO2)

Charge Time:

5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Estimated Max Range:

45 miles (72 km)

Display Type:

Rad Power Bikes Branded King Meter LED, Fixed, Adjustable-Angle, 11 Orange LED Lights, Buttons: +, -/Walk Mode, Lights, On/Off, (Hold - for Walk Mode)

Readouts:

Battery Charge Level Indicator (5 Dots), Assist Level (0-4), Lights Indicator (On/Off)

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Twist Throttle (14 Pulse Sealed Cadence Sensor)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)


Written Review

My goal is to be transparent and unbiased with you, this video and writeup are not meant to be an endorsement of RPB products. The review was performed free of charge but Rad Power Bikes is an advertiser on this website. I often perform free reviews if a bike is shared before launch or if I feel that it’s especially important and likely to be popular. RPB also delivered the products to my apartment using their Rad Mobile delivery service van, making it efficient and easy to perform the reviews. I welcome your corrections, additions, and feedback in the comments below and the Rad Power Bikes electric bike forums.

Observations:

  • Starting in 2020, customers in some major cities including Austin, Seattle, Sacramento, and Vancouver Canada can pay $149 to have Rad Mobile Service van deliver and assemble their bike. The company is also offering demo rides and post-purchase service, including warranty work. I got to see the van and interact with some of the Austin Texas and Vancouver Canada team members, and was impressed with this unique service that blends the predominantly online presence of Rad with a local shop feel!
  • This is the first generation of the RadMission, and I was loaned the standard high step and ST (step-thru) versions… the ST is actually more of a mid-step. These bikes are using a brand new proprietary geared hub motor, lower capacity 504 watt hour battery pack (that interfaces the same way as the other Rad batteries and is cross compatible), and the simpler LED display panel also used on the RadRunner.
  • This is the cheapest ebike from Rad Power Bikes and is very stripped down… it doesn’t even include a kickstand! However, they do sell a kickstand for $15, along with fenders, racks, suspension seat post, bags, and other accessories. It does come stock with reflective tires and integrated lights. It’s a single-speed ebike, like their RadRunner, so the drivetrain is very simple, quiet, and clean.

Pros:

  • RadMission is the lightest, most affordable electric bike from Rad Power Bikes to date. For $1k USD, I was amazed that they could sell it in two frame styles and sizes (high-step large 20.25″ and mid-step medium 18″). It also comes in six color combinations across the two frame types.
  • One way that RPB keeps their prices low is by selling direct to consumer, through their website. However, they also sell through a couple of in-person stores in Vancouver, Canada and Seattle, Washington. If you’re not in one of those cities, they recently began selling through mobile delivery vans in major cities like Austin Texas and Sacramento California. This, paired with their modular systems, cross compatible accessories, and one year warranty, puts them ahead of many other direct-online ebike brands. They also have great phone support and one of the bigger teams.
  • This ebike is super quiet, aside from some motor whirring noises. There are no fenders, racks, or even a kickstand that could rattle loose or bounce around. Since it’s a single speed, the chain stays tight and won’t clink into the chain stay… and they used a chain tensioner and aluminum alloy guide to keep the chain from falling off if you ride over bumpy terrain. I got to test the bike with fenders and racks added, and even then it was very quiet when riding across grass and off of a curb.
  • I really appreciate that the front and rear racks come with extension cables and alternative mounting points for the lights, because this means they won’t get blocked by cargo. However, the headlight will no longer point where you steer. It will be fixed inline with the bike frame because of how the basket mounts.
  • In its default location, the headlight mounts to the stem (the piece which holds the handlebar). This is awesome because it elevates the position of the light, making you easier to see by cars and other cyclists. I wish that more ebike companies did this, but it required a special part to do right and I wonder if it will still work perfectly if you get their optional LCD display as an upgrade? In any case, I love where the light is mounted on this ebike more than any of their other models, which have it lower down on the arch of the fork.
  • I’m kind of a safety nut, so I love the reflective tires and quality integrated lights that run off of the ebike battery. The rear light has solid and blinking mode (just press the little rubber button on the lower left edge of the light), and it also goes bright when you pull either brake lever! So whenever you brake, the rear light will actually turn on and go bright if the lights are turned off, or it will go extra bright when the lights are on.
  • Excellent attention to detail with the frame and components… notice the aluminum alloy chainring guide, the chain tensioner that is tucked inside the left chainstay so as not to get bent, the bottle cage bosses below the downtube, the black matching spokes, hubs, and rims, the extra-long seat collar quick release clamp that’s easier to adjust, and the sealed 14-pulse cadence sensor.
  • Most of the single speed bicycles I’ve reviewed are setup with horizontal dropouts for the rear wheel. This allows the rear axle, hub, and cog to be positioned far enough back to create tension in the chain or belt. It can work alright, but often requires additional metal pieces on the frame and horizontal bolts to support and secure the axle… so it won’t slip forward over time. Rad’s vertical dropout design seems a lot simpler, especially when it comes to rear wheel maintenance and flat fixes, but it does require a chain tensioner. Perhaps the weight difference between the two approaches is similar? I feel that Rad Power Bikes did an excellent job with the design they chose and used good hardware to make this drivetrain durable and functional, it doesn’t seem like they took the easy way out.
  • The brake levers have rubberized edges that improve comfort a bit, and don’t feel as cold. The left brake lever even has an integrated bell for friendly signaling. It’s a lot cleaner, easier to reach, and more durable than most aftermarket bells I’ve tested.
  • Since the battery pack is removable, and the one-pound charger is so compact and lightweight, you can easily charge at work, school, or other destinations where there is a standard plug to use. Removing the battery will help to protect it from water, and extreme temperatures. Heat will degrade the cells faster, limiting the lifespan of the pack, while cold will stunt your range temporarily. I appreciate that these batteries have two fuses to prevent damage, and that you can also lock the battery to the bike in the “off” position, so nobody can turn on the display and tamper with your bike.
  • I really like that this is a Class 2 electric bike with a throttle, and that Rad Power Bikes gives you absolute control over that throttle. You can use it any time the bike is powered on and get full power… it’s not tied to the assist levels at all. This means, the further you twist, the more power you get, and it allows you to override lower levels of assist (or even zero mode) to get started, gain speed, or climb a hill without pressing any display buttons. This is especially important given the single speed design of the drivetrain.
  • Lots of great accessories to choose from, and you know that they will all fit and perform well. I especially like the side mirror option, which can help increase safety and confidence for people who ride near lots of traffic. There are front and rear racks, plastic fenders, a suspension seat post, pannier bags, platforms to mount on top of the racks for even more space, and waterproof insulated bags for carrying all sorts of groceries etc. Domino’s actually uses the RadCity models in some large cities, to deliver pizzas :D
  • Note the longer seat post binder lever that Rad uses, it’s much easier to unlock and then tighten without straining fingers vs. a traditional shorter binder… though it does ad a little extra weight, this is a great example of how Rad scrutinizes the little details of their products to make them more enjoyable, and that’s easy to skip or miss!
  • Even though the RadMission comes with narrower tires than any other Rad Power Bike, they still chose slightly wider than average at 27.5″ x 1.95″ vs. 1.25″ or 1.75″ and that results in better stability and comfort. I’m glad they went this route, even though it increases drag and weight just a bit. That’s because, most ebike riders go further and faster on average than pedal cyclists.
  • Even though the RadMission comes with a lower capacity battery pack, it mounts using the same interface as the other bikes and those batteries do work on this ebike, This means you can purchase a few bikes and easily swap the packs around, or take two packs along for an extended adventure. All of their batteries use high-quality lithium-ion cells from Samsung, are warrantied for a year, and are cheaper to replace they don’t contain the ebike controller (that’s in a little box, mounted behind the seat tube on this bike). In short, the batteries don’t heat up as much and cost less to replace because of this design choice.
  • You can charge the battery pack on or off the frame, and it has three key positions for unlocked, locked to frame powered off, and locked to frame powered-on. This helps you to deter tampering with the bike without having to take the battery pack off at every stop. For best results, store the battery in a cool, dry location. Extreme heat can damage the cells and extreme cold will stunt them and limit your range temporarily
  • Even though the battery and controller box are mounted externally, this is still a purpose-built electric bike with a sturdier frame design and internally routed cables and wires. Note the stainless steel torque arm on the left rear dropout that adds frame strength! This will keep the motor axle from chewing into the softer aluminum alloy frame over time. Also note the flattened portion of downtube where the battery slide mounts with three bolts vs. just two. Good stuff…
  • I think the standard free shipping is a great option, and Rad Power Bikes has updated their box to include some fun artistic graphics. Note the plastic handles built into the sides of the cardboard box for easy lifting and dragging (I suggest asking a friend to help you move the box safely, because these are heavy machines). I often tip the box onto the right side and slide it out to avoid hurting your back or bending the disc brake rotors which are on the left side of the bike.
  • The RadMission models use a high-resolution 14-pulse cadence sensor, which makes starting and stopping faster and predictable. I love that they also included motor inhibitors on both brake levers (which also activates bright mode on the rear light!) It seems like they really dialed in the controller settings too, because the motor is smooth and predictable when starting vs. delayed or jerky
  • Both wheels are built with thicker 12 gauge spokes for increased durability and weight capacity support. Note that the official max weight rating on both RadMission models is 275 pounds (~125 kilograms). That’s higher than the average 250lb max weight limit of many other affordably priced ebikes.

Cons:

  • Initially, I was bummed out about the weight of this ebike. I was expecting it to be lighter because it’s a single speed with no suspension fork! However, Rad chose a heavier steel fork because it supports the higher 275lb weight capacity of the bike and frame mounted front basket option. The steer tube mounting point for the rack is extremely sturdy with four bolts! The optional basket can hold 20+ pounds of cargo and won’t impact steering the way that fork and handlebar mounted baskets can. Another contributor to the higher weight of this single speed is the high-torque motor, which contains more copper windings, and the high volume puncture resistant tires.
  • This ebike does not come with a kickstand. That caught me off guard, because it has plastic pedals that seem like they could be vulnerable when laying the bike down on its side? I asked the founders about this decision, and they said they were trying to reduce weight and waste because not all users felt that they needed one. The bike is super tough and simple with the single speed drivetrain, so maybe having a stand is less of a requirement here… but for those (like me) who definitely want one, it’s just $15 to add it… and the stand is really great! It offers tool-free adjustable length and attaches to the frame with a standard 18mm spacing at the rear – so it shouldn’t come loose easily or cause pedal lock.
  • Some of the more expensive ebikes these days have frame-integrated batteries and hidden controllers. Rad Power Bikes is using external systems that don’t look as beautiful, but they are cheaper to replace and aren’t as complex. The result is battery packs that cross compatible and affordable to upgrade and a controller that isn’t passing heat to the battery pack – which can contribute to cell degredation.
  • Removing the battery pack on this and other Rad ebikes can be a bit finicky and difficult. First, you insert the key and twist left, push in, and twist left once more. This final position is unlocked… and it allows you to slide the pack forward on the track and take it off. The battery doesn’t have a handle and the slide interface can be a little sharp. Just take your time and be careful with your fingers. Try not to drop the battery pack.
  • The display panel is very simple, with limited readouts including battery charge level, assist level, and lights indicator. You don’t get the precise speed, trip stats like average speed and odometer, or watts. You cannot adjust the brightness of this display either… but I was able to swivel it forwards so the orange LEDs wouldn’t be shining up into my face when riding at night. Rad Power Bikes also told me that they’d be offering the fancier LCD display as an optional retrofit upgrade at some point in the future.
  • It would be nice to have more than five bars to indicate the battery charge level, on the LCD readout. As it stands, each bar represents a 20% drop vs. 10 bars representing 10% drops, or even a written percentage such as 42%. This could really help riders to make it home without completely depleting the battery. This is especially relevant with this ebike because it’s a single speed that is geared high, making it difficult to start from standstill and and climb with.
  • There’s no USB charging port built into the LCD display that comes with the RadRunner and RadMission. This is a handy feature, because it allows for smartphone charging on the go. With the lower capacity battery pack used here, perhaps it’s okay that you cannot tap into it to draw power… but it is still a downgrade from the other more expensive RPB models. I suspect that the optional retrofit LCD display will include the USB charging port, but I cannot say for sure.
  • The bike does have walk mode, but because of the high single-speed gearing, it goes faster than I was expecting… so it’s more of a “jog mode”. You could also just use the twist throttle to walk the bike at lower speeds, just be careful since the throttle could get bumped and go much faster than you want as well ;)
  • This is a single speed electric bike, and it’s geared pretty high (slow pedaling), which makes starting and climbing much more difficult. It feels natural at higher speeds above 15mph, but I really struggled to get started and climb even small hills when the bike was shut off. I prefer lower gearing, because I like to spin fast and reduce knee pressure. I asked the Rad designers about this, and they said the gearing was chosen based on user testing and feedback, and because the bike has a throttle to help get started. The throttle definitely works well, and I can understand the choice. Ultimately, with only one gear here, some people will be happy, and others might feel a bit uncomfortable. Also, there is no way to upgrade to a multi-speed drivetrain later on; the bike isn’t setup for a derailleur at all.
  • The chain is rust resistant, along with the Nickel coated rear cog, but the steel chainring and steel fork could get some wear and show rust over time. I’ve heard that a bit of clear nail polish over scratches on the fork could reduce rust… or some basic touch up paint. Note that the main frame and optional baskets are all aluminum alloy and the optional fenders are plastic vs. steel.
  • I asked Rad Power Bikes about the rear rack being compatible with the Yepp! Nexxt Maxi, which I assumed would fit on the bike. They said it was not compatible, which surprised me. I also learned that the rack is only rated to 18kg (40lbs) vs. most of their other ebike racks which are rated to 25kg (55lbs).
  • Since there’s no suspension built into the bike, it can feel a little rough if the tires are inflated to a high pressure and you’re riding on bumpy terrain. I lowered the tire pressure near the 40 PSI minimum, and I’d consider buying a suspension seat post (with 27.2mm diameter) and suspension stem if I were riding every day.
  • At the time of this review, none of the Rad Power Bikes come with hydraulic disc brakes. This is probably a cost savings decision, and it makes them easier to adjust manually. The downside is that actuating the brake levers can require more hand effort, especially the rear brake (right lever). I noticed that the caliper is angled a bit, and the brake cable is running down into the housing vs. being flat on the other Rad models. This could lead to more water and dust accumulating in the brake line, gunking it up and creating friction. I asked about this, and they said they had limited space to mount the caliper because of the way the rear portion of this frame is designed.
  • The optional rear rack doesn’t support as much weight as all of the more expensive RPB models, and I was told that it is not compatible with child seats. That’s a bummer, and one big reason to consider paying more for the RadCity or RadCity Step-Thru if you plan to ride with a small child.
  • Minor consideration here: if you opt for a front tray rack, the headlight will have to be moved onto the base of the tray because otherwise it would collide. The thing is, the light no longer aims where you steer in this position… it points where the bike is heading but isn’t as quick to turn. The alternative is leaving it mounted to the stem, where it could possibly get blocked by the contents of the basket.
  • All of the Rad Power Bikes use the same charger (just like the interchangeable battery packs), and it’s fairly lightweight, but it only puts out 2 amps. This means that charging can take up to 4.5 hours if the battery is completely drained. This would be faster if they used a 3 or 4 amp charger like some other companies have started doing, but it might raise the price, increase weight, and possibly decrease reliability.

Useful Resources:

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2015 Rad Power Bikes RadRover Review

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Comments (51) YouTube Comments

Lloyd Currery
4 months ago

When in Toronto??

  Reply
Court
4 months ago

Hi Lloyd, are you asking when I will be in Toronto, or when the RadMission 1 will begin selling there, or maybe when they will have a Rad Mobile Service van there? I’d like to help, but I’m not sure which question you’re asking :)

  Reply
Shane Helie
4 months ago

Thanks for the review. I just ordered a step through model for my wife and I to share after watching it. I’m glad you mentioned how tall your assistant was, because my wifes the same height and we were worried she would be too short. Also glad you did the hill test because I’m next door in Victoria, and like the rest of the Pacific Northwest there’s hills everywhere.

Cheers

  Reply
Court
4 months ago

Hi Shane! Awesome, I’m so glad the review was useful for you. I love Victoria but haven’t been in a while, I hope to make it back sometime this summer and also visit Tofino! Anyway, yeah! It worked well for Judy and I think Rad says it can accommodate people starting at 5’1″ so that’s great :)

  Reply
Shane Helie
3 weeks ago

Hi Court, the step-thru RadMission I ordered for my wife and I to share arrived, and I’d like to share a little mini-review if that’s ok? This is our first e-bike, and it arrived today about 2-weeks past the scheduled time after a 4 month wait. It came well packaged without any damage to the box, and the shipper brought it right to the front door of our 6th floor apartment. It was easy to put together taking about 25 minutes to put on the handle bars, the front wheel, the pedals, and also checking to see if everything worked. Unfortunately the front wheel was a little wobbly and rubbed against the disc brakes so I think I’ll have to adjust the spokes and calipers to get a perfect fit. Frustratingly I wasn’t able to put on the front basket or fenders, because some of the bolts were torqued on way too tight, and I ended up stripping them trying to remove them. After an email exchange with customer service they authorized me a $60 repair from a bike shop of my choosing to get the bolts off for me. Later, I took it for about a 2 mile spin across the neighborhood and here are some impressions I had, and how it compares to my road bike.

  • I never realized before how heavy 50lbs was on a bike. I wouldn’t want to ride it too long without peddle assist. But it is very sturdy, and the frame seems like it was definitely purpose made for an ebike. All the weight was low to the ground as well, making it feel very stable.
  • I’m 5’8/5’9 with a 31′ inseam when wearing shoes and my wife is 5’1 with a 28′ inseam when wearing shoes. The stepthru seems a smidge too small for me, and a smidge too big for her, but I think it’ll work just fine for the both of us.
  • The single speed worked great for me. It seems geared for exactly the cadence I prefer. I went up a few steep hills, and it conquered them all but the bike definitely seemed to prefer lots of help from me to do it. The throttle worked great for getting started at intersections as well, doing a good job of replacing those lower gears.
  • The ride position is very comfortable, and almost upright. It would be really easy for me to do long commutes on this, especially compared to my other “acoustic” bikes that are much more aggressive. The seat was fairly plush as well.
  • The tires didn’t seem to have much grip at all, like most new tires, but were very stable at speed. They did a pretty good job isolating road bumps because of how wide they were (I’m used to skinny road tires). I never really wished for a front suspension at any time, but I’m also a little younger than the typical e-bike rider.
  • The lights were of adequate brightness for night riding. More lumens are always welcome but not necessary.
  • The cadence sensor was definitely dialed in way better than I anticipated. I don’t see the need for expensive torque sensors if cadence sensors can be this responsive.
  • This being my first e-bike I didn’t see the need for a nicer screen. Buttons were kind of hard to push with gloves on, but I like having something cheap, simple, and easy to replace if needed.
  • Fit and finish were great (except maybe the front wheel and bolts), and the bike is a looker. Much better esthetics than the Voltbikes and Pedegos I usually see around here.
  • It got up to speed really quick, and I’ve never covered so much ground so quick on a bike before. Saying that, I already wish it had more power than the 500W. I guess it’s kind of like a Toyota Corolla in that way. Will get the job done, but sometimes you wish you had a bit more in reserve for some situations like clearing intersections, or going up those really big hills. Weird because I rarely feel that way on my road bike, but riding this feels almost more like scooter you peddle I guess, and puts you in a different mindset.
  • I now get why you like hydraulic brakes so much. 50lbs is a lot of bike at speed, and the mechanical discs worked adequately, but I did wish for a bit more stopping power for any future “oh sh*t” moments. Also, after 1 ride the front brakes already needed a slight adjustment. This could get annoying if I have to do that after every ride.

Overall, great bike. Better than what I was expecting. I paid about $1800 with accessories and taxes and it feels like a bargain at that price. If I could change anything it would be better quality bolts that don’t strip so easily, hydraulic brakes, and maybe a little more torque from the motor. I’d give it an 8/10, with potential for a nine if I can get these initial problems sorted out. It won’t replace my road bike for exercise, but I definitely see us using the car a lot less, and now my wife can keep up to me (more like me keeping up with her now) for weekend rides.

Keep up the good work Court! Hope to see you one day on the island.

Sookoor Ali
4 months ago

I currently own a RadRover and I am thinking of getting this bike. My question is: can I change the front fork to an adjustable one? Because I ride a lot of sidewalks and trails and need the shock absorber to help with the ridges.

Thanks.

  Reply
Court
4 months ago

Hi Sookoor! Yeah, I do think it’s possible to swap the rigid fork out for suspension, but you need to get the correct size (I believe it’s 1-1/8″ straight) and then install it and possibly cut the top down to fit the spacer and stem setup. This can be a fun project, but it takes effort and some money for the parts. The suspension fork alone is probably at least $150, and that’s for a basic one. Instead, consider a suspension stem from Red Shift Sports, and maybe a suspension seatpost. However, these also cost $100+ each. Maybe you should take another look at the RadCity models which come with softer saddles and suspension fork by default?

  Reply
Ron Pope
4 months ago

I am 6’6” tall, with an inseam of 33” and weigh 255#. Will this bike fit me.

  Reply
Court
4 months ago

Hi Ron, I’m going to give you my opinion… but I’m not an engineer and do not want to be liable. Yes, it will fit you because they rated the bike to carry up to 275lbs. You are at the top end of heights, and it may feel a little cramped in terms of reach, but it should be workable (if you get the high-step version). Please DO NOT put the seat post all the way up high, you need to look at the minimum insertion point stamp on the metal and not go higher, or it could break or bend the seat tube. You might want to replace the stock seat tube with a longer one and get a longer stem to make the bike fit a bit better. If you’re getting this ebike to save money, then spending another $50+ for those parts might not sound great… in that case, just deal with limited leg extension and make due as-is, just be careful not to break it or yourself. Good luck ;)

  Reply
Charles Murray
4 months ago

Hi Court,

Overall the RadMission looks to be a pretty great package for the price. Considering placing a preorder, this would be my first e-bike. My questions are: Would you recommend this as a first e-bike, with primary usage for commuting? I’ve been paying attention to your pedal cadence at different speeds throughout the video, but in your opinion, how does the gearing “feel” at top speed? Does it feel like a cadence that could be kept up for several minutes at a time, or is it a fairly fast cadence? Overall quality and feel, does it seem to be comparable build quality and finish to other RPB products?

I was excited for this video, glad you were able to get an early review to show the in-depth ins and outs of this bike beyond what RadPower’s promotional videos show. Keep up the great work, and stay safe!

  Reply
Court
4 months ago

Hi Charles! Yes, this would be a great option for a first commuter ebike. The cadence at higher speeds is very comfortable. That’s probably where it’s the most comfortable for me because I feel that it’s too slow when starting or going at low speeds. Rad said they tested the bike with a bunch of consumers to get the right cadence based on feedback. I like to spin, so for me, the pedaling is a bit slow… but I guess I’m in the minority here ;)

The quality of the bike is great, especially for the price. Their lights, tires, touch points, and all accessories are above average. This bike is tough, and the display is simple. There are trade-offs, but it all plays well for commuting and parking outside at a rack. So glad that my in-depth coverage has helped you, that’s always my goal. Every product has trade-offs, and that’s okay if you can understand and accept them. I’d say that this or the RadCity would be great options for commuting. The cheaper RadMission gives you extra money for accessories if you want (like a bike lock, suspension seat post, racks, bags). I like the motor on the RadMission more than RadCity, but I like the geometry and suspension fork on the RadCity more… plus the gears so I can spin fast ;)

  Reply
Louis
4 months ago

Howdy! I’ve been looking at this bike for a bit and I’m wondering if it could work for someone who’s quite a bit tall (6’7). I’ve looked at the Aventon Level (a bit more expensive, but could be shipped sooner) and it looks like it could work for my height as well (I also looked at the Wing Freedom). I’m a bit stuck on which would fit me the best and be able to work on some country roads where I live (middle IL). Any recommendations or tips would be greatly appreciated!

  Reply
Court
4 months ago

Hi Louis! Even though it costs a bit more and may require additional work to assemble, I’d probably go for the Aventon Level and get a longer seat post and stem to help it fit your body. The reason I suggest this is because that bike has a suspension fork that could improve the feel of gravel roads. The RadMission has a steel fork that helps, but the rigid frame could feel rough. Alternatively, you could save money on the bike, get the long version of the 27.2mm Thudbuster, and benefit from the great accessories, support, and easy assembly of RadRunner. It’s a great bike all around, I just really like comfort. Hope this helps clarify just a bit. The best options for your size are from Trek, Giant, and Specialized who sell multiple frame sizes. CUBE, Moustache, Haibike, Cannondale, and Yamaha are also good options. They all just cost more and don’t have throttles, if that matters to you :)

  Reply
Barbara T
4 months ago

Thanks for the review. Really not sure who this bike is for. For 1K or a little more could get several models of e bikes with a name brand 500 watt motor with a kickstand, more useful display, bigger battery and gears. Some even have lights, fenders, racks. My Espin Sport came with all of that plus a suspension fork and hydraulic brakes for $1200. An Espin Nero has all that except for hydraulic brakes for $1k.

  Reply
Court
4 months ago

Thanks for the feedback, Barbara! How are you liking your Espin Sport so far?

  Reply
Shane Helie
3 months ago

It’s for broke millennials who hate bike maintenance like me. Lol.

  Reply
Barbara T
4 months ago

I really like my Espin Sport. Came to me undamaged. Easy to put together. Had a bike mechanic check it over. Fits me well. It is a beautiful cobalt blue and the fenders, lights and rack are all very solid. Zippy. Nice responsive hydraulic brakes. I rode in PAS 1 on a bike path and had no problem keeping it at a slow speed. Somewhat of a learning curve with finding the right gear to match the assist level. Feels much like riding a non electric bike. Very stable probably in part due to wider tires than my road bike. No problem on hills. One short steep hill near my house was no problem using assist level 2. Seat was surprisingly comfortable as I was planning to change it before I received my bike. It was a little harder to get on and off than I expected. I am 5’8″ and I am used to riding a regular frame bike. However the heavier weight of the e bike makes it different. The only thing I really did not like were the pedals. My feet kept slipping off. I have never had that problem before. Perhaps it was my shoes – I have purchased some mountain biking shoes (5/10) and I will probably change the pedals. Also there were not many directions regarding the display. I thought you could change the top speed but directions just say do not do this. No water bottle attachment and tubes are too wide for most third party solutions. I e-mailed Espin and they suggested something I could attach to my handlebars. My son has a new Ride1up 500 that he very much likes. Only problem he has is the bike is almost too big for him. He has to ride it with the seat all the way down. He is 5’6″-5’7″. We are now considering buying an Espin Nero for my husband who wants a fat tire e bike.

  Reply
Court
4 months ago

Thanks for this great feedback, Barbara! I’m so happy to hear that you’re enjoying the bike, great job communicating what you like and thanks for sharing a bit about your son too :D I agree about the water bottle mounting being something Espin should consider. We all get thirsty!!

  Reply
Brent
4 months ago

Love the review, thanks for all the in depth info.

Thinking of preordering this bike. But, I have a question about its hill climbing capability. I have a 6% to 7.5% incline hill one way on my commute. It’s about 1km in total length. Heading up the escarpment in Hamilton, Ontario. I can do this on a standard mountain bike with proper gear settings for me. But I was wondering in your short time with the bike, would the single gear Radmission have any issues with this slight climb with petal assist etc. I’m not as young as I used to be. Any information would be great thanks.

  Reply
Court
4 months ago

Hi Brent! I think it depends on your weight (you plus cargo), how strong your legs are, and weather you can gather and maintain speed. I’m 135lbs for reference, and the motor was very impressive to me, in terms of climbing. I did not expect it to basically carry me slowly up the steep hill shown in the video. It worked very well once I contributed pedaling a bit. The single speed drivetrain is geared high, so it’s not fast or easy to start and climb, but that motor is very capable and really benefits from any input you provide as a rider. I realize this is sort of a non answer, but I’d rank it above average in terms of power and below average in terms of gearing. Good luck, and please share your input if you do get one and test it out yourself :D

  Reply
Brent
4 months ago

Thanks for the input! I’m a heavier dude, but at this point my knees are holding up. Just looking at this model to assist in the climb and my morning commute. Right now it’s a toss up between this model, the RadRunner, and a VoltBike Bravo… your reviews have helped out big time. Thanks again.

Max
3 months ago

Now make a version with 7 speeds and an option to have a better 14ah battery shipped by default and it would be a great bike.

  Reply
Court
3 months ago

Yeah, if they can do all that and keep this great price, I would be very impressed and prefer it. Maybe we will see that in the future? I can see why a single speed would appeal to many people, because it’s reliable and quiet, and at least they have the spring chain tensioner and have done a good job with the other parts as is. I prefer the RadCity models, but they do cost 50% more, so it’s tough if you’re on a tight budget.

  Reply
Bhargav
3 months ago

Hey Court, thanks for the review. I’m currently considering Radmission 1, NCM Prague, and Ride1up 500 series for my first ebike. I’m split between single speed and geared ebikes. I mostly am going to use it for commuting. What do would you suggest?

  Reply
Court
3 months ago

Hi Bhargav, sorry for the slow reply… busy week ;) I do enjoy gears, so that’s a big consideration with the RadMission. It’s powerful, well supported, and priced extremely well. I like the Ride1Up 500 Series for its “tried and true” design (motor and battery selection). I’m less familiar with the NCM Prague, but they have been around longer than Ride1Up and now appear to sell direct on Amazon. I’ve seen some complaints about limited support there. I really feel like Rad is the winner if you are okay with single speed. The positive way to look at it is how reliable the drivetrain is, like at bike racks and stuff. I think Ride1Up comes in second for having the gears. They’re a much smaller company from my understanding, and NCM is like an international bigger but less engaged company based on what I’ve seen. As a commuter, depending on how much damage it might get, the RadMission is going to be the toughest and easiest to repair/replace… and I think that’s why they went single speed. Back to gears, I like them because of my knee injury, I like to pedal light and fast. It seems that many people are just fine pedaling slow and hard at first… and the motor on this ebike is impressively powerful for the rating. I hope this helps you decide, and it might also come down to availability because so many are sold out. Good luck :D

  Reply
David
3 months ago

Really enjoyed your review of this e bike! I’m 5′ 11′ with a 30″ inseam and was curious if I would be comfortable on the high step or if the midstep is the better option. I like the appearance of the high step but I think that the midstep is actually my correct size. I’ve checked out Rad’s sizing guide but was just curious to hear any thoughts from someone who’s ridden them. Thank you very much!

  Reply
Court
3 months ago

Hi David! I feel like you’d actually be a great candidate for the Large. I rode both and have very similar height and inseam to you (I’m 5’9″ with 30″ inseam). The high-step felt a bit more spread out and natural to me, but I like the step-thru design a bit more for approachability. Frankly, I don’t think you can go wrong either way, they are somewhat adjustable and you could even change the stem, handlebar, etc. aftermarket to extend reach or height if you do go for the mid-step. If you’re leaning towards the high-step, keep in mind that the ~30″ stand over height that I measured for the bike should be easy to clear if you’re wearing shoes, because they usually add half an inch or more and you can stand on the ball of your foot and lean to one side. I hope this helps!!

  Reply
Donald N. Storing
3 months ago

Nice review of the Radmission. I’ve been looking at Ebikes for over a year now and have several friends who own one. My wife and I both ride non-epowered bikes but like a lot of “more mature” people, it’s getting harder and harder to go long distances or up hills. Both of our present bicycles are multi-speed (mine a 21 speed and my wife’s a 7 speed) and it seems that over the years they all seem to end up giving me fits trying to get them to shift all the way from lowest to highest gear without adjusting on a regular basis and I really would rather do without that issue so a single speed model is fine with me both from a maintenance standpoint and the physical aspect of being able to pedal without a problem. In my book, simpler is better. I’m also an avid motorcyclist and during my 55 years of motorcycling I’ve seen complexity take over just about everything in our lives and it can be very distracting when trying to maneuver down the paths and roadways. I really don’t care for a display that tells me what I already know or don’t really care to know so the Mission fits me to a “T”. I preordered mine today so hopefully I’ll get it before the snow flies. I do live in the snow-belt of northern Michigan and will probably be riding in some snow covered streets from time to time. I was wondering if you could suggest a good manufacturer/model of snow tire. I know there are some made from some research I did a few years ago and I think they were all made in Europe. I also think I saw some studs you could order to install in some tires.

Thanks,
Don

  Reply
Court
3 months ago

Hi Don, great question! I’ve seen some amazing snow tires from Benno Bikes and some products that basically let you screw studs into existing tires. My experience with both products is very limited. I’m not the best guy to ask about this… but maybe someone else will chime in, or you could post a question in the EBR forums and see if anyone else has experience with this! I’d love to hear what you end up doing :D

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James
3 months ago

Awesome review. Thanks. I’m considering this for my first E-Bike. I live in Chicago and I have a heated detached garage that gets cold in the winter. How will this bike handle Chicago winters? Also, I’m 5’10 what size bike would you recommend? Lastly I’d like an E-Bike where I can ride like a traditional bike for exercise. Does this work for that as well? Thanks for your awesome reviews and any help on this front would be great. Sorry last question for real : for first E-Bike you think this is better option then FLX Babymaker as far as quality and support? Thanks again!

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Court
2 months ago

Hi James! Sorry for the slow reply here. I do think the RadMission 1 would be a great choice. Since the battery is removable, you can charge and store it in a warmer area while leaving the bike in the garage. My understanding is that cold temperatures will not wreck the battery, but will limit your daily range vs. if the battery is at a more neutral temperature. Extreme heat can damage the long term charge capacity of lithium-ion batteries.

I’d choose rad over FLX, personally, just given the accessories they sell, their longstanding reputation, and the customer support. There are a bunch of people commenting on the FLC Baby Maker saying that they aren’t able to reach the company or are having some issues with the bike. That can be frustrating… and unfortunately, I think that both bikes are back ordered right now. Anyway, you can indeed ride the RadMission 1 without a battery at all, and it will just function as a heavy bicycle with only one gear. For me, it’s worth paying extra for the RadCity models which have a 7-speed drivetrain. You can still remove the battery from those ebikes and ride like a normal bike too :)

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Ian Murray
3 months ago

Thank you for the great review! You have helped me decide to order the Mission. I am wondering how you found the slightly swept back handlebars? I have only ever had straight handlebars. Thank you.

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Court
2 months ago

Hi Ian! Great question. One thing Rad has done really well (in my opinion) is to make hybrid style ebikes. If you look at the RadRover, for example, they have a very short stem and riser handlebar vs. long aggressive stem and flat bar. The result is a more upright body position that fits most use cases and just feels better. Most people who ride ebikes and buy a Rad product in particular are going to use it for a variety of things. They are less about extreme mountain biking or aerodynamic road cycling and more about feeling comfortable and having a reliable fun ride. So, the swept back handlebar is a part that feels great, looks pretty good, and is still more aerodynamic than the full upright bars on some of their other models. I hope this long explanation helps, and I hope you enjoy the bike :P

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Ian Murray
2 months ago

Thank you Court, that helps a lot! I ended up ordering the Rover as well as the Mission, so I can ride with a friend. Thank you for creating and running this website. It’s so helpful, and I love your reviews!

Ian

2 months ago

Hi Court,

I was just wondering if the “accelerator function” will actually do anything if the Pedal/Motor Boost Setting is already set to its maximum number. Like where would the extra “jam” come from?

Thanks!
Captain Ron

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Court
2 months ago

First of all, I love the movie Captain Ron :D second of all, if you’re talking about the throttle adding power and speed, then it will only do so if you are not already in the highest level of assist or if it is not twisted all the way. It’s just an override that adds power and potentially higher speeds if you’re in levels 1-4 assist. I hope that makes sense and helps ;)

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Paulo
2 months ago

Hi Court, Great review! I’m now considering this bike as my first ebike for commuting and for pulling my kids in a trailer. Thoughts on how powerful it would be to pull a trailer?

Thanks! Paulo

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Court
2 months ago

Hi Paulo! That sounds like fun. A single speed is always going to be limited by the set gearing. For the RadMission, I experienced slower starts and difficulty climbing. it’s geared higher, to be more comfortable at 20mph than at 0-5mph. This struggle will be amplified by heavier riders and increased cargo (like a child trailer), so you’ve got a trade-off here. The RadMission is durable, affordable, well supported, and will be much easier to pull a trailer with than a non-electric single speed. Depending on the bike in question, it may even be easier to pull a trailer with than a multi-speed non-ebike. However, it’s not as optimal as if it had some gears and you might feel held back by the slow cadence, like you’re not getting much exercise and the motor is doing most of the work for much of the riding. I’m only guessing that you might be riding slower in general since you’re pulling kids and don’t want to take too many risks. To me, this is not the ideal bike to pull a trailer, I’d recommend getting the RadCity or RadCity Step-Thru instead, even though it costs more. If you’re short on money, I’ll send you $300 via PayPal for free since you sound like an awesome Dad and I grew up being pulled around in a trailer by my parents! If you do choose the RadMission 1, it should still work fine, just have the trade-offs I discussed above ;) you can email me at electricbikereview at gmail.

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Ben Lotstein
2 months ago

Do you know if you can use a third-party rear rack?

Thanks!

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Court
1 month ago

Great question, Ben. I do think that it would be possible to find a rack and make it work… but that’s a lot of time and risk, and it might not fit perfectly. Rad has customized their frames to work with the chain tensioner, kickstand positioning, lights, and their own racks (which they try to make work across the line of bikes). Since the Mission is a bit narrower and kind of unique (compared to all of the fat bikes), I’m not sure how cross-compatible it will be, even with their own stuff (maybe just the front racks). If I were in your shoes, I’d just buy the official rack or double check with their customer support.

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Danny
2 months ago

Hi Court! I pre-ordered a Rad Mission a few weeks ago when the website said it will be shipping in October. Do you have any insight on if this is right. I’m just very excited to ride it so I just want to get as much info of this as possible. Thank you.

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Court
1 month ago

Hi Danny! I remember seeing that date advertised as well. No, unfortunately I’m not in contact with Rad much outside of scheduling reviews and asking questions about specs. I think it could be location dependent, and maybe the best thing to do is check with their online customer support. I’d only be guessing, but at least I can confirm that I remember October being the timeframe for pre-orders when I looked right when the bike came out :D

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Brian N
2 months ago

Hi, Court

Great review. I am in the market for a new commuter. Currently have a Giant which has been great but the high winds and open fields in Winnipeg have pushed me to look at pedal assist ebikes. This led me to your review. I’m not certain on the single speed but given the flatness of where I live I think it should work great and get the mechanical benefits of less maintenance.

My question though, I have smaller kids I take on packed or gravel trails. Given the high gear ratio, how challenging is it to maintain a slow pace? I look forward to your reply and hopefully a future purchase. Unfortunately I need one for myself and my wife and even with the lower cost that RadPower has brought with the mission, two bikes are just not in the current budget.

Cheers
Brian

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Court
1 month ago

Hi Brian! I’d highly recommend the RadCity models for you and your wife if you want to pedal slower and be comfortable (especially on gravel and with hills). I’m sorry to hear that your budget is limited, I realize it can be tight when raising kids. I’m in a position where I have extra money and would love to send you $1,500 CAD which could help bring the bikes within reach, we can use etransfer if you just email me and I can help set it up, it’s a business expense for me and Rad happens to be an advertiser here, so I can just allocate some of that money to help you :)

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Albert
3 weeks ago

Thanks for the thorough review. I’ve been looking into getting my first one and it looks like the RadMission is it! You were even reviewing the color I want; it’s great to see it in action. :)

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Court
3 weeks ago

Wonderful! I’m so glad that the review helped you out, Albert. It’s a fun ebike in my opinion, at a great value. I hope you enjoy it and welcome future feedback here :D

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Imelda
2 weeks ago

Hi Court, thank you for this review! It is what convinced me to purchase my RadMission! It’s fun, fast, and as a college student the best for $$. Just wondering if you have any tips on removing the battery? I’m having a little trouble getting it off the frame. Thanks!

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Court
2 weeks ago

Hey, I’m glad the review helped you! Yeah, for the money I agree that it’s one of the best choices right now, especially with their support. Sometimes the battery pack can be kind of tight, which is good if it stops rattling/vibration, but might require a bit of extra strength to remove. The first step is to insert the key into the battery locking core, twist to the left, and then push in and keep twisting to the left until it gets all the way to the unlocked position. You should be able to remove the key at this point. Next, use two hands (one on each end, sort of on the top of the pack) to slide it towards the handlebar section of the bike, up the downtube. The battery should slide about an inch, and then you should be able to lift it up off of the mounting plate. Please let me know if you are still having trouble, or consider contacting Rad directly for help :)

  Reply

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